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View Full Version : To the poor, unaustralian masses



Anuan
2009-05-08, 11:59 PM
You with your unfortunate lack of timtams and milo and lemon butter and various other delicious stuff that we have and your governments have declared you unworthy of.

I pity you. I pity you yet I love you and so I have decided to finally share this with you.
http://www.greataussiefood.com.au/
This will ship some of the greatest examples of australian food right to your open mouth.
Get Milo. Get Timtams. Make a hot milo and drink it through a timtam.
Return here and shower me in love and adoration for giving you the opportunity to do this.

/arrogance

Enjoy, my lovely playgrounders! :smallbiggrin:

RabbitHoleLost
2009-05-09, 12:00 AM
<3, just for you, mah lovely Anuan.

Rutskarn
2009-05-09, 12:01 AM
Sounds good.

We'll give you our brownie recipes and call it even, shall we?

ShiningTed
2009-05-09, 12:04 AM
Thanks goodness someone finally said it. Don't forget Boag's and Kev's Iced VoVos and Carlton Smooth and Toohey's Old and beetroot on burgers!

Anuan
2009-05-09, 12:18 AM
and beetroot on burgers!

YES!
OH *expletive deleted!*ING HELL YES!

reorith
2009-05-09, 12:35 AM
You with your unfortunate lack of timtams and milo and lemon butter and various other delicious stuff that we have and your governments have declared you unworthy of.

I pity you. I pity you yet I love you and so I have decided to finally share this with you.
http://www.greataussiefood.com.au/
This will ship some of the greatest examples of australian food right to your open mouth.
Get Milo. Get Timtams. Make a hot milo and drink it through a timtam.
Return here and shower me in love and adoration for giving you the opportunity to do this.

/arrogance

Enjoy, my lovely playgrounders! :smallbiggrin:


do ho ho ho. little do you know there is an international foods section of my nearby grocery store! also, milo sucks. brb, enjoying firearms, cheap booze, a dearth of water restrictions, and nonlethal jellifish.

now if you could find a website that supplies saltwater crocodiles and bunyips, that'd be sweet.

RabbitHoleLost
2009-05-09, 12:36 AM
do ho ho ho. little do you know there is an international foods section of my nearby grocery store! also, milo sucks. brb, enjoying firearms, cheap booze, a dearth of water restrictions, and nonlethal jellifish.

now if you could find a website that supplies saltwater crocodiles and bunyips, that'd be sweet.

Yeah, well, my grocery store has an international foods section, too, but it doesn't really carry anything that isn't Mexican, Italian, kosher, or a small selection of "Asian" food.
So, hurrah for Rabbit getting some fricken' Timtams and Milo!

Edit: Also, Reorith, I can never tell if you're being sarcastic or witty or for srs.
I fail. v.v

charl
2009-05-09, 12:51 AM
Are all Australian foods as sweet as they look on that site? Seriously all that food looks like it has a sugar content in the 60% minimum. I don't know if it's true of course, but it looks way too sweet for my tastes.

Ninja Chocobo
2009-05-09, 01:02 AM
brb, enjoying firearms, cheap booze, a dearth of water restrictions, and nonlethal jellifish.

Shame you don't seem to enjoy shift keys.

reorith
2009-05-09, 01:47 AM
Shame you don't seem to enjoy shift keys.

hurr hurr hurr. when i was sixteen, i had all the digits of my left hand and the pinky and ring finger of my right hand CRUSHED WITH A GORRAM HAMMER leaving me with only three fingers in a usable condition for typing. as a result, this makes using the shift key some what challenging.

tl;dr
ninja chocobo picks on cripples.

charl
2009-05-09, 01:52 AM
hurr hurr hurr. when i was sixteen, i had all the digits of my left hand and the pinky and ring finger of my right hand CRUSHED WITH A GORRAM HAMMER leaving me with only three fingers in a usable condition for typing. as a result, this makes using the shift key some what challenging.

tl;dr
ninja chocobo picks on cripples.

He obviously didn't know that. No need to result to ad hominem, man.

randman22222
2009-05-09, 02:25 AM
*Already has Milo. :smalltongue:*

Timtams, however, are a new concept to me.

