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View Full Version : To the poor, Unamerican masses



Innis Cabal
2009-05-09, 06:35 PM
Created in response to the other thread, we here in America have some great foods that go widely unnoticed with our cultural theft...and down right culinary muggery.

Apple Pie
BBQ (Real BBQ)
Deep Fried Chicken
Southern Comfort Food

Hell Puppi
2009-05-09, 06:37 PM
Does mac and cheese count? 'Cause done right that's probably the best stuff ever.
Also fried okra.

Syka
2009-05-09, 06:41 PM
Ribs. My favorite food EVER. As in, it's the one food I could eat every single day and never tire of it. There is this one place near me that always has amazing ribs. They are a chain and evidently quality varies by location, but the one where I live is always spot on.

But technically ribs fall under "real bar-b-que". My 'uncle' makes awesome ribs too...we do BBQ for Christmas Dinner. :smallwink:

Logalmier
2009-05-09, 06:47 PM
And some of the stuff we haven't stolen is pretty nasty, like some of the fast food you get. There are a few American foods that are passable I suppose, although I mostly cook Italian food.

SDF
2009-05-09, 06:52 PM
It isn't even about food from america. It's about the americanization of the food. Like pizza, burgers, and chili cheese dogs(Sonic the Hedgehog and I agree, they rokk).

And ribs truly are an anytime food, but then we get in fights about sauces and it gets messy, like my food.

Rutskarn
2009-05-09, 06:54 PM
Jelly Beans.

Brownies.

Chocolate Chip Cookies.

American-Style Pizza (I actually heard someone, who had gone to Italy many times and waxed downright poetic about it, eat a slice of Pizza Hut pizza and say, "You know, thing about Italy is, the pizza there isn't as good. They invented it; we perfected it.") Without question, this is open to interpretation, but I'm throwing it out there.

Lobster Newberg.

Chicken Fingers.

Milkshakes.

Ice Cream Sundaes.

Hot Wings.

Eldan
2009-05-09, 06:58 PM
Hmm. I have no idea what american style pizza is like, but it can't possibly be better than the one that guy in that restaurant two villages over makes.

Rutskarn
2009-05-09, 07:01 PM
There's a place here called D'Amore's. It's delicious. The proprietor ships in water all the way from Boston, just so the crust has that special fluff to it.

The crust is thin, the sauce is sweet and subtle, and the cheese is excellent.

Pepperoni and Pineapple are, in my view, the finest toppings.

THAC0
2009-05-09, 07:06 PM
Chocolate chip pizza.

Say no more.

Rutskarn
2009-05-09, 07:10 PM
Man, you can't get that stuff out here, but it's heartbustingly delicious.

Faulty
2009-05-09, 07:16 PM
Self-scrubbed for unnecessary aggression.

Rutskarn
2009-05-09, 07:24 PM
I'm sure the chickens who have their beaks pulled off and are stuffed in cages where they can barely move before being killed really love it.

Doubtful, as chickens are extremely stupid and incapable of higher cognition.


Also, almost everything you listed is incredibly bad for you.

So's breathing.

Lawliet
2009-05-09, 07:28 PM
Most of the stuff you mentioned is good, but Brasil and Argentina have the best barbecues and american pizza is just disgusting.

Xallace
2009-05-09, 07:29 PM
There's a place here called D'Amore's. It's delicious. The proprietor ships in water all the way from Boston, just so the crust has that special fluff to it.

The crust is thin, the sauce is sweet and subtle, and the cheese is excellent.

Pepperoni and Pineapple are, in my view, the finest toppings.

It's Facca Luna for us here. Any sauce, any topping, wood-stove cooked right when you order it. Gets their cheese from a local dairy and their meat from a butcher two towns over. (Funny story behind that, too. They used to import the meat from DC until one of their customers claimed that his mom's shop had better sausage. So the management up and drove to this woman's shop and tried the stuff. Now the use her shop's meat exclusively.)

Or, heck, Canyon Pizza, right around the corner from here. Nothing like 2 Extra-Large slices, a Pepperoni roll (or garlic breadstick!) and a good ol' American bucket-o-liquid-sugar for $4 to liven up your day. And you give them a tip, they ring a big gong. Has nothing to do with the pizza but it's great incentive to tip 'em.

Anuan
2009-05-09, 07:32 PM
There's a place here called D'Amore's. It's delicious. The proprietor ships in water all the way from Boston, just so the crust has that special fluff to it.

The crust is thin, the sauce is sweet and subtle, and the cheese is excellent.

Pepperoni and Pineapple are, in my view, the finest toppings.

Add Chorizo to that list and I'll agree wholeheartedly. Plus olives. Also yay I sparked a parody-thread without meaning to. I call on someone to provide a link that sells american food overseas that we don't already get, though.

strawberryman
2009-05-09, 07:34 PM
http://76.163.242.17/uploaded_images/jimmy-dean-pancake-sausage-chocolate-chip-736804.jpg

All that needs to be said.

...Oh, wait, good food.

