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Satyr
2009-01-16, 01:05 PM
The remodeling and creation of character classes was certainly the most complex and time-consuming part of the homebrew. Creating one class, is work, but creating 23 of them, balancing them to each other and make sure that everyone has its specific niche and interesting traits and gifts is somewhat more complicated.

Serpents and Sewers features 23 base classses, most of them with at least one significant variety or other options. These 23 classes include replacements for all core base classes except one, and a various number of additional classes. It does not contain Prestige Classes, as we never came to an agreement how or if those should be implemented. Ithink that with the additional characters layers through background traits and heroic paths prestige classes aren't a necessary feature anymore for thei nidividualisation of characters, and on the account of power, it is not necessary for any of the S&S classes to be replaced to be able to compete in the long run.

In comparison zo the vanilla rules, Serpents & Sewers characters have more skill points, more class features and almost no dead levels; whenever a character gains a level, he also gains a new feature (okay, sometimes it is only a couple of new spells).

I am not completely content with all of these classes. Three of them - the Paladin, the Man-at-Arms and the Wizard - are close to what I strive for in the area of individualisation and options, others are just not good enough . The train wreck until now is the sorcerer (but I think this specific class is so used to neglection, it has ceased to suffer).

In general, melee fighters are much more powerful than in the normal rules and spellcasters are significantly weaker. They meet in the middle ground and are roughly equal to each other (a strongly optimised character will almost always be better than a weak one, indepentently of the class). The designated support characters may be a bit weaker on their own, but may boss around the other characters. That's worthwhile enough in itself, I think.

Satyr
2009-01-16, 01:08 PM
Classes: Short Description:

Adventurer: A Jack of all traits that has an enormously wide spread knowledge and adaptability, but is master in no field. Strengths: Adaptability. Weaknesses: Master of nothing, no spellcasting

Alchemist: A meddler and researcher specialised in the creation of magical potions, alchemical goods and large explosions. Strengths: Explosions, Pyromania and support for the rest of the team. Weaknesses: very specialised on one matter, no ‘real ‘ spellcasting

Archer: A character concentrated on ranged attacks, deadly with a bow but with problems when forced into melee. Strengths: Ranged Combat. Weaknesses: Melee combat, no spellcasting

Assassin: A silent killer, specialised in stealth, ambush attacks and the use of poisons. Deadly when he attacks from the shadow, in the open the assassin loses many of his advantages. Strengths: Silence and ambushing kill attacks. Weaknesses: much weaker in the open, no spellcasting

Battle Priest: A servant of a god specialised into fighting and defending his faith, combining martial prowess and divine spellcasting. Strengths: Combining spellcasting and the arts of war. Weaknesses: Worse fighter than true warriors, worse spellcasters than full clerics

Berserker: A mighty warrior with an uncontrollable rage; deadly to his enemy, but sometimes deadly to his allies as well. Strengths: Nigh unstoppable Monster in melee. Weaknesses: Lack of Control, no spellcasting

Bravo: A cocky fighter that prefers light weapons and mobility to heavy armor and discipline; a fast and deadly but sometimes fragile fighter. Strengths: good in the offense and mobility, many skills. Weaknesses: Glassjaw fencer that can much better attack than defend; no spellcasting)

Cleric: A divine spellcaster, educated in the way of the magic of his gods and the rhetoric of a preacher. A man of the word and the book, not of the battlefield. Strengths: Powerful spellcaster, highly educated scholar and great supporter. Weaknesses: very specialised on Magic and support of others

Commander: A leader of men, whose bravery can inspire armies and tactical instincts can lead to victory or defeat; while he commands troops he is not necessarily a good fighter as well. Strengths: Good supporter of other characters, natural leader. Weaknesses: Better in support than direct action; no spellcasting

Druid: A divine spellcaster who does not draw her powers from the faith but from nature itself. The druid is wild mirror image of the civilised cleric. Strengths: Access to magic with a very strong connection to the natural world, good scout Weaknesses: lost in an urban environment or social situations, specialised on magic

Healer: The personification of healing energy and the magic of life. The healer’s magic does not only protect and preserve the living, it is also a deadly weapon against the (un-)dead. Strengths: The best life insurance a party of adventurers can have. Weaknesses: Better in support and healing than in taking the initiative and doing heroic deeds yourself.

Mage Blade: A Mage Blade is an arcane spellcaster who is specialised in casting spells on himself to boost his combat prowess or to use their weapons to deliver deadly spells. Mage Blades try to merge spellcasting and fighting power. Strengths: Combine magic and combat arts into very effective attacks. Weaknesses: Average spellcaster at best, can not compete with mundane fighters without magic

Man-at-arms: The knight, the legionnaire, the mercenary. The man-at-arms is the most versatile fighter and the backbone of every elite troop. A man or a woman of steel and fire, not of gentle words and polite conversations. Strengths: Master of armed combat and frontline heroism. Weaknesses: not very useful outside of combat; No spellcasting.

Noble: An aristocrat, ruler or other person born into power. A ruler and leader of man but more focused on the social network of the ruling class than the command of troops on the battlefield. Strengths: Scheming, Manipulating and leadership. Weaknesses: Political power does not always make up for lacking martial or magical aptitude.

Paladin: Combining the dedication of a priest with the fighting prowess of a Man-at-arms and leadership of a commander, the Paladin is the most powerful warrior around, and his rigid code of honor makes sure that she also deserves this power. Strengths: powerful fighter, protected by faith and honor and granted with specialised but effective magic. Weaknesses: No powers without obligations for the Paladin.

Pathfinder: The scout and wilderness expert. The pathfinder is at home in the wilderness and is also an expert hunter who relies on finding his enemies’ weak spots instead of brute force. Strengths: a master outdoorsman of great adaptability and a surprisingly effective fighter. Weaknesses: While you are good in everything, you are the master of nothing. And lack spellcasting.

Shapechanger: Part mortal, part spirit creature, the shapechanger is a wanderer between the worlds and is not bond by their physical form. A shapechanger can adopt many elements of the spirit inside his soul and turn into a terrible beast or an inconspicuous watcher. Strengths: You can change into a 3 meter beast and rip your enemies open with razor-sharp talons. And you can even cast a handful of spells. Weaknesses: besides of the spirit in your soul and the monster form you can adopt, you are just a peasant who lives in interesting times.

Sorcerer: A child, born with a powerful Gift for magic but not the rigid education of a wizard, the sorcerer is a rare and flamboyant spellcaster more used to the life of the normal people than dusty libraries. Strengths: You are living magic, combined with enough pragmatism to get along. Weaknesses: You are almost completely dependent on your magic.

Spellthief: Not everyone is born with a powerful gift for magic but still yearning for it. These are the spellthieves, who ‘borrow’ their magical gift from other casters. Strengths: Combine stealth and sorcery with the ability to steal magic. Weaknesses: You are a worse rogue than the more specialised rogues and will probably never achieve the power levels of a full caster.

Thief: The Thief is an expert to gain riches, treasures and goods from other people. Some thieves are brutal thugs, others are romantic scoundrels, steadily smiling tricksters or agile cat burglars. Strengths: Subtlety, Stealth and social aptitude. Weaknesses: You are better in stealing and betraying than in fighting and you have no innate magic.

War mage: The artillery of the battlefield, warmages are specialised in using their magical powers for combats and battles. Their access to magic may be limited, but within their speciality, they are deadly and terrible enemies. Strengths: You are the personified magical artillery. Let them burn. Weaknesses: You are likewise dependent on your magic and lack the versatility of less focused spellcasters.

Weapon Master: While other fighters learn to fight with a diversified numbers of weapons, the Weapon Master concentrates on the perfection in wielding one weapon of her choice. While not as flexible as other fighters, the Weapon Master is deadly with his armament of choice. Strengths: With your weapon of choice your are incredible. Weaknesses: Without your weapon of choice you are indescribable. Besides, no spellcasting

Wizard: The combination of discipline, magic talent and a life-long dedication to learning and studies are the trademark abilities of the wizard, who completely concentrates on the control of the magic energies. Strengths: You are probably the strongest of all spellcasters. Weaknesses: You are almost completely dependent on your magic and have almost no skills besides magic.

Satyr
2009-01-16, 01:36 PM
Adventurer
The adventurer is the most versatile and adaptable character class. She is a dilettante that learns many things but masters none of them and can adjust to new and dangerous situations with quick wits and reflexes. Some adventurers chose this life voluntarily or are driven by curiosity, greed or wanderlust; others are reluctant heroes, which were forced into a life of dangers and adventures.

The adventurer is meant to be the catch-all class. He knows a bit about everything (except magic, which is generally treated much more exclusive in my games), and is able to fill in many, many party roles, while he is not able to compete with any class in its core competence. From a party constellation point of view, the Adventurer is a good 5th party member and rogue representative, and is very likely to contribute in many ways - especially through the adaptation features.

Hit Points at 1st level: 16 + Con modifier
Hit Points at Each Additional Level: 3 + con modifier

Class Skills
The adventurer is the most versatile of all classes and may treat any skill as a class skill.

Skill Points at 1st Level: (10 + Int modifier) x 4.
Skill Points at Each Additional Level: 10 + Int modifier.

The adventurer
{table=head]Level|BAB|BDB|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Special

1st|
+0|
+0|
+2|
+2|
+1|Bonus Feat, trap finding, call of adventure

2nd|
+1|
+1|
+3|
+3|
+1|Evasion

3rd|
+2|
+2|
+3|
+3|
+2|Danger Sense +1, Luck of Heroes +1

4th|
+3|
+3|
+4|
+4|
+2|simple Art of War

5th|
+3|
+3|
+4|
+4|
+3|Bonus Feat

6th|
+4|
+4|
+5|
+5|
+3|Uncanny Dodge, Danger Sense +2

7th|
+5|
+5|
+5|
+5|
+3|Special Ability, Favorite Environment 1

8th|
+6/+1|
+6|
+6|
+6|
+4|Simple Art of War, Luck of Heroes +1

9th|
+6/+1|
+6|
+6|
+6|
+4|Adaptation, Danger Sense +3

10th|
+7/+2|
+7|
+7|
+7|
+5|Bonus Feat

11th|
+8/+3|
+8|
+7|
+7|
+5|Special Ability

12th|
+9/+4|
+9|
+8|
+8|
+6|advanced Art of War, Danger Sense +4

13th|
+9/+4|
+9|
+8|
+8|
+6|Improved Uncanny Dodge, Luck of Heroes +1

14th|
+10/+5|
+10|
+9|
+9|
+6|Favorite Environment 2

15th|
+11/+6/+1|
+11|
+9|
+9|
+7|Special Ability, Bonus Feat, Danger Sense +5

16th|
+12/+7/+2|
+12|
+10|
+10|
+7|advanced Art of War

17th|
+12/+7/+2|
+12|
+10|
+10|
+8|Immediate Adaptation

18th|
+13/+8/+3|
+13|
+11|
+11|
+8|Danger Sense +6, Luck of Heroes +1

19th|
+14/+9/+4|
+14|
+11|
+11|
+9|Special Ability

20th|
+15/+10/+5|
+15|
+12|
+12|
+9|Bonus Feat, complex Art of War[/table]



Class Features

Weapon and Armor Proficiency: Adventurers are proficient with all simple and martial weapons and with light armor and shields (but not tower shields).

Trap finding (Ex): Adventurers can use the Search skill to locate traps when the task has a Difficulty Class higher than 20.
Finding a non-magical trap has a DC of at least 20, or higher if it is well hidden. Finding a magic trap has a DC of 25 + the level of the spell used to create it.
Adventurers can use the Disable Device skill to disarm magic traps. A magic trap generally has a DC of 25 + the level of the spell used to create it.
An Adventurer who beats a trap’s DC by 10 or more with a Disable Device check can study a trap, fig-ure out how it works, and bypass it (with her party) without disarming it.

Bonus Feats: At 1st, 5th, 10th, 15th and 20th level, the Adventurer may chose any one feat as a bonus feat. She must fit the feat’s prerequisites to take it.

Call of Adventure: The Adventurer class always counts as a favorite class for all characters, independ-ent from the character’s background traits or species.

Evasion (Ex): At 2nd level and higher, an Adventurer can avoid even magical and unusual attacks with great agility. If she makes a successful Reflex saving throw against an attack that normally deals half damage on a successful save, she instead takes no damage. Evasion can be used only if the Adventurer is wearing light armor or no armor. A helpless Adventurer does not gain the benefit of evasion.
If an Adventurer already has evasion from a different class she automatically gains improved evasion instead.

Danger Sense (Ex): At 3rd level, an Adventurer gains an intuitive sense that alerts her to danger from traps ambushes and similar perils, giving her a +1 bonus on Reflex saves made to avoid traps, a +1 dodge bonus to Defense against attacks made by traps and a +1 bonus to all skill checks to recognize ambushes and act during a surprise round. These bonuses rise to +2 when the thief reaches 6th level, to +3 when she reaches 9th level, to +4 when she reaches 12th level, to +5 at 15th, and to +6 at 18th level.
Danger sense bonuses stack with the Bonus from Trap Sense from other classes.

Luck of Heroes (ex): At 3rd, 8th and every 5 levels hereafter, the Adventurer may add a +1 luck bonus to either a Save, his Defense or his Attack bonus. Once the Luck bonus is allotted, it cannot be changed again.
Art of War: at level 4, and every 4 level after that, the Adventurer gains a special ability from the ap-propriate list of Arts of War. No ability may be taken more than once. If an Art of War ability has other such abilities as prerequisites, the Adventurer must possess the prerequisite abilities to take the ability in question.

Uncanny Dodge (Ex): Starting at 5th level, a thief can react to danger before her senses would normally allow her to do so. She retains her Dexterity bonus to AC (if any) even if she is caught flat-footed or struck by an invisible attacker. However, she still loses her Dexterity bonus to Defense if immobilized.
If a thief already has uncanny dodge from a different class she automatically gains improved uncanny dodge (see below) instead.
Special Abilities: On attaining 7th level, and at every four levels thereafter, an Adventurer gains a spe-cial ability of her choice from among the Thief’s special ability list.

Favorite Environment (Ex): At 7th and 14th level, the Adventurer may chose a favorite Environment, just like the Druid’s ability of the same name.
Adaptation (ex): The Adventurer may not be the most focused character around, but he is certainly one of the most adaptable. After reaching 9th level, the Adventurer may reshuffle up to 10 Skill points he already spent among his skills. Doing so requires an hour of concentration and preparation. This ability can be used as often as wanted, but only 10 skill points can be readjusted per day. If a number of skill points is needed as a requirement for any of the Adventurer’s traits or feats, the new skill score can not be lowered beyond the prerequisite amount.

Improved Uncanny Dodge (Ex): An adventurer of 13th level or higher can no longer be flanked.
This defense denies another thief the ability to sneak attack the character by flanking her, unless the attacker has at least four more thief levels than the target does.
If a character already has uncanny dodge (see above) from a second class, the character automatically gains improved uncanny dodge instead, and the levels from the classes that grant uncanny dodge stack to determine the minimum thief level required to flank the character.

Immediate Adaptation (ex): This ability works like adaptation (see above) but instead of an hour, a 17th level Adventurer needs only five minutes to readjust his skill scores. The maximum of 10 skill points per day stays in function, though.



Variety: Unlikely Hero: This subtype of the Adventurer is no less effective than the standard form - much to the surprise of those who see him. The unlikely hero doesn’t seem to be a well suited for a life full of danger and austerity, but somehow they keep going.
The unlikely hero gets a use of the Luck of Heroes trait every 3 levels (on 3rd, 6th, 9th, 12th, 15th and 18th level) instead of the regular progression but doesn’t have the Danger Sense trait.


Variety: Urban Hero: The urban hero doesn’t come out to the wild that often and does not have the outdoorsman ability of the more rural standard adventurer. They seem less at home in the forest but move with more grace and Self-assurance through towns and cities and have learned to fight dirty in the dark alleys of the rundown parts of the city.
The Urban hero gains the following traits:
Ear on the street: When in a settlement of at least the size of a small town, the Urban hero gains a +2 competence bonus to all checks on gather information. On 7th level, they gain the Sneak attack trait with a damage of 1d6. This damage increases to 2d6 on 14th level.
The urban hero does not gain the favorite environment trait.

Harperfan7
2009-01-16, 02:35 PM
Keep em coming. I think you are on to something here.

Athaniar
2009-01-16, 03:20 PM
Interesting. Interesting indeed. I eagerly await the rest.

Satyr
2009-01-16, 03:27 PM
The Alchemist
The Alchemist is a man or woman of research, experimentation and many loud explosions. While they are not spellcasters themselves, they have learned to mimic the effects of spells through potions and other alchemical products. An Alchemist is a source of healing ointments, potions that promise victory, deadly poisons and many explosions. Pyromania and mad creativity are not necessary for a good Alchemist, but these traits are disturbingly common among them. An Alchemist could start a carrier as an Adventurer because of a search for new recipes or exotic ingredients or just because she wants to prove that ingenuity can compete with magic – if it is supported with enough fire and acid.
The alchemist - which is in large parts inspired on a homebrewed class of this very forum, which was based on the artificer - is not a particularly powerful character. Actually, I think he is among the weakest characters in Serpents&Sewers, perhaps even the weakest one. But is it fun to play one! Buidling stuff, blewing stuff up (often the very same stuff), feed the rest of the party with helpful toys and solve every problem with fire. Playing an alchemist is all about toys, gadgets and pyromania, but they are neither frontline fighters nor the unravellers of magical powers. The alchemist is a good fifth character who can be very helpful for a group, and can even work as a replacement for spellcasters, emulating their spells through elixirs, balms and explosives.


Hit Points at 1st level: 12 + Con modifier
Hit points at each additional level: 2 + Con modifier

Class Skills: The Alchemist’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Apppraise (Int+Cha), Bluff (2xCha), Concentration (Con+Wis), Craft (Int+?), Heal (Wis+Cha), Knowledge (history) (2xInt), Knowledge (arcana) (2xInt), Profession (Wis+?), Sense motive (Wis+Cha), Spellcraft (Int+Wis), Sur-vival (Con+Wis) and Use magical Device (2xCha).

Skill Points at 1st Level: (8 + Int modifier) x 4
Skill Points at every additional level: 8 + Int modifier



Table: The Alchemist
{table=head]Level|BAB|BDB|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|CR|Special

1st|
+0|
+0|
+1|
+0|
+2|50|Brew Potion, Spell Knowledge (1), Resistance +1

2nd|
+1|
+1|
+1|
+0|
+3|100|Grenadier, Poison Use

3rd|
+2|
+1|
+2|
+1|
+3|150|Advanced Craft, Speedbrewing

4th|
+3|
+2|
+2|
+1|
+4|200|Resistance +2, Spell knowledge (2)

5th|
+3|
+2|
+3|
+2|
+4|250|Combat Alchemist

6th|
+4|
+3|
+3|
+2|
+5|300|Battlefield Scrounger

7th|
+5|
+3|
+3|
+2|
+5|350|Resistance +3, Spell knowledge (3)

8th|
+6/+1|
+4|
+4|
+2|
+6|400|Advanced Craft

9th|
+6/+1|
+4|
+4|
+3|
+6|450|Multibrew (2), Pyrotechnics

10th|
+7/+2|
+5|
+5|
+3|
+7|500|Resistance +4, Master of Demolitions

11th|
+8/+3|
+5|
+5|
+3|
+7|550|Economic Potions (1)

12th|
+9/+4|
+6|
+6|
+4|
+8|600|Multibrew (3), Extend Tools

13th|
+9/+4|
+6|
+6|
+4|
+8|650|Resistance +5, Advanced Craft

14th|
+10/+5|
+7|
+6|
+4|
+9|700|Economic Potions (2)

15th|
+11/+6/+1|
+7|
+7|
+5|
+9|750|Multibrew (4)

16th|
+12/+7/+2|
+8|
+7|
+5|
+10|800|Resistance +6, Maximize Tools

17th|
+12/+7/+2|
+8|
+8|
+5|
+10|850|Economic Potions (3)

18th|
+13/+8/+3|
+9|
+8|
+6|
+11|900|Advanced Craft, Multibrew (5)

19th|
+14/+9/+4|
+9|
+9|
+6|
+11|950|Resistance +7

20th|
+15/+10/+5|
+10|
+9|
+6|
+12|1000|Grandmaster of Destruction, Empower Tools[/table]

Class Features

Weapon and Armor Proficiency: The alchemist gains proficiency with simple weapons and light armor, but not with shields.

Magic Simulation: While the Alchemist simulate the effects of spells with his potions and craft them as magical items, he does not count as a caster class. A character does not need the Gift trait to gain levels in the Alchemist class, nor can the Alchemist learn any feats that require spellcasting nor can he learn spells in an other form than magical recipes for spells.

Craft Reserve: A master alchemist receives a pool of points he can spend instead of experience points when crafting a magic item. Each time the alchemist gains a new level, he receives a new level, he re-ceives a new craft reserve; leftover points from the previous level do not carry over. If the points are not spent, they are lost. An alchemist can also use his craft reserve to supplement the XP cost of the item he is making, taking a portion of the cost from his craft reserve and a portion from his own XP.

Brew Potion: At 1st level, an Alchemist gains Brew potion as a bonus feat.

Spell Knowledge: Starting at 1st level, an Alchemist gains a limited knowledge of spells, which allows them to utilize the craft (alchemy) skill. At 1st level, the Alchemist gains knowledge of a number of 1st level spells equal to their intelligence modifier+5 and all Cantrips on the Sorcerer/Wizard spell list. At each new level, an Alchemist gains a pool equal to their Intelligence modifier of acquisition points for gaining new spells, whereby the cost of every spell is equal to its spell level. The Alchemist may not learn spells with a higher level than his spell knowledge trait indicates, but he can learn spells from every spell list. While the Alchemist is not able to actively cast these spells, he is fully able to incorpo-rate these spells into potions regardless of their spell level (although only spells usable as potions can be so incorporated). The Alchemist’s effective spellcaster level is equal to their class level.

Resistance: Alchemists deal with many toxic, dangerous and highly instable substances. At first level, the Alchemist gains a +1 bonus to all Saving Throws against poisons and all spells or effects that would make him sickened or nauseated and gain a Resistance to Fire and Acid as high as the listed bonus. Both bonuses increase again on 4th level and every three levels afterwards.

Grenadier: At 2nd level, an Alchemist gains Grenadier as a bonus feat.

Poison Use: starting at 2nd level, an Alchemist can apply poison to a weapon without any chance of poisoning himself.

Advanced Craft: At 3rd level and every 5 levels afterwards (8th, 13th, and 18th), the Alchemist learns an advanced method by which they may advance their craft. Only one advancement may be added onto any item and when an advanced item is completed, construction on another item with the same ad-vancement cannot start for 1 week. Unless otherwise stated, these abilities may only be used to modify poisons, alchemic items, and potions. No ability may be chosen more than once.


Virulent Poison: damage dealt to any ability score by the crafted poison is increased by 1.
Prolonged Potion: the crafted potion has its duration doubled.
Precise Aim: any attack rolls made with the crafted alchemic item gain a +2 bonus.
Healing Powder: anyone affected by the crafted substance heals hit points equal to the alchemist’s intel-ligence modifier.
Efficient Crafter: the base price of the crafted substance is lowered by 10%.
Quick Worker: the substance only requires 30 minutes of work each day to gain the benefits of a full 8 hours of work.
Innocuous: sleight of hand checks made to hide the crafted poison gain a +10 bonus.
Extra Dose: You create a second dose of the crafted potion that only remains active for 24 hours.
Vapor Form: the poison or potion crafted is released as a 5-foot radius cloud. Poison crafted in this way becomes inhaled poison and is tossed like a grenade-like weapon while potions are dropped and affect anyone within range. Either way, the cloud disperses after 1 round and is not thick enough to obscure vision.
Virulence: the dc of the crafted alchemic item or poison is increased by 2.
Ranged Treatment: The crafted potion or alchemic item can be used at range. Alchemic items thrown in this way can be made to travel 5 feet further as an immediate action. Potions can be applied to an ally or item 10 feet away by taking an extra swift action to do so.


Speed Brewing: At 3rd level, an Alchemist learns how to travel even when working on other projects. When using the craft (poisoncrafting), craft (alchemy), or working on a potion, the alchemist require only 1 hour of work each day to gain the full benefits of a full 8 hours of work and can be worked on even in extremely stressful situations (but not in combat).

Combat Alchemist: An Alchemist, through the most basic of alchemic combinations, can put up suit-able defenses in the blink of the eye. These alchemic items cost 50gp for various unguents and can be created as a full-round action, making a craft (alchemy) check against the indicated dc. At 5th level, a master alchemist learns a number of combinations equal to their intelligence modifier and they learn an additional one every odd levels afterwards (7th, 9th, 11th, 13th, 15th, 17th and 19th). The DCs for saving throws, if any, are equal to the 1/2 the alchemist’s class level + the alchemist’s intelligence modifier +1d20. Items created in this way last for 1 hour or until they are used.


Blinder (DC 20) all enemies within 20 feet must make a fortitude save or become blinded for 1d4 rounds and dazed for another 2 rounds.
Numbglob (DC 25): anyone hit takes 1d4 points of dexterity damage and takes an additional –2 penalty on dexterity-based skill checks and ability checks for 1 hour.
Disabler (DC 19): anyone hit takes must make a fortitude save or drop all held items. Any enemy who fails this save must make another one 1 minute later or fall prone.
Spark Rocks (DC 17): anyone stepping into a square filled with spark rocks takes a –5 penalty on move silently checks and takes 1 point of electricity damage. Enough spark rocks are produced to fill one 5-foot square
Invigorator (DC 21): anyone imbibing this substance gains 1d4+1 temporary hit points for 10 minutes.
Grappler (DC 18): Anyone hit must make a grapple check against the alchemist’s grapple modifier. Anyone who becomes pinned by this ability takes 1d4 nonlethal damage each round. Anyone who would pin the grappler breaks free from it. The grappler lasts 1d4+2 rounds once in use.
Lifeseep (DC 25): anyone hit takes 1d2 points of constitution damage.
Burner (DC 30): anyone hit takes 2d6 fire damage and anyone within 5 feet takes 1d4 points of fire damage from the splash.
Slipspill (DC 15): anyone stepping into a square filled with slipspill must make a reflex save or fall prone. Enough slipspill is produced to fill one 5-foot square.
Bottled Reflex (DC 27): anyone imbibing this liquid gains a +1 bonus on initiative checks and a +1 dodge bonus to AC for 1 minute.
Bottled Fatigue (DC 28) anyone hit by this substance must make a fortitude save or become fatigued for 1 minute.
Groundbreaker (DC 19): any square that groundbreaker is poured onto becomes rough terrain. Enough groundbreaker is produced to effect one 5-foot square.
Disorienter (DC 20): anyone hit by a disorienter must make a will save or become confused for 1 round.
Joint Freezer (DC 19): anyone hit by a joint freezer takes 1d4 cold damage and must make a fortitude save or have their speed slowed by 5 feet for 1 hour.
Blade Duller (DC 23): anyone who applies blade duller to themselves gains DR 1/bludgeoning and piercing for 5 rounds.
Armor Stopper (DC 18): anyone hit by an armor freezer has their armor freeze up, doubling their armor penallty, reducing their maximum dexterity bonus by 1, and their armor bonus by 1. These effect last until the armor is thoroughly washed.
Flesheater (DC 30): anyone hit by this substance takes 1d4 acid damage and takes another 1d4 points of acid damage every round for the next 2d4 rounds or until they spend a standard action scrapping it off.
Guardbreaker (DC 25): anyone hit by this substance must make a will save or lose their dexterity bonus to their AC for 1 round.
Compressed air (DC 22): anyone walking through an area filled with compressed air takes 1d4 slashing damage and any ranged attacks made through such a square take a –2 penalty. Enough compressed air is produced to fill one 5-foot square and it lasts for 1d4 rounds after release.
Quick Retreat (DC 20): anyone imbibing this liquid can move three times their speed using the with-draw action for 1 round.



Battlefield Scrounger: Starting at 6th level, an Alchemist can scrounge up loose materials to make their trademark items. If the alchemist can succeed on a survival check equal to the cost of the supplies needed to make a potion, alchemic item, or poison in gp, the master alchemist can make it without spending any gp. This search for materials takes 1d4+1 hours.
Multibrew: Starting at 9th level, an Alchemist can brew the indicated amount of potions at one time (although the amount of time spent is cumulative). In addition, the alchemist can work on crafting any number of poisons and alchemic items on the same days that they work on potions, although the amount of time spent is cumulative.

Master of Demolition: Whenever an Alchemist of 10th or higher level attacks with a potion or alchemical good of his own production that deals fire, explosion or acid damage, he adds his Intelligence modifier to the damage (including all splash damage).

Economic Potions: Starting on 11th level, the Alchemist can temper and deal with his potions to greatly reduce the costs of them. On 11th level, he may half the GP and XP costs of all first level potions, on 14th level for all 2nd level potions and on 17th level for all third level spells as well.

Extend Tools: Starting at 12th level, an Alchemist can extend the duration of their alchemic items, and potions. This ability can be used a number of times per day equal to the alchemist’s intelligence modi-fier (minimum 1/day). The level of the potion does not increase, only the production time and costs of it.

Maximize Tools: Starting at 16th level, the Alchemist can maximize the results of their poisons, al-chemic items, and potions. This ability can be used a number of times per day equal to the alchemist’s intelligence modifier (minimum 1/day). The level of the potion does not increase, only the production time and costs of it.

Empower Tools: At 20th level, the Alchemist can empower the results of their poisons, alchemic items, and potions. This ability can be used a number of times per day equal to the alchemist’s intelligence modifier (minimum 1/day). The level of the potion does not increase, only the production time and costs of it.

Grandmaster of Destruction: A 20th level Alchemist has learned that enough fire or acid will destroy everything – when applied in the right doses. Whenever he attacks with a potion or alchemical good of his own production that deals fire, explosion or acid damage, he may increase the damage die of the attack by one step (including all splash damage).

Satyr
2009-01-16, 03:39 PM
The Archer
The Archer is an expert marksman, a warrior or hunter specialized in the use of a bow or crossbow. Archers are disciplined warriors, often more focused on precision and accuracy than on pure strength. In direct melee combat, an Archer will have many problems, but it can be very difficult to reach an enemy Archer and force him into melee. Archers come from very different areas of life – some are hunters or poachers in the woods and fields, other made a military career and become prized specialists for ranged combat. Since they are rarely involved in direct hand-to-hand combat, Archers rarely use heavy armor, and many archers prefer to attack from ambushes before they are attacked themselves, making armor more of a hindrance than a boon. Archetypical Archers from history, myth and media include characters like Robin Hood, Wilhelm Tell, an English Longbowmen from the 100 years war, or the Diablo II Amazon.

The archer is a bit of a one trick pony. Yes, she is the impersonification of second line fighting and small scale artillery, but that is her most important and almost only feature. Forced into melee, the Archer is going to suffer. Running out of arrows is a nightmare. But, if she manages to achieve a position where her enemies can't reach her, she let death rain on them.
An archer in combination with a big, broad-shouldered compagnion is a great team - and even more so in cooperation with anyone who can slow down or halt enemies.

Hit Points at 1st Level: 12 + Con modifier
Hit Points at Each Additional Level: 2 + Con modifier.

Class Skills
The archer’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Climb (Str+Dex), Concentration (Con+Wis), Craft (Int+?), Handle Animal (Wis+Cha), Heal (Wis+Cha), Jump (2xStr), Knowledge (dun-geoneering) (2xInt), Knowledge (geography) (2xInt), Knowledge (nature) (2xInt), Listen (Wis+Con), Profession (Wis+?), Ride (Dex), Search (Int+Wis), Spot (Wis+Con), Survival (Wis+Con) and Swim (Str+Con).

Skill Points at 1st Level: (5 + Int modifier) x 4.
Skill Points at Each Additional Level: 5 + Int modifier.



Table: The Archer
{table=head]Level|BAB|BDB|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Special

1st|
+0|
+0|
+2|
+2|
+1|Chosen Weapon (Focus), Sniper +1D4

2nd|
+1|
+1|
+3|
+3|
+3|Rapid Shot

3rd|
+2|
+1|
+3|
+3|
+2|Distracting Attack

4th|
+3|
+2|
+4|
+4|
+2|Chosen Weapon (Specialization), Sniper +2D4

5th|
+3|
+2|
+4|
+4|
+3|Bonus Feat

6th|
+4|
+3|
+5|
+5|
+3|Manyshot

7th|
+5|
+3|
+5|
+5|
+3|Sniper +3D4

8th|
+6/+1|
+4|
+6|
+6|
+4|Chosen Weapon (Improved Critical)

9th|
+6/+1|
+4|
+6|
+6|
+4|Ride the Wind

10th|
+7/+2|
+5|
+7|
+7|
+5|Bonus Feat, Sniper +4D4

11th|
+8/+3|
+5|
+7|
+7|
+5|Improved Precise Shot

12th|
+9/+4|
+6|
+8|
+8|
+6|Chosen Weapon (Greater Focus)

13th|
+9/+4|
+6|
+8|
+8|
+6|Sniper +5D4

14th|
+10/+5|
+7|
+9|
+9|
+6|Deflect Arrows

15th|
+11/+6/+1|
+7|
+9|
+9|
+7|Bonus Feat

16th|
+12/+7/+2|
+8|
+10|
+10|
+7|Sniper +6D4

17th|
+12/+7/+2|
+8|
+10|
+10|
+8|Wounding Critical

18th|
+13/+8/+3|
+9|
+11|
+11|
+8|Chosen Weapon (Greater Specialization)

19th|
+14/+9/+4|
+9|
+11|
+11|
+9|Greater True Shot, Sniper + 7D4

20th|
+15/+10/+5|
+10|
+12|
+12|
+9|Bonus Feat, Piercing Arrows[/table]

Class Features
Weapon and Armor Proficiency: An archer is proficient with all simple weapons, all martial ranged weapons and with light armor, but not with shields.