Felixaar
2009-05-09, 03:15 AM
Some knowledge for you all!

Hot Milo: Laaaame.

Cold Milo: Fantastic.

Sucking Milo Through Timtams: Nope.

I also reccomend trying shapes.

Also, reorith, Ha! Laugh now, but when aliens invade and the new world order is decided based upon the lethality of jellyfish, you... well, you'll probably be dead along with us since that's by a wide margin very unlikely to happen within the next century (alien contact, yeah. jellyfish lethality rankings, maybe not). But I'll be laughing! Laughing from my grave! Hahahahahahahahaha!

Ha!

Ninja Chocobo
2009-05-09, 03:19 AM
He obviously didn't know that. No need to result to ad hominem, man.

Pretty much this (except the word is "resort"). I also tried typing in the manner you describe, and I have found that using Shift is nowhere near as difficult as you make it out to be, and I would imagine it would get even easier if you had to practice all the time. It also would make your posts many, many times more readable. Most word processors nowadays also autocorrect capitals, most of the time.

Anuan
2009-05-09, 03:36 AM
Felix is a silly Felix, don't listen to him.
reorith is an alcoholic that wastes water whilst shooting at defenseless jellyfish and drinking inferior chocolatey drink-additives.

Rawhide
2009-05-09, 03:38 AM
I...
...don't like beetroot or milo.

Quincunx
2009-05-09, 05:05 AM
(waylays the Swede who doesn't like sugar and robs the pick'n'mix, Marabou chocolate bars, Cloetta chocolate bars, the entire candy section generally minus that disgusting salted licorice, flat gingerbread cookies, lingonberry jam, that weirdly sweet flavor of pickled herring. . .)

randman, I think the TimTams would melt before you picked them up, in your climate. I can't understand how untempered chocolate survives in the Australian climate when the Irish climate was enough to melt them--

Wait. It's the Australians who call it lemon butter? How'd that linguistic quirk slip into North America?

Thanatos 51-50
2009-05-09, 05:12 AM
Well, I have had TimTams (Readily available in Japan), and I find them very sweet.
And whilst, due to Australian girlfriend, I have many oppertunitys to sample milo, I have not yet done so. Such is a situation I shall, apparently, have to rectify.
Vegemite is okay, but I apparently had it spread too thick, which made it too salty for my tastes.

Haven't really had the oppertunity to sample beetroot, though.

I shall have to try this food site.

charl
2009-05-09, 05:33 AM
(waylays the Swede who doesn't like sugar and robs the pick'n'mix, Marabou chocolate bars, Cloetta chocolate bars, the entire candy section generally minus that disgusting salted licorice, flat gingerbread cookies, lingonberry jam, that weirdly sweet flavor of pickled herring. . .)


You can have it. I prefer the salted licorice. Pickled herring is also delicious.

Dispozition
2009-05-09, 05:37 AM
You know how Milo is awesome? Well, it is...Fun fact about it, I go to the same school as the guy who invented it :D

InaVegt
2009-05-09, 05:43 AM
You can have it. I prefer the salted licorice. Pickled herring is also delicious.

Quoted for ultimate truth.

dish
2009-05-09, 05:59 AM
Now I have a craving for beetroot, and I am probably about 500km away from the nearest accesible source.

Mutter.

Anuan
2009-05-09, 06:34 AM
I love when I find people that say they love beetroot on the internet. So many people I meet are like 'ewwwww' especially when I talk about having it on burgers. Bugger you guys. Beetroot is delicious.

dish
2009-05-09, 06:38 AM
Yes, beetroot is fantastic.

Now please stop talking about it.

Tamburlaine
2009-05-09, 07:03 AM
Now I have a craving for beetroot, and I am probably about 500km away from the nearest accesible source.

Mutter.

Why is beetroot so inaccessible to you? Do you live in some kind of underground bunker, far from the lights of civilisation? Or do they just not sell it in your area?

Also, Marmite is, in my opinion, slightly nicer than vegemite though both are very nice indeed.

dish
2009-05-09, 07:17 AM
Why is beetroot so inaccessible to you? Do you live in some kind of underground bunker, far from the lights of civilisation? Or do they just not sell it in your area?

