PDA

View Full Version : Any Latin speakers ITP?



EvilDMMk3
2009-05-03, 06:34 AM
I have a small favor to ask. As part of a theatrical activity we want to have some of the good old ominous Latin chanting but a part of me, the sneaky part, wants a Bilingual Bonus. So here is the question.

What could "Chanting Ominous Gibberish" or the closest equivalent be in Latin?

Denied
2009-05-03, 06:43 AM
"Chantious omiminis gibbiis"?

toasty
2009-05-03, 06:45 AM
"Chantious omiminis gibbiis"?

Hmm... that could work... ;) though omiminis is very close to omnis (all, every). Gibberish no clue.

Chanting, also no clue, canet is the 3rd person singular form of the verb to sing though.

Yes, a few years of high school latin doesn't go very far I'm afraid. :smallbiggrin:

Illiterate Scribe
2009-05-03, 07:02 AM
'Cantans quisquiliae sortum', I'd guess. 'Singing rubbish (or 'trifles', things of inconsequence' about (of) omens'.

EDIT: My latin dictionary also has 'purgamentum' for rubbish. While it means 'rubbish' in a more literal sense, further from what OP asked for, it sounds a bit better.

EvilDMMk3
2009-05-03, 07:22 AM
Thanks. I doubt that anyone in the audience will get it, but I like that sort of gag.

Cantans purgamentum sortum it is. Any notes on pronunciation?

Sir_Norbert
2009-05-03, 07:39 AM
Cantans purgamentum sortum it is. Any notes on pronunciation?
Cantans is easy, but note that the s is "s" and not "z".

Your location says Plymouth, so you probably speak a non-rhotic variety of English (that is, when r comes after a vowel you don't pronounce it as a consonant but instead change the vowel to a different one, so tort and taught sound the same). In Latin you should pronounce the "r".

Purgamentum: the first u and the a are long, sounding "oo" and "aa". Short u is pronounced as in "put", never as in "shut". Stress is on "men".

Sortum is also easy, same point about the letter "r".

Illiterate Scribe
2009-05-03, 12:25 PM
Cantans is easy, but note that the s is "s" and not "z".

Your location says Plymouth, so you probably speak a non-rhotic variety of English (that is, when r comes after a vowel you don't pronounce it as a consonant but instead change the vowel to a different one, so tort and taught sound the same). In Latin you should pronounce the "r".

Purgamentum: the first u and the a are long, sounding "oo" and "aa". Short u is pronounced as in "put", never as in "shut". Stress is on "men".

Sortum is also easy, same point about the letter "r".

On the other hand, ominous Latin chanting is unlikely to use classical Latin pronunciation - you'd be more likely to have a post-renaissance (when I think 'ominous chanting', I don't really think plainchant), more modern pronunciation.