Chosen Weapon (Ex): At first level, the Archer chooses one category of ranged weapons such as javelins, crossbows or bows. For all weapons of this category, she gains the weapon focus feat, and additional feats when she gains more Archer levels.

1st Level: Weapon Focus
4th: Weapon Specialization
8th: Improved Critical
12th: Greater Weapon Focus
18th: Greater Weapon Specialization

Sniper (Ex): The Archer is trained to use her ranged weapon to kill her enemies. As a full round action, the Archer can attack a foe with a ranged weapon attack, when she did not move more than a 5 ft. Step and is not threatened by any opponent in melee, she can add the additional sniper damage to a single ranged attack. The damage resulting from this ability improves every three levels. The extra damage only applies against living creatures that have a discernible anatomy. Undead, constructs, oozes, plants, incorporeal creatures, and creatures immune to extra damage from critical hits are not vulnerable to this additional damage. The archer must be able to see the target well enough to pick out a vital spot and must be able to hit such a spot.

Rapid Shot: At 2nd level, an archer is treated as having the Rapid Shot feat, even if she does not have the normal prerequisites for that feat.

Distracting Attack (Ex): Starting at 3rd level, whenever the archer hits an enemy with a weapon attack (melee or ranged) that enemy is considered flanked by her for the purpose of adjudicating the archer’s allies’ attacks. For example, if the archer’s rogue ally attacked that enemy, not only he would gain +2 on her melee attack roll but he could also add his sneak attack damage to a successful sneak attack. This flanked condition lasts until either the enemy is attacked by one of the archer’s allies or until the start of the archer’s next turn, whichever comes first.
This ability has no effect on creatures that can’t be flanked.

Bonus Feats: The Archer gets a Bonus Feat of the Fighter Bonus Feat list every five levels.

Manyshot: At 6th level, an archer’s aptitude improves. He is treated as having the Manyshot feat, even if he does not have the normal prerequisites for that feat.

Improved Precise Shot: At 11th level, an archer’s aptitude improves again. He is treated as having the Improved Precise Shot feat, even if he does not have the normal prerequisites for that feat.

Ride the Wind (ex): On 9th level, the Archer learns to cope with environmental effects on his arching skills; natural and supernatural environment effects such as strong wind, storm or spells like Gust of Wind or Windwall have no effect on the arrows and bolts of an Archer.

Deflect Arrows: Starting at 14th Level, the archer’s knowledge about ranged weapons grants him the Deflect Arrows feat, even if he does not have the normal prerequisites for that feat.

Wounding Criticals (Ex): An archer of 17th or higher level who scores a critical hit on a creature also deals 1D4 Constitution Damage to said creature. Creatures immune to critical hits are also immune to this effect.

Improved True Shot: Starting at 19th Level, an archer’s arrows are considered as adamantine weapons to bypass Damage Reduction.

Piercing Arrows: After reaching 20th Level, every arrow shot by the Archer is considered a penetrating and attacks every creature in a 60 ft line.

Satyr
2009-01-16, 03:59 PM
Assassin

Assassins are specialized, professional murderers. They have great expertise in hunting and killing other people, and are deadly when they have the tactical advantage. Many assassins have profound knowledge of anatomy and poisons and are experts in the art of silent killing. An assassin is much more focused on stealth and violence than a thief, and has a more focused set of traits. Archetypical Assassins from history or popular media include people like the traditional Hashishin order or the traditional ninjas of Japan, but also the typical psychotic killer of slasher horror movies or Jack the Ripper would be representative examples.

The assassin kills people - or things. He doesn't do much else (except a bit of acrobatics and stealth), but he is a deadly enemie when hes able to ambush an enemy. In a direct confrontation, the assasssin is going to lose against most decent fighters (including the thief), but when it is all about sneaking and silent killing, the assassin is great.
The greatest problem of the assassin is a roleplaying one. To put it shortly, the assassin is no nice character and in a more heoric party, a character whose major gimmic is "I am a skulduggery psychokiller for hire" is going to lead to significant problems. Killing people is bad, and all that.
As a side note, the assassin's will save is intentionally low - both as it fits a scoundrel who kills for fun and profit, but also to encourage taking a code of honor, turning the assassin into the traditional ninja.

Hit Points at 1st Level: 16 + Con Modifier
Hit Points at Each Additional Level: 3 + Con Modifier

Class Skills
The assassin’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Balance (2xDex), Bluff (2xCha), Climb (Str+Dex), Concentration (Con+Wis), Craft (Int+?), Disguise (Cha+Int), Escape Artist (Str+Dex), Gather Information (2xCha), Hide (Dex+Con), Heal (Wis+Cha), Jump (2xStr), Listen (Wis+Con), Move Silently (Dex+Con), Profession (Wis+?), Search (Int+Wis), Sense Motive (Wis+Cha), Sleight of Hand (Dex+Cha), Spot (Wis+Con), Swim (Str+Con), Tumble (Str+Dex) and Use Rope (Str+Dex).

Skill Points at 1st Level: (8 + Int modifier) x 4.
Skill Points at Each Additional Level: 8 + Int modifier.


Table: The Assassin
{table=head]Level|BAB|BDB|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Special

1st|
+0|
+0|
+1|
+3|
+0|Sneak Attack +1d6, Defense bonus, Trapfinding

2nd|
+1|
+1|
+1|
+4|
+0|Poison use

3rd|
+2|
+2|
+2|
+5|
+1|Sneak Attack +2d6

4th|
+3|
+3|
+2|
+5|
+1|Acrobatics +1

5th|
+3|
+3|
+3|
+6|
+1|movement +10’, Sneak Attack +3d6

6th|
+4|
+4|
+3|
+7|
+2|great leap

7th|
+5|
+5|
+3|
+7|
+2|Speed climb, Sneak Attack +4d6

8th|
+6/+1|
+6|
+4|
+8|
+2|Acrobatics +2, crippling strike

9th|
+6/+1|
+6|
+4|
+9|
+3|Evasion, Sneak Attack +5d6

10th|
+7/+2|
+7|
+5|
+9|
+3|Hide in Plain Sight

11th|
+8/+3|
+8|
+5|
+10|
+5|Sneak Attack + 6d6

12th|
+9/+4|
+9|
+6|
+11|
+4|Acrobatics + 3

13th|
+9/+4|
+9|
+6|
+11|
+4|improved Poison use, Sneak Attack +7d6

14th|
+10/+5|
+10|
+6|
+12|
+6|Ghost mind, agility training

15th|
+11/+6/+1|
+11|
+7|
+12|
+5|movement +20’, Sneak Attack + 8d6

16th|
+12/+7/+2|
+12|
+7|
+13|
+5|Acrobatics + 4, ghost sight

17th|
+12/+7/+2|
+12|
+8|
+14|
+5|Sneak Attack +9 d6

18th|
+13/+8/+3|
+13|
+11|
+11|
+8|Killing the Deadless

19th|
+14/+9/+4|
+14|
+8|
+15|
+6|Sneak Attack + 10d6

20th|
+15/+10/+5|
+15|
+9|
+16|
+6|Acrobatics + 5, True Death[/table]


Class Features
Weapon and Armor Proficiency: Assassins are proficient with all simple weapons, plus the hand crossbow, shortbow (including composite shortbow), shuriken, shortsword and garrotte.
Assassins are proficient with light armor but not with shields. When wearing medium or heavy armor, using a shield, or carrying a medium or heavy load, a assassin loses her AC bonus, as well as her fast movement abilities.

Defense Bonus (Ex): When wearing light or no armor, and unencumbered, the assassin adds 1 point of Intelligence bonus (if any) per assassin level to her AC.
This bonus to AC applies even against touch attacks or when the assassin is flat-footed. She loses this bonuses when she is immobilized or helpless, when she wears medium or heavy armor, when she uses a shield, or when she carries a medium or heavy load.

Trapfinding: Assassins can use the Search skill to locate traps when the task has a Difficulty Class higher than 20.
Finding a nonmagical trap has a DC of at least 20, or higher if it is well hidden. Finding a magic trap has a DC of 25 + the level of the spell used to create it.
Assassins can use the Disable Device skill to disarm magic traps. A magic trap generally has a DC of 25 + the level of the spell used to create it.
An assassin who beats a trap’s DC by 10 or more with a Disable Device check can study a trap, figure out how it works, and bypass it (with his party) without disarming it.

Sneak Attack (Ex): If an assassin can catch an opponent when he is unable to defend himself effec-tively from her attack, she can strike a vital spot for extra damage.
The assassin’s attack deals extra damage any time her target would be denied a Dexterity bonus to AC (whether the target actually has a Dexterity bonus or not), or when the assassin flanks her target. This extra damage is 1d6 at 1st level, and it increases by 1d6 every other assassin class level thereafter up to a maximum of 10d6 at 19th level. Should the assassin score a critical hit with a sneak attack, this extra damage is not multiplied.
Ranged attacks can count as sneak attacks only if the target is within 30 feet.
With a sap (blackjack) or an unarmed strike, an assassin can make a sneak attack that deals nonlethal damage instead of lethal damage. He cannot use a weapon that deals lethal damage to deal nonlethal damage in a sneak attack, not even with the usual –4 penalty.
An assassin can sneak attack only living creatures with discernible anatomies—undead, constructs, oozes, plants, and incorporeal creatures lack vital areas to attack. Any creature that is immune to critical hits is not vulnerable to sneak attacks. The thief must be able to see the target well enough to pick out a vital spot and must be able to reach such a spot. An assassin cannot sneak attack while striking a crea-ture with concealment or striking the limbs of a creature whose vitals are beyond reach.

Poison Use (Ex): At 2nd level and higher, an assassin never risks accidentally poisoning herself when applying poison to a weapon.

Acrobatics (Ex): Starting at 4th level, a assassin gains a +1 bonus on Balance, Climb, Jump, and Tumble checks and his initiative. At 8th level and every four levels thereafter, this bonus increases by +1.

Fast Movement (Ex): Starting at 5th level, a assassin gains a +10 feet bonus to her speed. At 15th level, this bonus increases to +20 feet.
A assassin loses this benefit when wearing medium or heavy armor or when carrying a medium or heavy load.

Great Leap (Ex): At 6th level and higher, an assassin always makes Jump checks as if she were run-ning and had the Run feat, enabling her to make long jumps without a running start and granting a +4 bonus on the jump. This ability cannot be used if she is wearing medium or heavy armor, or carrying a medium or heavy load.

Speed Climb (Ex): An assassin of 7th level or higher can scramble up or down walls with great speed. She can climb at her speed (instead of one-quarter or one-half her speed) as part of normal movement with no penalty (though she still needs to make successful Climb checks). An assassin needs only one free hand to use this ability. This ability cannot be used if an assassin is wearing medium or heavy ar-mor, or carrying a medium or heavy load.

Crippling Strike (Ex): An assassin of 8th level or higher can sneak attack opponents with such precision that his blows weaken and hamper them. An opponent damaged by one of his sneak attacks also takes 2 points of Strength damage. Ability points lost to damage return on their own at the rate of 1 point per day for each damaged ability.

Evasion (Ex): At 9th level or higher, if an assassin makes a successful Reflex saving throw against an attack that normally deals half damage on a successful save, she instead takes no damage. Evasion can be used only if the assassin is wearing light armor or no armor. A helpless assassin does not gain the benefit of evasion.
If an assassin already has evasion from a different class she automatically gains improved evasion in-stead.

Improved Poison Use (Ex): Starting at 13th level, an assassin can apply poison to a weapon as a move action. Normally, applying poison is a standard action, like applying an oil.

Ghost Mind (Su): At 14th level, an assassin gains a special resistance to spells of the divination school. To detect or see an assassin with such a spell, the caster must make a caster level check (DC 20 + the assassin's class level). In the case of scrying spells (such as arcane eye) that scan the assassin's area, a failed check indicates that the spell works but the assassin simply isn't detected. Scrying attempts tar-geted specifically at the assassin do not work at all if the check fails.

Agility Training (Ex): Starting at 14th level, an assassin reduces the armor check penalty imposed on her by light armor by 2 (to a minimum of 0).

Ghost Sight (Su): At 16th level and higher, a assassin can see invisible and ethereal creatures and ob-jects as easily as she sees material creatures and objects.

Killing the Deadless (Ex): An assassin of 18th level can spend one spellpoint to load his weapon with energy. For the a time span equal to the assassin’s class levels in rounds, his Sneak Attacks and critical hits are also applied to targets which are normally immune to such damage like undeads or oozes.

True Death (Ex): At 20th level, an assassin has mastered the Art of killing to an amount that his victims never come back. An assassin can spend a full round action to mutilate a body of one of his victims. This person can only be revived through True Resurrection. All other spells fail. It is also not possible to raise the killed creature as an undead creature.

Satyr
2009-01-17, 09:18 AM
Battle priest
Battle priests are the more militant variety of the normal cleric. They are better fighters, but their martial training replaces the rhetorical superiority and vast knowledge of the ordinary clerics and their focus on the direct combat also makes slows down the speed with which they learn to control their spellcasting abilities. Archetypical Battle priests are historically much rarer than in fiction and not a very common appearance.

The battle priest stands between the Paladin on the one, more martial, and the full cleric on the other, more mystical side. Which makes him more similar to the original cleric than the cleric - he is the guy in the full plate armor who is not going to convince the people through sermons and prayers, but through the application of good old violence in the name of his god.
The battle priest is a great character for the "party healer/divine spellcaster" slot of the party. For a more militant group, he is certainly better suited, while in group less prone to violence, he can also fill in the role of the big, bad frontline fighter.
Personally Ithink the Battle Priest is not nearly as interesting as the full-blown cleric, as he has neither the apparent weaknesses nor strengths of the latter one and is more of a brute among the clergymen in comparison to the more intellectual cleric. But sometimes it is just great to kick ass in the name of the god of your affiliation.

Hit Points at 1st level: 16 + Con modifier
Hit points at each additional level: 3 + Con modifier

Class Skills: The battle priest’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Concentration (Con+Wis), Craft (Int+?), Diplomacy (Cha+Wis), Heal (Wis+Con), Knowledge (history) (2xInt),Knowledge (Religion) (2xInt), Knowledge (War and tactics) (2xInt), Profession (Wis+?) and Spellcraft (Int+Wis).

Skill Points at 1st Level: (3 + Int modifier) x 4
Skill Points at every additional level: 3 + Int modifier

Spell Points at 1st level: 10 + Wis modifier
Spell points at each additional level: 4 + Wis modifier
Spell Aquisition points: 2 + Wisdom modifier
Spell point regeneration (per hour of meditation): 2d10 +Wis modifier


Table: The Battle Priest
{table=head]Level|BAB|BDB|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Special

1st|
+0|
+0|
+1|
+0|
+2|Turn Undead, basic energy control

2nd|
+1|
+1|
+1|
+0|
+3|Armored Caster +1
3rd|
+2|
+2|
+2|
+1|
+3| -

4th|
+3|
+3|
+2|
+1|
+4|Bonus feat

5th|
+3|
+3|
+3|
+2|
+4|simple Art of War

6th|
+4|
+4|
+3|
+2|
+5|Armored Caster +2

7th|
+5|
+5|
+3|
+2|
+5|advanced energy control

8th|
+6/+1|
+6|
+4|
+2|
+6|Bonus feat

9th|
+6/+1|
+6|
+4|
+3|
+6|-

10th|
+7/+2|
+7|
+5|
+3|
+7|Armored Caster +3, simple Art of War

11th|
+8/+3|
+8|
+5|
+3|
+7| -

12th|
+9/+4|
+9|
+6|
+4|
+8|Bonus feat

13th|
+9/+4|
+9|
+6|
+4|
+8|complex Energy control

14th|
+10/+5|
+10|
+6|
+4|
+9|Armored Caster +4

15th|
+11/+6/+1|
+11|
+7|
+5|
+9|advanced Art of War

16th|
+12/+7/+2|
+12|
+7|
+5|
+10|Bonus feat

17th|
+12/+7/+2|
+12|
+8|
+5|
+10| -

18th|
+13/+8/+3|
+13|
+8|
+6|
+11|Armored Caster +5

19th|
+14/+9/+4|
+14|
+9|
+6|
+11|perfect energy control

20th|
+15/+10/+5|
+15|
+9|
+6|
+12|Bonus feat, advanced Art of War[/table]


Class Features
Weapon and Armor Proficiency: Battle priests are proficient with all simple and martial weapons and with light and medium armor and with shields (except tower shields).
A battle priest who chooses the War domain receives the Weapon Focus feat related to his deity’s weapon as a bonus feat. He also receives the appropriate Exotic Weapon Proficiency feat as a bonus feat, if the weapon falls into that category.

Servant of the Gods: At character creation, the battle priest chooses a god he follows. He is a servant of this god’s religion and has the mission to further, strengthen and spread his faith and fight its enemies. A battle priest who grossly violates the code of conduct required by his god loses all spells and class fea-tures, except for armor and shield and weapon proficiencies. He cannot thereafter gain levels as a battle priest of that god until he atones (see the atonement spell description).

Spells: A battle priest casts divine spells, which are drawn from the cleric spell list. The Difficulty Class for a saving throw against a battle priest’s spell is 10 + the spell level + the battle priest’s Wisdom modifier.
Like other spellcasters, a battle priest can cast only a certain number of spells per day limited on their number of spell points. At first level, a battle priest gains 10 + Wisdom Modifier spellpoints, and 4 + Wisdom Modifier on each additional level.
Battle priests meditate or pray for their spells. Each battle priest must choose a time at which he must spend 1 hour each day in quiet contemplation or supplication to regain his spell points. Time spent rest-ing has no effect on whether a battle priest can prepare spells. A battle priest may prepare and cast any spell on the cleric spell list, provided that he can cast spells of that level and has said spell noted in his holy book, but he must choose which spells to prepare during his daily meditation.
A battle priest may know any number of spells and can learn additional spells from holy texts and scripts.

Domain Spells: Each domain gives the cleric access to a domain spell at each spell level he can cast, from 1st on up, as well as a granted power. The battle priest gets the granted powers of both the domains selected. The battle priest can cast the domain spells granted by the chosen domains as if they were one level lower – they cost less spellpoints, can be channeled faster and the DC of the casting check is lower.
A battle priest must choose at least one of his domains from this list: Destruction, Protection, Strength or War. Gods without these domains do not support battle priests.

Spontaneous Casting: A battle priest can channel stored spell energy into domain spells that the cleric did not prepare ahead of time. The battle priest can "lose" any prepared spell that is not a domain spell in order to cast any domain spell of the same spell level or lower.

Basic energy control: At 1st level, a battle priest can channel one spell energy point per turn. The total sum of Energy points the battle priest can keep under control is equal to his Wisdom modifier or three, whichever is lower.

Turn Undead: A Battle Priest can channel his life magic into a power that can halt, hinder and hurt undead creatures. Turning Undead is a standard action that cost a certain amount spell energy, which can be channeled into the turn attempt. Spells that have been prepared beforehand can be given up to make spell energy for turning attempts available. Since turning is no form of spellcasting, the normal limits of channeling spell energy given by the character’s energy control trait are neglected – he can invest as much spell energy as he wants into the attempt to turn undead.
The costs of the check depend on the battle priest, granting a bonus on the turning check equal to the invested spell points. Every turning attempt costs at least one spell point. A battle priest can attempt to turn as many times as he has spell points left. The effect of the turning attempt is not determined with a d20, but with 2d6 (+ the battle priest’s charisma modifier and the invested spell points). The result of this roll also determines how many hit dice of undeads are turned or destroyed.

Armored Caster (ex): A Battle Priest is used to cast spells while wearing armor. At 2nd level, he reduce the armor penalty for spellcasting by one point. The more experienced the Battle Priest gets, the more comfortable he can cast spells while wearing armor. Every 4 levels, the armor penalty for spellcasting is reduced by one. This bonus is only applied if the battle priest wears an armor he is proficient with.

Bonus Feat: At 4th, 8th, 12th, 16th and 20th level, a battle priest gets a Divine or Fighter Feat as a Bonus Feat.

Art of War: at level 5, and every 5 level after that, the battle priest gains a special ability from the ap-propriate list of Arts of War. No ability may be taken more than once. If an Art of War ability has other such abilities as prerequisites, a Battle Priest must possess the prerequisite abilities to take the ability in question.

Advanced Energy Control: At 7th level, a battle priest has learned to control the flow of magic energies more efficiently. From now on, he can channel two spell energy points per turn and the maximum of energy he can keep under his control increases to Wisdom modifier +1 up to a maximum of five points.

Complex Energy Control: At 13th level, the battle priest gains a new level of control over his inner flame of magic. Now, he can channel up to three spellpoints per turn, and control a maximum of spell energy up to Wisdom modifier +2 or 7 points, which ever is lower.

Perfect energy control: At 18th level, a battle priest has become a master of magic. He can control the inner flame of magic so effectively that he can channel up to 4 spellpoints per turn. His maximum of spell energy that he can control increases to Wisdom mod +3 or 10 points, which ever is lower.

Known Spells: A battle priest begins play with a holy book containing all 0-level cleric spells plus three 1st-level spells of your choice and all domain spells he is able to cast. For each point of Wisdom bonus the battle priest has, the holy book holds one additional 1st-level spell of your choice. At each new level, a Battle Priest gains a pool of 2 + Wisdom modifier acquisition points for gaining new spells, whereby the cost of every spell is equal to its spell level. (Example: A battle priest with Wisdom 16 reaching 7th level would gain 5 points to gather new spells – he could learn 1 level 3 and one level 2 spell or one fifth level spell or five level 1 spells). Apart from this basic stock of spells and the domain spells, the battle priest has to learn all further spells from other spellcasters who are willing to train them or learn the spell from one of the holy texts of their faith. Learning a new spell requires that the source is available and takes a number of days equal to the spell’s level. The Battle priest automatically learns all domain spells when he becomes able to cast them.

Athaniar
2009-01-17, 03:35 PM
Very good, keep them coming. Also, would the yamabushi and sohei of feudal Japan fit as examples of the Battle Priest?

Satyr
2009-01-17, 03:50 PM
I fear I do not know enough about Japanese history and/or medieval military structure to offer an answer to that.

The idea was, that there are the Battle Priest stands between the Paladin (mostly warrior, only a bit spellcasting) on the one side and the full cleric (which is more a cloistered intellectual and gained several sermons based on the bard's abilities), to cover a broader variety of characters.

Satyr
2009-01-18, 06:35 AM
Berserker
Berserkers are the wild and often unpredictable warriors of more rural or even primitive communities. Normally, they are less focused on discipline and tactics than more civilized combatants, and emphasize the importance of personal prowess and ferocity. Many Berserkers are little more than brutes who man-age to keep their rage under minimal control and turn it into a weapon; others do not control their rage, but are controlled by it. Individually, Berserkers are formidable warriors, but as a military force, their bad temperedness and lack of discipline their have significant weaknesses. Examples for archetypical Berserkers are quite common in fantasy literature, characters like Conan or many berserkers or einherjars from Norse legends fits into this class.

The berserker is a class for men. Manly men, with hairy chests and a large battle axe. There is nothing subtle about the Berserker - Give him a weapon, see how he kills things with it. He has a bad temper (and not this "I am a bit angry if I want to" feature of his barbarian progenitor - this is full-fledged "Don't provoke me or I eat your face" wrath), and he is also tough in a fight (which is helpful, as he is less likely to have access to heavy armor, his defense is good, but not excellent and suffers while raging, while shields may be an odd choice for a Berserker).
The Berserker can be a problem for his group, especially when one of the player decides to play one of those very annoying (and very fragile) kender-style thiefs. But the Berserker is also the most aggressive fighter around and a very capable, if self-destructive fighter.


Hit Points at 1st Level: 24 + Con modifier
Hit Points at Each Additional Level: 5 + Con modifier

Class Skills
The barbarian’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Balance (2xDex), Climb (Str+Dex), Craft (Int+?), Handle Animal (Wis+Cha), Heal (Wis+Cha), Intimidate (Str+Cha), Jump (2xStr), Knowl-edge (geography) (2xInt), Knowledge (nature) (2xInt), Listen (Wis+Con), Perform (percussion instru-ments) (Cha+Str), Profession (Wis+?), Ride (Dex+Cha), Spot (Wis+Con), Survival (Wis+Con), and Swim (Str+Con).

Skill Points at 1st Level: (5 + Int modifier) x 4.
Skill Points at Each Additional Level: 5 + Int modifier.



{table=head]Level|BAB|BDB|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Special

1st|
+1|
+0|
+3|
+1|
+2|Fast movement, Rage (basic)

2nd|
+2|
+1|
+4|
+1|
+3|Uncanny dodge

3rd|
+3|
+2|
+5|
+2|
+3|simple Art of War

4th|
+4|
+3|
+5|
+2|
+4|Fast Frenzy

5th|
+5|
+3|
+6|
+3|
+4|Improved uncanny dodge

6th|
+6/+1|
+4|
+7|
+3|
+5|art of war, simple

7th|
+7/+2|
+5|
+7|
+3|
+5|Damage reduction 1/—

8th|
+8/+3|
+6|
+8|
+4|
+6|Tame the Beast

9th|
+9/+4|
+6|
+9|
+4|
+6|art of war, advanced

10th|
+10/+5|
+7|
+9|
+5|
+7|Damage reduction 2/—

11th|
+11/+6/+1|
+8|
+10|
+5|
+7|Greater rage

12th|
+12/+7/+2|
+9|
+11|
+6|
+8|art of war, advanced

13th|
+13/+8/+3|
+9|
+11|
+6|
+8|Damage reduction 3/—

14th|
+14/+9/+4|
+10|
+12|
+6|
+9|Indomitable will

15th|
+15/+10/+5|
+11|
+13|
+7|
+9|art of war, complex

16th|
+16/+11/+6/+1|
+12|
+13|
+7|
+10|Damage reduction 4/—

17th|
+17/+12/+7/+2|
+12|
+14|
+8|
+10|Tireless rage

18th|
+18/+13/+8/+3|
+13|
+15|
+8|
+11|art of war, complex

19th|
+19/+14/+9/+4|
+14|
+15|
+9|
+11|Damage reduction 5/-

20th|
+20/+15/+10/+5|
+15|
+16|
+9|
+12|Mighty rage[/table]


Class Features
Weapon and Armor Proficiency: A berserker is proficient with all simple and martial weapons, light armor, medium armor, and shields (except tower shields).

Fast Movement (Ex): A barbarian’s base speed is faster than the norm for his race by +10 feet. This benefit applies only when he is wearing no armor, light armor, or medium armor and not carrying a heavy load. Apply this bonus before modifying the barbarian’s speed because of any load carried or armor worn.

Rage (Ex): A Berserker can fly into a rage, both willingly and out of stress and pain. Doing so requires a standard action that does not provoke an attack of opportunity. The Berserker can also enter the Rage involuntarily when he or a close ally (e.g. another PC) is hurt. Whenever the Berserker or one of his allies is hurt for the first time in a battle, the berserker must make a Will Save (DC is the dealt damage). If he fails, the Berserker enters the Rage.
In a fit of Rage, a Berserker temporarily gains a +4 bonus to Strength, a +4 bonus to Constitution, and a +2 morale bonus on Will saves, but he takes a -2 penalty to Defense and is immune against any form of fear attacks or effects.
The increase in Constitution increases the barbarian’s hit points by 2 points per level, but these hit points go away at the end of the rage when his Constitution score drops back to normal. (These extra hit points are not lost first the way temporary hit points are.) While raging, a berserker cannot use any Charisma-, Dexterity-, or Intelligence-based skills (except for Balance, Escape Artist, Intimidate, and Ride), the Concentration skill, or any abilities that require patience or concentration, nor can he cast spells or activate magic items that require a command word, a spell trigger (such as a wand), or spell completion (such as a scroll) to function. He can use any feat he has except Combat Expertise, item creation feats, and metamagic feats. A fit of rage lasts for a number of rounds equal to 3 + the character’s (newly im-proved) Constitution modifier. At the end of the rage, the berserker loses the rage modifiers and restric-tions and becomes fatigued (-2 penalty to Strength, -2 penalty to Dexterity, can’t charge or run) for the duration of the current encounter (unless he is a 17th-level barbarian, at which point this limitation no longer applies).
When in a Rage, the Berserker can lose the control over his Attacks and viciously attacks anything that moves. When all enemies are slain while the berserker is still raging, he must make a Will Save (DC 15 or attack the next innocent bystander or even ally. Berserkers are dangerous enemies, but sometimes they are just as dangerous as allies.
A berserker can fly into a rage only once per encounter.

Uncanny Dodge (Ex): At 2nd level, a berserker retains his Dexterity bonus to AC (if any) even if he is caught flat-footed or struck by an invisible attacker. However, he still loses his Dexterity bonus to AC if immobilized. If a berserker already has uncanny dodge from a different class, he automatically gains improved uncanny dodge instead.

Art of War: at level 3, and every three level after that, the Berserker gains a special ability from the appropriate list of Arts of War. No ability may be taken more than once. If an Art of War ability has other such abilities as prerequisites, a Berserker must possess the prerequisite abilities to take the ability in question.

Fast Frenzy (Ex): Starting at 4th level, the Berserker can enter a Rage as a free action instead of a stan-dard action, but he can do it only during his action, not in response to someone else’s action.

Improved Uncanny Dodge (Ex): At 5th level and higher, a berserker can no longer be flanked. This defense denies a rogue the ability to sneak attack the berserker by flanking him, unless the attacker has at least four more rogue levels than the target has berserker levels. If a character already has uncanny dodge from a second class, the character automatically gains improved uncanny dodge instead, and the levels from the classes that grant uncanny dodge stack to determine the minimum level a thief or assassin must be to flank the character.

Damage Reduction (Ex): At 7th level, a berserker gains Damage Reduction. Subtract 1 from the dam-age the berserker takes each time he is dealt damage from a weapon or a natural attack. At 10th level, and every three berserker levels thereafter (13th, 16th, and 19th level), this damage reduction rises by 1 point. Damage reduction can reduce damage to 0 but not below 0.

Tame the Beast (ex): A Berserker who survives his temper long enough to reach 8th level gains a stronger control over his rage. From now on, he can make a Will save (DC 15) every turn to voluntarily end a Rage.

Greater Rage (Ex): At 11th level, a barbarian’s bonuses to Strength and Constitution during his rage each increase to +6, and his morale bonus on Will saves increases to +3. The penalty to Defense re-mains at -2.

Indomitable Will (Ex): While in a rage, a berserker of 14th level or higher gains a +4 bonus on Will saves to resist enchantment spells. This bonus stacks with all other modifiers, including the morale bo-nus on Will saves he also receives during his rage.

Tireless Rage (Ex): At 17th level and higher, a berserker no longer becomes fatigued at the end of his rage.

Mighty Rage (Ex): At 20th level, a berserker’s bonuses to Strength and Constitution during his rage each increase to +8, and his morale bonus on Will saves increases to +4. The penalty to Defense re-mains at -2.

Variant: Steppe Raider
Steppe Raiders are the warriors of the nomadic horse people. They do not get the Fast Movement ability and are not proficient with medium armor, but they gain the Mounted Warrior and Saddleback feats at 1st level.
often, Steppe Raiders also use the Fevered Frenzy trait instead of the standard berserker rage.

Variant: Urban Thug
While the majority of Berserkers come from so-called barbarian societies, which put more praise on the ferocity of the Berserker, there are also brutal thugs in the back alleys and slums of the large cities. An urban thug Berserker does not gain Handle Animal, Knowledge (Nature), Ride and Survival as class skills, instead they gain Gather Information, Knowledge (local), Sense Motive and Tumble.

Variant: Wolf of the Sea
You are a sea rider, a viking and a pirate who plunders the coastal areas and rich merchantmen.
Berserkers of this variety are not proficient with medium armor but get the Skill Focus (Swim) and Skill Focus (Profession: Sailor) Feats at 1st level.

Variant: Fevered Frenzy
This is a special form of Rage, which is not as destructive but more focused on speed and Whirling Attacks. A Berserker with this variant form of rage doesn't gain the normal bonuses when he enters a rage. Instead, he temporarily gains a +4 bonus to Strength and a +2 dodge bonus to Defense and on Reflex saves. While in a frenzy, the Berserker may make one extra attack in a round at his highest base attack bonus, but this attack takes a -2 penalty, as does each other attack made that round. This penalty applies for 1 round, so it also affects attacks of opportunity the Berserker might make before his next action.
Otherwise, Fevered Frenzy is identical to the standard rage in all other ways. At 11th level , the Strength bonus increases to +6, and the dodge bonus to Defense and on Reflex saves increases to +3. At 20th level, the Strength bonus increases to +8, and the dodge bonus to Defense and on Reflex saves increases to +4.
A barbarian using this variant doesn't gain indomitable will at 14th level. Instead, he gains the Pounce, but only while in a whirling frenzy.
Other than other varieties, the fevered frenzy can be combined with any other Berserker variant.

Satyr
2009-01-18, 08:28 AM
Bravo
The Bravo is a swift and agile warrior who combines dexterity and reflexes to bring down foes, even clearly tougher ones with panache, elegance and a very strong ego. Bravos train hard to achieve their skill, and under the mask of a careless spirit and laissez-faire attitude hides focused mind and steady hand. The Bravo focuses on speed, agility and elegance, not so much on heavy armor and discipline. Archetypical Bravos would be D’Artagnan, Captain John Smith and numerous pirates, swashbucklers and their lot.

The bravo is something new to D&D - a warrior who almost completely focus on mobility instead of armor to defend himself. The Bravo uses only lighter weapons and armor, which will be a serious problem in a longer fight, but in a duel situation, he is very dangerous. Besides, he is certainly winning in the style competition of the warrior classes - elegance and agility are somewhat more favorable than brute strength or fighting in a heavy and slowing armor.
This leads to the other strength of the Bravo: He is not only the agile fencer, he also looks good while doing it. He can learn many social skills (and gets a bonus to it).
The Bravo is a frontline fighter, but not a very resilient one. He works best when he faces single combatants and he will face serious problems when facing unliving creatures and other things immune against his precision damage. As a secondary role, the Bravo can act as a good socialising character.
As a side note: The abilities of the Bravo and the racial traits of Elves synergizes very well, perhaps even too well. If Serpents and Sewers had signature characters, the Elf Bravo would be one of them.