Right this minute I'm in Hefei, which is the capital of Anhui Province in China.
Strangely enough, for a nation that loves its roots and tubers as much as the Chinese, beetroot never seems to have made it here.
I haven't even seen it in Shanghai. Not even in the imported food aisles of the supermarkets. While I suspect that a sustained search of Shanghai delis might turn some up, it would probably be easier just to go to Hong Kong.

Coidzor
2009-05-09, 07:42 AM
What? :smallconfused: The US has lemon butter. We make it all the time for eating seafood with... especially lobster and crab but also occasionally fish filets and shrimp. It's a freaking sauce that's simple to make.

Also... What part of the beet is one eating if one is not eating the root?

Quincunx
2009-05-09, 07:55 AM
Ah, no, their lemon butter (UK usage: lemon curd) is something different, a sort of lemon-flavored pudding (UK usage: shush, you people).

OverdrivePrime
2009-05-09, 07:55 AM
Beetroot on burgers is something I've brought home to the US with mixed success. It's a tough sell, but if I can trick people into trying it they usually enjoy it.

Tim Tams and Mint Slices! My family loves them to death! Arnott's has a US operation, I'm not sure why they don't bring the full range of their awesome power to us. I've recently seen Tim Tams sold in a fancy grocery store in Illinois, but they the taste wasn't the same. Still better than other cookies, but not as good as the Aussie originals.

Ninja Chocobo
2009-05-09, 08:13 AM
Still better than other cookies, but not as good as the Aussie originals.

Tim Tams are biscuits. Say it with me now: bis-cuits.

Coidzor
2009-05-09, 08:20 AM
Ah, no, their lemon butter (UK usage: lemon curd) is something different, a sort of lemon-flavored pudding (UK usage: shush, you people).

Oh, then I've had that or at least something purporting to be it and similar in physical description before, it's just not very popular due to more people liking jelly (and being used to fairly mundane flavors such as grape and strawberry for the most part... I at least go to blackberry and elderberry for my usuals, but what can I say, I am le boring :smallannoyed:)

Hmm, come to think of it, I've never had beets other than in dried "chip" form... I wonder what they taste like... I'll have to look into this sometime.

Thanatos 51-50
2009-05-09, 08:22 AM
Tim Tams are biscuits. Say it with me now: bis-cuits.

Tim Tams are sandwitches, by the same qualifcation that makes Oreos sandwitches.

Sorry, I just wanted to point out how ridiculous the cookies/biscuts thing is.
I don't bear down on you for pronouncing the letter "Z" as "Zed", instead of "Zee".
Nor do I explode when you spell words with a superflorus "u". Or, more approriately, without the letter u, as I use it, myself now.
Can we talk about delicious Aussie food, now?

Anuan
2009-05-09, 08:30 AM
Than; The u's are not superfluous. They are necessary for correctness and for looking down on people, which is always fun.
Coidzor; I've never had plain beets, the beetroot you get in tins etc is 'pickled beets' and are sweet and delicious. Stay -away- from the beetroot 'chips.' Seriously. KEEP THE HELL AWAY ITS LIKE EATING DIRT AND THEY'RE FLEXIBLE! THE CHIPS ARE FLEXIBLE! Dirt really IS the most accurate way of describing the flavour. Dark soil, mildly moist.

Felixaar
2009-05-09, 08:42 AM
Tim Tams are biscuits. Say it with me now: bis-cuits.

Amen, Brother!

Thanatos 51-50
2009-05-09, 08:44 AM
Than; The u's are not superfluous. They are necessary for correctness and for looking down on people, which is always fun.

I seem to remember that the us were originally put into place when Written English was still all wonky as a gambit for signmakers to make some extra dough.
Which, is, you know - kind of the opposite of looking down upon people, and is instead a simple scam.
Same thing with the superflorus 'k' at the end of words like "Magick" and "Publick".

Tamburlaine
2009-05-09, 08:46 AM
Well, I've been doing a little research, see, and apparently milo is pretty much the same thing as ovaltine, and a tim tam is just a penguin biscuit!