RS14
2009-05-09, 07:50 PM
Funnel cake is quite delicious. Wikipedia claims similar dishes are also popular in Austria and Finland. I submit that nothing is more delicious. :smallbiggrin:

Ninja Chocobo
2009-05-09, 08:29 PM
And now, a rebuttal.
Pizza Hut is the worst thing ever to happen to pizza. Pineapple is hot on its heels.
"Real" barbecue....as opposed to "Fake" barbecue? :smallconfused:

lord of kobolds
2009-05-09, 08:30 PM
Cornbread.
'nuff said.

Assassin89
2009-05-09, 08:39 PM
For pizza, what about Chicago style deep-dish pizza? Being from around the Chicago area, I have had pizza from a place called Lou Malnati's.

Jack Squat
2009-05-09, 08:41 PM
And ribs truly are an anytime food, but then we get in fights about sauces and it gets messy, like my food.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ubTQfr_tyY :smallcool:


I'm sure the chickens who have their beaks pulled off and are stuffed in cages where they can barely move before being killed really love it. Also, almost everything you listed is incredibly bad for you.

This isn't the place for that. Let's assume that he was talking about homemade, go-to-the-farm-and-kill-your-own-chicken fried chicken and not KFC. (Not that there's anything wrong with KFC, but it can't beat homemade)

Feel free to suggest foods of your own, but let's keep it civil.

Pop(soda, cola, whatever) is a great American beverage, as are ice cream sodas, root beer floats, and the like.

Also, Ice Cream is decidedly American (meaning it was basically stolen from ideas of the British and French). The first "real" ice dessert was enjoyed by Nero Claudius Caesar, where he'd have runners bring shaved ice from the mountains and serve it with honey and fruit juices poured over, and in the 1200s, Marco Polo returned from the Middle East with a recipe for something similar to sherbet, but it was in the 1700s in America that ice cream was celebrated.

I'll second BBQ and pizza. Also, steak (originally a cheap cowboy meal), nachos, NE clam chowder, lobster (also originally a poor man's meal), and diner food.

Innis Cabal
2009-05-09, 09:19 PM
American-Style Pizza (I actually heard someone, who had gone to Italy many times and waxed downright poetic about it, eat a slice of Pizza Hut pizza and say, "You know, thing about Italy is, the pizza there isn't as good. They invented it; we perfected it.") Without question, this is open to interpretation, but I'm throwing it out there.

Lobster



This. Yes. Though I think the pizza I make at home is far supiror to all others, but thats a cook thing so its not fair to post.

And comming from a long line of Lobster Fishers...Lobster is the second greatest food on earth.



Add Chorizo to that list and I'll agree wholeheartedly. Plus olives. Also yay I sparked a parody-thread without meaning to. I call on someone to provide a link that sells american food overseas that we don't already get, though.

This isn't a parody thread! This is a thread so we don't derail your awesome one ;D

AgentPaper
2009-05-09, 09:31 PM
Sushi. It didn't become awesome until immigrants decided to mix things up. The California Roll is the first as far as I can tell, but definitely not the last. See a sushi roll with the rice on the outside? That's American-style sushi.

Gwyn chan 'r Gwyll
2009-05-09, 09:32 PM
I liek bbq.


Nothin' more.

Cheesegear
2009-05-09, 09:35 PM
So, over in the Australia in the Playground thread, we started to wax lyrical about how Emu, Crocodile, Kangaroo and Wombat meat are delicious (and they are).

I'm pretty sure Bald Eagles are endangered (or protected?). But, do you Americans eat your national fauna too?

Faulty
2009-05-09, 09:36 PM
Feel free to suggest foods of your own, but let's keep it civil.

Sorry. In a bad mood, and I really apologize for taking it out here. I'll self-scrub.

Tequila Sunrise
2009-05-09, 09:39 PM
Homemade mac and cheese, made from a rue.

New York pizza.

New York bagels.

Innis Cabal
2009-05-09, 09:41 PM
So, over in the Australia in the Playground thread, we started to wax lyrical about how Emu, Crocodile, Kangaroo and Wombat meat are delicious (and they are).

I'm pretty sure Bald Eagles are endangered (or protected?). But, do you Americans eat your national fauna too?

No....well sort of. Depending on the state it might change. I know we eat our state animal here in Ohio, which is venison.


Also agentpaper....your incorrect i'm afraid, we weren't the first to put the rice on the outside. Nigirizushi was one of the first accepted sushi's and it has no nori.

Recaiden
2009-05-09, 09:43 PM
This isn't a parody thread! This is a thread so we don't derail your awesome one ;D

Hear, hear! This is an adaptation thread.

I've got to say many americanized foreign foods are pretty good.

Bald Eagles are endangered, yes, so we don't eat them. We do eat some of our state animals. Like cattle here in Texas.

xyzzy
2009-05-09, 09:46 PM
Chicago-style pizza is tremendously <3.

Apple butter.

Americanized Chinese food, and especially Springfield, MO's cashew chicken.

Tex Mex.

Innis Cabal
2009-05-09, 10:14 PM
Chicago-style pizza is tremendously <3.

Apple butter.

Americanized Chinese food, and especially Springfield, MO's cashew chicken.