Hit Points at 1st Level: 16 + Con modifier
Hit Points at Each Additional Level: 3 + Con modifier

Class Skills
The Bravo’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Appraise (Int+Cha), Bluff (2xCha), Climb (Str+Dex), Concentration (Con+Wis), Diplomacy (Wis+Cha), Disguise (Int+Cha), Gather Information (2xCha), Intimidate (Str+Cha), Jump (2xStr), Knowledge (tactics and war) (2xInt), Knowledge (nobility and royalty) (2xInt), Listen (Con+Wis), Perform (any) (Cha+?), Profession (Wis+?), Ride (Dex+Cha), Sense Motive (Wis+Cha), Sleight of Hand (Dex+Cha), Spot (Wis+Con), Swim (Str+Con), and Tumble (Str+Dex).

Skill Points at 1st Level: (5 + Int modifier) x 4.
Skill Points at Each Additional Level: 5 + Int modifier.

Table: The Bravo
{table=head]Level|BAB|BDB|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Special

1st|
+1|
+0|
+2|
+3|
+0|Weapon Finesse, Skirmish (+1d4)

2nd|
+2|
+1|
+3|
+4|
+0|Fast Movement +10’ Uncanny Dodge

3rd|
+3|
+2|
+3|
+5|
+1|Skirmish (+1d4, Defense +1)

4th|
+4|
+3|
+4|
+5|
+1|Art of War, Simple

5th|
+5|
+3|
+4|
+6|
+1|Skirmish (+2d4, Defense +1), irresistible smile+1

6th|
+6/+1|
+4|
+5|
+7|
+2|Improved Uncanny Dodge

7th|
+7/+2|
+5|
+5|
+7|
+2|Skirmish (+2d4, Defense +2)

8th|
+8/+3|
+6|
+6|
+8|
+2|Art of War, Simple, Evasion

9th|
+9/+4|
+6|
+6|
+9|
+3|Skirmish (+3d4 Defense +2)

10th|
+10/+5|
+7|
+7|
+9|
+3|Defensive Roll, irresistible smile+2

11th|
+11/+6/+1|
+8|
+7|
+10|
+3|Skirmish (+3d4, Defense +3)

12th|
+12/+7/+2|
+9|
+8|
+11|
+4|Art of War, advanced

13th|
+13/+8/+3|
+9|
+8|
+11|
+3|Skirmish (+4d4, Defense +3)

14th|
+14/+9/+4|
+10|
+9|
+12|
+4|Riposte

15th|
+15/+10/+5|
+11|
+9|
+13|
+5|Skirmish (+4d6, Defense +4), irresistible smile+3

16th|
+16/+11/+6/+1|
+12|
+10|
+13|
+5|Art of War, advanced

17th|
+17/+12/+7/+2|
+12|
+10|
+14|
+5|Skirmish (+5d4, Defense +4)

18th|
+18/+13/+8/+3|
+13|
+11|
+15|
+6|Improved Defensive Roll

19th|
+19/+14/+9/+4|
+14|
+11|
+15|
+6|Skirmish (+5d4, Defense +5)

20th|
+20/+15/+10/+5|
+15|
+12|
+16|
+6|Art of War, complex, irresistible smile+ 4[/table]


Class Features
All of the following are class features of the Bravo:

Weapon and Armor Proficiency: A Bravo is proficient with all simple and martial weapons and with light armor but not with shields.

Skirmish: When the Bravo is unencumbered and wears no armor heavier than light armor, and round moves 10’ or more from her starting position in her turn, the Bravo may add the listed damage bonus to all attacks for this round when she wields a light melee weapon or a weapon which is affected by the weapon finesse feat. Only creatures vulnerable to critical hits are vulnerable to the extra damage. Also, the Bravo receives the listed Competence bonus to her Defense whenever she qualifies for the skirmish. This class feature does not apply when mounted.

Uncanny Dodge (Ex): Starting at 2nd level, a Bravo can react to danger before her senses would nor-mally allow her to do so. She retains her Dexterity bonus to AC (if any) even if she is caught flat-footed or struck by an invisible attacker. However, she still loses her Dexterity bonus to Defense if immobilized.
If a Bravo already has uncanny dodge from a different class she automatically gains improved uncanny dodge (see below) instead.
Art of War: at level 4, and every 4 levels after that, the Bravo gains a special ability from the appropri-ate list of Arts of War. No ability may be taken more than once. If an Art of War ability has other such abilities as prerequisites, the Bravo must possess the prerequisite abilities to take the ability in question.

Irresistible Smile: At 5th level and every five levels thereafter, the Bravo gains the listed bonus as a competence bonus to Bluff, Diplomacy, Gather Information and Perform checks.

Improved Uncanny Dodge (Ex): A Bravo of 9th level or higher can no longer be flanked.
This defense denies a thief the ability to sneak attack the character by flanking her, unless the attacker has at least four more class levels than the target does.
If a character already has uncanny dodge (see above) from a second class, the character automatically gains improved uncanny dodge instead, and the levels from the classes that grant uncanny dodge stack to determine the minimum thief level required to flank the character.

Defensive Roll (Ex): Starting at 10th level, the Bravo can roll with a potentially lethal blow to take less damage from it than she otherwise would. Once per day, when she would be reduced to 0 or fewer hit points by damage in combat (from a weapon or other blow, not a spell or special ability), the Bravo can attempt to roll with the damage. To use this ability, the Bravo must attempt a Reflex saving throw (DC = damage dealt). If the save succeeds, she takes only half damage from the blow; if it fails, she takes full damage. She must be aware of the attack and able to react to it in order to execute her defensive roll—if she is denied her Dexterity bonus to AC, she can’t use this ability. Since this effect would not normally allow a character to make a Reflex save for half damage, the Bravo’s evasion ability does not apply to the defensive roll.

Riposte: Whenever an opponent attacks a Bravo of 14th level or higher with a melee attack and misses, she gains attack of opportunity against that opponent as an immediate action when she wields a light melee weapon and does not wear medium armor, heavy armor or a medium or heavy load. This attack of opportunity counts against the character's attacks of opportunity for that round.

Improved Defensive Roll (ex): This ability is basically similar to defensive roll except that instead of half damage, the Bravo takes no damage at all. This is an additional ability, so that a Bravo of 18th level has already defensive roll, so he may now make two defensive rolls per day — one for zero damage and one for half damage.

Athaniar
2009-01-19, 05:53 AM
Bravo
The bravo is something new to D&D - a warrior who almost completely focus on mobility instead of armor to defend himself.

What about the Swashbuckler (Complete Warrior), then?

Satyr
2009-01-19, 06:33 AM
It didn't work well, if I remember correctly. I have never seen (or heard of) a swashbuckler in another function as a easy accessable prestige class for rogues. The daring outlaw feat change it a bit, but really, the swashbuckler didn't work well.
But the major difference is: The swashbuckler can reach a decent defense even though he only wears minimal armor; the Bravo doesn't need an armor at all for defense, but becomes a lot squishier in a fight. That's what I meant with the low endurance in a fight - he will be grinded down faster than the more heavier fighters, but at least he isn't hit as often. This works mostly because of the Armor as DR rules.

Satyr
2009-01-19, 09:57 AM
The Cleric
A cleric is a servant of a God, granted with spellcasting powers through is faith. It is up to debate if the cleric’s powers originate in the deity or if their faith is only used as a focus to cast and control the magic energies. Only an extremely small minority of the actual clergymen are indeed Clerics, but in almost all religious communities, they hold all the powers. Clerics are powerful spellcasters, but not nearly as martial as their Battle Priest counter parts. Independently of the actual source of their powers, Clerics are mostly focused on using spells which fit into the domain of their gods. Apart from their magical Gifts, Clerics are trained in rethorics and preaching and can turn a crowd of listeners into a fanatic mob.
There are countless examples of Clerics in fantasy literature and wonderworkers in historical texts, ranging from shamans to bishops.

The cleric is the civilized counterpart to the supposedly 'wild' druid, or the man of the word in comparison to the man of the sword the Battle priest is; Clerics are primarily divine spellcasters, and in this area they are the best. They are also intellectual characters with a profound education and a vast knowledge and are competent social characters, who do not need magic to convince their followers.
From a roleplaying perspective, clerics are somewhat a challenge, as they require to be played as faithful, convincing characters. It is too easy to reduce this piety to blind fanaticism. A good played cleric should be able to convert every other player character through arguments and roleplaying alone. A badly played cleric -will either completely lack any features of a strong faith or will annoy the other characters and players with his felt moral superiority. This should be avoided, as it can lead to a lot of anger and strive within a gaming group.

Hit Points at 1st level: 12 + Con modifier
Hit points at each additional level: 2 + Con modifier

Class Skills: The cleric’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Concentration (Con+Wis), Craft (Int), Diplomacy (Cha), Heal (Wis), Knowledge (all skills, taken individually) (Int), Perform (ora-tory), Profession (Wis), Sense Motive (Wis) and Spellcraft (Int).

Skill Points at 1st Level: (5 + Int modifier) x 4
Skill Points at every additional level: 5 + Int modifier

Spell Points at 1st level: 12 + Wis modifier
Spell points at each additional level: 5 + Wis modifier++
Spell Aquisition points per level: 4 + Wisdom modifier
Spell point regeneration (per hour of meditation): 2d10 +Wis modifier


Table: The Cleric
{table=head]Level|BAB|BDB|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Special

1st|
+0|
+0|
+0|
+0|
+2|Turn Undead, basic energy control, Lore

2nd|
+1|
+1|
+0|
+0|
+3|Sermon, Inspire Courage +1

3rd|
+1|
+1|
+1|
+1|
+3| -

4th|
+2|
+2|
+1|
+1|
+4| -

5th|
+2|
+2|
+2|
+2|
+4|Bonus Feat

6th|
+3|
+3|
+2|
+2|
+5|advanced energy control

7th|
+3|
+3|
+2|
+2|
+5|Inspire Hope and Despair

8th|
+4|
+4|
+2|
+2|
+6|Inspire Courage +2

9th|
+4|
+4|
+3|
+3|
+6|Convert

10th|
+5|
+5|
+3|
+3|
+7|Bonus Feat

11th|
+5|
+5|
+3|
+3|
+7| -

12th|
+6/+1|
+6|
+4|
+4|
+8|complex energy control

13th|
+6/+1|
+6|
+4|
+4|
+8|-

14th|
+7/+2|
+7|
+4|
+4|
+9|Inspire Courage +3

15th|
+7/+2|
+7|
+5|
+5|
+9|Bonus feat

16th|
+8/+3|
+8|
+5|
+5|
+10| -

17th|
+8/+3|
+8|
+5|
+5|
+10| -

18th|
+9/+3|
+9|
+6|
+6|
+11|perfect energy control

19th|
+9/+4|
+9|
+6|
+6|
+11|-

20th|
+10/+5|
+10|
+6|
+6|
+11|Bonus feat, inspire courage +4[/table]

Class Features
Weapon and Armor Proficiency: Clerics are proficient with all simple weapons, with light armor and with shields (except tower shields).

A cleric who chooses the War domain receives the Weapon Focus feat related to his deity’s weapon as a bonus feat. He also receives the appropriate Martial or Exotic Weapon Proficiency feat as a bonus feat, if the weapon falls into that category.

Servant of the Gods: At character creation, the cleric chooses a god he follows. He is a servant of this god’s religion and has the mission to further, strengthen and spread his faith and fight its enemies. A cleric who grossly violates the code of conduct required by his god loses all spells and class features, except for armor and shield and weapon proficiencies. He cannot thereafter gain levels as a cleric of that god until he atones (see the atonement spell description).

Spells: A cleric casts divine spells, which are drawn from the cleric spell list. The Difficulty Class for a saving throw against a cleric’s spell is 10 + the spell level + the cleric’s Wisdom modifier. A cleric must succeed in a Concentration check to successfully cast a spell (DC = 15 + Spell level).
Like other spellcasters, a cleric can cast only a certain number of spells per day limited on their number of spell points. At first level, a cleric gains 10 + Wisdom Modifier spellpoints, and 4 + Wisdom Modi-fier on each additional level.
Clerics meditate or pray for their spells. Each cleric must choose a time at which he must spend 1 hour each day in quiet contemplation or supplication to regain his spell points. Time spent resting has no effect on whether a cleric can prepare spells. A cleric may prepare and cast any spell on the cleric spell list, provided that he can cast spells of that level, but he must choose which spells to prepare during his daily meditation.
A cleric may know any number of spells and can learn additional spells from holy texts and scripts.
Known Spells: A cleric begins play with a holy book containing all 0-level cleric spells plus four 1st-level spells of your choice and all domain spells he is able to cast. For each point of Wisdom bonus the battle priest has, the holy book holds one additional 1st-level spell of your choice. At each new level, a Cleric gains a pool of 4 + Wisdom modifier acquisition points for gaining new spells, whereby the cost of every spell is equal to its spell level. (Example: A Cleric with Wisdom 18 reaching a new level would gain 12 points to gather new spells – he could learn 4 level 3 spells, 6 level 2 spells or 12 level 1 spells or a combination of this like 3 level-3 spells, two level-1 spells and two new cantrips.).
Apart from this basic stock of spells and the domain spells, the battle priest has to learn all further spells from other priests of their faith who are willing to train them or learn the spell from one of the holy texts of their faith. Learning a new spell requires that the source is available and takes a number of days equal to the spell’s level. The Cleric automatically learns all domain spells when he becomes able to cast them.

Domain Spells: Each domain gives the cleric access to a domain spell at each spell level he can cast, from 1st on up, as well as a granted power. The cleric gets the granted powers of both the domains se-lected. The cleric can cast the domain spells granted by the chosen domains as if they were one level lower – they cost less spellpoints, can be channelled faster and the DC of the casting check is lower.

Lore (Ex): Thanks to long hours of study, a cloistered cleric has a wide range of stray knowledge. This ability is identical to the bard's bardic knowledge class feature, using the cleric's class level in place of the bard level.

Turn Undead: A Cleric can channel his life magic into a power that can halt, hinder and hurt undead creatures. Turning Undead is a standard action that cost a certain amount spell energy, which can be channeled into the turn attempt. Spells that have been prepared beforehand can be given up to make spell energy for turning attempts available. Since turning is no form of spellcasting, the normal limits of channeling spell energy given by the character’s energy control trait are neglected – he can invest as much spell energy as he wants into the attempt to turn undead.
The costs of the check depend on the Cleric, granting a bonus on the turning check equal to the invested spell points. Every turning attempt costs at least one spell point. A Cleric can attempt to turn as many times as he has spell points left. The effect of the turning attempt is not determined with a d20, but with 2d6 (+ the battle priest’s charisma modifier and the invested spell points). The result of this roll also determines how many hit dice of undeads are turned or destroyed.

Basic energy control: At 1st level, a cleric can channel one spell energy point per turn. The total sum of Energy points the cleric can keep under control is equal to his Wisdom modifier or three, whichever is lower. (A cleric with Wisdom 14 could cast spells with a total amount of 2 Energy points, while a 1st level cleric with Wisdom 18 would still only be able to channel three spell points in total).

Spontaneous Casting: A cleric can channel stored spell energy into domain spells that the cleric did not prepare ahead of time. The cleric can "lose" any prepared spell that is not a domain spell in order to cast any domain spell of the same spell level or lower.

Sermon: A cleric can use his prayers and sermons to produce a morale effect on those around him (usu-ally including himself, if desired). These abilities are based on the rhetorical skills of the cleric and each ability requires both a minimum bard level and a minimum number of ranks in the Perform (oratory) skill to qualify; if a cleric does not have the required number of ranks in the skill, he does not gain the sermon ability until he acquires the needed ranks.
Beginning a sermon effect is a standard action. Sermon abilities require concentration, which means the cleric must take a standard action each round to maintain the ability. Even while using sermons that doesn’t require concentration, a cleric cannot cast spells, activate magic items by spell completion (such as scrolls), spell trigger (such as wands), or command word. Just as for casting a spell with a verbal component, a deaf cleric has a 20% chance to fail when attempting to use sermons. If he fails, the at-tempt still counts against his daily limit.

The Cleric’s sermons:
Inspire Courage (Ex): A cleric of 2nd level with 3 or more ranks in Perform (oratory) can give a rallying speech to inspire courage in his allies (including himself), bolstering them against fear and improving their combat abilities. To be affected, an ally must be able to hear the cleric. The effect lasts for as long as the ally hears the cleric preaches and for his Charisma Modifier +2 rounds thereafter. An affected ally receives a +1 morale bonus on saving throws against charm and fear effects and a +1 morale bonus on attack and weapon damage rolls. At 8th , 14th and 20th level, this bonus increases by 1 (+2 at 8th, +3 at 14th and +4 at 20th level). Inspire courage is a mind-affecting ability.
Inspire Hope and Dread (Ex): A cleric of 7th level with at least 9 ranks in perform (oratory) can inspire spiritual resilience in his allies or hopelessness in his enemies in a 30 feet radius. The inspire hope abil-ity gives the cleric and all his allies who can hear the sermon a +4 sacred bonus on Will saves, inspiring dread imposes a –4 penalty to all will saves on all enemies.
Delivering any of these oratories requires a full round action to activate and requires concentration each round to continue the effect. The effect lasts as long as the clerics preaches and for his Charisma Modi-fier Rounds thereafter. Inspire Hope and Inspire Dread are mind affecting abilities.
Convert (Ex): A cleric of 9th level with at least 13 ranks in Perform (oratory) may attempt to convert a single enemy. For at least one hour the cleric delivers an impassioned speech on the righteousness of his beliefs to a single enemy who must attempt a Will save (DC= 10+ class level + Cha mod). If the crea-ture succeeds, nothing happens. If the creature fails the saving throw, however, it converts. A converted creature is effectively charmed by the cleric (similar to the charm monster spell). A converted creature shifts its loyalties to the cleric but will do nothing that is contrary to its basic beliefs. When the duration elapses, the creature must attempt a second Will safe (same DC). If it succeeds, it returns to its former affiliations and perspectives. If it fails again, the shift is permanent.


Bonus Feat: At 5th, 10th, 15th and 20th level, a Cleric gets a Divine, Domain or Metamagic Feat as a Bonus Feat.

Advanced Energy Control: At 6th level, a cleric has learned much about the control of the flow of magic energies. From now on, he can channel two spell energy points per turn and therefore increase the casting speed of complex spells, and the maximum of energy he can keep under his control increases to his Wisdom modifier+1 or five points, whichever is lower.
Complex Energy Control: At 12h level, the cleric becomes a true master of the arts of spiritual magic. Now, he can channel up to three spellpoints per turn, and control a maximum of spell energy up to his Wisdom modifier +2 or seven points.

Perfect energy control: At 18th level, a cleric has perfected the arts of magic. Now, he can control the inner flame of magic so effectively that he can channel up to 4 spellpoints per turn. His maximum of spell energy that he can control increases to his Wisdom modifier+3 or 9 nine points.

Athaniar
2009-01-19, 04:49 PM
I have never seen (or heard of) a swashbuckler in another function as a easy accessable prestige class for rogues.

It's a base class. Duelist is a prestige class, on which swashbuckler is based. Nevertheless, I like your class better.

Satyr
2009-01-20, 11:34 AM
Yes, I am quite fond of it myself. I like playing the smart, charming warrior types, so I wanted this kind of warrior be able to compete with the heavily armored ones; I saw to late how brutal an Elven bravo would be, and I am not sure if I therefore should change either the Elf or the Bravo write-up. On the other hand, it is not so powerful that it would be gamebreaking.

Satyr
2009-01-20, 12:10 PM
The Commander
The Commander is a leader of men. He is not an invicible warrior or a master of many weapons, but a keen strategist and leader of warbands and armies. A Commander may not be the deadliest opponent, but he is able o turn a ragtag band of adventurers into a specialised commando troop. The commander is a leader, who can boost the morals and the discipline of his followers and turn them in a well cooperat-ing team. Under the leadership of a good commander, the prowess of many warriors is greatly increased and often, the calm commands and battle plans of the leader are more important than the sword arm of an additional fighter.
Archetypical Commanders are often chiefs, officers or nobles, but you can also use the commander as a base for music inspired motivator class, if you miss the Bard of old.

The commander is a replacement for the - actually quite weak - marshal class. I didn't like the idea of the auras (too much Diablo II for my taste), so I tried to make a complete unmagical character whosae complete unmagical commands and tactical dvice works similar to buffing spells, but do not increase the inflation of magic.
The commander has an odd role - on the one hand, he is clearly a support character, on the other hand he has a very strong claim for the party leadership. Depending on the group, this can either be a source of many, many annoying conflicts or a strong and helpful hierarchy.
The commander has several good abilities, but suffers from a mild case of MAD.

Hit Points at 1st Level: 16 + Con modifier
Hit Points at Each Additional Level: 3 + Con modifier.

Class Skills: The Commander’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Appraise (Int+Cha), Bluff (2xCha), Climb (Str+Dex), Craft (Weaponsmithing), (Int+Str), Craft (Armorsmithing) (Int+Str), Diplomacy (Wis+Cha), Handle Animal (Con+Cha), Heal (Wis+Cha), Intimidate (Str+Cha), Jump (2xStr), Knowledge (tactics and war) (2xInt), Knowledge (nobility and royalty) (2xInt), Listen (Con+Wis), Profession (Wis+?), Ride (Dex+Cha), Speak Language (Int+Cha), Spot (Wis+Con), Swim (Str+Con), and Use Rope (Str+Dex).

Skill Points at 1st Level: (5 + Int modifier) x 4.
Skill Points at Each Additional Level: 5 + Int modifier.

Table: The Commander
{table=head]Level|BAB|BDB|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Special

1st|
+0|
+0|
+2|
+1|
+2|Command, Rally

2nd|
+1|
+1|
+3|
+1|
+3|Lead from the front

3rd|
+2|
+2|
+3|
+2|
+3|Improved Initiative

4th|
+3|
+3|
+4|
+2|
+4|Bonus Feat, Command

5th|
+3|
+3|
+4|
+3|
+4|Presence of Leadership

6th|
+4|
+4|
+5|
+3|
+5|Leadership

7th|
+5|
+5|
+5|
+3|
+5|Command

8th|
+6/+1|
+6|
+6|
+4|
+6|Bonus feat

9th|
+6/+1|
+6|
+6|
+4|
+6|Grant Move Action

10th|
+7/+2|
+7|
+7|
+5|
+7|Presence of Leadership, Command

11th|
+8/+3|
+8|
+7|
+5|
+7|Legendary Leader

12th|
+9/+4|
+9|
+8|
+6|
+8|Bonus feat

13th|
+9/+4|
+9|
+8|
+6|
+8|Command

14th|
+10/+5|
+10|
+9|
+6|
+9|We will win

15th|
+11/+6/+1|
+11|
+9|
+7|
+9|Presence of Leadership

16th|
+12/+7/+2|
+12|
+7|
+5|
+10|Bonus Feat, Command

17th|
+12/+7/+2|
+12|
+10|
+8|
+10|Protect the Commander

18th|
+13/+8/+3|
+13|
+11|
+8|
+11|Grant Attack Action

19th|
+14/+9/+4|
+14|
+11|
+9|
+11|Command

20th|
+15/+10/+5|
+15|
+12|
+9|
+12|Bonus Feat, Presence of Leadership[/table]

Class Features
Weapon and Armor Proficiency: Commanders are proficient with all simple and martial weapons and with all armor and with shields (except tower shields).

Command (ex): As a Standard action that provokes no attack of opportunity, a Commander may com-mand his troops in a combat situation. At first level and every three levels thereafter, the commander gains a new command that he can install on the battlefield. The Commands are chosen from the list above. To profit from one or the Commands, a character must be able to hear and understand the com-mander. The effect of this Command holds on for a number of rounds equal to 3+ the Commander’s Charisma Bonus. The commander himself gains no bonus from this ability and no character can profit from more than one command bonus at the same time.

The commands:

Aim for the eyes - Allies may add the Commander’s charisma bonus as a morale bonus to their damage with ranged weapons.
Engage! – Allies may add the Commander’s charisma bonus as a morale bonus to their attack rolls in melee.
Hold the line! – Allies may add double the Commander’s charisma bonus as a morale bonus to all attack of opportunities
Defense! - Allies may add the Commander’s charisma bonus as a morale bonus to their Defense rolls.
Strike deep! - Allies may add the Commander’s charisma bonus as a morale bonus to their dam-age with melee weapons.
Protect each other! - Allies may add the Commander’s charisma bonus as a morale bonus to the bonus of the help another action and to attack rolls when flanking.
Do you want to live forever? - Allies may add the Commander’s charisma bonus as a morale bonus to attacks and damage when charging and gain a number of temporary hitpoints equal to the Commander’s charisma score.
Courage! - Allies may add the Commander’s charisma bonus as a morale bonus to Will saves, and twice that amount against fear and fear related effects or powers.
Go go go! – Allies increase their base speed by 10 feet.
Steady Hand! - Allies may add the Commander’s charisma bonus as a morale bonus to their at-tack rolls with ranged weapons.
Capture them alive! Allies may add the Commander’s charisma bonus as a morale bonus to trip and disarm attempts and their attack rolls to deal nonlethal damage.
It is only a hedge witch! - Allies may add the Commander’s charisma bonus as a morale bonus to all Saving throws against all spells and spell-like effects.
Watch out! - Allies may add the Commander’s charisma bonus as a morale bonus to Spot, Search and Initiative checks.

Rally (ex): On the battlefield, communication between the members of a war party is the key to not being surprised by foes. As a standard action that provokes no attack of opportunity, the commander may raise a powerful alert that helps to warn and coordinate his allies, granting them a +4 bonus to all rolls to avoid being surprised. The Commander himself gains no bonus fro this ability.

Lead from the front (ex): Whenever the Commander charges an enemy, his allies are inspired by his example. Until the start of the Commander’s next turn, all allies within 30’ foot +5 feet for every point of Charisma modifier, gain a +2 morale bonus to attack rolls and damage when they charge.

Improved Initiative: A commander needs a quick reaction time to be able to make decisions within a heartbeat. Therefore, he gains Improved Initiative as a bonus feat on 3rd level.

Bonus Feats: On 4th, 8th and every four levels afterwards, the Commander may chose one feat from the fighter feat list as a bonus feat.

Presence of Leadership (ex): A 5th level Commander is inspiring enough that his presence alone in-spires his troops. As long as the Commander is actively involved in a combat and not hindered through conditions that forces him to upstain from the battle, all allies within 30’ +5 feet for every point of Cha-risma modifier gain a moral bonus to certain combat rolls equal to the Commander’s Charisma bonus. With increasing levels, the effect of this power increases.

5th level: Initiative and Saving throws against fear and fear related effects
10th level: Attack Rolls
15th level: Damage Rolls
20th level: Defense and all Will Saves

The effects of Presence of leadership stack with the morale bonus from the Commander’s Command ability, even though both are moral bonuses. It does not stack with any other morale bonuses, though.

Leadership: On 6th level, the Commander gains Leadership as a Bonus feat.

Grant Move action (ex): As a full round action that provokes an attack of opportunity, the Commander may grant an ally an additional move action. The ally must take the additional move action immediately, and must be within a 30’ +5 feet for every point of Charisma modifier radius and must be able to hear and understand the Commander.

Legendary Leader (ex): At 11th level, the reputation of the commander has increased to legendary pro-portions. This grants him a +2 competence bonus to all Diplomacy and Intimidate and a +4 Bonus to his leadership score.

We will win (ex): At 14th level, whenever the Commander successfully
delivers an attack that deals enough damage to immediately kill an enemy or drop him nauseated from a heavy hit, his allies are motivated and their lust for blood is stirred – all allies within 30’ +5 feet for every point of Charisma modifier radius of the Commander gain an immediate move action or attack with their highest attack bonus.

Protect the Commander (ex): At 17th level, whenever the commander is tripped, knocked prone, can not continue to fight because of a status condition, or has lost more than of his hitpoints, all allies adjacent to the Commander gains a +4 bonus to attack rolls.

Grant Attack: At 18th level, the Commander can coordinate the Attack of an ally to devastating effect. As a full round action that provokes an attack of opportunity, the Commander may grant an ally an addi-tional attack with the highest attack bonus. The ally must make the additional attack immediately, and must be within a 30’ +5 feet for every point of Charisma modifier radius and must be able to hear and understand the Commander.

Daracaex
2009-01-20, 12:11 PM
Spell Points at 1st level: 12 + Wis modifier
Spell points at each additional level: 5 + Wis modifier
Spell point regeneration (per hour of meditation): 2d10 +Wis modifier

Spell points at each additional level: 4 + Wis modifier
Spell point regeneration (per hour of meditation): 2d10 +Wis modifier


This is confusing. For one, in the text, you say it gets 4+Wis modifier spell points at each level after first. Another question is why you have the last two-thirds of the first part reprinted with a 4 instead of a 5. If it is something different and not an error, change the name to differentite it from normal "spell points."

And if the acquisition points are going to be the main form of acquiring spells, you should put them up next to spell points for easy access.

Satyr
2009-01-20, 12:15 PM
Yes, that was a copy&paste mistake; I have corrected it. The idea zo put the Spell aquisition points up to the spell points is a good one.

Athaniar
2009-01-20, 01:52 PM
Lore (Ex): Thanks to long hours of study, a cloistered cleric has a wide range of stray knowledge. This ability is identical to the bard's bardic knowledge class feature, using the cleric's class level in place of the bard level.


Copy-paste error. Just thought I'd point it out.

Satyr
2009-01-21, 01:45 PM
The Druid
Druids manipulate similar powers as clerics, but while Clerics track their magical powers back on the patronage of their god, druids either worship nature themselves or its spirits. There are several religions of primal or nature deities where the high priests are in fact druids. When the Berserker is the wild coun-terpart of more civilized warriors, the Druid is the primal counterpart of the more civilized clerics and battle priests. Druids try to live in harmony with their environment and often become protectors of endangered glens or places of spiritual powers.

The conversion of the druid was some kind of a problem, as I felt that the original class was much too strong and completely failed to implement the feeling of a wise man or woman close to nature. So the S&S druid loses several of the more traditional abilities (most significantly the shapeshift ability and the animal companion) but gains a more wilderness-based set of abilities.
The druid is the wid and untamed counterpart to the supposedly civilized cleric.

Hit Points at 1st level: 12 + Con modifier
Hit points at each additional level: 2 + Con modifier

Class Skills
The druid’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Balance (2xDex), Climb (Str+Dex), Con-centration (Con+Wis), Craft (Int+?), Escape Artist (Str+Dex), Handle Animal (Con+Cha), Heal (Wis+Cha), Hide (Dex+Con), Jump (2xStr), Knowledge (dungeoneering) (2xInt), Knowledge (geography) (2xInt), Knowledge (nature) (2xInt), Listen (Con+Wis), Move Silen1tly (Dex+Con), Profession (Wis+?), Ride (Dex+Cha), Search (Int+Wis), Spellcraft (Int+Wis), Spot (Wis+Con), Survival (Wis+Con), Swim (Str+Con), and Use Rope (Str+Dex).

Skill Points at 1st Level: (5 + Int modifier) x 4.
Skill Points at Each Additional Level: 5 + Int modifier.

Spell Points at 1st level: 12 + Wis modifier
Spell points at each additional level: 5 + Wis modifier
Spell Aquisition points per level: 8 + Wisdom modifier
Spell point regeneration (per hour of meditation): 2d10 +Wis modifier

Table: The Druid
{table=head]Level|BAB|BDB|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Special

1st|
+0|
+0|
+1|
+0|
+2|wild empathy, favorite environment 1, simple energy control

2nd|
+1|
+1|
+1|
+0|
+3|woodland stride

3rd|
+2|
+2|
+2|
+1|
+3|instinctive defense

4th|
+3|
+3|
+2|
+1|
+4|resist nature’s lure

5th|
+3|
+3|
+3|
+2|
+4|favorite environment 2

6th|
+4|
+4|
+3|
+2|
+5|advanced energy control

7th|
+5|
+5|
+3|
+2|
+5|Trackless Step

8th|
+6/+1|
+6|
+4|
+2|
+6|-

9th|
+6/+1|
+6|
+4|
+3|
+6|Venom immunity

10th|
+7/+2|
+7|
+5|
+3|
+7|favorite environment 3

11th|
+8/+3|
+8|
+5|
+3|
+7| -

12th|
+9/+4|
+9|
+6|
+4|
+8|complex Energy control

13th|
+9/+4|
+9|
+6|
+4|
+8|-

14th|
+10/+5|
+10|
+6|
+4|
+9|Timeless Body

15th|
+11/+6/+1|
+11|
+7|
+5|
+9|favorite environment 4

16th|
+12/+7/+2|
+12|
+7|
+5|
+10|-

17th|
+12/+7/+2|
+12|
+8|
+5|
+10| Woodland sprint

18th|
+13/+8/+3|
+13|
+8|
+6|
+11|perfect energy control

19th|
+14/+9/+4|
+14|
+9|
+6|
+11| -
20th|
+15/+10/+5|
+15|
+9|
+6|
+12|favorite Environment 5[/table]

Class Features
Weapon and Armor Proficiency: Druids are proficient with all simple weapons, shortbows (including composite shortbows) and one martial melee weapon of the player’s choice. Druids are also proficient with light armor and with shields (except tower shields).

Bonus Languages: A druid’s bonus language options include Sylvan, the language of woodland creatures. This choice is in addition to the bonus languages available to the character because of her race.
A druid also knows Druidic, a secret language known only to druids, which she learns upon becoming a 1st-level druid. Druidic is a free language for a druid; that is, she knows it in addition to her regular allotment of languages and it doesn’t take up a language slot. Druids are forbidden to teach this lan-guage to nondruids.