Here I was imagining all sorts of exotic weirdness going on, and it turns out we have them here in england as well. How disappointing...:smallfrown:

DarkLightDragon
2009-05-09, 08:47 AM
It's great to be an Aussie! :smallwink:

Don't like beetroot. Love Milo, though. And Vegemite. Gotta love the Vegemite. And Tim-Tams are freakin' EPIC! Especially if you can get the ones with caramel in the middle.

V: Are you saying that disabled people are stupid? :smallannoyed:

V: Fair enough, then.

Anuan
2009-05-09, 08:47 AM
No, we realised that 'magick' and 'publick' are stupid and have removed the k's. The only people I know now that use a k on the end of 'magic' are wiccan or not-very-good fantasy writers.

I've never pet a merson that writes 'publick.'
Noone without a disability, anyway.

edit: ^ - I was refering to people with learning disabilities that don't end up learning the correct spelling.

Or just, y'know, generally stupid people that can't spell.

Thanatos 51-50
2009-05-09, 08:51 AM
No, we realised that 'magick' and 'publick' are stupid and have removed the k's. The only people I know now that use a k on the end of 'magic' are wiccan or not-very-good fantasy writers.

I've never pet a person that writes 'publick.'
Noone without a disability, anyway.

Same base source, though for the same reason.
And "Publick" is still in (Very rare) usage, I've only seen it used on signs for a Publick House. I guess they were going for an olde-time feel.
Oh, look, another signamker's gambit word - olde.

Some decent fantasy writers have used the with-a-k spelling of Magic, and I only use it when using "Magickal" and such - because it looks prettier, otherwise, I leave it off because the 'k' is jarring.

Coidzor
2009-05-09, 09:16 AM
Tim Tams're the ones with the crisp chocolate outside and vanilla creme inside, right? Sort of doily-shaped?

Ed: no... it's a biskit bar... Interesting. Though now it's making me want to have a proper plate of biscuits and gravy...

Ninja Chocobo
2009-05-09, 09:24 AM
Well, I've been doing a little research, see, and apparently milo is pretty much the same thing as ovaltine, and a tim tam is just a penguin biscuit!

I dunno...in my experience Milo is...crunchier than Ovaltine. (Eat your heart out, Coco Pops!)

Ed: no... it's a biskit bar... Interesting. Though now it's making me want to have a proper plate of biscuits and gravy...

There is no part of this that does not boggle my mind.

Thanatos 51-50
2009-05-09, 09:24 AM
The ones I had were roughly brick-shaped, choclate wafers sandwitching a chocolate creme and covered by more choclate.
Like I said, by the same standards as Oreos being sandwithces (You just decribed oreos.)

Yes, Biscuts go with gravy. Yum.

InaVegt
2009-05-09, 09:47 AM
Oh, look, another signamker's gambit word - olde.

While I do not know about the other things, "olde" actually had a purpose in older times, in a lot of occasions, it used to be necessary to add an -e to the end of adjectives, this -e was very much pronounced.

Compare this to one of English's closest relatives, Dutch, which does this till this day.

So while this feature of Ingveaonic (child of West Germanic, parent of both Dutch and English) might be lost in modern English, it wasn't always lost.

---

And, unless I'm misremembering, I believe those superfluous 'u's do not come from some gambit, but rather from French, where most of these words were borrowed from. American English reverted to Latin spelling, which did not have them, but regardless of whether they were ever pronounced in English, or are pronounced in Modern French, they were pronounced in French at the time the French spelling system was invented.

V'icternus
2009-05-09, 11:12 AM
I...
...don't like beetroot or milo.

Finally! A kindred spirit!

Beetroot? Ukk. Milo? Meh. Lamingtons? :biggrin:

mercurymaline
2009-05-09, 11:21 AM
Well, I've been doing a little research, see, and apparently milo is pretty much the same thing as ovaltine, and a tim tam is just a penguin biscuit!

Here I was imagining all sorts of exotic weirdness going on, and it turns out we have them here in england as well. How disappointing...:smallfrown:

I told you, Anuan. Milo = Ovaltine.

I thought tim tams were cakes...

And, if you call ketchup tomato sauce, what do you call tomato sauce?

V'icternus
2009-05-09, 11:25 AM
We call Tomato Sauce Tomato Sauce, duh. What else would we call it?