Tex Mex.


We have this sizzling rice soup here that i've been trying to get the recipe for the last 5 years, so amazing. That and our dim sum here in Akron is so astounding they ask you to leave your eyes at the door least they fall out of your head and into the plate.

Gorgondantess
2009-05-09, 10:22 PM
Hmmm... as an American food connosieur (read: snobby elitist) I have to agree, I like most american foods.
we invented french fries and hamburgers, and while the stuff you get at fast food stores irs crap (Ok, here in sunny california we have In&Out, which is effing delicious, but it's an anomaly). Anyhow, freshly ground beef and home fried french fries is one of the greatest meals ever.
As for pizza: most americans hate italian pizza. Most italians hate american pizza. It's really a different thing entirely, the two. The first italian pizza was just thick, fluffy bread with a thin layer of sauce and melted cheese. It focused on the bread, really. We Americans like it cheesy and saucy and meaty, without much bread. I like it that way too.
As for Australian food, I can prove to you that it isn't good through simple logic. Australia originated as a British penal colony, and everyone knows Britain has the worst food in the world. No, really, british food sucks. It all tastes like lumpy potatoes. Anyhow, Australian food is therefore based off of British food- Aussies are really just exiled brits- and I refuse to believe that anything derived from that crap can be worth putting in my mouth.
I'd say more, but I don't really know the origins of most food, so I'll just leave it at that.

Stormthorn
2009-05-09, 10:30 PM
And now, a rebuttal.
Pizza Hut is the worst thing ever to happen to pizza. Pineapple is hot on its heels.
"Real" barbecue....as opposed to "Fake" barbecue? :smallconfused:

Yes. America is the king of BBQ.


Also, meximerican food. Like a taco in a fried corn tortilla or balogna burritos.

And Pancakes

And PEANUT BUTTER

and Apple Crisp

Im hungry now.

Mephibosheth
2009-05-09, 10:45 PM
"Real" barbecue....as opposed to "Fake" barbecue? :smallconfused:

I feel like this needs to be addressed, but that I am not the one to do it. As usual, the wikipedia article (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbecue) speaks to the distinction, but isn't necessarily authoritative.

I think (and I could easily be mistaken) that "real barbecue" refers one of two things. It could refer to the pork dish that is most commonly viewed as the orignal, authentic barbecue, in which the pork was seasoned with any of a number of sauces that are commonly associated with barbecue. Alternatively, "real barbecue" could refer to the method of cooking; in this case a long slow cooking process using indirect heat or hot smoke as opposed to a relatively quick cooking process more accurately called "grilling" wherein the meat is placed directly on a hot grate. In either case, "fake barbecue" would refer to any cooked meat covered in barbecue sauce. Can anyone confirm either of these explanations or offer a better one?

That said, spare ribs barbecued or grilled and covered in caramelized barbecue sauce are close to my favorite dish of all time. Especially if the sauce is homemade.

Mephibosheth

reorith
2009-05-09, 10:48 PM
And now, a rebuttal.
Pizza Hut is the worst thing ever to happen to pizza. Pineapple is hot on its heels.
"Real" barbecue....as opposed to "Fake" barbecue? :smallconfused:

"real" barbecue involves a pit and huge whole animals or at least large portions of them being cooked slowly with a consistent heat or something like that. fake barbecuing involves grilling/roasting/broiling something and then using barbecue sauce to mask the affront to the culinary spirits.

Fawkes
2009-05-09, 10:52 PM
So, over in the Australia in the Playground thread, we started to wax lyrical about how Emu, Crocodile, Kangaroo and Wombat meat are delicious (and they are).

I'm pretty sure Bald Eagles are endangered (or protected?). But, do you Americans eat your national fauna too?

Depends on what you call national fauna. We mostly just eat farm-type animals - cattle, pigs, chicken, duck and occasionally sheep - and seafood.

They eat alligator in New Orleans, though. It's delicious.

And yeah, it's illegal to kill/harm/consume Bald Eagles.


Pineapple is hot on its heels.

BLASPHEMY! PINEAPPLE PIZZA IS DELICIOUS!


As for Australian food, I can prove to you that it isn't good through simple logic. Australia originated as a British penal colony, and everyone knows Britain has the worst food in the world. No, really, british food sucks. It all tastes like lumpy potatoes. Anyhow, Australian food is therefore based off of British food- Aussies are really just exiled brits- and I refuse to believe that anything derived from that crap can be worth putting in my mouth.

I counter your weak logic with anecdotal evidence! I've been to Australia, and just about everything I ate there was delicious! I had a steak pot pie that was incredible, every pizza place served amazing Hawaiian-style pizza, and I discovered that the best burgers come with lettuce, tomato, onion, beetroot, pineapple, and a fried egg! Also, their french fries (or should I say 'chips') beat the pants off of ours (although our ketchup is much better than their 'tomato sauce'). Most of their sodas are better, too. Schweppes Lemonade is much better than Sprite, 7up, or Sierra Mist. Of course, Ginger Beer and Sarsaparilla are no match for the mighty American Root Beer.

At least in my experience, American and Australia isn't really that different.