Spells: A druid casts divine spells, which are drawn from the druid spell list. The Difficulty Class for a saving throw against a druid’s spell is 10 + the spell level + the druid’s Wisdom modifier.
Like other spellcasters, a druid can cast only a certain number of spells per day limited on their number of spell points. At first level, a druid gains 10 + Wisdom Modifier spellpoints, and 4 + Wisdom Modi-fier on each additional level.
A druid’s selection of spells is extremely limited. A druid begins play knowing 4 0-level spells and two 1st-level spells of your choice. At each new level, a druid gains a pool of 8 + Wisdom modifier acquisi-tion points for gaining new spells, whereby the cost of every spell is equal to its spell level. (Example: A druid with Wisdom 18 reaching 7th level would gain 12 points to gather new spells – he could learn 4 level 3 spells, 6 level 2 spells or 12 level 1 spells or a combination of this like 3 level-3 spells, two level-1 spells and two new cantrips). These new spells must chosen from the druid spell list. A druid cannot spare his spell acquisition points to learn more powerful spells on a higher level.
Upon reaching 4th level, and at every even-numbered druid level after that (6th, 8th, and so on), a druid can choose to learn a new spell in place of one he already knows. In effect, the druid "loses" the old spell in exchange for the new one. The new spell’s level must be the same as that of the spell being ex-changed, and it must be at least two levels lower than the highest-level druid spell the druid can cast. A druid may swap only a single spell at any given level, and must choose whether or not to swap the spell at the same time that she gains new spells known for the level.
Unlike a wizard or a cleric, a druid need not prepare his spells in advance. She can cast any spell she knows at any time, assuming she has not yet used up her spellpoints. She does not have to decide ahead of time which spells she’ll cast.

Basic energy control: At 1st level, a druid can channel one spell energy point per turn. The total sum of Energy points the druid can keep under control is equal to his Wisdom modifier or three, whichever is lower.

Favorite Environment (Ex): At 1st level, a druid may select a natural environment from among those given on Table: Favored Environments. Due to the druid's experience in that environment, he gains a +2 bonus on Hide, Listen, Move Silently, Spot, and Survival checks when using these skills in that envi-ronment. She also gains the same bonus on Knowledge (nature) checks made in association with that environment (or on Knowledge (dungeoneering) checks made in association with underground envi-ronments, if the druid has selected underground as a favored environment).
At 5th level and every five levels thereafter (at 10th, 15th, and 20th level), the druid may select an addi-tional favored environment from those given on the table and gains an identical bonus on the appropri-ate skill checks in that environment. In addition, at each such interval, the bonuses in any one favored environment (including the one just selected, if so desired) increase by 2. For example, a 5th-level druid has two favored environments. In one she has a +4 bonus on the appropriate skill checks, and in the other she has a +2 bonus. At 10th level, she has three favored environments, and she gains an additional +2 bonus, which she can allocate to any of her three favored environments. Thus, her bonuses could be either +4, +4, and +2 or +6, +2, and +2.
If the druid chooses desert or forest, he must also choose a climate type, as indicated on the table (either "cold" or "temperate or warm" for desert, or "cold or temperate" or "warm" for forest).
A druid can't select an environment that she has never visited.

Wild Empathy (Ex): A druid can improve the attitude of an animal. This ability functions just like a Diplomacy check made to improve the attitude of a person. The druid rolls 1d20 and adds her druid level and her Charisma modifier to determine the wild empathy check result.
The typical domestic animal has a starting attitude of indifferent, while wild animals are usually un-friendly.
To use wild empathy, the druid and the animal must be able to study each other, which means that they must be within 30 feet of one another under normal conditions. Generally, influencing an animal in this way takes 1 minute but as with influencing people, it might take more or less time.
A druid can also use this ability to influence a magical beast with an Intelligence score of 1 or 2, but she takes a -4 penalty on the check.

Woodland Stride (Ex): Starting at 2nd level, a druid may move through any sort of undergrowth (such as natural thorns, briars, overgrown areas, and similar terrain) at her normal speed and without taking damage or suffering any other impairment. However, thorns, briars, and overgrown areas that have been magically manipulated to impede motion still affect her.

Instinctive Defense (Ex): When unarmored and unencumbered, a third level druid adds her Wisdom bonus (if any) to her Defense. In addition, a druid gains a +1 bonus to AC at 7th level. This bonus in-creases by 1 for every four Druid levels thereafter (+2 at 11th, +3 at 15th, and +4 at 19th level).
These bonuses to AC apply even against touch attacks or when the druid is flat-footed. She loses these bonuses when she is immobilized or helpless, when she wears any armor, carries a shield or when she carries a medium or heavy load.

Resist Nature’s Lure (Ex): Starting at 4th level, a druid gains a +4 bonus on saving throws against the spell-like abilities of fey.
Advanced Energy Control: At 6th level, a druid has learned to control the flow of magic energies a lot better than before. From now on, she can channel up to two spell energy points per turn and therefore increase the casting speed of complex spells, and the maximum of energy she can keep under his control increases to her Wisdom modifier +1. Additionally, she gains an additional spell acquisition point per level (increasing the total to 7 + Wisdom modifier).

Trackless Step (Ex): Starting at 7th level, a druid leaves no trail in natural surroundings and cannot be tracked. She may choose to leave a trail if so desired.

Venom Immunity (Ex): At 9th level, a druid gains immunity to all poisons.

Complex Energy Control: At 12h level, the druid’s ability to control her magical energies increase again. Now, she can channel up to three spellpoints per turn, and control a maximum of spell energy up to 2 + Wisdom modifier. The druid also gains an additional spell acquisition point per level (up to the total of 8 + Wisdom modifier).

Timeless Body (Ex): After attaining 14th level, a druid no longer takes ability score penalties for aging and cannot be magically aged. Any penalties she may have already incurred, however, remain in place.
Bonuses still accrue, and the druid still dies of old age when her time is up.

Woodland Sprint (Ex): At 17th level, a druid may move at her normal speed through thorns, briars, and overgrown areas that have been magically manipulated. She does not take damage or suffer any other impairment, since she becomes immune to such magical effects.

Perfect energy control: At 18th level, a druid has mastered the arts of spiritual magic. She can control the inner flame of magic so effectively that she can channel up to 4 spellpoints per turn. Her maximum of spell energy that he can control increases to 3 + Wisdom mod. Her spell acquisition points per level increases to 9 + Wisdom modifier.

Variety: Revenge of the Wild
Some Druids are not focused on the protection of the wild and the harmony, but on the revenge for real or imagined iniquities against nature. These Revenge Druids have often become spiteful and bitter dur-ing the conflict between civilization and nature and decided to take sides – against civilization.
Revenge Druids gain a favorite enemy feature on 1st, 5th, 10th, 15th and 20th level instead of the usual Favorite Environment. This grants them the usual boni against those who they see as the enemies of nature.

Variety: Glen Druids
While the regular druid travels and learn as much as they can about nature, the Glen Druid closes a pact with a certain stripe of land. This territory, the druid’s glen, becomes the centerpiece of the druid’s in-terests and powers, but on the other hand they are bound to this land and rarely leave it. The glen has a size of Druid class levels x 10 acres.
On 1st level, a Glen Druid gains a +3 conditional bonus to all spellcasting checks.
On 5th level, the Druids gains Fast Healing 1 as long as he is in the glen territory.
On 10th level, the glen counts as sacred territory for the regeneration of spell points.
On 15th level, the Glen Druid gains Fast Healing 2 as long as he is within the glen’s boundaries.
On 20th level, the Druid automatically regenerates a number of spell points equal to twice wisdom bonus per hour when they are within the boundaries of the glen. In addition, they can Tree stride at will within the glen.
Glen Druids do not gain the Favorite Environment class trait for any other environment apart from their glen. They gain a +2 bonus on Hide, Listen, Move Silently, Spot, and Survival checks when they are within the boundaries of their glen, which increases every five levels by +2, but no other benefits.

Satyr
2009-01-21, 02:12 PM
Healer
Healers are, like Clerics and Druids, divine or spiritual spellcasters, but their magic is very focused on life and the living as the source of all magic powers. In their specific niche, they are more powerful than any other spellcaster, but they sacrifice versatility for this focus. In the broad public, healers are normally the most respected and even revered spellcasters and are rarely faced with the same amount of mistrust and fear than other Gifted people. On the other hand, their life magic turns the healers into formidable enemies of all undead creatures.

I don't think there was any class in D&D 3.5 i found as disappointing as the original healer. A mostly useless and weak character. With a unicorn. Argh.
The healer was one of the first classes I converted to Serpents and Sewers, and I took as a standard for all other spellcaster classes, including so basic ideas like that no spellcaster should be reduced to spellcasting only, but should always could contribute otherwise. The healer so became not only someone who tends the injuries of her comrades, but also a threatening doom to everything undead. And gained the ability to raise themselves from the dead at the highest levels. Despite his very narrow focus within the game, the healer got some helpful additional abilities, and two realy good crowning abilities.



Hit Points at 1st level: 16 + Con modifier
Hit Points at Each Additional Level: 3 + Con Modifier

Class Skills
The healer’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are: Concentration (Con+Wis), Craft (Int+?), Diplomacy (Wis+Cha), Handle Animal (Wis+Cha), Heal (Wis+Cha), Knowledge (nature) (2xInt), Knowledge (Religion) (2xInt), Profession (Wis+?), Sense Motive (Wis+Cha), Spellcraft (Int+Wis), and Survival (Wis+Con).

Skill Points at 1st level: (5 + Int modifier) x4
Skill Points at Each Additional Level: 5 + Int Modifier

Spell Energy at 1st Level: 15 + Wis Modifier
Spell Energy at each additional level: 6 + Wis modifier
Spell point regeneration (per hour of meditation): 2d10 +Wis modifier

Table: The Haler
{table=head]Level|BAB|BDB|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Special

1st|
+0|
+0|
+0|
+0|
+2|Resilience +1, Brew Potion, basic energy control

2nd|
+1|
+1|
+0|
+0|
+3|Retributive Smite

3rd|
+1|
+1|
+1|
+1|
+3|Advanced Learning, Turn Undead

4th|
+2|
+2|
+1|
+1|
+4|Leechcraft, Resilience +2

5th|
+2|
+2|
+2|
+2|
+4|Healing Hands

6th|
+3|
+3|
+2|
+2|
+5|Advanced Learning, advanced energy control

7th|
+3|
+3|
+2|
+2|
+5|Merciful Weapon, Resilience +3

8th|
+4|
+4|
+2|
+2|
+6|Bonus Feat, Sympathy Shield

9th|
+4|
+4|
+3|
+3|
+6|Advanced Learning

10th|
+5|
+5|
+3|
+3|
+7|Aura of Vigor, Resilience +4

11th|
+5|
+5|
+3|
+3|
+7|Battle Medic

12th|
+6/+1|
+6|
+4|
+4|
+8|Advanced Learning, complex energy control

13th|
+6/+1|
+6|
+4|
+4|
+8|Resilience +5

14th|
+7/+2|
+7|
+4|
+4|
+9|Life Sense

15th|
+7/+2|
+7|
+5|
+5|
+9|Advanced Learning

16th|
+8/+3|
+8|
+5|
+5|
+10|Bonus Feat, Resilience +6

17th|
+8/+3|
+8|
+5|
+5|
+10|Greater Merciful Weapon

18th|
+9/+3|
+9|
+6|
+6|
+11|Advanced Learning, perfect energy control

19th|
+9/+4|
+9|
+6|
+6|
+11|Ashes of the Phoenix, Resilience +7

20th|
+10/+5|
+10|
+6|
+6|
+12|Greater Aura of Vigor[/table]

Class Features
Weapon and Armor Proficiencies: The healer is proficient with all simple weapons, as well as the sap and truncheon. He is proficient with light armor but not with any shields.

Spells: A healer casts divine spells, which are drawn from the healer spell list given below. He can cast any spell he knows without preparing it ahead of time the way a cleric or wizard must. When a healer gains access to a new level of spells, he automatically knows all the spells for that level listed on the healer’s spell list. Healers also have the option of adding to their existing spell list through their ad-vanced learning ability as they increase in level (see below).
A healer starts the game with 12 + Wisdom modifier spellpoints. On each additional level he gets 5 + Wisdom modifier additional spellpoints. The healer‘s spellpoints limit the use of spells like usual for spellcasters. Healers regain spellpoints like spiritual spellcasters.
As protectors of life, healers have no access to blood magic and healer spells may not powered by spell points gained through blood magic.
Unlike a cleric or wizard, a healer need not prepare his spells in advance. He can cast any spell he knows at any time, assuming he has not yet used up his spells for the day for that spell level or above.
Basic energy control: At 1st level, a healer can channel one spell energy point per turn. The total sum of Energy points the healer can keep under control is equal to his Wisdom modifier or three whichever is lower.

Resilience (Ex): Starting on 1st Level and every three levels afterwards, the healer gets a +1 bonus to all saves against all poisons and illnesses.

Brew Potion: At first Level, a healer gets the Brew Potion feat as a bonus feat.

Retributive Smite (Su): Though the healer seeks to preserve life, there are those who would tear apart his great works. By expending a point from his spell energy pool, the healer can make a touch attack, dealing non-lethal damage equal to the number of hit points his last conjuration (healing) spell healed.

Advanced Learning (Ex): At 3rd, 6th, and every three levels thereafter, a healer can add a new spell to his list, representing the result of personal study and experimentation. The spell must be chosen from the cleric or sorcerer/wizard spell lists, and it must be of the conjuration school or the school of abjuration. The spell must be no higher than that of the highest level spell the healer already knows. Once a new spell is selected, it is forever added to that healer’s spell list, and can be cast just like any other spell on the healer’s list.

Turn Undead: A Healer can channel her life magic into a power that can halt, hinder and hurt undead creatures. Turning Undead is a standard action that cost a certain amount spell energy that can be chan-neled into the turn attempt, like all Healer spells they don’t have to be prepared before hand. Since turn-ing is no form of spellcasting, the normal limits of channeling spell energy given by the Healer’s energy control trait are neglected – a healer can invest as much spell energy as she wants into the attempt to turn undead.
The costs of the check depend on the healer, granting a bonus on the turning check equal to the invested spell points. Every turning attempt costs at least one spell point. A healer can attempt to turn as many times as she has spell points left. The effect of the turning attempt is not determined with a d20, but with 2d6 (+ theHealer’s charisma modifier and the invested spell points). The result of this roll also deter-mines how many hit dice of undeads are turned or destroyed.

Leechcraft (Ex): At 4th level, the healing abilities of the healer increase: Every time he uses the Heal skill for long time care, the regeneration rates of hit points are quadrupled, not just doubled.

Healing Hands (Ex): Whenever a healer casts a spell that cures hit point damage or uses the Heal skill, he adds his Charisma modifier to the amount of damage healed. For instance, if a 5th level healer with an 18 Charisma casts Cure Light Wounds, he cures 1d8+5 points of damage, plus an additional 4 points of damage due to his Charisma bonus.

Advanced Energy Control: At 6th level, a healer has learned to control the flow of magic energies a lot better than before. From now on, she can channel two spell energy points per turn and the maximum of energy she can keep under his control increases to her Wisdom modifier +1. Independently from the healer’s wisdom bonus, the total amount of spell energy can not exceed five points.

Merciful Weapon (Su): Upon reaching 7th level, any melee weapon a healer wields gains the Merciful enhancement. At the healer’s discretion, he may deal an additional1d6 point of damage with his strike, but he deals only non-lethal damage. This additional damage is also added to any Retributive Smite the healer makes. Furthermore, when striking an undead opponent, this additional damage is added to the attack as positive energy damage.

Sympathy Shield (Su): At 8th level, a healer may add his Charisma as a deflection bonus to his AC. This bonus also applies against touch and incorporeal touch attacks.

Battle Medic (Ex): At 10th level, the healer become adept to administer first aid quickly and under du-ress. The healer can make a heal check to provide first aid as a move action instead of a standard action and he always can take 10 on such checks even when stress or circumstances would normally hinder him from doing so.

Aura of Vigor (Su): Starting at 10th level, a healer’s body is constantly loaded with healing energies which radiate from him. All allies within a 30 foot radius of the healer gain fast healing 2. The aura also deals two points of damage per turn to all undead creatures within a 30’ foot radius of the healer.
Complex Energy Control: At 12h level, the healer’s control of the energies of magic becomes even stronger. Now, she can channel up to three spellpoints per turn, and control a maximum of spell energy up to her Wisdom modifier +1 or seven spell energy points, whichever is lower.

Bonus Feats (Ex): At 8th and 16th levels, the healer gains a bonus metamagic feat of his choice. She must meet the prerequisites of this feat.

Lifesense (Su): The healer’s connection to the positive energy plane allows him to see life energy as a brilliant glow. In addition to any normal light sources that might be present, your surroundings are illu-minated by roving points of brightness, created by the aura of living creatures. The healer can see living beings even in total darkness as if she had Blindsight 30’, but it does not allow her to ‘see’ undeads or unliving things (e.g. chairs).

Greater Merciful Weapon (Su): The bonus from the Merciful Weapon ability increases from 1d6 to 2d6.

Perfect energy control: At 18th level, a healer has perfected the arts of healing magic. She can control the inner flame of magic so effectively that she can channel up to 4 spellpoints per turn. Her maximum of spell energy that he can control increases to her Wisdom mod +3. Independently from the healer’s wisdom bonus, the total amount of spell energy can’t exceed nine points, though.

Ashes of the Phoenix (Sp): At 19th level, even death cannot deny a healer’s touch. Once per week, the healer may use Resurrection as a spell like ability if the target of the spell is not longer dead than 5 min-utes. Though he does not need to use material components, she must expend 2,000 XP to power this ability. The Healer may use this ability on herself in the case she dies.

Greater Aura of Vigor (Su): At 20th level, a healer’s Aura of Vigor becomes much stronger – the range of the aura increases to 40 feet, and all allies gain fast healing 4. The aura is also very deadly for undead creatures – every undead within the 30’ radius suffers from 4 points of damage per turn.

Healer Spell List

Healers cast spells from the following list (and any additional spells they gain with their Advanced Learning ability).
0th Level: Create Water, Cure / Inflict Minor Wounds, Deathwatch, Detect Magic, Detect Poison, Light, Mending, Purify Food and Drink, Read Magic
1st Level: Bless Water, Cure / Inflict Light Wounds, Faith Healing^, Goodberry, Healthful Rest^, Invest Light Protection#, Protection from Undead, Remove Fear, Remove Paralysis, Sanctuary, Speak With Animals, Vigor, Lesser^
2nd Level: Avoid Planar Effects^, Calm Emotions, Close Wounds^, Consecrate, Cure / Inflict Moderate Wounds, Delay Poison, Gentle Repose, Healing Lorecall^, Protection from Negative Energy^, Remove Blindness/Deafness, Remove Disease, Shield Other, Spawn Screen^, Lesser Restoration
3rd Level: Create Food and Water, Cure /Inflict Serious Wounds, Daylight, Invest Moderate Protec-tion#, Neutralize Poison, Remove Curse, Restoration, Searing Light, Spark of Life^, Status, Vigor^, Vigor Mass Lesser^
4th Level: Astral Hospice^, Channeled Divine Health#, Cure / Inflict Critical Wounds, Death Ward, Delay Death^, Freedom of Movement, Healing Spirit#, Mass Cure /Inflict Light Wounds, Panacea^, Positive Energy Aura^, Revenance^, Sheltered Vitality^
5th Level: Atonement, Break Enchantment, Mass Cure / Inflict Moderate Wounds, Invest Heavy Pro-tection#, Life’s Grace^, Radiance#, Raise Dead, Renewed Vigor#, Revivify^, Sanctuary, Mass^, Stone to Flesh, True Seeing, Vigor, Greater^
6th Level: Greater Restoration, Harm, Heal, Heroes’ Feast, Mass Cure / Inflict Serious wounds, Regen-erate, Revive Outsider^, Vigorous Circle^
7th Level: Mass Cure /Inflict Critical Wounds, Fortunate Fate^, Renewal Pact^, Repulsion, Restoration, Mass^, Resurrection
8th Level: Death Pact^, Death Ward, Mass^, Discern Location, Holy Aura, Mass Heal
9th Level: Foresight, Gate, True Resurrection, Undeath’s Eternal Foe^
^ Spell found in Spell Compendium
# Spell found in Players Handbook II

Satyr
2009-01-21, 04:03 PM
Mage Blade
The Mage Blade is an arcane spellcaster with a strong focus on combat and fights. She specializes in spells to improve her own abilities as a fighter and to combine martial prowess with magic to form a deadly combination of both. Others than War Mages who act as the support and second line shooters, the Mage Blade is a frontline fighter who does not replace his sword with a spell or vice versa but com-bine them.

The Mage Blade is meant as a gish class - and it is actually quite effective in its way. A Mage Blade is not going to cast the most powerful spells, but theycan prepare spells beforehand and use them in the right situation without much preparation or the fear, that the spell may fail. The problem of the Mage Blade is, that it has access to both magic and a solid martial prowess, but the class cannot compete with purer fighters in direct combat or with pure wizards in magic.

Hit Points at 1st Level: 16 + Con Modifier
Hit Points at each additional level: 3 + Con Modifier

Class Skills:
The Mage Blade ’s Class skills and the key ability for each skill are: Concentration (Con+Wis), Craft (Int+?), Diplomacy (Wis+Cha), Heal (Wis+Cha), Knowledge (Arcane) (2xInt), Knowledge (War and tactics) (2xInt), Profession (Wis+?) and Spellcraft (Int+Wis).

Skill Points at 1st Level: (3 + Int modifier) x 4
Skill Points at every additional level: 3 + Int modifier

Spell Points at 1st level: 6 + Int modifier
Spell points at each additional level: 2 + Int modifier
Spell point regeneration (per night’s rest): 3d12 + Int modifier
Spell Aquisition points per level: 0 + Intelligence modifier

The Mage Blade
{table=head]Level|BAB|BDB|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Special

1st|
+0|
+0|
+1|
+0|
+2|basic energy control, Imbue Weapon

2nd|
+1|
+1|
+1|
+0|
+3|Armored Caster +1

3rd|
+2|
+2|
+2|
+1|
+3|Egoist Spellcaster

4th|
+3|
+3|
+2|
+1|
+4|Art of War, simple

5th|
+3|
+3|
+3|
+2|
+4|Bonus Feat

6th|
+4|
+4|
+3|
+2|
+5|Armored Caster +2, Arcane Toughness

7th|
+5|
+5|
+3|
+2|
+5|Empower Spell

8th|
+6/+1|
+6|
+4|
+2|
+6|Art of War, simple

9th|
+6/+1|
+6|
+4|
+3|
+6|Multiple Imbue

10th|
+7/+2|
+7|
+5|
+3|
+7|Armored Caster +3, Bonus Feat

11th|
+8/+3|
+8|
+5|
+3|
+7|Immediate Imbuement

12th|
+9/+4|
+9|
+6|
+4|
+8|Art of War, advanced, Arcane Strike

13th|
+9/+4|
+9|
+6|
+4|
+8|advanced energy control

14th|
+10/+5|
+10|
+6|
+4|
+9|Armored Caster +4, Maximize Spell

15th|
+11/+6/+1|
+11|
+7|
+5|
+9|Bonus Feat

16th|
+12/+7/+2|
+12|
+7|
+5|
+10|Art of War, advanced

17th|
+12/+7/+2|
+12|
+8|
+5|
+10|Improved Egoist Spellcaster

18th|
+13/+8/+3|
+13|
+8|
+6|
+11|Armored Caster +5

19th|
+14/+9/+4|
+14|
+9|
+6|
+11| Double Imbuement

20th|
+15/+10/+5|
+15|
+9|
+6|
+12|Art of War, complex, Bonus Feat[/table]


Class Features:
Armor and Weapon Proficiency: A Mage Blade is proficient with all simple weapons and martial weapons, light and medium armor and shields (except tower shields).

Spells: A Mage Blade has the ability to cast a small number of spells as an arcane spellcaster, which are drawn from the Dusk Blade spell list. He can cast any spell he knows without preparing it ahead of time, just as a sorcerer can. The Difficulty Class for a saving throw against a Mage Blade ’s spell is the spell level + the Mage Blade ’s Intelligence modifier + 1d20.
Like other spellcasters, a Mage Blade can cast only a certain number of spells of each spell level per day, limited by his spell points. A Mage Blade gains 6 + Intelligence modifier spell points at 1st level, and 2 + Intelligence modifier each additional level.
A Mage Blade begins play knowing only 3 level 0 spells and one single level one spell of the player’s choice. At each new level, a Mage Blade gains a spell acquisition pool equal to his Intelligence modifier for gaining new spells, whereby the cost of every spell is equal to its spell level. (Example: A Mage Blade with Intelligence 16 reaching a new level would gain 6 points to gather new spells – he could learn 2 level 3 spells or 3 level 2 spells or 6 level 1 spells or any combination of this). These new spells can be common spells chosen from the beguiler spell list. A Mage Blade cannot spare his spell acquisi-tion points to learn more powerful spells on a higher level.
Basic energy control: At 1st level, a Mage Blade can channel one spell energy point per turn. The total sum of Energy points the Warmage can keep under control is equal to his Intelligence modifier or three, whichever is lower.

Imbue Weapon (Sp): At 1st level the Mage Blade gains the ability to channel a spell into a weapon she holds in her hands. The spell costs as many spell energy points as if it was casted and does not count against the Mage Blade ’s control threshold. When the Mage Blade attacks with the weapon, the spell is activated against the Weapon’s target. Only spells that target a creature or require a touch attack or ranged touch attack can be imbued into a weapon. Every weapon can only be imbued with one spell, and the Mage Blade can never imbue more than one weapon at the same time. The imbued spell stays on he weapon until it is activated or up until the next sunrise. Imbuing a weapon with a spell takes as long as casting the spell and requires a successful spellcasting check. You can imbue a weapon with a spell that is cast as a ritual. If the Mage Blade has natural weapons, she can imbue her spells into those.

Armored Caster (ex): A Mage Blade is used to cast spells while wearing armor. At 2nd level, she re-duces the armor penalty for spellcasting by one point. The more experienced the Mage Blade gets, the more comfortable she can cast spells while wearing armor. Every 4 levels, the armor penalty for spell-casting is reduced by one. This bonus is only applied if the Mage Blade wears an armor she is proficient with. When wearing a non-proficient armor, she gains no advantage whatsoever from this ability.

Egoist Spellcaster (sp): A 3rd level Mage Blade can channel spells that only targets herself a lot faster than spells that has other, outside targets. She can channel an additional spell point per turn whenever the spell is targeted on her and only her.

Art of War: at level 4, and every 4 level after that, the Mage Blade gains a special ability from the ap-propriate list of Arts of War. No ability may be taken more than once. If an Art of War ability has other such abilities as prerequisites, the Mage Blade must possess the prerequisite abilities to take the ability in question.

Bonus Feats: At 5th, 10th, 15th and 20th level, the Mage Blade may chose a feat from the Fighter Feat list as a bonus feat. Shem must fit the feat’s prerequisites to take it.

Arcane Toughness (su): A spell thief can burn spell energy to close his wounds and regain lost hit-points. The spell thief burns 1d6 points of spell energy and for every spellpoint he spends, he regains one hitpoint. This ability works as an immediate action and can be used every d4+1 rounds. If the spell thief would spend more spell energy than his current energy pool, he spends all remaining spell points instead.

Empower Spell: A Mage Blade gains Empower Spell as a free Bonus feat at 7th level.

Multiple Imbue (sp): A 9th level Mage Blade can imbue as many weapons as his Intelligence Modifier.

Immediate Imbuement (sp): When a Mage Blade of level 11 or higher scores a critical hit, she may imbue her weapon as a swift action with any spell she can channel within one turn. The target of the critical hit also becomes the target of the newly imbued spell. If the weapon is already imbued when the critical hit is scored, this ability cannot be used.

Advanced Energy Control: At 13th level, a Mage Blade has learned to control the flow of magic ener-gies a lot better than before. From now on, she can channel two spell energy points per turn and the maximum of energy she can keep under his control increases to her Intelligence modifier +1 or five, whichever is lower.

Maximize Spell: A Mage Blade gains Maximize Spell as a free Bonus feat at 14th level.

Improved Egoist Spellcaster (sp): This ability works like Egoist spellcaster, but grants a total +2 Bo-nus to the channeling speed for all spells that the Mage Blade targets on herself and a +1 Bonus to the channeling speed for the imbuement of a weapon.

Double Imbuement (sp): The Mage Blade can imbue two spells in a weapon at the same time. When the weapon hits, the Mage Blade can decide if only one or both spells are simultaneously activated. The double imbuement is much less stable than a single imbuement and will discharge after one hour, but the Mage Blade does not have to imbue both spells at the same time.

Athaniar
2009-01-21, 04:43 PM
All of this looks very good so far.

Satyr
2009-01-22, 08:26 AM
Yes, I am also quite content with most of it; it is not a perfect system, but for my taste it includes a great improvement to the standard rules.

Satyr
2009-01-22, 08:45 AM
Man-at-arms
The man-at-arms is the archetypical fighter, defender or guardian. The members of this class differ very widely, from ruthless mercenaries to knights in shining armor, some a heroes, others only brutes. The Man-at-arms is the primary warrior class, trained in the use of multiple weapons and armors and in fighting in individual combat as well as on large battlefields. There are many different warriors within this class, but they all have their martial prowess in common. Examples for Man-at-arms characters include almost every soldier, warrior or knight, from Heracles to Sharpe.

The man-at-arms is one of the three classes I am most content with; it has many options, it completely fulfils its role as a warrior and is flexible and adaptable to a great amount of various concepts. Yes, a character like this is most potent in combat and will easily beat most of the other classes in a direct confrontation. As it should be. The variability of the class also allows to cover very different concepts, from an amoral pirate to the glorious knight in shining armor.
The Man-at-arms is also one of the classes were the similarity to its progenitor is extremely obvious, but thanks to the Arts of War, the Man-at-arms is not only mechanically superior to the fighter, but also offer more flexibility and options for the player.


Hit Points at 1st Level: 20 + Con modifier
Hit Points at Each Additional Level: 4 + Con modifier.

Class Skills
The man-at-arms’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Appraise (Int+Cha), Climb (Str+Dex), Craft (Weaponsmithing), (Str+Int), Craft (Armorsmithing) (Str+Int) Handle Animal (Wis+Cha), Heal (Wis+Cha), Intimidate (Wis+Cha), Jump (2xStr), Knowledge (tactics and war) (2xInt), Knowledge (nobility and royalty) (2xInt), Listen (Con+Wis), Perform (weapon drill) (Dex+Cha), Profession (Wis+?), Ride (Dex+Cha), Spot (Wis+Con), Swim (Str+Con), and Use Rope (Str+Dex).

Skill Points at 1st Level: (5 + Int modifier) x 4.
Skill Points at Each Additional Level: 5 + Int modifier.

Table: The Man-at-arms
{table=head]Level|BAB|BDB|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Special

1st|
+1|
+1|
+3|
+1|
+1| Weapon Training, Bonus feat

2nd|
+2|
+2|
+4|
+1|
+1| Bonus feat, Way of the Warrior

3rd|
+3|
+3|
+5|
+2|
+2 |Art of War, Simple

4th|
+4|
+4|
+5|
+2|
+2| Bonus feat

5th|
+5|
+5|
+6|
+3|
+3| Art of War, Simple

6th|
+6/+1|
+5|
+7|
+3|
+3| Bonus feat, improved Way of the Warrior

7th|
+7/+2|
+6|
+7|
+3|
+3| Art of War, Simple

8th|
+8/+3|
+7|
+8|
+4|
+4| Bonus feat

9th|
+9/+4|
+8|
+9|
+4|
+4| Art of War, Advanced

10th|
+10/+5|
+9|
+9|
+5|
+5| Bonus feat, greater Way of the Warrior

11th|
+11/+6/+1|
+10|
+10|
+5|
+5|Art of War, Advanced

12th|
+12/+7/+2|
+10|
+11|
+6|
+6| Bonus Feat

13th|
+13/+8/+3|
+11|
+11|
+6|
+6| Art of War, Advanced

14th|
+14/+9/+4|
+12|
+12|
+6|
+6| Bonus feat

15th|
+15/+10/+5|
+13|
+13|
+7|
+7| Art of War, Complex

16th|
+16/+11/+6/+1|
+14|
+13|
+7|
+7| Bonus feat

17th|
+17/+12/+7/+2|
+15|
+14|
+8|
+8| Art of War, Complex

18th|
+18/+13/+8/+3|
+15|
+15|
+8|
+8| Bonus feat

19th|
+19/+14/+9/+4|
+16|
+15|
+9|
+9| Art of War, Complex
20th|
+20/+15/+10/+5|
+17|
+16|[center]+9/center]|
+9 | Bonus feat, Art of War, Peerless
[/table]

Class Features
All of the following are class features of the man-at-arms:

Weapon and Armor Proficiency: A man-at-arms is proficient with all simple and martial weapons and with all armor (heavy, medium, and light) and shields (including tower shields).

Weapons Training (Ex): A Man-at-arms trains obsessively with armor and weapons of all kinds, and using a new weapon is easy and fun for him. By practicing with a weapon he is not proficient with for a week, a Man-at-arms may gain proficiency with that weapon as long as he trains regularly with it. A man-at-arms can only get proficiency with one exotic weapon at a time through this ability; if he trains a new weapon, he loses the proficiency with the older one.

Bonus Feats: At 1st level, a man-at-arms gets a bonus combat-oriented feat in addition to the feat that any 1st-level character gets and the bonus feat granted to a human character. The man-at-arms gains an additional bonus feat at 2nd level and every two man-at-arms levels thereafter (4th, 6th, 8th, 10th, 12th, 14th, 16th, 18th, and 20th). These bonus feats must be drawn from the fighter bonus feat list. A man-at-arms must still meet all prerequisites for a bonus feat, including ability score and base attack bonus minimums.
These bonus feats are in addition to the feat that a character of any class gets from advancing levels. A man-at-arms is not limited to the list of man-at-arms bonus feats when choosing these feats.