Thanatos 51-50
2009-05-09, 11:32 AM
And, unless I'm misremembering, I believe those superfluous 'u's do not come from some gambit, but rather from French, where most of these words were borrowed from. American English reverted to Latin spelling, which did not have them, but regardless of whether they were ever pronounced in English, or are pronounced in Modern French, they were pronounced in French at the time the French spelling system was invented.

Hey! Leave me and my utter distrust of humanity and belief that they're all out to take more money and do little else alone!
:smalltongue:

mercurymaline
2009-05-09, 11:41 AM
We call Tomato Sauce Tomato Sauce, duh. What else would we call it?

Haha. Funny.

But I know y'all call the stuff on cheeseburgers "tomato sauce." I call it gross ketchup.
I call the stuff on spaghetti "tomato sauce." What do y'all call that?

Serpentine
2009-05-09, 12:07 PM
I think it's just called tomato sauce, or maybe tomato pasta sauce, or maybe just pasta sauce. Also, I think there is some difference between ketchup and tomato sauce, something to do with the amount of actual tomato or sugar or something like that.

Sandwich:
http://www.snoopbloggyblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/ham-sandwich.jpg

Tim-Tam:
http://kevinandheather.files.wordpress.com/2009/03/tim_tam1.jpg

Biscuits:
http://images.calorieking.com.au/branding/dc/runtime/portionsense/10.jpg

The only sort of thing I might consider calling a "cookie" if I must:
http://www.chocolaterewards.com/img/chocolate-chip-cookie_01.jpg

Unfortunately, that last has the side-effect of throwing ANZAC biscuits in with the cookie crowd, and that's just sacrilicious.

I like ovalteenies, but it's Milo all the way for me. I think it's more grainy, has more crunch, and I like that. Hey, does anyone else remember the old Milo bars? The ones that were just compressed Milo covered in chocolate? I miss them so much, and I despise the new ones with a passion (why are they adding rice bubbles to everything nowadays?).

Also: So, I hear the rest of the world (or maybe just the Americas) don't eat meat pies much. You poor, poor bastards.

mercurymaline
2009-05-09, 12:14 PM
I thought a timtam was a cake...

Also, milo is /more/ grainy than Ovaltine, and that makes it /better/?!? Ew.

All those things are technically sauce from a tomato, so: tomato sauce it is. Ketchup here is generally just red sugar anyway.

Thanatos 51-50
2009-05-09, 12:15 PM
I think it's just called tomato sauce, or maybe tomato pasta sauce, or maybe just pasta sauce. Also, I think there is some difference between ketchup and tomato sauce, something to do with the amount of actual tomato or sugar or something like that.

Sandwich:
http://www.snoopbloggyblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/ham-sandwich.jpg

Tim-Tam:
http://kevinandheather.files.wordpress.com/2009/03/tim_tam1.jpg

Biscuits:
http://images.calorieking.com.au/branding/dc/runtime/portionsense/10.jpg

I see Stuff (Creme filling or delicious meats, cheeses and vegetables) pressed in between other stuff (Be they wafers or wholesome bread).
Therefore - Sandwitch.

I'm deliberatly arguing the really out-there.
In reality, I would call what you pictured as 'biscuts' 'cookies', mostly due to my cultural conditioning.

Biscuts, as I grew up hearding the term used, are dinner roll-like pieces of bread usually baked into fluffy goodness and slathered in butter/butter substitute or honey.
Alternativly they are covered in tasty gravy (with optional sausage).

Serpentine
2009-05-09, 12:25 PM
I thought a timtam was a cake...

Also, milo is /more/ grainy than Ovaltine, and that makes it /better/?!? Ew.

All those things are technically sauce from a tomato, so: tomato sauce it is. Ketchup here is generally just red sugar anyway.Tim-Tams are biscuits. I like the chewy caramel ones...
Milo's good for chompin'. Actually, I've never had Ovaltine, but I get the impression that it dissolves easier, and that's not why I drink Milo.
And with tomato sauce, yep, pretty much. Thinking about it, though, I think I tend to call the pasta sauce a "tomatoey sauce", but only if I don't have a proper name for it. I think I call the recipe I copied down from the Revolution909 video clip the Revolution909 Pasta Sauce...