Innis Cabal
2009-05-09, 11:05 PM
Yes. America is the king of BBQ.



And PEANUT BUTTER


Yes, this exactly. And Root Beer. People from out of the country that I know simply don't understand out

And that would be the distinction of BBQ, sure other cultures have done similar, Char Sui comes to mind, but the real authentic BBQ is wholey american.



Pop/Soda altogather really...what a wonderful invention...not one we started, they've been around for literally thousands of years, but we were the first to make them as they are now...so its ours. Back off.

That and the waffle cone! Who can forget the waffle cone? Not us Ohio people thats for sure, its bloody our invention! Don't let any of those other people out there tell you otherwise!

Jack Squat
2009-05-09, 11:14 PM
Pop/Soda altogather really...what a wonderful invention...not one we started, they've been around for literally thousands of years, but we were the first to make them as they are now...so its ours. Back off.

I'd say we were really the ones that invented pop, as in the US was the first place that had syrups added to them for flavor. We also were the ones that first made soda water widely available, which led to the ever awesome ice cream soda and floats.

...I wish soda shoppes were still around.

Oh, milkshakes too...

Anuan
2009-05-09, 11:22 PM
Hmmm... as an American food connosieur (read: snobby elitist) I have to agree, I like most american foods.
we invented french fries and hamburgers,
'French fries' were invented in Belgium in the late 1600s.

Also, no gingerbread for you, because it tastes like lumpy potatoes. No excellent beef wellington either. Lumpy potatoes again. No scotch eggs, which are the best things in the world. No pheasant (which you're unfortunately unlikely to get anyway), no roast pork or crackling or just about any roast dinner in general. No full british breakfast with sausage and bacon and toast and eggs. No yorkshire puddings , no awesome sweet puddings (spotted **** is delicious, giggle all you like at the name). No unspiced sausages. Everything tastes like lumpy potatoes.
Well, I happen to be a lumpy potato connosieur and can tell you one kind of lumpy potato is entirely different to another :smallbiggrin:

kpenguin
2009-05-09, 11:25 PM
'French fries' were invented in Belgium in the late 1600s.

We invented the frozen french fry, though.

shadzar
2009-05-09, 11:36 PM
mmm good BBQ (pork shoulder slow cooking in a cooker for 12 hours over maple wood coals) with home-made BBQ sauce (vodka, molasses, fresh picked habeneros, fresh tomato paste, brown sugar [measurements hidden to protect the innocent])

All you need to go with that is fresh buttermilk biscuits with apple butter, and a baked potato with sour cream.

:drool:

reorith
2009-05-09, 11:39 PM
i think high fructose corn syrup is a pretty cool guy! no seriously, is there any food additive that can claim to be more american? hfcs is derived from corn, a product of the new world, is produced as a result of cheap corn prices due to the subsidization of corn growers by the 'merican gov'ment. then american consumers purchase it as an ingridient in their cokes and ketchup and gasoline and consume it to the detriment of their health. hfcs 4tw.

Cleverdan22
2009-05-09, 11:42 PM
There's this great little restaurant like three blocks away from my house that makes amazing New York style pizza, and I live in South Carolina!

Yeah, deep-fried chicken, apple pie, and apple butter are all amazing. And steak. Love steak.

Ninja Chocobo
2009-05-09, 11:43 PM
About the barbecue stuff: I see now. Sort of, anyway.

Am I still allowed to like barbecue sauce?

Gorgondantess
2009-05-09, 11:44 PM
I counter your weak logic with anecdotal evidence! I've been to Australia, and just about everything I ate there was delicious! I had a steak pot pie that was incredible, every pizza place served amazing Hawaiian-style pizza, and I discovered that the best burgers come with lettuce, tomato, onion, beetroot, pineapple, and a fried egg! Also, their french fries (or should I say 'chips') beat the pants off of ours (although our ketchup is much better than their 'tomato sauce'). Most of their sodas are better, too. Schweppes Lemonade is much better than Sprite, 7up, or Sierra Mist. Of course, Ginger Beer and Sarsaparilla are no match for the mighty American Root Beer.

At least in my experience, American and Australia isn't really that different.

I'm sure. I was being Ironic.


'French fries' were invented in Belgium in the late 1600s.
Excuse me. I was largely referring to the french fries/hamburger combo. Bad wording.:smallredface:

Also, no gingerbread for you, because it tastes like lumpy potatoes. No excellent beef wellington either. Lumpy potatoes again. No scotch eggs, which are the best things in the world. No pheasant (which you're unfortunately unlikely to get anyway), no roast pork or crackling or just about any roast dinner in general. No full british breakfast with sausage and bacon and toast and eggs. No yorkshire puddings , no awesome sweet puddings (spotted **** is delicious, giggle all you like at the name). No unspiced sausages. Everything tastes like lumpy potatoes.
Well, I happen to be a lumpy potato connosieur and can tell you one kind of lumpy potato is entirely different to another .
I'm sure, I'm sure. Roast foods are not a british invention, however, I'm not a fan of pheasant, nor gingerbread, and my lumpy potatoes comment was specifically referring to british sausages... "bangers". Whuh. Bleh. Anyhow, I'll admit that a bit of British food is ok, but as a whole I believe it is quite bland and textureless, or with bad texture. Most will agree with me. There's a reason you find "authentic italian cuisine", or "authentic french cuisine", or the like, but you will never find "Authentic British cuisine". It's just not very good.