Art of War: at level 3, and every odd level after that, the Man-at-arms gains a special ability from the appropriate list of Arts of War. No ability may be taken more than once. If an Art of War ability has other such abilities as prerequisites, a Man-at-arms must possess the prerequisite abilities to take the ability in question.

Way of the Warrior: At 2nd level, a man-at-arms decides to follow one specific style of fighting, and gains a bonus to some special skills – like Attack Rolls, Defense Rolls or certain skill rolls when he follows this certain way. To follow a certain way, the man-at-arms must fulfill some requirements to get the bonus. At 6th and 10th level, the Bonus increases. You may use your 2nd level Bonus feat to fulfill the requirements of any way of the warrior.

The man-at-arm's ways of the warrior:

Way of the Ambush
Requirements: Move silently 2 Ranks, Hide 2 Ranks, Stealthy
Bonus: You get Sneak Attack +1 d6 at 2nd level. At 6th level, the damage increases to +2d6, and on 10th level to +3d6

Way of Ambidexterity
Requirements: Dexterity 15
Bonus: You get Two Weapon Combat as a Bonus Feat at 2nd level, Improved Two Weapon Combat at 6th level, and Greater Two Weapon Fighting on 10th level. The Man-at-arms does not have to fulfill the feats’ prerequisites.

Way of the Brave
Requirements: Concentration 3 Ranks
Bonus: You get a +4 Bonus to resist fear and fear-like effects and spells and can cast Heroism (self only) as a spell-like ability that you can use 1/day at 2nd level whereby your caster level is equal to half of your man-at-arms class levels. You get additional uses at 6th and 10th level. To successfully use the heroism ability, you must succeed in a Concentration Check (DC 15).

Way of the Horseman
Requirements: Mounted Combat, 4 Ranks in Handle Animal and Ride
Bonus: +1 to Attack and +2 to Damage rolls with all melee attacks when mounted. You also get a +2 Bonus to all Ride and Handle Animal checks that deal with your mount. These Bonuses increases to +2/+4 on 6th level and +3/+6 on level 10.

Way of the Defender
Requirements: Combat expertise
Bonus: When fighting defensively, using Combat Expertise, or using the total defense action, increase the dodge bonus to Defense that you gain from using that tactic by 1. This Bonus increases to +3 on 6th, and +5 on 10th level.

Way of the Tyrant
Requirements: Intimidate 5 Ranks, Skill Focus (intimidate)
Bonus: On 2nd level, you can intimidate your foes with a move action, instead of a standard action. On 6th level, you can use the intimidate skill to demoralize all foes within 30’ radius, and on 10th level, you only need a swift action to use the intimidate skill. Additionally, you get a +2 Bonus to the Intimidate skill on every step (up to +6 on 10th level).

Way of the Bull
Requirements: Power Attack, Improved Bull Rush
Bonus: Whenever you bullrush or charge an opponent, you get a +1 Bonus to your attack roll and Strength checks. This bonus increases at 6th level to +3 and at 10th level to +5.

Way of the Mongoose
Requirements: Improved Initiative, Combat Reflexes or Elf
Bonus: You get a +1 Bonus to your initiative and your reflex saves. This bonus increases by +1 at 6th and 10th level.

Way of the Mageslayer
Requirements: Iron Will, Knowledge (Arcane) 1 Rank or Dwarf
Bonus: +1 to saving throws against spells and spell-like effects, this bonus increases at 6th and 10th level by +1.

Way of the Survivor
Requirements: Endurance, 3 Ranks in Heal
Bonus: +5 Hitpoints at 2nd, 6th and 10th level.

Way of the Knight
Requirement: significant code of honor, Ride 3 Ranks, Knowledge (nobility and royalty) 3 Ranks
Bonus: You gain a +2 to Charisma based skills and may treat Diplomacy, Sense motive and Gather Information as class skills. The bonus increases to +4 at 6th and +6 at 10th level. In addition, you may add your bonus from your code of honor to your leadership score as well, if you take the leadership feat.

Way of the Blackguard
Requirements: No code of honor, Appraise 3 Ranks, Knowledge (tactics and war) 3 ranks
Bonus: You get a +2 Bonus to Charisma based skills and may treat Bluff, Sneak and Hide as Class Skills. The bonus increases to +4 at 6th and +6 at 10th level.

Way of the Corsair
Requirements: Swim 2 Ranks, Use Rope 2 Ranks, Profession (Sailor) 2 Ranks, Balance 1 Rank
Bonus: You can treat Balance as a class skill and can ignore the penalty to combat roles from slippery footing. Add +1 to your Attack Rolls and Defense Rolls when fighting on board of a ship. This bonus increases by +1 at level 6 and 10.

Way of the true Ally
Requirements: minor code of honor, Charisma 11+
Bonus: When you use the Help another action, you grant your ally an additional +1 Bonus and gain an equal bonus to your defense. This increases to +2 at 6th and +3 at 10th level.


Variant: Dungeon Crasher
This variant of the man-at-arms is more specialized in fighting in the enclosed space of subterranean cave or dungeon. They do not get the Bonus feat on second and 6th level, but the Dungeon Crasher abil-ity described in Dungeonscape (p. 10).

Satyr
2009-01-22, 10:20 AM
Noble
The Noble was born into a role of leadership and rule. He is expected to command and delegate their household and vassals while their own loyalty to their country and the status quo is obligatory. As members of the ruling class, Nobles receive the best education available and often combine witty intel-lect and charismatic demeanor. Nobles are experts in the field of diplomacy and dealing with the aris-tocracy. While they are leaders, they normally concentrate stronger on the social networks and administration than the leadership on the battlefield.

Hit Points at 1st level: 12 + Con modifier
Hit points at each additional level: 2 + Con modifier

Class Skills: The Noble’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Appraise (Int+Cha), Bluff (2xCha), Craft (Int+?) (only honorable artistic skills, such as Architecture, Calligraphy or Painting). Diplomacy (Wis+Cha), Disguise (Int+Cha), Forgery (Dex+Int), Gather Information (2xCha), Handle Animal (Wis+Cha), Intimidate (Str+Cha), Knowledge (all skills taken individually) (2xInt), Listen (Con+Wis), Perform (Cha+?), Ride (Dex+Cha), Search (Con+Wis), Sense Motive (Wis+Cha), Speak Language (Int+Wis), Spot (Con+Wis), Swim (Str+Con), Survival (Wis+Con) and Use Magic Device (Con+Cha)

Skill Points at 1st Level: (8 + Int modifier) x 4
Skill Points at every additional level: 8 + Int modifier


Table: The Noble
{table=head]Level|BAB|BDB|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Special

1st|
+0|
+0|
+1|
+0|
+2| Bonus Feat, Noble Grace +1

2nd|
+1|
+1|
+1|
+0|
+3| Lay on Hands

3rd|
+2|
+1|
+2|
+1|
+3| Noble Grace +2

4th|
+3|
+2|
+2|
+1|
+4| Greater Aid, Art of War, simple

5th|
+3|
+2|
+3|
+2|
+4| Bonus Feat, Honey Tongue

6th|
+4|
+3|
+3|
+2|
+5| Leadership, Noble Grace +3

7th|
+5|
+3|
+3|
+2|
+5| Untouchable Ruler

8th|
+6/+1|
+4|
+4|
+2|
+6 |Delegate, Art of War, simple

9th|
+6/+1|
+4|
+4|
+3|
+6| Noble Grace +4

10th|
+7/+2|
+5|
+5|
+3|
+7| Bonus Feat

11th|
+8/+3|
+5|
+5|
+3|
+7| Skill Mastery, Irrefragable argument

12th|
+9/+4|
+6|
+6|
+4|
+8| Noble Grace +5, Art of War, advanced

13th|
+9/+4|
+6|
+6|
+4|
+8| Guarded Mind

14th|
+10/+5|
+7|
+6|
+4|
+9| Mettle

15th|
+11/+6/+1|
+7|
+7|
+5|
+9|Bonus Feat, Noble Grace +6

16th|
+12/+7/+2|
+8|
+7|
+5|
+10| Superior Aid, Art of War, advanced

17th|
+12/+7/+2|
+8|
+8|
+5|
+10| Harbinger of Terror

18th|
+13/+8/+3|
+9|
+8|
+6|
+11| Noble Grace +7

19th|
+14/+9/+4|
+9|
+9|
+6|
+11| Improved Mettle

20th|
+15/+10/+5|
+10|
+9|
+6|
+12| Bonus Feat, Art of War, complex [/table]


Class Features

Weapon and Armor Proficiency: The Noble is proficient in the use of all simple and martial weapons and with all types of armor and shields (except tower shields).

Bonus Feats: At 1st, 5th, 10th, 15th and 20th level, the Noble can chose a Bonus Feat from the following list. A noble must still meet all prerequisites for a bonus feat, including ability score minimums. The noble's bonus feats include Acrobatic, Agile, Alertness, Animal Affinity, Athletic, Deceitful, Deft Hands, Diligent, Great Fortitude, Investigator, Iron Will, Lightning Reflexes, Magical Aptitude, Nego-tiator, Persuasive, Run, Self-Sufficient, Skill Focus, and Stealthy.

Noble Grace (ex): The Noble may add the listed Bonus as a competence bonus to all skill checks with Bluff, Diplomacy, Gather Information, Intimidate, Knowledge (nobility and royalty) and Sense Motive. Starting on 6th level, he also gains the listed bonus to his leadership score.

Lay on Hands (Su): Beginning at 2nd level, a Noble with a Charisma score of 12 or higher can heal wounds (her own or those of others) by touch. Each day she can heal a total number of hit points of damage equal to her Noble level her Charisma bonus. A Noble may choose to divide her healing among multiple recipients, and she doesn’t have to use it all at once. Using lay on hands is a standard action.

Art of War: at level 4, and every 4 level after that, the Adventurer gains a special ability from the ap-propriate list of Arts of War. No ability may be taken more than once. If an Art of War ability has other such abilities as prerequisites, the Adventurer must possess the prerequisite abilities to take the ability in question.

Greater Aid (ex): Nobles of at least 4th level can use the aid another action to assist multiple allies si-multaneously. Each time he or she uses the aid another action successfully, the Noble may choose to provide the aid another bonus for up to one additional ally per point of positive Charisma modifier, but each of the allies he or she aids must be within 60 feetand must be able to hear the Noble providing advice. Also, whenever the Noble uses the aid another action, the bonus provided is increased by +2.

Honey Tongue (ex): Through sweet words and compliments, a Noble can manipulate and fascinate weaker minds, This works like the Enthrall spell, but can be used at will and uses the Noble’s Bluff skill for the Casting check DC 20). The result of the Bluff check is also used as the DC for the Saving Throw against this ability.

Untouchable Ruler (ex): A Noble of 7th level and higher may add his Charisma bonus (if any) to all Saving Throws.

Leadership: Nobles of 6th-level gain the Leadership feat for free. Further, at every six levels in this class (6th, 12th, and 18th), the Noble gains a bonus cohort, which does not count towards their normal limit of one cohort. Each bonus cohort starts at half the maximum level, rounded down, allowed for a cohort appropriate to the Noble's character level and Leadership Score. These cohorts are, like the main cohort, usually Fighters serving under the Noble and, to a lesser degree, the Noble's main cohort. These extra cohorts are often warriors of the nobility who have pledged their lives to serving the Noble, attach-ing themselves to the Noble's reputation and glory while serving as auxiliary bodyguards.

Delegate (Ex): Nobles of 8th-level and higher are exceptionally capable at delegating tasks to others. When using the aid another action, the Noble can simply make an Intelligence or Wisdom check instead of the normally appropriate roll or check. Also when taking the aid another action, if successful, the Noble's aid provides a bonus for one additional round per 5 points rolled above the DC with that aid another action, and the extra duration of the bonus does not require additional actions.

Skill Mastery: At 11th level the Noble selects a number of skills equal to 3 + their Intelligence modifier, to apply Skill Mastery with. The Noble must possess at least 5 ranks in each skill chosen for this Skill Mastery ability. The Noble may take 10 on checks with those skills regardless of distractions, threats, stress, or being rushed.

Irrefragable Argument (ex): The noble can make completely convincing arguments and can make their opposites doing things they never intended through superior rhetoric. This works like the Sugges-tion spell, but can be used at will and uses the Noble’s Diplomacy skill for the Casting check DC 25). The result of the Diplomacy check is also used as the DC for the Saving Throw against this ability.

Guarded Mind (ex): By 13th-level, the Noble has developed such a complex and guarded mind that he or she is almost invulnerable to mental effects. The Noble gains a +5 bonus on saves and checks against mind-affecting effects, and a +3 bonus on checks to conceal whether they are being sincere, honest, or truthful. He or she is immune to fear and intimidation.

Mettle (Ex): Starting at 14th level, a Noble has mastered a stronger resistance against magic. She can resist magical attacks with her great willpower and fortitude. If she makes a successful fortitude or will save against an attack that normally would have a lesser effect (such as any spell with a saving throw entry of will half or fortitude partial) she instead completely negates the effect. An unconscious or sleeping paladin does not gain the benefit of mettle.

Superior Aid (ex): Nobles of 16th-level and higher are incredibly capable at assisting others with ad-vice and expertise earned in their long career. Each time he or she uses the aid another action success-fully, the Noble may choose to provide the aid another bonus for any number of allies within 60 feet who are able to hear the Noble's advice. Also, whenever the Noble uses the aid another action, the bonus provided is increased by +2, which stacks with the bonus from Greater Aid.

Harbinger of Terror (ex): The incredible social empathy and ability to manipulate other people allow the Noble to scare any opponent into deep depression and desperation. This works like the Crushing Despair spell, but can be used at will and uses the Noble’s Intimidate skill for the Casting check DC 30). The result of the Intimidate check is also used as the DC for the Saving Throw against this ability.

Improved Mettle (Ex): This ability works like Mettle, except that while the Noble still takes no dam-age on a successful saving throw against attacks henceforth she takes only half damage on a failed save. A helpless Noble does not gain the benefit of improved evasion.

Satyr
2009-01-22, 02:59 PM
Paladin
The only thing harder to become a Paladin is to fulfill the expectancies of a Paladin’s life. The Paladin is a warrior and a poet, a leader and an example of a great man. Through their force of their will and their honor alone, Paladins manage to learn magic, even though most of them do not have the Gift, while they are also great warriors. The life of a Paladin is glorious, but often short. A Paladin is a beacon of light and hope in a grim and dark world.

The Paladin was meant to be the single most powerful class in the game - because who else deserves this honor but the most honorful man? Paladins are great warriors and gain several supernatural abilities. As a side note, a Paladin does not necessarily need to be good, as long as he is honorable.
Due to the numerous different brotherhoods to chose, the Paladin also includes the variability I find essential to create versatile and interesting characters.

Hit Points at 1st Level: 20 + Con modifier
Hit Points at Each Additional Level: 4 + Con modifier.

Class Skills: The paladin’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Concentration (Con+Wis), Craft (Int+?), Decipher Script (Int+Wis), Diplomacy (Wis+Cha), Handle Animal (Wis+Cha), Heal (Wis+Cha), Knowledge (nobility and royalty) (2xInt), Knowledge (war and tactics) (2xInt), Knowledge (religion) (2xInt), Perform (sing) (Con+Cha), Profession (Wis+?), Ride (Dex+Cha), Sense Motive (Wis+Cha), Spellcraft (Int+Wis) and Swim (Str+Con)

Skill Points at 1st Level: (5 + Int modifier) x 4.
Skill Points at Each Additional Level: 5 + Int modifier.
Spell Points at 1st level: 0
Spell points at each additional level (starting at level 5): 1 + Wis modifier
Spell point regeneration (per hour of meditation): 2d10 +Wis modifier

Table: The Paladin
{table=head]Level|BAB|BDB|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Special

1st|
+1|
+0|
+2|
+1|
+2| Paladin’s oath, Brotherhood, smite Cha mod/day

2nd|
+2|
+1|
+3|
+1|
+3| Divine grace, lay on hands

3rd|
+3|
+2|
+3|
+2|
+3 |Aura of courage, divine health

4th|
+4|
+3|
+4|
+2|
+4| art of war, simple

5th|
+5|
+3|
+4|
+3|
+4| Smite +1, basic energy control

6th|
+6/+1|
+4|
+5|
+3|
+5| Remove disease 1/week

7th|
+7/+2|
+5|
+5|
+3|
+5| Fanatic 1/day

8th|
+8/+3|
+6|
+6|
+4|
+6| art of war, simple

9th|
+9+4|
+6|
+6|
+4|
+6| Remove disease 2/week

10th|
+10/+5|
+7|
+7|
+5|
+7| Smite +1, armored caster +2

11th|
+11/+6/+1|
+8|
+7|
+5|
+7| Paragon of virtue

12th|
+12/+7/+2|
+9|
+8|
+6|
+8| Remove disease 3/week, art of war, advanced

13th|
+13/+8/+3|
+9|
+8|
+6|
+8| Mettle

14th|
+14/+9/+4|
+10|
+9|
+6|
+9| Fanatic 2/day

15th|
+15/+10/+5|
+11|
+9|
+7|
+9| Remove disease 4/week, smite +1, advanced energy control

16th|
+16/+11/+6/+1|
+12|
+10|
+7|
+10| art of war, advanced

17th|
+17/+12/+7/+2|
+12|
+10|
+8|
+10| Armor of Faith

18th|
+18/+13/+8/+3|
+13|
+15|
+8|
+8|Remove disease 5/week

19th|
+19/+14/+9/+4|
+14|
+16|
+9|
+9| Improved Mettle

20th|
+15/+10/+5|
+15|
+9|
+6|
+12 | Smite +1, art of war, complex
[/table]

Class Features
All of the following are class features of the paladin.

Weapon and Armor Proficiency: Paladins are proficient with all simple and martial weapons, with all types of armor (heavy, medium, and light), and with shields (except tower shields).

Paladin’s Oath: A Paladin must uphold an at least significant code of honor, without receiving the normal bonus from such an oath. A Paladin who breaks her code of honor loses her paladin spells and supernatural abilities. She may not progress any farther in levels as a paladin. She regains her abilities and advancement potential if she atones for her violations, as appropriate for a code violation. A paladin can follow a major code of honor but gets only the bonus of a minor code.
A Paladin’s oath is powerful enough to empower their supernatural powers, and replace the need of the Gift to learn spells and similar powers. Still, the Paladin’s powers are considered to be magic and all rules for magic are applied.

Brotherhood: A Paladin is a member of one of the faith militant orders or a brotherhood of fighters. The different brotherhoods give additional benefits to the paladin dependant from the focus of the brotherhood and add a unique flavor to your paladin.

Smite (Su): A paladin may attempt to smite an enemy with a normal melee attack. Activating the Smite is a move action. She adds her Charisma bonus (if any) to her attack roll and deals 1 extra point of dam-age per paladin level. At first level, the Smite ability can be used Cha modifier times per day, with an additional use every five level.

Divine Grace (Su): At 2nd level, a paladin gains a bonus equal to her Charisma bonus (if any) on all saving throws.

Lay on Hands (Su): Beginning at 2nd level, a paladin with a Charisma score of 12 or higher can heal wounds (her own or those of others) by touch. Each day she can heal a total number of hit points of damage equal to her paladin level her Charisma bonus. A paladin may choose to divide her healing among multiple recipients, and she doesn’t have to use it all at once. Using lay on hands is a standard action.
Alternatively, a paladin can use any or all of this healing power to deal damage to undead creatures. Using lay on hands in this way requires a successful melee touch attack and doesn’t provoke an attack of opportunity. The paladin decides how many of her daily allotment of points to use as damage after successfully touching an undead creature.

Aura of Courage (Su): Beginning at 3rd level, a paladin is immune to fear (magical or otherwise). Each ally within 10 feet of her gains a +4 morale bonus on saving throws against fear effects.
This ability functions while the paladin is conscious, but not if she is unconscious or dead.

Divine Health (Ex): At 3rd level, a paladin gains immunity to all diseases, including supernatural and magical diseases.
Spells: Beginning at 5th level, a paladin gains the ability to cast a small number of divine spells, which are drawn from the paladin spell list. A paladin must choose and prepare her spells in advance.
The Difficulty Class for a saving throw against a paladin’s spell is the spell level + the paladin’s Wis-dom modifier +1d20.
Like other spellcasters, a paladin can cast only a certain number of spells per day, limited by the number of spellpoints. Starting at 4th level, a Paladin gains 1 + Wis modifier spell points per level.
A paladin prepares and casts spells the way a cleric does, though she cannot lose a prepared spell to spontaneously cast a domain spell in its place. A paladin may prepare and cast any spell on the paladin spell list, provided that she can cast spells of that level, but she must choose which spells to prepare during her daily meditation.
For the first four levels, a paladin has no caster level. At 5th level and higher, her caster level is one-half her paladin level.

Basic energy control: At 5th level, a paladin cam channel one spell energy point per turn and can keep a total amount of energy under control equal to her wisdom modifier or three, whichever is lower. The ability to control the spell energies steadily increases while the paladin becomes more experienced.

Remove Disease (Sp): At 6th level, a paladin can produce a remove disease effect, as the spell, once per week. She can use this ability one additional time per week for every three levels after 6th (twice per week at 9th, three times at 12th, and so forth).

Fanatic (Ex): Starting at 7th level, once per day, the Paladin’s righteous zeal allows her to reroll any attack or saving throw. On 14th level, she get another reroll, but every roll can only be rerolled once.

Armored Caster (Ex): While a paladin has access to a small collection of spells, she is a warrior at heart and trains both her magical abilities and her fighting prowess to forge them into one ability. A paladin of the 10th level is used to cast her spells while wearing arms and armor and therefore reduces the armor penalty of her spellcasting checks by 2.

Paragon of Virtue (Ex): A Paladin of 11th level has reached a certain popularity with those she gas sworn to protect. A Paladin gets a +2 Bonus to Diplomacy and Sense Motive.

Mettle (Ex): Starting at 13th level, a Paladin has mastered a stronger resistance against magic. She can resist magical attacks with her great willpower and fortitude. If she makes a successful fortitude or will save against an attack that normally would have a lesser effect (such as any spell with a saving throw entry of will half or fortitude partial) she instead completely negates the effect. An unconscious or sleeping paladin does not gain the benefit of mettle.

Advanced Energy Control: At 15th level, a paladin has improved her ability to control her magic abili-ties a lot better than before. From now on, she can channel two spell energy points per turn and there-fore increase the casting speed of complex spells, and the maximum of energy he can keep under his control increases to her Wisdom modifier +1 or five points, whichever is lower. Since the Paladin has no access to fifth level spells, the maximum spell energy can only be used with Metamagic powers, though.

Armor of Faith (Ex): A Paladin of 17th level is protected by her trust in all things good and holy. When a critical hit or sneak attack is scored on her, there is a 25% chance that the critical hit or sneak attack is negated and damage is instead rolled normally.

Improved Mettle (ex): This ability works like Mettle, except that while the Paladin still takes no dam-age on a successful Fortitude or Will Save saving throw against attacks henceforth he takes only half damage on a failed save. A helpless Paladin does not gain the benefit of improved evasion.


Paladin Orders
At first level, every Paladin character chooses an order or brotherhood she belongs to. Dependant from the chosen Order, the Paladin gets different additional benefits, but sometimes additional obligations and limitations. A paladin can only change her Order through extraordinary circumstances.


The Brotherhood of Fire
The Brotherhood of fire is a cult of paladins who are weapon smiths and armorers as well as warriors. The Brotherhood entertains several arsenals and smithies and many of the Brothers only wear armor or weapons, which were created by them. The crest of the brotherhood is a red and golden flame on grey field.
Requirements: Str 13, Con 13, 4 Ranks Craft (Weaponsmith) or Craft (Armorer)
Benefits: Members of the Brotherhood of Fire get Skill Focus (Craft) as a Bonus Feat on 1st Level. On 7th level they get Craft Magical Arms and Armor as a Bonus Feat. A Brother of fire add +3 to his caster level for the enchantment of magical weapons and armors that he has forged himself.
Obligations: A Brother of the fire may not sell magical weapons or armors he has created; he may give them away to other honorable allies though; obedience towards his order
Limitations: A Brother of the fire does not get the Fanatic ability on 7th level. He gets the ability at 14th level, but only with one use per day.

The Dragon Legion
The Dragon Legion is the largest order of Paladins – mostly because it does not limit itself to recruit only potential men and women of honor who have access o the gift of magic. The Dragon Legionaries are expert warriors who focus completely on their fighting abilities and their supernatural gifts but who do not learn how to cast spells actively. The crest of the Dragon Legion is a green dragon on a red field.
Requirements: Strength 13, Dexterity 13, Constitution 13
Benefits: At 1st level, a Dragon Legionnaire gains Weapon Focus for a weapon of her choice she is pro-ficient with as a bonus feat. At. 4th level, she gains Weapon specialization for the same weapon as a bonus feat. At 8th level, she gains greater weapon focus, at 12th level greater weapon specialization and on 16th level she gains the melee weapon mastery feat for the type of damage of her Chosen Weapon. She does not need to fulfill the bonus feats’ requirements. Additionally, the rigorous martial training of the Dragon Legion grants their members an additional +2 bonus to initiative checks when they are equipped with their weapon of choice.
Obligations: Loyalty to the Legion and those countries and people under its protection.
Limitations: Dragon Legionnaires have no access to spellcasting and don’t get any abilities, which relate to spellcasting like simple energy control or armored caster.

The Glorious Inquisition
The Inquisition is perhaps the most feared of all Paladin orders. The Glorious Inquisitors are traveling through the country, but in opposite to other Paladin Orders, they do not look for outside threats of the society but for inside ones - traitors, heretics, infernalists and warlocks are the prey of the Inquisition and while their efforts and motives are honorable, their methods sometimes aren’t. Sometimes, the Glo-rious Inquisition looks worse than those they hunt and judge.
Requirements: Wisdom 13 +, 4 ranks in Sense Motive
Benefits: A Glorious Inquisitor can use Detect Evil as a cantrip at will. They gain intimidate as an addi-tional class skill. When a Glorious Inquisitor reaches 5th level, he can always take 20 on all casting checks to cast Detect Evil and Discern Lies and may add his Wisdom Modifier to the difficulty to resist those spells. Additionally, an Inquistor gains a +2 Bonus to all Intimidate and Sense Motive checks when he reaches 11th level.
Obligations: Loyalty towards the order, search ad hunt for traitors and heretics, no mercy for the wicked.
Limitations: Inquisitors do not gain the bonuses associated with the Paragon of Virtue trait.

The Green Knights
The Green Knights are an Order of Elves, and Elves only, that is sworn to protect the remaining holds of the Elves against their enemies. The Green Knights are better trained in the mystic ways of magic than most other paladins and share a vast knowledge about spells. The Green Knights’ crest is a pure green shield.
Requirement: Elf, Wisdom 14, 3 Ranks in Spellcraft
Benefits: A Green Knight can chose spells from both the Paladin and the Ranger Spell list.
Obligations: The Green Knights may not attack a fellow Elf without provocation (this does not include Drows) and treat other Elves with respect and generosity; every Green Knight is oath-bound to an Elven monarch or other noble.
Limitations: None

The Knights Errant
This is no brotherhood, but of those paladins who are no member of a larger organization. The knights errant are independent and have no obligations towards any superiors.
Requirements: None.
Benefits: The knights errant are a heterogeneous group with little in common. To express this diversity a knight errant may chose a bonus feat from the following list at 1st level: Acrobatic, Agile, Alertness, Animal Affinity, Athletic, Investigator, Negotiator or Toughness and can chose an additional skill as a class skill.
Obligations: None.
Limitations: None.

The Lions of the Battlefield
The Lions are as depicted as a paladin order can be – they are seen as little more than mere mercenaries that fight for almost everyone who offers them good gold. In truth, the Lions choose very carefully for who they kill and die, and while the order indeed sell their swords as mercenaries, they never does this without consideration – their code of honor may be different from the more traditional brotherhoods, but is just as strong. The crest of the Lions is a golden rampant lion on black field.
Requirements: Str 13, Con 13
Benefits: The lion knights are the most potent warriors among the paladin orders. They get Intimidation as a class skill and Power Attack as a Bonus Feat on 3rd level. Their mercenary attitude also grants them the double amount of starting gold.
Obligations: A Lion Knight may fight as a mercenary, but he is obligated to pay 10% of his pay to the order and may not fight for a dishonorable employer. The Lion knights must be obedient towards their order as well.
Limitations: The Lion Knights do not share the good reputation of other Paladins. They receive only half benefits from the Paragon of Virtue ability.

The Merciful Hand
Not all paladins focus on war and destruction: The Order of the Merciful Hand is more focused on the healing than on the infliction of wounds. They are more combat medics and less warriors – but they are still paladins and they are still chivalric defenders of the helpless. The crest of the merciful hand is a white hand on a blue field.
Requirements: Wis 13, Cha 13
Benefits: Paladins of the merciful hand double their class level to determine how many hitpoints they can heal with their lay on hands ability.
Limitations: Paladins of the Merciful Hand are not proficient with heavy armor.

The Order of the Ram
The Order of the Ram was founded to drive an invading army away and pursue the attackers into their own territory. The Rams as they call themselves are the most aggressive Paladin Order, and well known and feared for their hot-headed attacks and their stubbornness. The members of the Order of the Ram embraces their righteous anger and directs it on any one they deem as evil. The Order is quite badly reputed among those who prefer laid out plans or careful tactics and shun the impulsiveness of the Rams, who on the other hand rarely differentiate between caution and cowardice. The crest of the Order of the Ram is the white head of ram on a green field.
Requirements: None, with the potential exception of impulsiveness and bad temper.
Obligations: Loyalty towards the order, and never show fear.
Benefits: On 1st level, Paladins of the Order of the Ram gain the ability to Rage, like the Berserker ability. On 11th level, they gain the Berserker ability of Indomitable Will and on 17th level the ability of Tireless Rage.
Limitations: Paladins of the Order of the Ram do not have the ability to Smite or the Paragon of Virtue or Armor of Faith class features.

The Radiant Blades
The radiant Blades are one of the most fanatical orders of paladins – the order consists completely of humans and is known for their radical positions and views. Because of their uncompromising attitude, other paladin orders stay on a distant to the fanatics of the radiant blades. The crest of the order consists of three crossed silver swords on a red field.
Requirements: Human
Benefits: Starting at 1st level, a radiant blade gains an additional use of the fanatic ability. At 6th, 12th and 18th level, a Radiant Blade gats a favorite enemy (like the ranger ability of the same name)
Limitations: Paladins of the Radiant Blades do not get the Cure Disease Ability at 6th, 12th and 18th level. They still get this ability at 9th and 15th level.

The Shield of the Realm
The Shield knights, the paladins of the Shields of the Realm are an old and very traditional brotherhood that patrol the border of the civilization and fights against berserkertribes and monsters in the border-lands. The Shields are not very well organized, and most of the paladins of the brotherhood act inde-pendently. The crest of the order is a green oak on golden field.
Requirements: Con 13, Ride 3 Ranks
Benefits: A shield knight gains Knowledge (Nature) and Survival as additional class skills and gets the Endurance Feat at 3rd level as a bonus feat.
Obligations: Obedience towards the Order
Limitations: None.

The Sisterhood of the Bow
The sisters of the bow are a small mystery cult, which only accommodates women. The sisters hunt rapists and war criminals and are very vigilant and sometimes even cruel in their tactics. But the sister-hood does not only prey on the delinquents, it also take care for their victims. The crest of the order is a silver bow with three arrows on blue field.
Requirements: Only female characters can join the sisterhood.
Benefits: A Sister of the bow can use the smite ability with ranged attacks. At 3rd level, A Sister of the Bow gets Point Blank Shot as a Bonus Feat.
Obligations: The sisters of the bow are obligated to support and protect females in peril and to revenge rape; obedience towards the order
Limitations: The sisterhood has a reputation of killing men and favoring women. They only get a +1 Bonus from the Paragon of Virtue ability when dealing with male characters.

The Eagles
The Eagles or Sky Knights are a very rare of Paladins – only a very few are ever chosen into the Order and those who are allowed to join the order have to prove their honor and worthiness before they are allowed into the inner circle of the Order – the community of the Eagle Riders, who are among the most prestigious brotherhood of Paladins. The Eagle Riders share a bond with an Aerie of Giant Eagles and glide through the sky. The Crest of the soaring eagles is a black Eagle on a blue field.
Requirements: A Paladin of the Eagles must uphold a major Code of honor, not only a signifi-cant one. They still gain only the limited benefit of the codex, though.
Benefits: On 8th level, a Paladin of the Eagles gains a Giant Eagle as a Wild Cohort. The Eagle improves in Levels like any Animal Companion, but its strength is determined on the base of the Paladin’s full character level.
Obligations: Paladins of the Soaring Eagles have to follow a more rigid code of honors (see above). They are also supposed to be loyal to their order and actively hunt down and destroy ‘the forces of evil’ on the back of their Eagle Mounts.
Limitations: The stronger bond of the code of honor is limiting enough.

The Stonelords
The Stonelords are the brotherhood of Dwarven Paladins who protect the mountain halls and fortresses of the Dwarven people. In the mountainous and underground environment of the Dwarf realms, they have little need for horses or other mounts and prefer to fight on foot. Even for dwarves, they are ex-tremely resilient. The Stonelord’s crest is a silver axe on a black field.
Requirements: Dwarf, Constitution 16
Benefits: Starting at 6th level, a stonelord paladin gains a natural DR of 1/-. This increases at 9th, 12th, 15th and 18th level.
Limitations: Stonelords do not gain the ability to heal diseases like other Paladins do.