Thanatos: I'm not going to argue with you, cuz I'm pretty sure you're just being silly. I'll just say this: A sandwich is stuff between two slices of bread. Also I want to try those gravy-biscuits.

Rutskarn
2009-05-09, 12:36 PM
In case it was unclear to anyone, the whole gravy thing was referring to this kind of biscuit:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/cc/Runny_hunny.jpg/395px-Runny_hunny.jpg

Also: Chocolate Chip cookies are the most awesome of cookies.

My confectionery nationalism extends to my apotheosis of the Jelly Belly as the god-king of sweets.

mercurymaline
2009-05-09, 12:40 PM
I'd have to call timtams sandwiches, rather than biscuits; I have the same cultural ideas as Thanatos regarding biscuits.

Biscuits - Breakfast bread
Cookies - Cooked dough
Cake - Cooked batter
Sandwich - Stuff between other stuff

While I'm at it:
Fries - Julienne strips of something
Chips - Baked slices of something

Thanatos 51-50
2009-05-09, 12:43 PM
Biscuts and gravy, as determined by a Google Images search.

http://chicagoist.com/attachments/chicagoist_chuck/2006_11_gravy.jpg

They're yummy. Trust me.

Serpentine
2009-05-09, 12:46 PM
Meh, whatever. We're talking about Australian food, therefore we're going to use Australian (read: correct :smalltongue:) terminology. Also, those things look a lot like scones... I know they're not, but they look like 'em.

Rutskarn
2009-05-09, 12:53 PM
I spent about a minute using Wikipedia to research the difference between the two, and somewhere in the middle realized that I had no clue about the culinary arts.

Let me just say this instead:

Scones, biscuits--it's all good.

Dihan
2009-05-09, 12:57 PM
I've had those so called "biscuits" when I was last on holiday in the US. They're just like scones without the fruit.

Rutskarn
2009-05-09, 12:58 PM
Well, there you have it, then.

We just mash up the fruit and put it on top, is all.

Thanatos 51-50
2009-05-09, 01:03 PM
But scones are lumpy, cinnamony, doughy cookie-wannabes served with tea!

Serpentine
2009-05-09, 01:06 PM
Scones are yummy. Also they don't necessarily have fruit, so I guess they're basically just scones... Also also, I live with a baker, so if I want to I can get him to bring me back plain, date, pumpkin or double-chocolate scones :biggrin: Actually... I think I'll do that, they'll be good for D&D tomorrow.

mercurymaline
2009-05-09, 01:10 PM
@ Thanatos: No, they're biscuit wannabes served with tea. Get it right.

Serpentine
2009-05-09, 01:13 PM
If anything, they're a type of cake or bun... Also, I've never had a scone with cinnamon in it. Maybe I should give it a try...

KilltheToy
2009-05-09, 01:17 PM
Out of curiosity, what DOES Vegemite taste like? I know leigons of Aussie kids have grown up on Vegemite sammiches, and I'm wondering what it tastes like.

Rutskarn
2009-05-09, 01:20 PM
Dessicated death and the leftovers of a brewery, from what I hear.

Serpentine
2009-05-09, 01:22 PM
How very predictable :smallsigh:
It's actually just mostly salty, with maybe a hint of yeast.

Moff Chumley
2009-05-09, 01:27 PM
I'll see you your Aussie food and raise you a huge plate of Latkas and a bowl of borshk. :smallamused:

Thanatos 51-50
2009-05-09, 01:34 PM
For referance - Vegemite is made from the slime at the bottom of the vat after you get done brewing beer.

Americans use the same stuff to make high-quality feed for cattle.:smallbiggrin:

Tamburlaine
2009-05-09, 02:38 PM
The things I remember culinary-wise from when I went to australia are, in order of deliciousness: Chicken flavoured salt, Kangaroo steak, and chicken sausages. Of course, now I'm a vegetarian, I don't eat any of those things anymore...

Bisected8
2009-05-09, 02:42 PM
Ah, but do you get Jaffa Cakes in Australia?