SMEE
2009-05-09, 11:47 PM
Most of the stuff you mentioned is good, but Brasil and Argentina have the best barbecues and american pizza is just disgusting.

Agreed on the barbecue statement. Add chimarrão as the beverage of choice and cook the meat on a slow ground fire and you're granted to have a winner.
I'm still giving the pizza another chance before deciding if it's good or not. The place where we had pizza at GenCon was 110% awful.

And please... get some real coffee. :smallsigh:

Other than that and the culinary shock (almost everything is too sweet :smalleek:), the food was okay.

It should be noted that I lost one kilo due to my GenCon trip. And I'm yet to get it back. :smallfrown:

Asbestos
2009-05-09, 11:50 PM
Depends on what you call national fauna. We mostly just eat farm-type animals - cattle, pigs, chicken, duck and occasionally sheep - and seafood.

How about the Turkey, the bird that was almost our national symbol?

Also, I didn't see this but... Potato Chips, those are American. As are Chimichangas.

The Vorpal Tribble
2009-05-09, 11:54 PM
How about the Turkey, the bird that was almost our national symbol?
Was going to post exactly that, about how no one else can possibly claim turkey... but I'm sure someone will try :smallsigh:

zeratul
2009-05-09, 11:56 PM
Most of the stuff you mentioned is good, but Brasil and Argentina have the best barbecues and american pizza is just disgusting.

The problem with this statement is that there isn;t really any particular "American Pizza" If by american pizza you mean pizza made here it;s certainly false as there are in New York City at least lots of places that make it the traditional way as opposed to the doughy kind that seems to be associated with America. There is also then of course the Chicago deep dish which when made well is fantastic. And lastly there's Californian style Pizza which is thin crust with various strange and wonderful topping combinations. One I've been longing to try is a pizza with barbecue sauce as the sauce, smoked Gouda as the cheese, and topped with barbecue chicken and served with fresh basil sprinkled over it. Saw it on a food network thing once.

Hell Puppi
2009-05-10, 12:02 AM
They really need to invent the transporter so I can try Chicago-style deep dish.

...or find an excuse to go to Chicago.

Asbestos
2009-05-10, 12:07 AM
And Pecan Pie! How could we have missed that?

Xsesiv
2009-05-10, 12:28 AM
I'm sure, I'm sure. Roast foods are not a british invention, however, I'm not a fan of pheasant, nor gingerbread, and my lumpy potatoes comment was specifically referring to british sausages... "bangers". Whuh. Bleh. Anyhow, I'll admit that a bit of British food is ok, but as a whole I believe it is quite bland and textureless, or with bad texture. Most will agree with me. There's a reason you find "authentic Italian cuisine", or "authentic french cuisine", or the like, but you will never find "Authentic British cuisine". It's just not very good.

I take offence to that. Being from a certain country doesn't define culinary skill related to the food that country may be known for, or all Americans would be brilliant burger-flippers. You can find "authentic British cuisine" in, say, France, but as Americans, as a whole, refuse to accept us Brits due to our habit for colonisation going one step too far several hundred years ago, it is extremely difficult or impossible to find it there. American food is worse, I could say, all fatty, sugary, acidic, salty, reconstituted, nuclear-irradiated, mass-produced slime made into a vaguely palatable taste and texture, but I'd much rather not act like a hypocrite.

The word "bangers" does in fact refer specifically to poor quality sausages, which in harsher times contained so much water they exploded in the frying pan. If you had them as opposed to simply "sausages" then I would notbe surprised if you were dissatisfied.

Bit of weasel wording going on? "Most will agree with me."?

Anyway there are plenty of American foods I enjoy, just as you probably enjoy sandwiches and bacon, so I'm not going to attack your views. Just presenting mine.

Hawriel
2009-05-10, 12:36 AM
pumpkin pie, sweet potato pie damn it! :smallbiggrin:

Tex mex is really good. In the past few years a Qadobas tex mex chain opened two stores neer my house. Its great food. The best part is you get at least 6 months of the mexican family and friends run the place befor converting to all high school and collage kids. Damn good.

Funny thing though what we Americans think as "mexican food" is really tex mex wich was developped by texas and mexican rangers. It was made for cooking and eating during the cattle drive. Real Mexican food is totaly different. NPR did an interveiw with an american that fell in love with mexican cooking. He then opened a resteront in the states. Dont remember the name though.

Pancakes. Oh man there is a small mom and pop diner up in Mount Morris. Their pancakes are the size of a plate and at least 1/4 in. thick. They also have a nice slightly tousted serface. A stack is three of these things. With blue barries and hony butter. Yum. Im going tomarow cant wait!