Satyr
2009-01-24, 05:24 AM
Pathfinder
The wilderness is a constant source of danger, and many of those who have to travel are well advised to hire a guide or scout who knows how to survive in the wildness. The Pathfinder is a specialist for the great outside, a well-travel led expert for survival and hunting. The Pathfinder is also a cunning tactician who is used to fight in rough and uneven terrain and can use this to his advantage. The Pathfinder has a broad number of helpful abilities to survive in the wilderness but also in other dangerous environment.
Typical Pathfinders would include poachers, scouts for military units, guerilla warriors in occupied countries or big game hunters.

Originally, the pathfinder was only the scout, but the name was changed as a reminiscence to Paizo's project of the same name. The pathfinder is not only a wilderness expert and tracker, he is also a very competent tactical fighter and guerilla warrior. The pathfinder does not necessarily fight especially well, but smart, using his environment for tactical advantages and exploiting the weaknesses of his opponents.
He is also the best early alert system for a party of adnventurers and on higher levels extremely hard to ambush.

Hit Points at 1st Level: 16+ Con modifier
Hit Points at Each Additional Level: 3 + Con modifier.

Class Skills: The pathfinder’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Balance (2xDex), Climb (Str+Dex), Concentration (Con+Wis), Craft (Int+?), Disable Device (Int+Dex), Escape Artist (Str+Dex), Handle Animal (Cha+Wis), Heal (Cha+Wis), Hide (Dex+Con), Intimidate (Str+Cha), Jump (2xStr), Knowledge (dungeoneering) (2xInt), Knowledge (geography) (2xInt), Knowledge (nature) (2xInt), Listen (Con+Wis), Move Silently (Con+Dex), Profession (Wis+?), Ride (Dex+Cha), Search (Int+Wis), Sense Motive (Wis+Cha), Sleight of Hand (Dex+Cha), Speak Language (Int+Cha), Spot (Con+Wis), Survival (Con+Wis), Swim (Str+Con), Tumble (Str+Dex), and Use Rope (Str+Dex).

Skill Points at 1st Level: (10+ Int modifier) x 4.
Skill Points at Each Additional Level: 10 + Int modifier.

Table: The Pathfnder
{table=head]Level|BAB|BDB|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Special

1st|
+0|
+0|
+2|
+2|
+1|Terrain advantage, trapfinding, Track

2nd|
+1|
+1|
+3|
+3|
+3|Uncanny dodge, Endurance

3rd|
+2|
+1|
+3|
+3|
+2|Trackless step

4th|
+3|
+2|
+4|
+4|
+2|Bonus feat, fast movement +10 ft.

5th|
+3|
+2|
+4|
+4|
+3|Evasion

6th|
+4|
+3|
+5|
+5|
+3|Flawless stride, improved uncanny dodge

7th|
+5|
+3|
+5|
+5|
+3|Assess Opponent

8th|
+6/+1|
+4|
+6|
+6|
+4|Bonus feat, camouflage

9th|
+6/+1|
+4|
+6|
+6|
+4|Wilderness enhanced Senses

10th|
+7/+2|
+5|
+7|
+7|
+5|Blindsense 30 ft.

11th|
+8/+3|
+5|
+7|
+7|
+5|Fast movement +20 ft., Improved Terrain Advantage

12th|
+9/+4|
+6|
+8|
+8|
+6|Bonus feat

13th|
+9/+4|
+6|
+8|
+8|
+6|improved assess opponent

14th|
+10/+5|
+7|
+9|
+9|
+6|Hide in plain sight

15th|
+11/+6/+1|
+7|
+9|
+9|
+7|Wolf Pack Tactics

16th|
+12/+7/+2|
+8|
+10|
+10|
+7|Bonus feat

17th|
+12/+7/+2|
+8|
+10|
+10|
+8|Blind Sense 60 ft

18th|
+13/+8/+3|
+9|
+11|
+11|
+8|Free movement

19th|
+14/+9/+4|
+9|
+11|
+11|
+9|Improved Wolf Pack Tactics

20th|
+15/+10/+5|
+10|
+12|
+12|
+9|Blindsight 30 ft., bonus feat[/table]

Class Features
Weapon and Armor Proficiency: Pathfinders are proficient with all simple weapons and martial weapons. Pathfinders are proficient with light armor, but not with shields.

Terrain advantage (Ex): When the pathfinder gains a cover bonus to defense due to terrain, this bonus is increased by +1. Likewise, the defense bonus due to terrain of your enemies is reduced by 1.

Trapfinding (Ex): Pathfinders can use the Search skill to locate traps when the task has a Difficulty Class higher than 20.
Finding a nonmagical trap has a DC of at least 20, or higher if it is well hidden. Finding a magic trap has a DC of 25 + the level of the spell used to create it.
Pathfinders can use the Disable Device skill to disarm magic traps. A magic trap generally has a DC of 25 + the level of the spell used to create it.
A pathfinder who beats a trap’s DC by 10 or more with a Disable Device check can study a trap, figure out how it works, and bypass it (with her party) without disarming it.

Track: A pathfinder gains Track as a bonus feat at 1st level.

Uncanny Dodge (Ex): Starting at 2nd level, a pathfinder can react to danger before her senses would normally allow her to do so. She retains her Dexterity bonus to AC (if any) even if she is caught flat-footed or struck by an invisible attacker. However, she still loses her Dexterity bonus to AC if immobi-lized.
If a pathfinder already has uncanny dodge from a different class she automatically gains improved un-canny dodge (see below) instead.

Endurance: At 2nd level, a Pathfiner gains Endurance as a Bonus Feat.

Trackless Step (Ex): Starting at 3rd level, a pathfinder leaves no trail in natural surroundings and can-not be tracked. She may choose to leave a trail if so desired.

Bonus Feats: At 4th level and every four levels thereafter, a pathfinder gains a bonus feat, which must be selected from the following list: Brachiation, Danger Sense, Dodge, Endurance, Far Shot, Great Fortitude, Hear the Unseen, Improved Initiative, Improved Swimming, Iron Will, Lightning Reflexes, Mo-bility, Point Blank Shot, Precise Shot, Quick Draw, Quick Reconnoiter, Rapid Reload, Shot on the Run, Skill Focus, Spring Attack. He must meet all the prerequisites for the feat.

Fast Movement (Ex): Starting at 4th level, a pathfinder gains a +10 feet bonus to her speed. At 11th level, this bonus increases to +20 feet.
A pathfinder loses this benefit when wearing medium or heavy armor or when carrying a medium or heavy load.

Evasion (Ex): At 5th level and higher, a pathfinder can avoid even magical and unusual attacks with great agility. If she makes a successful Reflex saving throw against an attack that normally deals half damage on a successful save, she instead takes no damage. Evasion can be used only if the pathfinder is wearing light armor or no armor. A helpless pathfinder does not gain the benefit of evasion.
If a pathfinder already has evasion from a different class she automatically gains improved evasion in-stead.

Flawless Stride (Ex): Starting at 6th level, a pathfinder can move through any sort of terrain that slows movement (such as undergrowth, rubble, and similar terrain) at her normal speed and without taking damage or suffering any other impairment.
This ability does not let her move more quickly through terrain or undergrowth that has been magically manipulated to impede motion or cause damage. A pathfinder loses this benefit when wearing medium or heavy armor or when carrying a medium or heavy load.

Improved Uncanny Dodge (Ex): A pathfinder of 6th level or higher can no longer be flanked.
This defense denies a rogue the ability to sneak attack the character by flanking her, unless the attacker has at least four more rogue levels than the target has pathfinder levels.
If a character already has uncanny dodge (see above) from a second class, the character automatically gains improved uncanny dodge instead, and the levels from the classes that grant uncanny dodge stack to determine the minimum rogue level required to flank the character.
Assess Enemy: At 7th level, the pathfinder can use his keen senses to quickly determine the tendencies, tactics and abilities of a monster he faces. As a standard action, a pathfinder may study his opponent to create an appropriate counter tactic. This study requires a successful Spot check (DC = 10 + the monster’s CR). If successful, the pathfinder gains +1 to Attacks, Defenses and Damage against this specific enemy. These benefits last until the end of the encounter. A pathfinder can assess as many enemies as his wisdom modifier.

Camouflage (Ex): A pathfinder of 8th level or higher can use the Hide skill in any sort of natural ter-rain, even if the terrain doesn’t grant cover or concealment. She loses this benefit when wearing medium or heavy armor or when carrying a medium or heavy load.

Wilderness Enhanced Senses (Ex): A pathfinder is better attuned to his environment than anybody else. Little escapes his notice, from a small bird in a tree to the goblin ambush party.
Each round as a free action, the pathfinder can make Spot and Listen Checks to notice hidden enemies and other details detectable with those skills. Outside of combat, he can always take 10 with Listen and Spot.

Blindsense (Ex): At 10th level, a pathfinder gains the blindsense ability out to 30 feet. She does not need to make a Listen or Spot check to pinpoint the location of a creature within range, provided that she has line of effect to that creature. Any creatures she cannot actually see still have concealment against her and she still has the normal miss chance when attacking them. At 17th level, the reach of a pathfinder’s Blindsense increase to 60 ft.
Visibility still affects the movement of a pathfinder with blindsense.

Improved Terrain Advantage (Ex): Starting at 11th level, the additional bonus to defense from Terrain increases to +2. Likewise, the pathfinder may ignore up to two points of defense bonus of his enemies due to terrain.

Improved Assess Opponent (Ex): Starting at 13th level, a pathfinder doubles his bonus from the Assess Opponent ability.

Hide in Plain Sight (Ex): While in any sort of natural terrain, a pathfinder of 14th level or higher can use the Hide skill even while being observed. A pathfinder loses this benefit when carrying medium or heavy armor or when carrying a medium or heavy load.

Wolf Pack Tactics (Ex): Starting at 15th level, a pathfinder gets used to strike in the exactly right mo-ment. While fighting alongside his allies, he can take advantage of the distraction of an enemy from one of his allies. Once per round, if a foe that is threatened by the pathfinder suffers damage from any source, the pathfinder can make an attack of opportunity against him.

Free Movement (Ex): At 18th level and higher, a pathfinder can slip out of bonds and even the effects of confining spells easily. This ability duplicates the effect of a freedom of movement spell, except that it is always active. A pathfinder loses this benefit when wearing medium or heavy armor or when carry-ing a medium or heavy load.

Improved Wolf Pack Tactics (Ex): At 19th level, the pathfinder is not limited to only one attack of opportunity due to wolf pack tactics. He can use this ability as often as an enemy he threatens suffers damage from a different source (the iterative attacks of an ally do not provoke additional attacks of op-portunity for the pathfinder, but the attacks of two opponents against the same target enables the path-finder to two attack of opportunities if he threatens the same foe).

Blindsight (Ex): A 20th level pathfinder gains the blindsight ability out to 30 feet. Her senses become so acute that she can maneuver and fight flawlessly even in total darkness. Invisibility, darkness, and most kinds of concealment are irrelevant, though the pathfinder must have line of effect to a creature or object to discern it.

Variety: Wilderness Expert
The Wilderness Expert is a Pathfinder who is much more focused on the wild and share a nigh mystical link to the land that even his colleagues can hardly understand. Their deep knowledge or even empathy for the wild and its denizens borders to the mystical, but they are often less practically oriented than most Pathfinders.
The Wilderness Expert Pathfinder gains the Druid’s favorite environment trait on 4th, 8th, 12th, 16th and 20th level. They do not gain the Bonus Feats that are normally gained on these levels.

Satyr
2009-01-24, 06:17 AM
Shapechanger
There are a few very rare children, which are born with an animal spirit within their souls. In some communities, these children are seen as blessed, in others as cursed, but most certainly do not fit in well in a normal society. This is mainly caused by the constant voice of the beast spirit in their mind and the ability to change their form and become a large and powerful beast. Shapechangers are extraordinary individuals and the spirit they share a body with makes them even stranger from the point of view of a more normal person. They are often associated with druids and it is rumored that the first Shapechangers were created as guardians and servants for a circle of powerful druids.

The shapeshifter is effectively the other side of the druid - the druid is all about spellcasting, but has no shapeshifting ability anymore, the Shapeshifter is all about shapeshifting and has only a verylimited access to spellcasting. The shapeshifter is somewhat of a gimmic character; the whole character class is built around one concept - shapeshifting - and that is mostly the attraction of the class. For those players who always felt that playing a towering beastman or lycanthrope is pure greatness will love the shapeshifter; for those who are not that interested in this concept, this class will be somewhat pointless.
The shapeshifter is also a very versatile character with a very broad spectrum of abilities he can cover; there are pure brawl and slash shapeshifters as well as tiny spies. It is also one of the most fluff-heavy classes of Serpents and Sewers as it was designed specifically for a very spiritual campaign.


Hit Points at 1st level: 16 + Con modifier
Hit points at each additional level: 3 + Con modifier

Class Skills: Climb (Str+Dex), Concentration (Con+Wis), Craft (Int+?), Handle Animal (Wis+Cha), Heal (Wis+Cha), Hide (Dex+Con), Jump (2xStr), Knowledge (geography) (2xInt), Knowledge (nature) (2xInt), Listen (Con+Wis), Move Silently (Dex+Con), Profession (Wis+?), Ride (Dex+Cha), Search (Int+Wis), Spot (Wis+Con), Survival (Wis+Con), Swim (Str+Con), and Use Rope (Str+Dex).

Skill Points at 1st Level: (5 + Int modifier) 4.
Skill Points at Each Additional Level: 5 + Int modifier.
Spell Points at 1st level: 0
Spell points at each additional level (starting at level 5): 1 + Wis modifier
Spell point regeneration (per hour of meditation): 2d10 +Wis modifier

The Shapeshifter
{table=head]Level|BAB|BDB|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Special

1st|
+0|
+0|
+2|
+1|
+1|Wild Empathy, Shapeshifting, Spirit Vision

2nd|
+1|
+1|
+3|
+1|
+1|Simple beast feature

3rd|
+2|
+2|
+3|
+2|
+2|Trackless Step

4th|
+3|
+3|
+4|
+2|
+2|Simple beast feature

5th|
+3|
+3|
+4|
+3|
+3|imple beast feature, Whispering Spirit

6th|
+4|
+4|
+5|
+3|
+3|Woodland Stride

7th|
+5|
+5|
+5|
+3|
+3|advanced beast feature

8th|
+6/+1|
+6|
+6|
+4|
+4|Healing Changes

9th|
+6/+1|
+6|
+6|
+4|
+4|advanced beast feature, greater beast form

10th|
+7/+2|
+7|
+7|
+5|
+5|Bonus Feat

11th|
+8/+3|
+8|
+7|
+7|
+5|Language of the Land

12th|
+9/+4|
+9|
+8|
+6|
+6|advanced beast feature, Spirit precognition

13th|
+9/+4|
+9|
+8|
+6|
+6|Fast Change

14th|
+10/+5|
+10|
+9|
+6|
+6|advanced beast feature

15th|
+11/+6/+1|
+11|
+9|
+7|
+7|advanced energy control

16th|
+12/+7/+2|
+12|
+10|
+7|
+7|complex beast feature

17th|
+12/+7/+2|
+12|
+10|
+10|
+8|Fast Healing 2

18th|
+13/+8/+3|
+13|
+11|
+8|
+8|complex beast feature, Spirit attack

19th|
+14/+9/+4|
+14|
+11|
+11|
+9|Spirit Form

20th|
+15/+10/+5|
+15|
+12|
+12|
+9|complex beast feature, Perfect beast form[/table]

Class Features:
Weapon and Armor proficiency: The Shapechanger is proficient with all simple weapons. Shapechangers are also proficient with all natural attacks (claw, bite, and so forth) of any form they assume. They are not proficient with any shields or armor.

Languages: A shapechanger bonus language options include Sylvan, the language of woodland creatures. This choice is in addition to the bonus languages available to the character because of her race.

Shapeshifting (Su): A shapechanger can change his form as often as she wants per day, and if she knows more than one form, she can change from one animal to another without problems without re-turning to human form first. There is no time limit how long a shapechanger can spend in any chosen form. Changing form (to beast form or back) is a full round action and doesn’t provoke an attack of opportunity.
In any form, the shapechanger keeps her Hit Dice, Hit Points, base attack bonus, base defense bonus, base saving throw bonuses, and skills regardless of the given form. The abilities of the shapechanger are adjusted by the assumed animal form. In beast form, the shapeshifters loses her original creature type and counts as a magical creature.
At first level, the shapechanger can chose a number of simple beast features equal to his Wisdom modi-fier. A shapechanger gains an additional beast feature on every even class level. Additionally, the Shapeshifter’s charisma is reduced by 6 points while all his physical abilities are increased by two points.
Held, carried and worn gear meld into the animal form and ceases to function. Armor, both mundane and magically enhanced does not grant any bonus anymore. Magical items do not merge with the new body but adapt to the new form and can still be used. It takes a full round action to change shape.
A shapechanger can not activated magic items or spells in animal form. They can not talk, or use any equipment that would need opposable thumbs. But she gains natural weapons, according to the chosen animal form. This natural weaponry gain an enhancement of of the shapechanger’s class level (round down) and at 4th and any higher level, they are considered as magical attacks.
The damage dice given are for medium sized shapechangers; small and large shapechangers should adjust the damage.
Beast Features: At every even level, the Shapeshifter gains additional beast features added to his beast form when she changes the shape. The more powerful the shapeshifter grows, the more powerful the abilities of his beast form get. Starting at level 8, he can choose from the advanced beast feature list and at level 16 and after from the complex beast feature list.

Wild Empathy (ex): A shapechanger can improve the attitude of an animal. This ability functions just like a Diplomacy check made to improve the attitude of a person. The shapechanger rolls 1d20 and adds her class level and her Charisma modifier to determine the wild empathy check result.
The typical domestic animal has a starting attitude of indifferent, while wild animals are usually unfriendly.
To use wild empathy, the shapechanger and the animal must be able to study each other, which means that they must be within 30 feet of one another under normal conditions. Generally, influencing an ani-mal in this way takes 1 minute but, as with influencing people, it might take more or less time.
A shapechanger can also use this ability to influence a magical beast with an Intelligence score of 1 or 2, but she takes a -4 penalty on the check.

Spirit Vision (ex): The Senses of the Spirit denizen of the Shapechanger give the host the ability to sense what is real and what is not. The Shapechanger gains a +2 Bonus to resist or disbelieve Illusions.
Spells: Beginning at 5th level, a shapeshifter gains the ability to cast a small number of divine spells, which are drawn from the Ranger spell list. A Shapeshifter must choose and prepare her spells in ad-vance.
The Difficulty Class for a saving throw against a Shapeshifter’s spell is the spell level + the Shapeshifter’s Wisdom modifier +1d20.
Like other spellcasters, a Shapeshifter can cast only a certain number of spells per day, limited by the number of spellpoints. Starting at 5th level, a Shapeshifter gains 1 + Wis modifier spell points per level.
A Shapeshifter prepares and casts spells the way a cleric does, though she cannot lose a prepared spell to spontaneously cast a domain spell in its place. A Shapeshifter may prepare and cast any spell on the Ranger spell list, provided that she can cast spells of that level, but she must choose which spells to prepare during her daily meditation.
Through 4th level, a Shapeshifter has no caster level. At 5th level and higher, her caster level is one-half her Shapeshifter class level.
Basic energy control: At 5th level, a shapeshifter can channel one spell energy point per turn and can keep a total amount of energy under control equal to her wisdom modifier or three, whichever is lower.

Whispering Spirit (Su): When reaching 6th level, the Shapechanger learns to communicate silently with his spirit within and can use this as a source of knowledge and insight. The Shapechanger gains an en-hancement bonus to Wisdom or a chosen skill check equal to her class levels. Activating the power is a free action, the power lasts 1 round, and it is usable once per day.

Healing Changes (Su): Starting at 9th level, the Shapeshifter can heal her wounds through the change into her beast form. Whenever she assumes the beast form, she regains lost hit points as if you had rested for a night. The otherworldly presence of the spirit within her soul also grants the shapeshifter the fast healing 1 ability. This Bonus increases to Fast Healing 2 at 17th level.

Greater Beast Form: On 10th level, the shapeshifter’s control over her basi shapeshifter has greatly increased – the Charisma Penalty in Beast Form is reduced to –4, while the Bonus to the Physical abili-ties is increased to +4.
Language of the Land (ex): Starting at 11th level, the shapechanger can communicate with all spirits and animals without problem.

Spirit Precognition (Su): At 12th level, the perception of the spirit and the host is almost completely merged, granting the Shapechanger the ability to intuitively ‘feel’ what happens in her environment. This ability grant Blindsense with a reach of 60 feet.

Fast Change (Ex): A shapechanger of 13th level or higher only needs a move action instead of a full round action to change her shape.
Advanced Energy Control: At 15th level, a shapeshifter has improved her ability to control her magic abilities a lot better than before. From now on, she can channel two spell energy points per turn and therefore increase the casting speed of complex spells, and the maximum of energy he can keep under his control increases to her Wisdom modifier +1 up to a – theoretic – maximum of five Spell energy points.

Spirit Attack (Ex): The spirit within the Shapechanger allows her to strike what they can sense, inde-pendently of the target’s actual physical constitution. All attacks of the Shapeshifter are treated as if the weapon – including the shapeshifter’s natural weapon – has the Ghost touch enchantment.

Spirit Form (Su): At 19th level, the shapeshifter and the spirit in her have completely merged. Once per day, the shapeshifter can become incorporeal for 3 + Wisdom Modifier rounds.

Perfect Beast Form: On 20th level, the shapeshifter’s beast form is bare of any weaknesses. She no longer suffers from any Charisma Penalty in Beast form and gains a total Bonus of +6 to all her physical abilities.

The Shapeshifter's beast features

Simple Beast Features:

Adaptive Coloring: The shapeshifter gains a +8 bonus to hide while in beast form in a natural environment.

Climber: While in Beast Form, the shapeshifter gains a climb speed equal to half his move rate (and a bonus of +8 to climb checks, can always take 10 on climb checks and retains their dexterity bonus to defense while climbing). You can take this feature twice, and gain climb speed equal to the shapeshifter’s full speed at the second time.

Fast Movement: The base movement of the shapeshifter increases by +10’. This feature can be taken multiple times and its effects stack.

Hold Breath: A shapeshifter in beast form can hold its breath for a number of rounds equal to 4 its Constitution score before he risks drowning.

Natural Armor: The natural armor of the shapechanger improves by +1. This feature can be taken multiple times and its effects stack.

Natural Attacks: Bite The beast form gets a natural bite attacks, dealing 1d6 points of slashing damage for a medium creature.

Natural Attacks: Claws The beast form gets two natural claw attacks, dealing 1d4 points of slashing damage for a medium creature.

Natural Grapple: The shapechanger grapples as if he was one size category bigger than he really is when he assumes beast form.

Natural Trip: The shapeshifter trips his enemies as if he was one size category larger than he really is when he assumes beast form.

Nightvision: In Beastform, the shapeshifter can see as if he had nightvision:

Physical Prowess: The shapechanger adds +2 to any physical score when entering his beast form. Once this ability is chosen, it can not be changed. This feature can be taken multiple times and its effects stack.

Powerful Built: The shapchanger’s Beast form is bigger and broader than usual. He gains the powerful built trait. This ability does not change the damage of the beast form’s natural attacks.

Scent: The shapeshifter gains the scent extraordinary ability when assuming his beast form.

Size adaptation: small and medium: A small character gains medium size in beast form. Likewise, a medium sized shapechanger changes to small size when he assumes the beast form. This does not influence any ability scores but the damage of the natural attacks.

Slight Built: The shapeshifters beast form is unusual skinny and small. While in Beastform, the Shapechanger gains the Slight Build trait. This ability does not change the damage of the beast forms natural attacks.

Swimmer: While in Beast Form, the shapeshifter gains a swim speed equal to half his normal move rate. You can take this feature twice, and gain climb speed equal to the shapeshifter’s full speed at the second time.
Wild Spell: The shapechanger gains wild spell as a bonus feat.

Advanced beast features:

Burrow: A shapechanger in beast form gains a burrow speed of 10’.

Blind Sense: The shapechanger gains a blind sense ability up to 20’ when assuming beast form. This feature can be taken multiple times, and increases the blindsense range by +20’.

Cheetah Speed: (Requirement: Fast Movement) Once per hour, the shapeshifter in beast form can move up to ten times his normal speed when he makes a charge.

Gills: The shapechanger’s beast form has gills and allows him to stay in water for an unlimited time span.

Humanoid Form: The beast form of the shapeshifter walks upright and can use its Arms to use tools and weapons and such like. The shapeshifter’s creature type changes to Monstrous Human and she can use all items and even armor and weapons in this form.

Improved Natural Weapons (Requirement: Natural Attacks): The damage of all of the Natural Attacks of the shapechanger’s beastform increases by one step.

Large Size (Requirement: Ability to assume medium size): The beast form of the shapechanger counts as a large creature.

Poison, killing: (Requirement: Natural Bite Attack): The bite attack of the east form serves as a carrier for a deadly poison. The poison deals 1d2 of consititution damage as initial damage and 1d4 points of constitution damage as secondary damage. The poison’s DC is 10+ half the shapechanger’s class level. The shapeshifter can not gain access to more than one form of poison.

Poison, paralyzing: (Requirement: Natural Bite Attack): The bite attack of the east form serves as a carrier for a paralyzing poison. The poison deals 1d2 of dexterity damage as initial damage and 1d4 points of dexterity damage as secondary damage. The poison’s DC is 10+ half the shapechanger’s class level. The shapeshifter can not gain access to more than one form of poison.

Poison, weakening: (Requirement: Natural Bite Attack): The bite attack of the east form serves as a carrier for a weakening poison. The poison deals 1d2 of strength damage as initial damage and 1d4 points of strength damage as secondary damage. The poison’s DC is 10+ half the shapechanger’s class level. The shapeshifter can not gain access to more than one form of poison.

Pounce: (Requirement: Natural Attacks, fast movement) While in beast form, the shapechanger gains the pounce ability.

Powerful Charge: The natural attacks of the shapeshifter’s beast form deals 2d6 additional damage when she charges.

Rake (Requirements: Claws, Natural Grapple): When grappling a foe in beast form, the shapechanger can attack with his natural attacks without penalty.

Smaller Changes: Instead of one complex change, the shapeshifter can chose three simple beast features and add them to her beast form.

Tremor sense: Somehow, the Shapeshifter can feel the vibrations of the ground. She gains tremor sense 30’ while in beast form.

Complex Beast Features

Advanced Changes: Instead of one complex beast feature, the shapeshifter can choose two advanced features.

Blind Sight: The shapeshifter’s beast form gains the blind sight ability with a reach of 20’. This feature can be taken several times, increasing the creature’s blind sight by 20’.

Deadly Poison (Requirement: Any poison): The ability damage of the poison increases by one step (1d3 initial damage and 1d6 as follow up damage) and the poison’s Save throw difficulty increases by +2.

Diminutive Size (Requirement: Ability to assume tiny size): The shapeshifter counts as a diminutive creature after assuming beast form.

Flight (Requirement: medium or smaller Beast form): The shapeshifter’s beast form grows wings, giving her the ability to fly. She gains a flying speed equal to her movement rate +10’ and a maneuverability that depends on the beast form’s size:

Medium: clumsy maneuverability
Small: poor maneuverability
Tiny: average maneuverability
Diminutive: good maneuverability.

This feature can be taken several times, each times it increases the flying speed by 10’ and improves the maneuverability by one step.

Greater Natural Weapons (Requirement: Improved Natural Weapons): The natural weapons of the shapeshifter’s beast form increases a step. This stacks with the damage bonus of the advanced Beast Feature improved natural weapons.

Huge Size (Requirement: Ability to assume large size): The shapeshifter counts as a huge creature in beast form.

Spit Poison (Requirement: Any poison): Instead of a bite, the shapeshifter can spit her poison to hurt her enemies. Spitting a poison is a ranged touch attack with 10’ range increment and spitting poison is a standard action attack. A natural 20 on the attack roll means that the poison has hit the enemies eyes and blinded him.

Swallow Whole (Requirement: large Size or bigger, natural bite attack, natural grapple): The shapeshifter gains the swallow whole ability. After swallowing an enemy, the shapeshifter can’t change back to human form without dying horribly for 24 hours.

endoperez
2009-01-24, 08:37 AM
If a paladin "falls from grace", will he still retain his extraordinary abilities and his Arts of War? Paladins of some orders, like Radian Blades, look like they would retain many of their abilities even if they "fell". They'd still lose the most defining features, but they would still work as "blackguards" of a sort.

There could be one or two more paladin orders. One based around traditional mounted combat (i.e. free Wild Cohort and/or Mounted Combat feats) is missing, most notably. Perhaps the Knight Errant (orderless) should get this. This way a paladin that focuses on mounted combat could progress from Knight Errant to Eagle (if he wants to).

Satyr
2009-01-25, 05:25 AM
If a paladin "falls from grace", will he still retain his extraordinary abilities and his Arts of War? Paladins of some orders, like Radian Blades, look like they would retain many of their abilities even if they "fell". They'd still lose the most defining features, but they would still work as "blackguards" of a sort.

The paladin loses only the spellcasting and the supernatural abilities, not the extraordinary abilities like Paragon of Virtue or Mettle.


There could be one or two more paladin orders. One based around traditional mounted combat (i.e. free Wild Cohort and/or Mounted Combat feats) is missing, most notably.

There is always more place for more Paladin orders, Man-at-arms way of the warrior, and other lenses. I would add those templates to every single class, if I knew how that would make sense and would give every character a vast palette of choices for a specific development. At the moment, only the Paladin, the Man-at-arms and the wizard have this flexibility, but I think about "favorite crime" lenses for thieves, more specific cults and religions for clerics and battle priests, totems for druids, shapeshifters and perhaps berserkers, and so on.
The idea of a "horse lord" order of Paladins is a good one, though.

Catattack
2009-01-25, 08:08 AM
dude, this material rocks! Can you make any 4e stuff like this (especially orcs)!

Satyr
2009-01-25, 08:48 AM
I fear that the things we did were mostly based on the opposite concept of D&D 4th edition. 4th edition is motl about very balanced classes snd every player can participate through very flashy and impressive stunts; Serpents and Sewers doesn't care much about balance and is very strongly focused on versimilitude and a gritty, unflashy presentation.
4th edition works best if you think of the player characters as comic book superheroes in a pseudo-medieval word; Serpents and Sewers characters are intended to be more like the hitorical counterpart.

I have once tried to make 4th edition houserules (http://www.giantitp.com/forums/showthread.php?t=97580) with a similar taste; the general opinion was that they weren't worth it. For Orcs, just add the two missing skill bonuses; I would sugest +2 to Intimidate and Endurance.

Satyr
2009-01-25, 10:52 AM
Sorcerer
Sorcerers are powerful spellcasters, but their magic is wild and uncontrolled in comparison to the re-search-focused bookworms that call themselves wizards. Sorcerers do not learn magic as much as they use it intuitively. They never get a formal education and generally less versatile than wizards, but with-out the education of the latter they have a more playful access to their spells which seem to grant them a deeper understanding for them.

I really don't like this sorcerer write-up. I have also no idea how it could be improved though, so I just put it in here and hope for creative feedback.
Perhaps I will eliminate the heritage crap and will introduce specific bloodline or talent lenses, but I have no idea how to do this yet.

Hit Points at 1st Level: 8 + Con modifier
Hit Points at each additional Level: 1 + Con Modifier

Class Skills
The sorcerer’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Bluff (2xCha), Concentration (Con+Wis), Craft (Int+?), Handle Animal (Wis+Cha), Knowledge (arcana) (2xInt), Knowledge (dungeoneering) (2xInt), Knowledge (nature) (2xInt), Perform (Cha+?), Profession (Wis+?), Speak Lan-guage, Spellcraft (Int+Wis), Survival (Con+Wis), and Use Magic Device (Con+Cha).

Skill Points at 1st Level: (5 + Int modifier) 4.
Skill Points at Each Additional Level: 5 + Int modifier.

Spell Points at 1st Level: 12 + Cha modifier
Spell Points at each additional level: 5 + Cha modifier
Spell point regeneration (per full night’s rest): 3d12 + Cha modifier
Spell acquisition points per level: 8 + Cha modifier

Table: the Sorcerer
{table=head]Level|BAB|BDB|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Special

1st|
+0|
+0|
+0|
+0|
+2|Eschew Material, Heritage Feat, simple Energy Control

2nd|
+1|
+1|
+0|
+0|
+3|-

3rd|
+1|
+1|
+1|
+1|
+3| -

4th|
+2|
+2|
+1|
+1|
+4| -

5th|
+2|
+2|
+2|
+2|
+4|Heritage Feat

6th|
+3|
+3|
+2|
+2|
+5|advanced Energy Control

7th|
+3|
+3|
+2|
+2|
+5|-

8th|
+4|
+4|
+2|
+2|
+6|-

9th|
+4|
+4|
+3|
+3|
+6|-

10th|
+5|
+5|
+3|
+3|
+7|Heritage Feat

11th|
+5|
+5|
+3|
+3|
+7| -

12th|
+6/+1|
+6|
+4|
+4|
+8|complex energy control

13th|
+6/+1|
+6|
+4|
+4|
+8|-

14th|
+7/+2|
+7|
+4|
+4|
+9|-

15th|
+7/+2|
+7|
+5|
+5|
+9|Heritage Feat

16th|
+8/+3|
+8|
+5|
+5|
+10| -

17th|
+8/+3|
+8|
+5|
+5|
+10| -

18th|
+9/+3|
+9|
+6|
+6|
+11|perfect energy control

19th|
+9/+4|
+9|
+6|
+6|
+11|-

20th|
+10/+5|
+10|
+6|
+6|
+11|heritage feat[/table]

Class Features
All of the following are class features of the sorcerer.

Weapon and Armor Proficiency: Sorcerers are proficient with all simple weapons. They are not proficient with any type of armor or shield.

