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Xondoure
2009-02-25, 06:05 PM
was part of the plot based off of Thomas Covenent the Unbeliever?
it's just that it seems awfully similar to the strategist who gets pulled into their world to help form a strategy against the dark one

Sieggy
2009-02-25, 06:33 PM
was part of the plot based off of Thomas Covenent the Unbeliever?
it's just that it seems awfully similar to the strategist who gets pulled into their world to help form a strategy against the dark one

Nah, it's a pretty common trope . . . if it was based on Covenant, Parson would be afflicted with something both tragic & socially repugnant, consumed with guilt, angst, and the heartbreak of psoriasis. He would also hold himself responsible for Misty's death, moping about like Hamsterlet.

And neither Ansom not Charlie are even close to Lord Foul in terms of villiany . . .

Xondoure
2009-02-25, 07:54 PM
Good point. and if he was based off the strategist he would be blind so that one doesn't make any sense either.

Jural
2009-02-25, 10:31 PM
Answer: 1 g

dr pepper
2009-02-26, 10:00 PM
He'd have raped someone too, but felt so consumed with guilt we'd be finding ourselves feeling worse for him than for the victim. And some relatively uncommon word like "dour" or "gelid" would be repeated until we screamed.

And there'd be a wave of suicide among the readers.

ShiningTed
2009-02-28, 02:11 AM
Or "mien". The Chronicles... becomes a drinking game very easily.

Theodoriph
2009-03-01, 03:05 AM
It's a fairly common theme. Lord of the Rings for instance involved Frodo being pulled from his world into another to fight evil.

Now of course in LoTR, we're not talking about different planets, but rather worlds in the sense of cultural and social norms and attitudes etc. In the WoT, two characters are "invaded" so to speak by spirits from the past. Rand, the hero. And Mat, the general.

The theme of a foreign entity being brought in to help occurs in all shapes and sizes. Bringing someone in from a different planet/plane of existence/dimension is simply a variant of the idea (e.g. The Chronicles of Narnia).

Heroes come in all shapes and sizes as well. From the typical "Conan smash" to intellectual geniuses with complex strategical plans.



I guess what I'm really trying to say is that unless the authors specifically say they derived their ideas from said series, it was likely just a coincidence.