I dont know if its origen is american or not but the omlet. A good omlet with nice shreded or diced potato, toast and good sausage. Not that burnt creasy black/brown stick with solid fat in them sausage. Nice red meat that plump. In the omlet. Hell almost any thing. Gyro, feta, tomato, and onion. Chedder, diced ham, green pepper.

I, I gota go get food.

EDIT

STRAWBARRIES!! Jam, jelly, icream, donuts, on chease cake, freshly picked and washed!

Honydew melons!

I go

Anuan
2009-05-10, 12:37 AM
...Xsesiv is my new hero. Apart from the fact he made an argument against a comment that didn't exist, that being that all british people are bad cooks, or something along the lines.

snoopy13a
2009-05-10, 12:37 AM
Hmm. I have no idea what american style pizza is like, but it can't possibly be better than the one that guy in that restaurant two villages over makes.

NY style pizza is the best. Thin and greasy and you have to fold it to eat it :smallbiggrin:

Chicken Wings are great as well.

Innis Cabal
2009-05-10, 12:41 AM
They really need to invent the transporter so I can try Chicago-style deep dish.

...or find an excuse to go to Chicago.

Other then its a great city?

Hawriel
2009-05-10, 12:44 AM
[QUOTE=Xsesiv;6085860] American food is worse, I could say, all fatty, sugary, acidic, salty, reconstituted, nuclear-irradiated, mass-produced slime made into a vaguely palatable taste and texture, but I'd much rather not act like a hypocrite.
[QUOTE]


Yes all to sadly this is true.

The comercial industrialization of food truely is horrific.

Oh and so is the pork rine. Oh my god :smallmad: Quick think of grandma pot roast! Mmmmm grandmas pot roast :smalltongue:

THAC0
2009-05-10, 12:44 AM
Corn Fritters! With honeybutter.

...I can't wait till the fair opens in a week or two and I can gorge myself.

Rutskarn
2009-05-10, 12:54 AM
How about the Turkey, the bird that was almost our national symbol?


Eh. Turkey's alright. Chicken's a better bird, to be honest.

kpenguin
2009-05-10, 12:55 AM
Eh. Turkey's alright. Chicken's a better bird, to be honest.

Undead-funny-man say whaaat?

Rutskarn
2009-05-10, 12:58 AM
That's right, I said it. There's nothing terribly delicious about turkey.

Awright, maybe it's because I dislike stuffing. Maybe that's the key ingredient. Or maybe it's because I've never eaten any of the deep-fried turkey legs they serve at the better kind of state fair. All I know is, I stuff it down my gullet when I'm hungry, but it's nothing too special.

AgentPaper
2009-05-10, 01:00 AM
Also agentpaper....your incorrect i'm afraid, we weren't the first to put the rice on the outside. Nigirizushi was one of the first accepted sushi's and it has no nori.

Putting fish on top of a lump of rice doesn't count as "rice on the outside", or even as sushi in my opinion, though it's still tasty of course. I'm talking about sushi rolls, with the nori on the inside instead of around, which was specifically designed by American sushi chefs because apparently Americans didn't like seeing the yucky black stuff on the outside. (silly Americans!) Of course, that's not what makes American sushi so good, but it is definitely a trademark of it.

As for turkey, it's the stuffing that makes it good on thanksgiving day, but the real reason you make turkey is for awesome turkey sandwiches for weeks after.:smallwink:

Innis Cabal
2009-05-10, 01:00 AM
Eh. Turkey's alright. Chicken's a better bird, to be honest.

Gotta agree with this...never ever had turkey at thanksgiving....ever...and wouldn't pick it if chicken was an option.


And to the idea that all american food is greasy etc etc. I ask you to look at our humble lobster and reconsider your stance, heck most of our sea food. We don't have fish and chips after all. -OR- Jelled Eels. We've go okra...which I can't stand, Greens which...also I can't stand.

And you'll find if you've done your fried chicken right its not greasy at all. In fact -good- fried chicken shouldn't be ever. Don't judge us by our fast food, its sort of like basing all of scotish food off hagis. Besides, there is more fried food (like candy bars....why?) in Scotland.



Putting fish on top of a lump of rice doesn't count as "rice on the outside", or even as sushi in my opinion, though it's still tasty of course. I'm talking about sushi rolls, with the nori on the inside instead of around, which was specifically designed by American sushi chefs because apparently Americans didn't like seeing the yucky black stuff on the outside. (silly Americans!) Of course, that's not what makes American sushi so good, but it is definitely a trademark of it.

I think you'll find that they do :smalltongue: and where else is the rice then on the outside...it can't be on the around.




Awright, maybe it's because I dislike stuffing. Maybe that's the key ingredient. Or maybe it's because I've never eaten any of the deep-fried turkey legs they serve at the better kind of state fair. All I know is, I stuff it down my gullet when I'm hungry, but it's nothing too special

Do I have a man you need to talk to Ser. Though I agree with you 100%. Stuffing? Why the heck would you ruin anything with it -or- gravy? WHY!

RTGoodman
2009-05-10, 01:08 AM
And to the idea that all american food is greasy etc etc. I ask you to look at our humble lobster and reconsider your stance, heck most of our sea food.