Innis Cabal
2009-05-09, 03:00 PM
I'll see you your Aussie food and raise you a huge plate of Latkas and a bowl of borshk. :smallamused:

You can keep that Moff....please.....

Katrascythe
2009-05-09, 03:06 PM
Gah you people with your funny names for foods :P

I'll take my biscuits and gravy (possibly with butter and jelly mmmmmmmmm)
I'll take my cookies (chocolate chips, with or without filling)
And I'll take my sandwiches (if it's sweet you're doing it wrong)

Then I'll take all the food that I associate with this great state..


And go to a private island and eat IN PEACE!

:P

Innis Cabal
2009-05-09, 03:08 PM
And I'll take my sandwiches (if it's sweet you're doing it wrong)

You've clearly never had a good pulled pork sandwich with BBQ sauce

Katrascythe
2009-05-09, 03:21 PM
Well that I've had. But I meant more in the dessert sense.

I'm from TX, BBQ is what we do.

Rutskarn
2009-05-09, 03:39 PM
You know what? As far as my culinary cultural experiences reach out, I'm convinced that there's absolutely nothing that's not delicious to some culture or another. Since my taste buds are about as subtle and exotic as a baseball bat with a nail through it, I don't judge anything.

Innis Cabal
2009-05-09, 05:57 PM
Well that I've had. But I meant more in the dessert sense.

I'm from TX, BBQ is what we do.

Ah I see, alright. Was a little worried someone who said they'd take their good ol'American food would have missed the most amazing thing we have to offer.

Though you probably find Texan BBQ to be the best, which I would mostly agree with, I can't help but ask if its really the case or if you care more for the St. Louis style or the South Carolinan style

zeratul
2009-05-09, 06:02 PM
I personally think the best BBQ joint is here where we have the origonal Dinosaur BBQ joint. Then again what I'm saying probably counts as BBQ sacrilege. :P

Innis Cabal
2009-05-09, 06:15 PM
Never been sadly. I perosnally think BBQ is an art made at home, the best isn't some area of land, its a kitchen. I put tumric and chilie peppers in mine so I get an orange glow, mix some curry powder and use molases....it will blow your mind

Recaiden
2009-05-09, 06:18 PM
Ah I see, alright. Was a little worried someone who said they'd take their good ol'American food would have missed the most amazing thing we have to offer.

Though you probably find Texan BBQ to be the best, which I would mostly agree with, I can't help but ask if its really the case or if you care more for the St. Louis style or the South Carolinan style

St. Louis style. Obviously. Vegemite is pretty tasty, if you don't eat too much of it.

Dispozition
2009-05-09, 07:03 PM
St. Louis style. Obviously. Vegemite is pretty tasty, if you don't eat too much of it.

This is why most people when they first have it don't like it. They go 'oh, look, a spread...Let's put heaps and heaps on like with Nutella or jam!' This then leads to disgusting results. You have to have a nice balance of bread and vegemite...

Also, vegemite and cheese toasted sandwiches are the greatest breakfast, lunch, or dinner food there is.

Ninja Chocobo
2009-05-09, 07:45 PM
The things I remember culinary-wise from when I went to australia are, in order of deliciousness: Chicken flavoured salt, Kangaroo steak, and chicken sausages.

Other countries don't get chicken salt?
You poor, poor souls.

I'll take my biscuits and gravy (possibly with butter and jelly mmmmmmmmm)

You are eating an afternoon food with a dinner food with a general food with a dessert food what is wrong with you?!

Anuan
2009-05-09, 07:49 PM
Other countries don't get chicken salt?
You poor, poor souls.[/I]

They call it season-salt over there

mercurymaline
2009-05-09, 07:50 PM
Other countries don't get chicken salt?
You poor, poor souls.

We do, it's called seasoned salt. Same thing, better name.

Yes, I know I've been pre-ninja'd.

Coidzor
2009-05-09, 08:05 PM
Wait, seasoned salt is made with chicken broth?

Australia has chicken-broth salt for sale? Intriguing...