Spells: A sorcerer casts arcane spells, which are drawn primarily from the sorcerer/wizard spell list. He can cast any spell he knows without preparing it ahead of time, the way a wizard or a cleric must (see below).
The Difficulty Class for a saving throw against a sorcerer’s spell is the spell level + the sorcerer’s Cha-risma modifier +d20.
A sorcerer starts the game with 12 + Charisma modifier spell points. On each additional level, he gains 5 + Charisma modifier additional spell points. The number of spellpoints limit the of spells per day.
A sorcerer regains spellpoints as an arcane spellcaster.
A sorcerer’s selection of spells is extremely limited. A sorcerer begins play knowing 4 0-level spells and two 1st-level spells of your choice. At each new level, a sorcerer gains a pool of 8 + Cha modifier acquisition points for gaining new spells, whereby the cost of every spell is equal to its spell level. (Exam-ple: A sorcerer with Charisma 18 reaching 7th level would gain 12 points to gather new spells – he could learn 4 level 3 spells, 6 level 2 spells or 12 level 1 spells or a combination of this like 3 level-3 spells, two level-1 spells and two new cantrips). These new spells can be common spells chosen from the sor-cerer/wizard spell list, or they can be unusual spells that the sorcerer has gained some understanding of by study for the double costs. A sorcerer can not spare his spell acquisition points to learn more power-ful spells on a higher level.
Upon reaching 4th level, and at every even-numbered sorcerer level after that (6th, 8th, and so on), a sorcerer can choose to learn a new spell in place of one he already knows. In effect, the sorcerer "loses" the old spell in exchange for the new one. The new spell’s level must be the same as that of the spell being exchanged, and it must be at least two levels lower than the highest-level sorcerer spell the sor-cerer can cast. A sorcerer may swap only a single spell at any given level, and must choose whether or not to swap the spell at the same time that he gains new spells known for the level.
Unlike a wizard or a cleric, a sorcerer doesn’t need to prepare his spells in advance. He can cast any spell he knows at any time, assuming he has not yet used up his spellpoints. He does not have to decide ahead of time which spells he’ll cast.

Basic energy control: At 1st level, a sorcerer can channel one spell energy point per turn and can keep a total equal to his Charisma modifier Energy points under his control, up to a maximum of three points.

Eschew Materials: The innate magic of the sorcerers makes the use of simpler rituals and spell compo-nents unnecessary. A sorcerer gains Eschew Materials as a bonus feat at 1st

Hereditary Feat: At 1st, 5th and every five levels after, a sorcerer gains a hereditary or draconic feat as a bonus feat. The sorcerer must fulfill the feat’s requirements.

Advanced Energy Control: At 6th level, a sorcerer has learned to control the flow of magic energies a lot better than before. From now on, he can channel two spell energy points per turn and therefore in-crease the casting speed of complex spells, and the maximum of energy he can keep under his control increases to Charisma modifier+1 or five, which ever is lower. From now on, the sorcerer also gains an additional spell acquisition point per level (the total number increases to 7 + Cha modifier).

Complex Energy Control: At 12h level, the sorcerer becomes a true master of the arts of magic. Now, he can channel up to three spellpoints per turn, and control a maximum of spell energy up to Charisma modifier +2 or seven points, whichever is lower. Additionally, the sorcerer also gains an additional spell acquisition point per level (the total number increases to 8 + Cha modifier).

Perfect energy control: At 18th level, a sorcerer has perfected the arts of magic. He can control the inner flame of magic so effectively that he can channel up to 4 spellpoints per turn. His maximum of spell energy that he can control increases to Charisma mod +3, up to a maximum of 9 apell energy points and the sorcerer also gains an additional spell acquisition point per level as well (the total number increases to 9 + Cha modifier).

Primal Fury
2009-01-25, 01:37 PM
This is a really nice setup you have here. And it feels like you made the Shapechanger especially for me. That's sweet of you. :smallredface:

:smalltongue: One question though. You mentioned somewhere that you need a specific background in order to take certain casting classes, but I noticed how you didn't mention the classes whose spell-casting is not their main feature, such as the Shapechanger or the Mage Blade. Would these classes also be under the same restrictions as others?

EDIT: As a sidenote, I'm wondering why certain classes are not included among any races favored classes? :smallconfused:

EDIT 2: One last thing. Did you mean to give the Shapechanger Advanced Energy Control? I don't see a description for it amidst the other class abilities.

Satyr
2009-01-26, 03:25 AM
This is a really nice setup you have here. And it feels like you made the Shapechanger especially for me. That's sweet of you.

I'm glad you liked it. The shapeshifter is one of the better (in terms of quality, not necessarily power) classes in S&S, mostly because of the flexibility. In the temproarily inactive group that developed the whole stuff, we had two of them - a very traditional werewolf and a girl who turned into a giant snake.
I am also working on a variant of this class, not based on nature spirits but on demon possesion, which will be a lot more aggressive and desperate.


One question though. You mentioned somewhere that you need a specific background in order to take certain casting classes, but I noticed how you didn't mention the classes whose spell-casting is not their main feature, such as the Shapechanger or the Mage Blade. Would these classes also be under the same restrictions as others?

All spellcasting classes except the paladin require the Gift character trait. The Paladin is an exception to strengthen his position of the most powerful class in the game (it is helpful to define an upper limit for power as an orientation. For me, that was the Paladin, as I found that this class deserves a bit of epicness and makes the mechanical power up with quite severe roleplaying drawbacks.).


As a sidenote, I'm wondering why certain classes are not included among any races favored classes?

That is intentional. The spellcasting classes are not avialable without the Gift. The Gift character trait includes a favorite spellcaster class of the fiting way of magic. Multiclassing between magical classes doesn't work in Serpents and Sewers (as long as I do not have found a way to come up with a solution for the spell points that doesn't require doubled bookkeeping), so it is just not necessary for any species to have a favorite spellcasting class.
There are other classes who are not among the species' favored classes, but they are somewhat special cases. The adventurer is a favorite class for everyone. Noble and Paladin are designed to be very rare classes, so that they are only available as favorite classes. through fitting character background traits. And the Weapon Master is effectively a more formalised and specialised man-at-arms and counts as one for favorite classes.


One last thing. Did you mean to give the Shapechanger Advanced Energy Control? I don't see a description for it amidst the other class abilities.

Yes, they get AEC on 15th level; the description seems to be forgotten. I will add it immediately.

Satyr
2009-01-26, 06:00 AM
Spell thief
Not everyone who has the Gift must be a disciplined, honorable person. Magic is power, and power always includes the promise of corruption, and some spellcasters combine this to use their powers for their own advantage –on the costs of others. Spellthieves are thieves, who use their magic for their prowls, but they do not only steal material goods. When magic is power, it becomes more valuable than gold and silver, so what lies closer than steal magic instead?

The spellthief is a hybrid class; as the Mage blade is the crossover between a fighter and an arcane spellcaster, the Spellthief is the combination of a spellcaster and a rogue. It is therefore a very flexible and adaptable class with a very broad range of possibilities, but also with some unique abilities (because without those there would be no point to a hybrid class as you could just multiclass and take both aspects seperately).


Hit Points at 1st Level: 12 + Con modifier
Hit Points at Each Additional Level: 2 + Con modifier.

Class Skills: The spell thief’s class skills (and the key abilities for each skill) are Appraise (Int+Cha), Bluff (2xCha), Concentration (Con+Wis), Craft (Int+?), Decipher Script (Int+Wis), Escape Artist (Str+Dex), Gather Information (2xCha), Hide (Dex+Con), Jump (2xStr), Knowledge (all skills, taken individually) (2xInt), Listen (Con+Wis), Move Silently (Con+Dex), Open Lock (Dex+Int), Profession (Wis+?), Search (Int+Wis), Sleight of Hand (Dex+Cha), Spellcraft (Int+Wis), Spot (Con+Wis), Swim (Str+), Tumble (Dex) and Use Magic Device (Cha).

Skill Points at 1st Level: (8 + Int modifier) x 4.
Skill Points at Each Additional Level: 8+ Int modifier.

Spell Points at 1st Level: 8 + Cha modifier
Spell points at each additional level: 3 + Cha modifier
Spell Aquisition points per level: 4 + Charisma modifier
Spell point regeneration (per full night’s rest): 3d12 + Cha modifier

Table: The spellthief
{table=head]Level|BAB|BDB|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Special

1st|
+0|
+0|
+0|
+2|
+2|Spells, Sneak attack +1d6, energy drain, basic energy control

2nd|
+1|
+1|
+0|
+3|
+3|Detect magic, steal energy resistance

3rd|
+2|
+1|
+1|
+3|
+3|Break Spell

4th|
+3|
+2|
+1|
+4|
+4|Magic strike

5th|
+3|
+2|
+1|
+4|
+4|Sneak attack +2d6, spellgrace +1

6th|
+4|
+3|
+2|
+5|
+5| Absorb spell

7th|
+5|
+3|
+2|
+5|
+5|Energy drain (touch)

8th|
+6/+1|
+4|
+2|
+6|
+6|Steal energy resistance (touch)

9th|
+6/+1|
+4|
+3|
+6|
+6|Arcane sight, sneak attack +3d6

10th|
+7/+2|
+5|
+3|
+7|
+7|energy drain (items), advanced energy control

11th|
+8/+3|
+5|
+3|
+7|
+7|spellgrace +2, Break Spell (touch)

12th|
+9/+4|
+6|
+4|
+8|
+8|Discover spells

13th|
+9/+4|
+6|
+4|
+8|
+8| Absorb spell (area and effect spells), sneak attack +4d6

14th|
+10/+5|
+7|
+4|
+9|
+9|Steal energy resistance (ranged)

15th|
+11/+6/+1|
+7|
+5|
+9|
+9 |energy drain (reached)

16th|
+12/+7/+2|
+8|
+7|
+10|
+10|Steal spell resistance

17th|
+12/+7/+2|
+8|
+5|
+10|
+10|Sneak attack +5d6, spellgrace +3

18th|
+13/+8/+3|
+9|
+6|
+11|
+11|Greater arcane sight

19th|
+14/+9/+4|
+9|
+6|
+11|
+11|Break Spell (ranged)

20th|
+15/+10/+5|
+10|
+6|
+12|
+12|energy drain (1d10), complex energy control[/table]

Class Features
Weapon and Armor Proficiency: A spell thief is proficient with all simple weapons, one chosen mar-tial weapon and with light armor but not with shields.

Spells: A spell thief has the ability to cast a small number of spells as an arcane spellcaster, which are drawn from the Bard spell list. He can cast any spell he knows without preparing it ahead of time, just as a sorcerer can. The Difficulty Class for a saving throw against a spell thief’s spell is the spell level + the spell thief’s Charisma modifier + 1d20.
Like other spellcasters, a spell thief can cast only a certain number of spells of each spell level per day, limited by his spell points. A spell thief gains 6 + Cha modifier spell points at 1st level, and 2 + Intelli-gence modifier each additional level.
A spell thief begins play knowing only 3 level 0 spells and one single level one spell of the player’s choice. At each new level, a spell thief gains a spell acquisition pool of 4 + Charisma modifier for gain-ing new spells, whereby the cost of every spell is equal to its spell level. (Example: A spell thief with Charisma 16 reaching a new level would gain 6 points to gather new spells – he could learn 2 level 3 spells or 3 level 2 spells or 6 level 1 spells or any combination of this). These new spells can be com-mon spells chosen from the beguiler spell list. A spell thief can not spare his spell acquisition points to learn more powerful spells on a higher level.
Upon reaching 8th level, and at every spell thief level after that, a spell thief can choose to learn a new spell in place of one he already knows. In effect, the spell thief “loses” the old spell in exchange for the new one. The new spell’s level must be the same as that of the spell being exchanged, and it must be at least one level lower than the highest-level spell thief spell the spell thief can cast. A spell thief may swap only a single spell at any given level, and must choose whether or not to swap the spell at the same time that he gains new spells known for the level.

Basic energy control: At 1st level, a spellthief can channel one spell energy point per turn. The total sum of Energy points the spellthief can keep under control is equal to his Charisma modifier or three, whichever is lower.

Sneak Attack (Ex): If a spell thief can catch an opponent when he is unable to defend himself effec-tively from his attack, he can strike a vital spot for extra damage.
The spell thief’s attack deals extra damage any time his target would be denied a Dexterity bonus to AC (whether the target actually has a Dexterity bonus or not), or when the spell thief flanks his target. This extra damage is 1d6 at 1st level, and it increases by 1d6 every four spell thief levels thereafter. Should the spell thief score a critical hit with a sneak attack, this extra damage is not multiplied.
Ranged attacks can count as sneak attacks only if the target is within 30 feet.
With a sap (blackjack) or an unarmed strike, a spell thief can make a sneak attack that deals nonlethal damage instead of lethal damage. He cannot use a weapon that deals lethal damage to deal nonlethal damage in a sneak attack, not even with the usual –4 penalty.
A spell thief can sneak attack only living creatures with discernible anatomies—undead, constructs, oozes, plants, and incorporeal creatures lack vital areas to attack. Any creature that is immune to critical hits is not vulnerable to sneak attacks. The spell thief must be able to see the target well enough to pick out a vital spot and must be able to reach such a spot. A spell thief cannot sneak attack while striking a creature with concealment or striking the limbs of a creature whose vitals are beyond reach.
A spell thief has several abilities (see below) that can only be used when he makes a successful sneak attack, that require him to forgo part of his extra damage. He can only use one of these abilities for each sneak attack he makes, and each ability can be used only once per round. However, even if he attacks an opponent normally immune to critical hits, as long as he fulfils the other requirements of a sneak attack (catching the opponent flat-footed, flanking her, she doesn't have concealment, etc.), he can still uses those abilities. This is like how flaming burst and similar weapons function even against creatures immune to critical hits.

Energy drain (Su): A spell thief can siphon spell energy (whether spiritual, hereditary or hermetic) away from his target and use it himself. A spell thief who hits an opponent with a successful sneak at-tack can choose to forgo dealing 1d6 points of sneak attack damage and instead steal the same amount of spell points. If the target is willing, a spell thief can steal spell energy with a touch as a move action. A spell thief can use this ability once per round, and he can't apply it simultaneously to a sneak attack that he's already using one of his other supernatural stealing abilities with. Logically, a spell thief can not steal more than 6 points of spell energy with this ability, but he can store more spell energy this way than his normal spell energy pool. If the current spell energy pool is bigger than the normal maximum, the spell thief loses 1 point of spell energy per round until he has reached his normal maximum.
At 7th level, the ability to drain spell energy from a caster improves and a spell thief can steal spell en-ergy with a normal touch attack, siphoning 1d6 points of spell energy from the target into the spell thief’s pool.
At 10th level, a spell thief can drain spell energy from magic items. Doing so gives the spell thief 1d6 points of spell energy and renders the item useless for 24 hours.
At 15th level, a spell thief can drain spell energy from distant opponents. He can make a ranged touch attack against an opponent within 30 ft. to drain 1d6 points of spell energy from his victim to his own pool. Doing so is a standard action.
At 20th level, a spell thief increases the amount of stolen spell points to 1d10.

Detect Magic (Sp): A spell thief of 2nd level or higher can use detect magic at will. His caster level is equal to his class level.

Steal Energy Resistance (Su): Beginning at 2nd level, a spell thief can siphon off some or all of a tar-get's resistance to an energy type (acid, cold, electricity, fire, or sonic). A spell thief who hits an oppo-nent with a successful sneak attack can choose to forgo dealing 1d6 points of sneak attack damage and instead temporarily gain resistance 1d10 to an energy type to which his target is resistant (or immune). Simultaneously, the target creature's resistance to that energy type is temporarily reduced by the same amount (to a minimum of 0). A creature with immunity to an energy type retains that immunity. If the target is willing, a spell thief can steal energy resistance with a touch as a move action. A spell thief can use this ability once per round, and he can't apply it simultaneously to a sneak attack that he's already using one of his other supernatural stealing abilities with.
If his target has more than one type of resistance to energy, a spell thief can choose which kind to steal; otherwise, the DM determines the stolen resistance randomly from among those possessed by the target.
The resistance a spell thief gains from using this ability lasts for 1 minute. If the resistance is derived from a temporary effect (such as a spell), the stolen resistance disappears when the effect expires if the remaining duration is less than 1 minute.
A spell thief can use this ability multiple times, but its effects do not stack unless they apply to different types of energy. For example, throughout a long combat, a spell thief might use this ability to gain resis-tance to fire and resistance to cold, but he could not use it twice on a creature that is resistant to fire to gain twice as much resistance to fire (nor to reduce the creature's resistance to fire by twice as much). However, he can use this ability multiple times, even on the same creature, to renew the duration of his stolen energy resistance.
At 8th level, a spell thief can steal resistance with a touch attack by using this ability, and at 14th level he can steal resistance to an energy type with a ranged touch attack. A spell thief cannot steal more re-sistance than what the creature has, if it less than these amounts.

Break Spell (Su): Beginning at 3rd level, a spell thief can disrupt an active spell effect from another creature. A spell thief who hits an opponent with a sneak attack can choose to forgo dealing 1d6 points of sneak attack damage and instead cancels the effect of a single spell affecting the target. A spell thief can use this ability once per round, and he can't apply it simultaneously to a sneak attack that he's al-ready using one of his other supernatural stealing abilities with.
The spell thief can choose which spell he disrupts; otherwise, the DM determines the stolen spell effect randomly. If a spell thief tries to disrupt a spell effect that isn't present, the disrupted spell effect is de-termined randomly among those currently in effect on the target. A spell thief can't disrupt a spell effect if its caster level exceeds his class level + his Intelligence modifier.
Spells are interrupted for 1 minute per spell thief level (or until the spell effect's duration expires, whichever comes first). If the spell effect's duration hasn't expired by this time, the spell effect returns to the creature that originally benefited from it.
At 11th level, the spell thief can use this ability with a touch attack instead and at 19th level with a ranged touch attack with a range of 30 feet.

Magic Strike (Su): A spell thief gains Arcane Strike as a bonus feat at 4th level, even if he does not have the normal prerequisites for it. If he already has Arcane Strike, he may instead select another feat, but he must meet all the prerequisites for it, including ability score and base attack minimums. In either case, a spell thief can channel spell energy to activate Arcane Strike, giving him +1 to attack rolls and +1d4 to damage to a single attack for each spent spell energy point.

Spellgrace (Su): A spell thief of 5th level or higher gains a +1 bonus on his saves against spells. This bonus improves to +2 at 11th level and to +3 at 17th level.

Absorb Spell (Su): Beginning at 6th level, if a spell thief makes a successful save against a spell that targets him, he can attempt to absorb the spell energy for later use. This ability affects only spells that have the spell thief as a target, not effect or area spells (at least until 13th level, see below).
To absorb a spell that targets him, a spell thief must succeed on a level check (1d20 + spell thief level) against a DC of 10 + the spell's caster level. Failure indicates the spell has its normal effect, even though the spell thief’s save was initially successful. Success means that the spell thief suffers no effect from the spell and gains the spell energy that was used to cast the spell as if he had stolen the spell energy with his energy drain ability.
If a spell targets the spell thief but only allows a saving throw for a partial effect, if he makes a success-ful save and then succeeds on his level check, he absorbs the spell without suffering even that partial effect. If a spell targets the spell thief but normally does not allow a saving throw, the spell thief is al-lowed to attempt as special save against what the spell's DC would be if it had one (type determined by DM as appropriate, for example, a Reflex save against scorching ray). If he succeeds at the special sav-ing throw he can attempt his level check to absorb the spell without harm, but if he fails either the sav-ing throw or the level check, he suffers the full effect of the spell as normal.
At 13th level or higher, a spell thief can attempt to absorb even effect or area spells that would affect him.

Arcane Sight (Su): Beginning at 9th level, a spell thief can discern the location and power of magical auras within sight. This ability duplicates the effect of an arcane sight spell, except that it is always active, though he can suppress it as a free action. At 18th level or higher, a spell thief instead gains the continuous effect of a greater arcane sight spell.

Advanced Energy Control: At 10th level, a spell thief has learned to control the flow of magic energies a lot better than before. From now on, he can channel two spell energy points per turn and therefore increase the casting speed of complex spells, and the maximum of energy he can keep under his control increases to 2 + Charisma modifier or five, which ever is lower.

Arcane Toughness (su): A spell thief can burn spell energy to close his wounds and regain lost hit-points. The spell thief burns 1d6 points of spell energy and for every spellpoint he spends, he regains one hitpoint. This ability works as an immediate action and can be used every d4+1 rounds. If the spell thief would spend more spell energy than his current energy pool, he spends all remaining spell points instead.

Discover Spells (Ex): A spell thief of 12th level or higher who steals a spell from a spellcaster with his steal spell ability automatically learns the names of all other spells prepared or known by the spellcaster that are of the same spell level as the stolen spell. This knowledge allows the spell thief to better choose which spells to steal on subsequent attacks.
For example, a 13th-level spell thief who steals disintegrate from an enemy sorcerer would also discover the names of all other 6th-level spells known by that sorcerer.

Steal Spell Resistance (Su): Beginning at 15th level, a spell thief can use a sneak attack to temporarily steal some or all of a creature's spell resistance. A spell thief who hits an opponent with a sneak attack can choose to forgo 3d6 points of sneak attack damage and instead reduce the target's spell resistance by 5. The spell thief also gains spell resistance equal to 5 + his spell thief level (up to a maximum value of the original spell resistance of the target). If the target is willing, a spell thief can steal spell resistance with a touch as a move action. A spell thief can use this ability once per round, and he can't apply it simultaneously to a sneak attack that he's already using one of his other supernatural stealing abilities with.
The stolen spell resistance benefits the spell thief for 1 minute and then returns to the target creature. If the spell resistance is derived from a temporary effect (such as a spell), the stolen spell resistance disap-pears when the effect elapses, if its remaining duration is less than 1 minute.
A spell thief can steal spell resistance multiple times from the same or different opponents, reducing their spell resistance by an additional 5, and increasing his own by the same amount. For example, a spell thief who uses this ability three times would have spell resistance equal to 15 + his spell thief level. However, he must keep track of each stolen source of spell resistance separately; if he steals spell resistance in three consecutive rounds, he would temporarily have a spell resistance equal to 15 + his spell thief level, but as each source's duration expires, he would be reduced to SR equal to 10 + his level, and then finally SR equal to 5 + his level.

Complex Energy Control: At 20th level, the spell thief becomes a master of the arts of magic. Now, he can channel up to three spellpoints per turn, and control a maximum of spell energy up to 3 + Charisma modifier or seven, whichever is lower. While Spellthieves have no access to level seven spells, they can use their maximum control with metamagic to empower the spells they know.

Satyr
2009-01-26, 06:45 AM
Thief
As long as there are riches, there will be people who try to get them, no matter if the means are regarded as honorable or not. The thief is a master of acquisition. He is a burglar, a pickpocket, a con artist, the shadow in a dark alley or the spy in the duke’s court. There are many different thieves, from polite highwaymen to cruel thugs, but they all have one thing in common: They are incredible versatile and equally untrustworthy.

The thief is the skill-focused, less deadly than the assassin version of the rogue. The thief is stealthy, adaptable, very talented in social situations and also very athletic.
Through the various special abilities, it is also one of the classes which allow more a specific adaptation to the player's wishes. The two different variants of the class allow for another, more specific adaptations.

Hit Points at 1st level: 12 + Con modifier
Hit Points at Each Additional Level: 2 + con modifier

Class Skills
The thief’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are: Appraise (Int+Cha), Balance (2xDex), Bluff (2xCha), Climb (Str+Dex), Craft (Int+?), Decipher Script (Int+Wis), Diplomacy (Wis+Cha), Dis-able Device (Int+Wis), Disguise (Int+Cha), Escape Artist (Str+Dex), Forgery (Dex+Int), Gather Infor-mation (2xCha), Hide (Dex+Con), Intimidate (Str+Cha), Jump (2xStr), Knowledge (dungeoneering) (2xInt), Knowledge (local) (2xInt), Listen (Wis+Con), Move Silently (Dex+Con), Open Lock (Dex+Int), Perform (Cha+?), Profession (Wis+?), Search (Int+Wis), Sense Motive (Wis+Cha), Sleight of Hand (Dex+Cha), Speak Language (Int+Wis), Spot (Con+Wis), Swim (Str+Con), Tumble (Str+Dex), Use Rope (Str+Dex) and Use Magic Device (Con+Cha).

Skill Points at 1st Level: (10 + Int modifier) x 4.
Skill Points at Each Additional Level: 10 + Int modifier.

Table: The Thief
{table=head]Level|BAB|BDB|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Special

1st|
+0|
+0|
+1|
+3|
+1|Sneak attack + 1d6, trap finding

2nd|
+1|
+1|
+1|
+4|
+1|Evasion

3rd|
+2|
+2|
+2|
+5|
+2|Trap sense+ 1

4th|
+3|
+3|
+2|
+5|
+2|Sneak Attack + 2d6

5th|
+3|
+3|
+3|
+6|
+3|Uncanny dodge

6th|
+4|
+4|
+3|
+7|
+3|Trap sense + 2, improved feint

7th|
+5|
+5|
+3|
+7|
+3|sneak attack +3d6

8th|
+6/+1|
+6|
+4|
+8|
+2|Special Ability


9th|
+6/+1|
+6|
+4|
+9|
+4|Improved uncanny dodge, trap sense + 3

10th|
+7/+2|
+7|
+5|
+9|
+5|Sneak attack + 4d6

11th|
+8/+3|
+8|
+5|
+10|
+5|Special Ability

12th|
+9/+4|
+9|
+6|
+11|
+6|Greater feint, trap sense + 4

13th|
+9/+4|
+9|
+6|
+11|
+6|sneak attack + 5d6

14th|
+10/+5|
+10|
+6|
+12|
+6|Special Ability

15th|
+11/+6/+1|
+11|
+7|
+12|
+7|trap sense + 5

16th|
+12/+7/+2|
+12|
+7|
+13|
+7|Acrobatics + 4, ghost sight

17th|
+12/+7/+2|
+12|
+8|
+14|
+5|Sneak attack + 6d6

18th|
+13/+8/+3|
+13|
+8|
+15|
+8|supreme feint,. trap sense + 6

19th|
+14/+9/+4|
+14|
+8|
+15|
+8|Sneak attack + 7d6

20th|
+15/+10/+5|
+15|
+9|
+16|
+9|Special Ability[/table]


Class Features
Weapon and Armor Proficiency: Thieves are proficient with all simple weapons, plus the hand cross-bow, rapier, sap, shortbow, and short sword. Thieves are proficient with light armor, but not with shields.

Sneak Attack (Ex): If a thief can catch an opponent when he is unable to defend himself effectively from her attack, she can strike a vital spot for extra damage.
The thief’s attack deals extra damage any time her target would be denied a Dexterity bonus to AC (whether the target actually has a Dexterity bonus or not), or when the thief flanks her target. This extra damage is 1d4 at 1st level, and it increases by 1d6 every three thief levels thereafter up to a maximum of 7d6 at 19th level. Should the thief score a critical hit with a sneak attack, this extra damage is not multi-plied.
Ranged attacks can count as sneak attacks only if the target is within 30 feet.
With a sap (blackjack) or an unarmed strike, a thief can make a sneak attack that deals nonlethal damage instead of lethal damage. She cannot use a weapon that deals lethal damage to deal nonlethal damage in a sneak attack, not even with the usual -4 penalty.
A thief can sneak attack only living creatures with discernible anatomies—undead, constructs, oozes, plants, and incorporeal creatures lack vital areas to attack. Any creature that is immune to critical hits is not vulnerable to sneak attacks. The thief must be able to see the target well enough to pick out a vital spot and must be able to reach such a spot. A thief cannot sneak attack while striking a creature with concealment or striking the limbs of a creature whose vitals are beyond reach.

Trap finding (Ex): Thieves can use the Search skill to locate traps when the task has a Difficulty Class higher than 20.
Finding a nonmagical trap has a DC of at least 20, or higher if it is well hidden. Finding a magic trap has a DC of 25 + the level of the spell used to create it.
Thieves can use the Disable Device skill to disarm magic traps. A magic trap generally has a DC of 25 + the level of the spell used to create it.
A thief who beats a trap’s DC by 10 or more with a Disable Device check can study a trap, figure out how it works, and bypass it (with her party) without disarming it.

Evasion (Ex): At 2nd level and higher, a thief can avoid even magical and unusual attacks with great agility. If she makes a successful Reflex saving throw against an attack that normally deals half damage on a successful save, she instead takes no damage. Evasion can be used only if the thief is wearing light armor or no armor. A helpless thief does not gain the benefit of evasion.
If a thief already has evasion from a different class she automatically gains improved evasion instead.

Trap Sense (Ex): At 3rd level, a thief gains an intuitive sense that alerts her to danger from traps, giv-ing her a +1 bonus on Reflex saves made to avoid traps and a +1 dodge bonus to AC against attacks made by traps. These bonuses rise to +2 when the thief reaches 6th level, to +3 when she reaches 9th level, to +4 when she reaches 12th level, to +5 at 15th, and to +6 at 18th level.
Trap sense bonuses gained from multiple classes stack.

Uncanny Dodge (Ex): Starting at 5th level, a thief can react to danger before her senses would normally allow her to do so. She retains her Dexterity bonus to AC (if any) even if she is caught flat-footed or struck by an invisible attacker. However, she still loses her Dexterity bonus to Defense if immobilized.
If a thief already has uncanny dodge from a different class she automatically gains improved uncanny dodge (see below) instead.

Improved Feint: A thief gains Improved Feint as a bonus feat at 6th level, even if she does not have the normal prerequisites for it. If she already has Improved Feint, she may instead select another feat, but she must meet all the prerequisites for it, including ability score and base attack minimums.

Special Abilities: On attaining 8th level, and at every three levels thereafter, a thief gains a special abil-ity of her choice from among the following options.
[spoiler]
Adaptability (ex): The thief selects a number of skills up to 2+ the character’s Intelligence modifier (minimum 2). All of these skills must be cross-class skills in which the character already has at least one rank. These skills are now considered to be thief class skills for this character.

Crippling Strike (Ex): A thief with this ability can sneak attack opponents with such precision that her blows weaken and hamper them. An opponent damaged by one of her sneak attacks also takes 2 points of Strength damage. Ability points lost to damage return on their own at the rate of 1 point per day for each damaged ability.

Dirty Fighting (ex): The rogue is so skilled at distracting, unnerving, deceiving and otherwise upsetting her opponent with dishonorable fighting techniques that once per day she may choose to do any one of the following: automatically succeed on a single roll to hit; cause her opponent to fail a single attack roll; make a single attack and then move away from the opponent, treating the square the action starts in as not threatened; or perform a single sneak attack, even while the opponent is not flanked and retains his full Dexterity bonus.

Defensive Roll (Ex): The thief can roll with a potentially lethal blow to take less damage from it than she otherwise would. Once per day, when she would be reduced to 0 or fewer hit points by damage in com-bat (from a weapon or other blow, not a spell or special ability), the thief can attempt to roll with the damage. To use this ability, the thief must attempt a Reflex saving throw (DC = damage dealt). If the save succeeds, she takes only half damage from the blow; if it fails, she takes full damage. She must be aware of the attack and able to react to it in order to execute her defensive roll—if she is denied her Dexterity bonus to AC, she can’t use this ability. Since this effect would not normally allow a character to make a Reflex save for half damage, the thief’s evasion ability does not apply to the defensive roll.

Honed Senses (ex): The rogue notices things that others miss. Once per day, the rogue may choose to use his honed senses on any one of the following rolls: Appraise, Gather Information, Knowledges, Listen, Search, Sense Motive or Spot skill checks, as well as all attempts to save vs. illusions. The rogue is considered to have rolled a 20 for this roll. The rogue may not use this ability after he has already rolled and failed.

Improved Defensive Roll (ex): This ability is basically similar to defensive roll except that instead of half damage, the thief takes no damage at all. Since all thieves with this ability are required to already have defensive roll, they may now make two defensive rolls per day — one for zero damage and one for half damage.
Prerequisite: Defensive Roll.

Improved Evasion (Ex): This ability works like evasion, except that while the thief still takes no damage on a successful Reflex saving throw against attacks henceforth she takes only half damage on a failed save. A helpless thief does not gain the benefit of improved evasion.

Improved Slippery Mind (ex): If a rogue with improved slippery mind is affected by any enchantment cast by a magic user, whose caster level is less than half the character’s rogue levels, the rogue succeeds automatically at her saving throw. The effects of the slippery mind special ability still apply to the en-chantments of higher level casters.
Prerequisite: Slippery Mind.

Inconspicuousness (ex): The rogue is difficult to notice unless he is actively trying to attract attention. Unless the rogue is choosing to stand out, or unless others are specifically searching for him, the rogue is considered at all times to be hiding. The DC to spot a rogue with the inconspicuousness ability is the rogue’s Dexterity modifier + his ranks in Hide. Characters purposefully searching for the rogue see him normally (unless of course the rogue actually is actively hiding). In addition, any time a magic user wishes to target the rogue with a Divination spell, she must first succeed at a Concentration check, with a DC equal to the rogue’s Intelligence modifier + his ranks in Hide.

Intuition (ex): Once per session, the player of a rogue character may privately ask the GM a single in-character yes or no question. The GM must answer the question truthfully, and the player may then use this information as an in-character “hunch.” This question cannot pertain to things that are randomly determined (since the GM cannot possibly know the answer in advance), but all other in-character yes or no questions are acceptable. If the question cannot be answered as it is phrased, the player may ask another until an answerable question is found.

Opportunist (Ex): Once per round, the thief can make an attack of opportunity against an opponent who has just been struck for damage in melee by another character. This attack counts as the thief’s attack of opportunity for that round. Even a thief with the Combat Reflexes feat can’t use the opportunist ability more than once per round.