Eh, you're just in the wrong part of the US. Here in the South, it's almost a sacrilege to serve seafood any other way than fried up alongside French fries or a baked potato and (of course) hush puppies (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hushpuppy).

Other staples of my North Carolina-raise diet are Lexington (NC)-style barbecue (http://www.northcarolinatravels.com/food/barbecue/index.htm), huge breakfast spreads (eggs several ways, bacon, sausage, ham, biscuits, grits (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grits), and anything else you want), fried chicken (and every real Southerner has a grandma that makes "the best" fried chicken), and, of course, sweet tea (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sweet_tea).

AgentPaper
2009-05-10, 01:11 AM
I think you'll find that they do :smalltongue: and where else is the rice then on the outside...it can't be on the around.

Oh, you poor unenlightened man. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_roll)

Innis Cabal
2009-05-10, 01:21 AM
Oh, you poor unenlightened man. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_roll)

I've had maki rolls. I've also had califonia rolls with the nori wrapped around the rice ;D. Heck I even make sushi with pork. And before I get anyone going AAH THATS NOT REALLY SUSHI!!!! I'll direct you to the definition which says that it may be served with fish, it does not require fish, just the vinigered rice.



Eh, you're just in the wrong part of the US. Here in the South, it's almost a sacrilege to serve seafood any other way than fried up alongside French fries or a baked potato and (of course) hush puppies.

Other staples of my North Carolina-raise diet are Lexington (NC)-style barbecue, huge breakfast spreads (eggs several ways, bacon, sausage, ham, biscuits, grits, and anything else you want), fried chicken (and every real Southerner has a grandma that makes "the best" fried chicken), and, of course, sweet tea.

Ah? No sadly the mid-west here though I am told Clevleand is one of the top places to eat in the country so :P. Here we like our food hearty, plentiful and locally here in Akron just a bit spicey. A nice blend of Hungarian food here over the years has breed a good deal of peprika into our dish's, I think honestly if its not made out of potato, chicken, pork or onion its not food here.

Rutskarn
2009-05-10, 01:23 AM
Oh, man, hush puppies!

It has been too goddamn long since I have had one of those. Too damn long.

Even though they make your flatus smell like a box of advanced-development leprosy.

AgentPaper
2009-05-10, 01:26 AM
I've had maki rolls. I've also had califonia rolls with the nori wrapped around the rice ;D. Heck I even make sushi with pork. And before I get anyone going AAH THATS NOT REALLY SUSHI!!!! I'll direct you to the definition which says that it may be served with fish, it does not require fish, just the vinigered rice.

AAH THATS NOT REALLY SUSHI!!!! :smalltongue:

Sure, it's technically sushi, but if that's your definition of sushi I could replace the bun of a chili dog with rice and that would be sushi. :smallconfused:

Anyways, my point is made, California rolls and other American-developed sushi are the best kind.

Innis Cabal
2009-05-10, 01:27 AM
I used to love them as a kid, stopped eating them for a while and can't stand em now sadly.

Fawkes
2009-05-10, 01:40 AM
I ate at a Steak'n'Shake in Akron once. You and me, we're like food brothers, right Cabal?

Innis Cabal
2009-05-10, 01:42 AM
If you've eaten at one in Akron then we've probably eaten at the same place, so gotta say ya. How was the experiance for you? I find the ones out of Akron to be better honestly.

Fawkes
2009-05-10, 01:49 AM
I liked it. We don't have Steak'n'Shake 'round these parts.

I forget... what's the name of the minor league baseball team in Akron? I saw them play.

That's basically the extent of my visit to Akron. Nice town.

tyckspoon
2009-05-10, 01:51 AM
I'm still giving the pizza another chance before deciding if it's good or not. The place where we had pizza at GenCon was 110% awful.

And please... get some real coffee. :smallsigh:


Well, now, that's no good. Where'd ya get the pizza? There are plenty of good pizza shops in downtown Indy, but I think most of them are a fair hike away from the convention center. Destination dining for a con group- have to borrow some cars/figure out our local bus routes to make it practical.

Can't speak for the coffee, I don't drink it myself. I have it on good authority that most of what you'll find served in bottomless mugs is pretty dire, tho.

Innis Cabal
2009-05-10, 01:52 AM
Ah? The astros, great minor leauge team. Their stadium makes sushi actually, and great hot dogs the likes you can't get outside of a stadium. I like the nights they allow you to bring your dog to the park, great family place. One of the shining beacons of what once was a great city, now to decayed and tired to work itself back into a stable part of the Midwest.

Fawkes
2009-05-10, 02:04 AM
I think I would have remembered if they were called the Astros (http://houston.astros.mlb.com). That's my team's name. :smalltongue: A quick google search gives me the Akron Aeros (http://www.akronaeros.com/), which seems right. I think I recognize that mascot.

Coincidentally, my city's hockey team is the Aeros (http://www.aeros.com/).

Why do we even have a hockey team?

shadzar
2009-05-10, 02:07 AM
Have I missed in in all that has been mentioned so far? (Got hungry and had to make a BBQ pizza)

Has no one yet mentioned red eye gravy? Is that anywhere but in the US South?