Anuan
2009-05-09, 08:19 PM
'chicken-salt/season salt' is a popular alternative on, like, chips. Fries to you guys. Especially if its chicken and chips, which is only slightly less popular than fish and chips. I tend to prefer chicken. I used to be huge on chicken-salt, but don't like it much now. My friend jokes about it being made from dehydrated chicken sweat :smallbiggrin:

charl
2009-05-09, 08:39 PM
This is why most people when they first have it don't like it. They go 'oh, look, a spread...Let's put heaps and heaps on like with Nutella or jam!' This then leads to disgusting results. You have to have a nice balance of bread and vegemite...

Also, vegemite and cheese toasted sandwiches are the greatest breakfast, lunch, or dinner food there is.

You aren't really supposed to put heaps of jam on bread anyway. (I have never had nutella but from what I gather you aren't supposed to do it with that either). It's all up to taste of course, but as a rule of thumb if you put so much stuff on your bread that you no longer taste the bread, then it's too much!

Dispozition
2009-05-09, 08:45 PM
You aren't really supposed to put heaps of jam on bread anyway. (I have never had nutella but from what I gather you aren't supposed to do it with that either). It's all up to taste of course, but as a rule of thumb if you put so much stuff on your bread that you no longer taste the bread, then it's too much!

Jam is always supposed to be heaped on, as is nutella (a chocolate hazelnut spread, this is kickass)...I think you're mistaking your jam for my jam...Jam in australia is what you call jelly, I believe...

Jam on bread
http://www.justinspaintings.com/images/p383_JamOnBread.jpg

Jelly
http://www.babygadget.net/pics/jelly.jpg

Nutella on toast
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2259/2341580658_5ecb8982eb.jpg

Vegemite on toast (I would put a tad more on, but that's just me)
http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b325/spagecca/VegemiteToast.jpg?t=1241919899

There's a huge difference in how much you put on :P

reorith
2009-05-09, 09:00 PM
Out of curiosity, what DOES Vegemite taste like? I know leigons of Aussie kids have grown up on Vegemite sammiches, and I'm wondering what it tastes like.

spreadable salty beer. Vegemite is possibly the greatest sandwich spread evaaar second only to cashew butter.

take a cup hot water and stir in a spoonful of Vegemite to make a hearty warm beverage.

Anuan
2009-05-09, 09:45 PM
For Diz; there IS a difference between what the americans call 'jam' and 'jelly.' They both get called jam here but over there and in some parts of britain it depends on whether it has chunks of fruit in it or not. 'jam' is the older version with chunks of fruit/berry and 'jelly' is the version thats just sorta goop. Over in America, from what I gather, 'jelly' is the prevalent.

Gwyn chan 'r Gwyll
2009-05-09, 09:52 PM
On the jelly/jam theme

I cannot believe that, on thanksgiving, Americans fail so bad at cranberry sauce. Seriously. It comes in a can, and you have to cut it! That's wrong! It doesn't even have cranberry in it!


Anyways, that tim-tam thing looks good (too lazy to scroll down page to check spelling)

Anuan
2009-05-09, 10:08 PM
Anyways, that tim-tam thing looks good (too lazy to scroll down page to check spelling)

Inside;
http://www.doobybrain.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/08/tim-tam-inside.jpg

Serpentine
2009-05-09, 11:55 PM
Jam is always supposed to be heaped on, as is nutella (a chocolate hazelnut spread, this is kickass)...I think you're mistaking your jam for my jam...Jam in australia is what you call jelly, I believe...As has already been said, I think US "jelly" is more sort of like jam if you strained out all the fruit bits.

I went to a residential school on Heron Island last year, over Halloween. There were a bunch of Canadians and USofAmericans there. The scary mean bully cook-lady served pumpkin pie, and the Americans (including Canadia) said that it was the best they've ever tasted - mostly, apparently, because it was made with real, fresh pumpkin. 'Twere pretty tasty. I should get a good recipe for it... With FRESH pumpkin!

Anuan
2009-05-10, 03:45 AM
So, does anyone from non-aussieland actually intend to buy anything from that website? :smalltongue:

RabbitHoleLost
2009-05-10, 12:14 PM
Tim Tams are biscuits. Say it with me now: bis-cuits.

Cooooookies sound better than biscuits. Maybe that's because, in my mind, biscuits are things that go with dinner and are decidedly less sweet.