Roguish Charm (ex): The rogue is very likable, in spite of all evidence to the contrary. Once per day she may choose to perform any one of the following two near-magical effects. First, the rogue may tell a single brief lie to one person and have it be believed unquestioningly until the rogue leaves the victim’s line of sight for more than a minute. The lie must be believable to a sane person — “the sky is green,” will not work, for example, but “of course I didn’t steal the jewel,” would work on anyone who hadn’t witnessed the incident directly. The lie cannot be longer than a single simple sentence.
Second, the rogue may talk someone into doing her a favor. This task must take less than 30 minutes to perform, and cannot directly endanger the victim or his loved ones in any way. Asking to borrow money is a good example, but requesting someone to hold off angry guards is not — unless the person is so high in level (or authority) that turning back the guards poses no threat whatsoever. These abilities can only be used on sentient creatures with whom the rogue shares a common language. They can only be used on one person at a time. Characters of higher total level than the rogue character’s levels in rogue may make a Will save at a DC of 10 + the rogue’s Charisma modifier + the rogue’s ranks in an appro-priate skill (usually Bluff for the first and Diplomacy for the second). Those who make their saves are fully aware of the rogue’s attempt to manipulate them. These abilities can never work on the same per-son twice, and the rogue must always be within the target’s line of sight to attempt either ability.

Search mastery (ex): The rogue is highly proficient at finding things. In fact, the rogue is so adept that he always finds something interesting on a roll of 20 or more, whenever he looks. Naturally, what the rogue finds will not always be what he was looking for — especially if he is searching in the wrong room — but it will be interesting in some way. GMs are encouraged to use this in whatever manner best fits the game. Rogues may find coins or jewelry, clues and plot devices for this or future sessions, bits of local gossip (a love note from the lord’s wife to a fellow rogue!), things of no interest to the rogue per-sonally but useful to other members of the party, or anything else useful or worthy of comment. Often the information or items a rogue finds in this manner may seem irrelevant at the time and only turn out to be interesting much later on in the campaign. Coins are a good fall-back if this ability ever threatens to slow down the game, but GMs should try to make the ability as interesting and diverse as they possibly can.
Prerequisite: Search 10+ ranks.

Skill Mastery: The thief becomes so certain in the use of certain skills that she can use them reliably even under adverse conditions.
Upon gaining this ability, she selects a number of skills equal to 3 + her Intelligence modifier. When making a skill check with one of these skills, she may take 10 even if stress and distractions would nor-mally prevent her from doing so. A thief may gain this special ability multiple times, selecting addi-tional skills for it to apply to each time.

Skilled Opportunist (ex): This functions identically to the special ability, opportunist, except that the rogue may use it as many times in a round as she has attacks of opportunity.
Prerequisite: Opportunist, Combat Reflexes

Slippery Mind (Ex): This ability represents the thief’s ability to wriggle free from magical effects that would otherwise control or compel her. If a thief with slippery mind is affected by an enchantment spell or effect and fails her saving throw, she can attempt it again 1 round later at the same DC. She gets only this one extra chance to succeed on her saving throw.
Strange Luck (ex): The thief is inordinately lucky — most of the time. Once per day, the thief may turn a single unsuccessful roll into a 20. This ability may be used on any roll that requires a d20. Strange luck can be used to confirm a critical hit; but if used as a regular attack roll, it does not create a critical threat. For every three times this ability is used, the GM may choose to turn one of the rogue’s success-ful rolls into a 1. The GM may not use this ability on a natural 20.

Feat: A thief may gain a bonus feat in place of a special ability.

Improved Uncanny Dodge (Ex): A thief of 9th level or higher can no longer be flanked.
This defense denies another thief the ability to sneak attack the character by flanking her, unless the attacker has at least four more thief levels than the target does.
If a character already has uncanny dodge (see above) from a second class, the character automatically gains improved uncanny dodge instead, and the levels from the classes that grant uncanny dodge stack to determine the minimum thief level required to flank the character.

Greater Feint: A thief gains Greater Feint as a bonus feat at 13th level, even if she does not have the normal prerequisites for it. If she already has Greater Feint, she may instead select another feat, but she must meet all the prerequisites for it, including ability score and base attack minimums.

Superior Feint (Ex): Beginning at 19th level, a thief is able to feint as a free action instead of a swift action (see Greater Feint). However, she is still only allowed to make one feint attempt before each at-tack roll.

Varaint: Thug
Not all thieves are focused on agility and bluff; some are nothing more than brutes who use sheer violence and fear to achieve their aims. Thug characters lack the finesse for sneak attacks, but gain Arts of War instead; a simple one on 1st, 4th and 7th level, advanced ones on 10th, 13th and 16th level and a complex one on 19th level. A thug is also proficient with all martial weapons, medium armor and shields (except tower shields and gain a stacking +1 professional bonus to Intimidate on 3rd, 6th, 9th, 12th, 15th and 18th level.
They do not gain the trapfinding and trapsense abilites.

Variant: Acrobatic Burglar
Some thieves are more focused on agility and acrobatics than the rest; they do not gain the Trap Finding and Trap Sense ability, but a Climb Speed equal to half their land speed on 1st level and the Assassin's Acrobatics trait on the levels they would normally gain the Trap Sense ability.

Harperfan7
2009-01-27, 03:33 AM
I am a big fan of 3.5, and I have homebrewed a ton of stuff for it, so I don't want to play anything else, but I love a LOT of what you have done. +5 adamantine cookies for you.

Mercenary Pen
2009-01-27, 09:53 AM
All looks interesting from here...

Just a thought on the Sorcerer as a different approach to other casters...

The sorcerer is a skilled spellcaster, but lacks the control of other magical schools (all very standard I know) instead not only relying on his/her magic, but locked in a constant struggle for control of it- for fear that one day the magic may instead control the caster.

Basically, the way I'd try to implement this would be as a magical analogue to the Barbarian's Rage, with the Mage subordinate to the magic waiting to be cast for a period of time after failing a will save (or equivalent) at the time of casting. During this 'controlled by the magic' period, I'd make spells stronger than normal (without metamagic), but force them to draw upon the Sorcerer's hp to demonstrate the magic drawing on the very life-force of the caster.

Hope this helps but- if not- at least I tried to give you something more distinctive for the Sorcerer...

Satyr
2009-01-27, 05:47 PM
I am a big fan of 3.5, and I have homebrewed a ton of stuff for it, so I don't want to play anything else, but I love a LOT of what you have done. +5 adamantine cookies for you.

I would be glad to see your homebrewed stuff. Even when I only borrow some of it for my own write-ups. It is a bit sad, but there is much official material which is just worse than many homebrews, especially of those people who dedicated a lot of time and attention in the development of 'their' rules.



Basically, the way I'd try to implement this would be as a magical analogue to the Barbarian's Rage, with the Mage subordinate to the magic waiting to be cast for a period of time after failing a will save (or equivalent) at the time of casting. During this 'controlled by the magic' period, I'd make spells stronger than normal (without metamagic), but force them to draw upon the Sorcerer's hp to demonstrate the magic drawing on the very life-force of the caster.

I am not sure if that fits my picture of a sorcerer, but a class like this would be very interesting indeed. I'll brainstorm it and give it a try.

Satyr
2009-01-28, 03:25 AM
War Mage
The War mage is a specialized arcane spellcaster whose talents are completely focused on one task: use the magic as a weapon. Warmages are often shunned as ‘magical brutes’ by their more generalist col-leagues and rivals, but others praise their straightforwardness and deadliness in combat.
In opposite to the Mage Blade, the War Mage is a full spellcaster who does not use his magic in combination with a weapon but as a weapon.

The warmage is a piece of artillery. There is little subtle about the magic of this class - it has a purpose - killing things through magic -and a very straightforward way to achieve it. Thanks to this, the Warmage is probably the easiest playable full spellcaster in Serpents and Sewers, but it is also one of the least flexible ones. A warmage can led things and people explode, that's it. But at least he is very good in letting them explode. And he is a constant source of stunning visiual effects.
From a mechanical level, the warmage is most similar to the healer, especially because he fills more or less the exact opposite role - both classes are very powerful within their specific niche, but are not that much outside of their special fields.

Hit Points at 1st Level: 12 + Con Modifier
Hit Points at each additional level: 2 + Con Modifier

Class Skills:
The War Mage’s Class skills and the key ability for each skill are: Concentration (Con+Wis), Craft (Int+?), Diplomacy (Wis+Cha), Heal (Wis+Cha) ,Knowledge (Arcane) (2xInt), Knowledge (War and tactics) (2xInt), Profession (Wis+?) and Spellcraft (Int+Wis).

Skill Points at 1st Level: (3 + Int modifier) x 4
Skill Points at every additional level: 3 + Int modifier

Spell Points at 1st level: 12 + Int modifier
Spell points at each additional level: 5 + Int modifier
Spell point regeneration (per night’s rest): 3d12 + Int modifier

Table: The Warmage
{table=head]Level|BAB|BDB|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Special

1st|
+0|
+0|
+1|
+0|
+2|basic energy control, Armored Caster +1

2nd|
+1|
+1|
+1|
+0|
+3|war mage’s edge

3rd|
+1|
+1|
+2|
+1|
+3| advanced learning

4th|
+2|
+2|
+2|
+1|
+4| -

5th|
+2|
+2|
+3|
+2|
+4|Armored Caster +2

6th|
+3|
+3|
+3|
+2|
+5|advanced energy control

7th|
+3|
+3|
+3|
+2|
+5|advanced learning

8th|
+4|
+4|
+4|
+2|
+6|Sudden Empower

9th|
+4|
+4|
+4|
+3|
+6|Armored Caster +3

10th|
+5|
+5|
+5|
+3|
+7|Sudden Enlarge

11th|
+5|
+5|
+5|
+3|
+7|advanced learning

12th|
+6/+1|
+6|
+6|
+4|
+8|complex Energy control

13th|
+6/+1|
+6|
+6|
+4|
+8|Armored Caster +4

14th|
+7/+2|
+7|
+6|
+4|
+9|-

15th|
+7/+2|
+7|
+7|
+5|
+9|advanced learning

16th|
+8/+3|
+8|
+7|
+5|
+10|Sudden Widen

17th|
+8/+3|
+8|
+8|
+5|
+10|Armored Caster +5

18th|
+9/+3|
+9|
+8|
+6|
+11|perfect energy control

19th|
+9/+4|
+9|
+9|
+6|
+11|advanced learning

20th|
+10/+5|
+10|
+9|
+6|
+11|Sudden maximize[/table]

Class Features:
Armor and Weapon Proficiency: A War Mage is proficient with all simple weapons, one chosen mar-tial weapon of her choice, light armor and light shields. At 9th level, a war mage becomes proficient with medium armor and all shields except tower shields as well.

Spells: A Warmage casts arcane spells, which are drawn from the war mage spell list given below. She can cast any spell he knows without preparing it ahead of time the way a cleric or wizard must. When a Warmage gains access to a new level of spells, she automatically knows all the spells for that level listed on the Warmage’s spell list. Warmages also have the option of adding to their existing spell list through their advanced learning ability as they increase in level (see below).
To cast a spell, a war mage must have an Intelligence score of 10 + the spell’s level. The war mage must be successful on a Concentration check to successfully cast a spell.
A Warmage starts the game with 10 + Intelligence modifier spellpoints. On each additional level she gets 4 + Intelligence modifier additional spellpoints. The warmage‘s spellpoints limit the use of spells like usual for spellcasters.
Unlike a cleric or wizard, a war mage need not prepare his spells in advance. She can cast any spell he knows at any time, assuming she has not yet used up his spells for the day for that spell level or above.

Basic energy control: At 1st level, a Warmage can channel one spell energy point per turn. The total sum of Energy points the Warmage can keep under control is equal to his Intelligence modifier or three, whichever is lower.

Armored Caster (ex): A war mage is used to cast spells while wearing armor. At 2nd level, she reduces the armor penalty for spellcasting by one point. The more experienced the war mage gets, the more comfortable she can cast spells while wearing armor. Every 4 levels, the armor penalty for spellcasting is reduced by one. This bonus is only applied if the war mage wears an armor she is proficient with. When wearing a non-proficient armor, she gains no advantage whatsoever from this ability.

War Mage’s edge (Ex): A War Mage is specialized in dealing damage with her spells. Whenever a war mage casts a spell that deals hit point damage, she may add her Intelligence modifier to the dealt dam-age. The bonus of warmage’s edge is only applied to the spells casted as a war mage, not to spells from other sources like other spellcasting classes, scrolls, wands or rods. A single spell profits only one time from this ability, even if the spell creates more than one projectile or deals damage to separate targets.

Advanced Learning (Ex): At 3rd, 7th, and every four levels thereafter, a war mage can add a new spell to his list, representing the result of personal study and experimentation. The spell must be chosen from the sorcerer/wizard spell list, and it must be of the evocation school or the school of abjuration. The spell must be no higher than that of the highest-level spell the war mage already knows. Once a new spell is selected, it is forever added to that war mage’s spell list, and can be cast just like any other spell on the war mage’s list.

Advanced Energy Control: At 6th level, a war mage has learned to control the flow of magic energies a lot better than before. From now on, she can channel two spell energy points per turn and the maximum of energy she can keep under his control increases to her Intelligence modifier +1 or five, whichever is lower.

Sudden Empower: At 8th level, a war mage gains the Sudden Empower Feat as a bonus feat.

Sudden Enlarge: On 10th level, Warmage gains Sudden Enlarge as a Bonus Feat.

Complex Energy Control: At 12h level, the war mage’s control of the energies of magic becomes even stronger. Now, she can channel up to three spellpoints per turn, and control a maximum of spell energy up to her Intelligence modifier +2 but not more than seven.

Sudden Widen: On 16th level, a war mage gains Sudden Widen as a bonus feat.

Perfect energy control: At 18th level, a war mage has perfected the arts of destructive magic. She can control the inner flame of magic so effectively that she can channel up to 4 spellpoints per turn. Her maximum of spell energy that he can control increases to Intelligence modifier +3, but not more than nine.

Sudden maximize: At 20th level, a war mage gains Sudden Maximize as a bonus feat.

Satyr
2009-01-29, 03:42 AM
Weapon Master
While the Man-at-arms tries to master numerous weapons and can fight with a very broad range of them, they are the masters of none of them. The weapon master is a perfectionist, who focuses his complete life on mastering the combat with a single weapon. With their weapon of choice, they are among the greatest fighters who ever lived, but without it, they are average at best.
For the purpose of favorite class, the weapon master is treated as a man-at-arms.

The wepon master is effectively only a little more than a variety of the man-at-arms, but with that many changes that it was much easier and clear to write it up as an own class. That is also the reason why the Weapon Master counts as a MaA for the favorite classes.

Hit Points at 1st Level: 20 + Con Modifier
Hit Points at each additional Level: 4 + Con Modifier

Class Skills
The Weapon Master’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) (and the key ability for each skill) are Appraise (Int+Cha), Climb (Str+Dex), Craft (Weaponsmithing), (Str+Int), Craft (Armorsmithing) (Str+Int) Handle Animal (Wis+Cha), Heal (Wis+Cha), Intimidate (Wis+Cha), Jump (2xStr), Knowledge (tactics and war) (2xInt), Knowledge (nobility and royalty) (2xInt), Listen (Con+Wis), Perform (weapon drill) (Dex+Cha), Profession (Wis+?), Ride (Dex+Cha), Spot (Wis+Con), Swim (Str+Con), and Use Rope (Str+Dex).

Skill Points at 1st Level: (5 + Int modifier) x 4.
Skill Points at Each Additional Level: 5 + Int modifier.


Table: The Weapon Master
{table=head]Level|BAB|BDB|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Special

1st|
+1|
+1|
+3|
+1|
+1|Chosen Weapon, Weapon Focus

2nd|
+2|
+2|
+4|
+1|
+1|Bonus feat

3rd|
+3|
+3|
+5|
+2|
+2 |Art of War, Simple

4th|
+4|
+4|
+5|
+2|
+2|Weapon Specialization

5th|
+5|
+5|
+6|
+3|
+3|Bonus feat

6th|
+6/+1|
+5|
+7|
+3|
+3|Insightful Strike +1d6

7th|
+7/+2|
+6|
+7|
+3|
+3| Art of War, Simple

8th|
+8/+3|
+7|
+8|
+4|
+4|Improved Critical

9th|
+9/+4|
+8|
+9|
+4|
+4|Bonus feat

10th|
+10/+5|
+9|
+9|
+5|
+5|Greater Weapon Focus

11th|
+11/+6/+1|
+10|
+10|
+5|
+5|Art of War, Advanced

12th|
+12/+7/+2|
+10|
+11|
+6|
+6|Greater Weapon Specialization

13th|
+13/+8/+3|
+11|
+11|
+6|
+6| Bonus feat
14th|
+14/+9/+4|
+12|
+12|
+6|
+6| Melee Weapon Mastery

15th|
+15/+10/+5|
+13|
+13|
+7|
+7| Art of War, advanced

16th|
+16/+11/+6/+1|
+14|
+13|
+7|
+7|Insightful Strike +2d6

17th|
+17/+12/+7/+2|
+15|
+14|
+8|
+8|Bonus Feat

18th|
+18/+13/+8/+3|
+15|
+15|
+8|
+8|Weapon Supremacy

19th|
+19/+14/+9/+4|
+16|
+15|
+9|
+9| Art of War, Complex

20th|
+20/+15/+10/+5|
+17|
+16|
+9|
+9 | Epic Weapon Focus
[/table]

Class Features:
Weapon and Armor proficiency: The Weapon Master is proficient with all simple and martial weapons and all armor and shields, including tower shields.

Chosen Weapon: At first Level, the Weapon Master chooses a weapon she is proficient with. This weapon becomes her chosen weapon for the weapon Focus tree. A Weapon Master may never change her favorite weapon, but gains her Intelligence Bonus (if any) added to her Attack bonus when someone tries to disarm her.

Weapon Focus: On 1st level, the weapon master gains Weapon Focus for her chosen weapon as a bonus feat, granting a Bonus of +1 to Attack Rolls.

Bonus Feats: At 2nd level, a weapon master gets a bonus combat-oriented feat in addition to the feat that any 1st-level character gets and the bonus feat granted to a human character. These bonus feats must be drawn from the fighter bonus feat list. A Weapon Master must still meet all prerequisites for a bonus feat, including ability score and base attack bonus minimums.
These bonus feats are in addition to the feat that a character of any class gets from advancing levels. A Weapon Master is not limited to the list of fighter bonus feats when choosing these feats.

Art of War: at level 3, and every four level after that, the Weapon Master gains a special ability from the appropriate list of Arts of War. No ability may be taken more than once. If an Art of War ability has other such abilities as prerequisites, a Weapon Master must possess the prerequisite abilities to take the ability in question.

Weapon Specialization: A 4th level Weapon Master gains Weapon Specialization for her chosen weapon as a bonus feat, granting a +2 Bonus to damage.

Insightful Strike: When fighting with her Chosen Weapon, a Weapon Master of 6th level or higher may add 1d6 points of precision damage to her damage rolls. Creatures that are immune to critical hits are also immune to this damage. On 16th level, the damage bonus increases to 2d6.

Improved Critical: At 8th level, the weapon master gains Improved Critical as bonus feat. The feat must be used with her weapon of choice and doubles the weapon’s threat range.

Greater Weapon Focus: A 10th level, a Weapon Master gains Greater Weapon Focus for her Chosen Weapon, increasing the total attack bonus to +2.

Greater Weapon Specialization: A Weapon Master gets Greater Weapon Specialization as a bonus feat at 12th level, increasing the total damage bonus to +4.

Melee Weapon Mastery: At 14th level, a weapon master’s knowledge grants him the melee weapon mastery feat for the type of damage of her Chosen Weapon.

Weapon Supremacy: A 18th level Weapon Master is truly a master of her Chosen Weapon and there-fore gains the Weapon Supremacy Feat.

Epic Weapon Focus: Even though ‘only’ a 20th level character, the final ability of the Weapon Master is an epic Weapon Focus with her Chosen Weapon, granting her a total + 4 Bonus to her attack rolls.

lesser_minion
2009-02-04, 02:59 PM
Hmm...

As far as the sorcerer is concerned, the fluff is quite open-ended. The 3.0 PHB pretty much says nothing more than that the sorcerer is a naturally talented arcanist - they don't need to go through truckloads of training and mental discipline to gain their powers.

On the other hand, a wizard can attain a greater level of power, but they don't have any intuitive sense of how their powers work - they have to spend years in training in order to cast spells successfully, and I generally read that as meaning that

An interesting way to convey this might be to give the sorcerer a number of uses of 'spell mastery' - allowing them to do things like re-roll casting rolls/gain a bonus or apply reduced cost metamagic(careful about this, though) This would replace their bonus spell slots, and they would also be able to use this Power to draw upon a small number of exclusive abilities.

I personally think that part of the allure of the sorcerer is that nobody really understands their origins. Some claim that they are descended from the dragons, but in reality there is no evidence in support of this (funnily enough, I think that the Dragon Disciple prestige class is insane and ban it from all of my campaigns) - the 3.0 PHB even went on to say that the sorcerers who claimed the whole 'blood of the dragons' origin were probably just arrogant.

I'd like to see abilities that maintain the mystery of their origins, by being appropriate to a whole variety of potential sources - for example, darkvision and (maybe) natural armour. Possibly ask them to expend some uses of Spell Mastery to use these special Powers - this means that they could be conceivably fluffed in a large variety of ways. If a player doesn't like the Mysterious and Unknowable Origins thing, they can just say that they grow scales whenever they tap arcane power to gain a natural armour bonus and so on.

However, the most crucial aspect of designing the Sorcerer for this variant would be determining how you see the class.

By the way, handing out +5 Adamantine cookies is hardly a reward - they sound pretty painful actually. :smalleek::smallamused:

Satyr
2009-02-09, 03:21 AM
Wizard
Wizards are educated spellcasters of the arcane powers. Their training is rigorous and strongly focused on research and intellect, and often they are firmer with the theory than with the practical implementa-tion of their powers. With the right preparation and research, wizards are extremely powerful spell-casters, and certainly they are the characters with the strongest focus on practicing magic, but without their preparation they are not nearly as effective.

Hit Points at 1st Level: 8 + Con modifier
Hit Points at Each Additional Level: 1 + Con modifier.

Class Skills
The wizard’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Concentration (Con+Wis), Craft (Int+?), Diplomacy (Wis+Cha), Heal (Wis+Cha) ,Knowledge (any) (2xInt), Profession (Wis+?) and Spellcraft (Int+Wis).

Skill Points at 1st Level: (3 + Int modifier) 4.
Skill Points at Each Additional Level: 3 + Int modifier.

Spell Points at 1st Level: 10 + Int modifier
Spell Points at Each Additional Level: 4 + Int modifier.
Spell point regeneration (per night’s rest): 2d10 + int modifier

Table: the Wizard
{table=head]Level|BAB|BDB|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Special

1st|
+0|
+0|
+0|
+0|
+2|Scribe Scroll, simple energy control, Specialization

2nd|
+1|
+1|
+0|
+0|
+3|-

3rd|
+1|
+1|
+1|
+1|
+3| -

4th|
+2|
+2|
+1|
+1|
+4| -

5th|
+2|
+2|
+2|
+2|
+4|Specialization feature

6th|
+3|
+3|
+2|
+2|
+5|advanced Energy Control

7th|
+3|
+3|
+2|
+2|
+5|-

8th|
+4|
+4|
+2|
+2|
+6|-

9th|
+4|
+4|
+3|
+3|
+6|-

10th|
+5|
+5|
+3|
+3|
+7|Specialization feature

11th|
+5|
+5|
+3|
+3|
+7| -

12th|
+6/+1|
+6|
+4|
+4|
+8|complex energy control

13th|
+6/+1|
+6|
+4|
+4|
+8|-

14th|
+7/+2|
+7|
+4|
+4|
+9|-

15th|
+7/+2|
+7|
+5|
+5|
+9|Specialization feature

16th|
+8/+3|
+8|
+5|
+5|
+10| -

17th|
+8/+3|
+8|
+5|
+5|
+10| -

18th|
+9/+3|
+9|
+6|
+6|
+11|perfect energy control

19th|
+9/+4|
+9|
+6|
+6|
+11|-

20th|
+10/+5|
+10|
+6|
+6|
+11|Specialization feature[/table]

Class Features

Weapon and Armor Proficiency: Wizards are proficient with the club, dagger, heavy crossbow, light crossbow, and quarterstaff, but not with any type of armor or shield. Armor of any type interferes with a wizard’s movements, which can cause her spells with somatic components to fail.

Spells: A wizard casts arcane spells, which are drawn from the sorcerer/wizard spell list. A wizard must choose and prepare her spells ahead of time (see below).
To learn, prepare, or cast a spell, the wizard must have an Intelligence score equal to at least 10 + the spell level. The Difficulty Class for a saving throw against a wizard’s spell is the spell level + the wiz-ard’s Intelligence modifier + 1d20.
Unlike a sorcerer, a wizard may know any number of spells. She must choose and prepare her spells ahead of time by getting a good night’s sleep and spending 1 hour studying her spellbook. While study-ing, the wizard decides which spells to prepare.
A wizard gets 10 + Intelligence modifier Spell points at first level and 4 + Intelligence modifier spell-points at each additional level. A wizard’s spell casting ability is dependant on his spell points as usual.
Bonus Languages: A wizard may substitute Draconic for one of the bonus languages available to the character because of her race.
Basic energy control: At 1st level, a wizard cam channel one spell energy point per turn and can keep a total of her Intelligence modifier Energy points under her control, but not more than three points.
School Specialization A school is one of eight groupings of spells, each defined by a common theme. A wizard must specialize in one school of magic (see below).
A wizard gains a +2 bonus on Spellcraft checks to learn the spells of her chosen school and a +2 bonus to Concentration checks to cast a spell from the chosen school.
Apart from the chosen speciality, she must also give up two other schools of magic, which become her prohibited schools.
Spells of the prohibited schools are not available to the wizard, and she can’t even cast such spells from scrolls or fire them from wands. She may not change either her specialization or her prohibited schools later.
In addition to the different spells, every wizard also gains a number of additional traits based on his or her specialization. On 5th, 10th and every 5 levels ever after, the wizard gains a specific feature based on the specialized school.

wizard specialisations

Abjurer: The abjurers are the specialists of anti-magic spells and are the wizards with the least depend-ency on magic and the most self-sufficient approach to it. Abjurers gain an additional class skill of choice every time the Specialization Feature is achieved and gain an additional skill point per level (in-cluding 4 skill points at first level).

Summoner: The Summoner is a specialist for summoning spells and often learns most about the crea-tures they call and control. A summoner gains the augment summoning feat at first level and Survival as a class skill and gain a +2 bonus for every step of the specialization feature for every check of knowl-edge or survival to identify creatures and their traits, starting at 1st level.

Seer: Seers are divination specialists and are often the most respected arcane spellcasters. Seers gain Search, Spot and Listen as additional class skills and gain a +1 bonus to these skills for every time they gain the specialization feature.

Enticer: The Enticer is a specialist for Enchantment spells and are often Con-artists, liars and infiltra-tors. These magicians are specialised in the most subtle casting of magic and the rule over the mind of sentient people. Enticers gain Bluff and Sense Motive as additional class skills and ay use the Bluff skill to hide spellcasting gestures and invocations. This works like the disguise spell feat, but it is based on the Bluff skill, not perform. This works for one spell rank for every time the specialization feature is gained.
Elementalists: Elementalists are Evocation specialists and often the most destructive spellcasters. Ele-mentalists chose one elemental descriptor, such as Fire. Whenever they cast a spell with this descriptor, they gain a +1 bonus to the concentration check for every time they gain the specialization feature. It doesn’t matter if the spell with the descriptor is an evocation spell or not to gain this bonus.

Illusionists: Illusionists are among the most subtle spellcasters. They gain Move Silently and Hide as additional class skills through this stealthier connotations, and they gain a +1 bonus to perceive and resist illusionary spells for every step of the specialization feature.
Necromancer: The power over life and death is alluring, and the necromancer is the one who has fallen for this lure. Necromancers. If the Necromancer creates an undead creature through a spell such as ani-mate dead or create undead, he may add an additional bonus hit dice to the created creature for every time he gains the specialisation feature, starting at level 1.

Blood Mages: Blood mages are Transmutation experts and also most strongest egocentric of all spell-casters. Blood Mages gain a +1 bonus to all concentration checks on all spells they cast on themselves, and only on themselves, even when these spells are no transmutation spells.


Advanced Energy Control: At 6th level, a wizard has learned to control the flow of magic energies a lot better than before. From now on, she can channel two spell energy points per turn and therefore in-crease the casting speed of complex spells, and the maximum of energy he can keep under his control increases to Intelligence modifier +1 or five, which ever is lower.

Complex Energy Control: At 12h level, the wizard becomes a true master of the arts of magic. Now, she can channel up to three spellpoints per turn, and control a maximum of spell energy up to 2 + her Intelligence modifier, but the amount of spell points can not exceed seven.
Perfect energy control: At 18th level, a wizard has perfected the arts of magic. She can control the in-ner flame of magic so effectively that she can channel up to 4 spellpoints per turn. Her maximum of spell energy that she can control increases to Intelligence modifier +3, but not more than nine.

Spellbooks: A wizard must study her spellbook each day to prepare her spells. She cannot prepare any spell not recorded in her spellbook, except for read magic, which all wizards can prepare from memory.
A wizard begins play with a spellbook containing all 0-level wizard spells (except those from her pro-hibited school or schools, see School Specialization, below) plus three 1st-level spells of your choice. For each point of Intelligence bonus the wizard has, the spellbook holds one additional 1st-level spell of your choice. At any time, a wizard can also add spells found in other wizards’ spellbooks or on arcane scrolls to her own, making this spell available to the wizard. Wizards know no other way to gain new spells apart from this.

unosarta
2009-04-14, 04:06 PM
Improved Wolf Pack Tactics (Ex): At 19th level, the pathfinder is not limited to only one attack of opportunity due to wolf pack tactics. He can use this ability as often as an enemy he threatens suffers damage from a different source (the iterative attacks of an ally do not provoke additional attacks of op-portunity for the pathfinder, but the attacks of two opponents against the same target enables the path-finder to two attack of opportunities if he threatens the same foe).

now, I hate to do this, but wouldn't this ability give any pathfinder infinite attacks against one target as long as there is another attacking the target?

Satyr
2009-04-15, 02:49 AM
now, I hate to do this, but wouldn't this ability give any pathfinder infinite attacks against one target as long as there is another attacking the target?

Wolf Pack Tactics and Improved Wolf Pack Tactics do not increase the maximum of attacks of opportunity in total; without combat reflexes, IWPT is actually useless, because you do not have that many attacks of opportunity per turn. Even with Combat Reflexes, the maximum number of AoO's is limmited by the pathfinder's dexterity bonus, and even with a company of archers in the back who all shoot the same target, the pathfinder will probably never get more than six additional attacks through Wolf Pack Tactics.


There are four new Serpents and Sewers classes in development now - the poor martial artist (thestill not finished monk replacement), the necromancer (a probably self-explanatory arcane spellcaster who concentrates on necromancy), the Shaman (a divine spellcaster with a strong focus on spirit magic and a number of varieties and totems that will make room for more different class varieties than any other class) and the Defender (a warrior-type who focuses on heavy armor, toughness and general invulnerability).
The Shaman is almost complete and will be uploaded in the next days.

Yes, Serpents and Sewers gets new stuff.

arkol
2009-04-27, 04:19 PM
My question is.... when will you be DMing S&S here at the GitP boards?

Satyr
2009-04-27, 05:11 PM
I had the idea to run a - completely different - forum-based game a month or so ago. Since the financial situation in my family (my soon-to-be wife is effectively laid off next month) has aggravated since then and I will work much more then than I had before to make sure that we are able to pay for the rent and something to eat, my free time melts away right now, I fear.

But: Ther is a huge Serpents and Sewers spring update in the development right now, which includes a complete new sets of supernatural powers, around six or so new species and and three (or four, if I ever finish the dreaded Martial Artist) new character classes.

When the whole "how are we going to pay the rent" issue is solved, I am looking forward to offer a Serpents and Sewers game here on the board, even though I fear that the number of interests is probably not very high.

Sometimes I am jealous for all the attention other, similar projects get in comparison.

Djinn_in_Tonic
2009-04-27, 05:18 PM
Here's one person behind a "similiar" (vaguely...) project voicing interest in these classes! It's not what I'm personally looking for for my games, but I'm going to be reading through them, because what you've done here interests me, and you may have thought of things I'd never have thought of (Yay inspiration!). If I have critique to offer as I do so, you'll be getting that. The same goes for compliments.

I'm very glad someone bumped this a little while ago...I would have missed it otherwise. And, although I've only given it a cursory glance, it looks very original and very well done.

More to come later.

dragonfan6490
2009-05-17, 11:44 PM
This looks really great, but I have to wonder, what does bdb stand for?

Satyr
2009-05-18, 12:38 AM
I have to wonder, what does bdb stand for?

Basic Defense Bonus. In Serpents and Sewers, Armor grants Damage Reduction, but does not influence the chance to be hit. That depends on the combat skills of the individual combatant, and when a character becomes more experienced, he does not only learn to become a better offensive fighter, he also improves his ability to dodge incoming attacks or parry his foes weapons.

dragonfan6490
2009-05-18, 05:42 AM
Basic Defense Bonus. In Serpents and Sewers, Armor grants Damage Reduction, but does not influence the chance to be hit. That depends on the combat skills of the individual combatant, and when a character becomes more experienced, he does not only learn to become a better offensive fighter, he also improves his ability to dodge incoming attacks or parry his foes weapons.

Ok, thanks for clearing that up, it really makes alot of sense that way. I'll have to take a longer look into Serpents and Sewers, it looks really promising.

gorfnab
2010-03-04, 04:54 AM
I'm wondering why the assassin class is not proficient with saps?

Satyr
2010-03-04, 05:06 AM
good question actually. I'll look into it.