Innis Cabal
2009-05-10, 02:54 AM
I think I would have remembered if they were called the Astros (http://houston.astros.mlb.com). That's my team's name. :smalltongue: A quick google search gives me the Akron Aeros (http://www.akronaeros.com/), which seems right. I think I recognize that mascot.

Coincidentally, my city's hockey team is the Aeros (http://www.aeros.com/).

Why do we even have a hockey team?

Oopps, you've got the right of it, been a long time since i've even had the money to see a game of theirs sadly.

THAC0
2009-05-10, 03:20 AM
Oopps, you've got the right of it, been a long time since i've even had the money to see a game of theirs sadly.

I'm sure your minor league team has nothing on the team in Montgomery Alabama.

...If only for the fact that instead of shooting teeshirts at the crowd, they shoot hot dogs. And they drop biscuits at you from the balcony.

Yarram
2009-05-10, 03:26 AM
I'm a liddle bit confused actually, because I think I can remember eating all of the food that you guys have listed at some time or another and I'm Aussie. Most commonly mentioned, I eat chocolate chip cookie's and apple pie often, though not as often as I'd wish. Heh.
:tongue:

EDIT:I'd never seen a California roll though. Does sushi count?

SMEE
2009-05-10, 05:32 AM
Well, now, that's no good. Where'd ya get the pizza? There are plenty of good pizza shops in downtown Indy, but I think most of them are a fair hike away from the convention center. Destination dining for a con group- have to borrow some cars/figure out our local bus routes to make it practical.

Can't speak for the coffee, I don't drink it myself. I have it on good authority that most of what you'll find served in bottomless mugs is pretty dire, tho.

I don't remember the pizza place name. It's close to that Subway and that McDonalds by the Hyatt's hotel.

And dire? Dire as in awfully weak, can see through you kind of coffee or dire as in strong, bitter, black, delicious, filled with caffeine rush and strong bitter aftertaste coffee?
Because I couldn't find the latter there. Although, I can give you that steak n' shake served me a half decent mug of coffee.
One... half decent mug of coffee... in 5 days... :smalleek:
It was terrible.

Anuan
2009-05-10, 06:06 AM
Because I couldn't find the latter there. Although, I can give you that steak n' shake served me a half decent mug of coffee.
One... half decent mug of coffee... in 5 days... :smalleek:
It was terrible.

You're from Brazil. I doubt you could find a comparably decent cup of coffee anywhere out of south-america. Although there's a place here called Gloria Jean's that sells beans that look nice...Though I'm barely a coffee conniseur. They sell a Paradiso Blend Dark that's described as 'An exotic blend from four continents. Dark roasted for full bodied flavour. A powerful blend for those who like it strong.'
Sounds like a coffee for the SMEE :smalltongue:

Black_Pants_Guy
2009-05-10, 07:44 AM
BBQ (Real BBQ)

I disagree my friend, clearly Australians invented the ancient art of BBQ-Fu; WE CAN BARBEQUE ANYTHING! :smallcool:

toasty
2009-05-10, 08:27 AM
This thread is making me hungry.

No one has mentioned corn chips. I dunno if they're technically american or not, but I LOVE corn chips.

Hamburgers are good, so long as they are not from McDonalds.

The Rose Dragon
2009-05-10, 08:27 AM
And dire? Dire as in awfully weak, can see through you kind of coffee or dire as in strong, bitter, black, delicious, filled with caffeine rush and strong bitter aftertaste coffee?

The latter is not real coffee. It's an abomination. And not delicious.

Anuan
2009-05-10, 08:41 AM
One cannot tell someone that what they find delicious is simply not delicious, TRD. 'tis entirely unsociable.
Plus, I'm not sure anyone in their right mind should attempt to argue about quality coffee with a Brazillian...It's like trying to argue about chilaquiles with a Mexican, or with a Turkish person about...about...whatever article of deliciousness it is you guys are supposedly nationally passionate about.

V- Ah, but brazillian coffee is internationally known for being the best. Like brazillian soccer players. And capoeristas. And actors/actresses that specify in films of an adult nature.
...I want to go to brazil...

The Rose Dragon
2009-05-10, 08:50 AM
...or with a Turkish person about...about...whatever article of deliciousness it is you guys are supposedly nationally passionate about.

Coffee? Yeah.

EDIT: That said, Turkish foods are much better than what the Americans invented.

And since the best Dominos in the world was the Turkey branch, you guys aren't so hot on pizzas, either.

Ninja Chocobo
2009-05-10, 09:00 AM
EDIT: That said, Turkish foods are much better than what the Americans invented.

I'm not sure about either of them, but Turkish Delight and Doner Kebabs immediately come to mind and are each extremely delicious.

reorith
2009-05-10, 09:01 AM
I disagree my friend, clearly Australians invented the ancient art of BBQ-Fu; WE CAN BARBEQUE ANYTHING! :smallcool:

wow no. barbecue was invented by caribbean islanders long before england sent its undesirables, to the land of steve irwin.

have you had barbecued horse? nothing compares.

The Rose Dragon
2009-05-10, 09:02 AM
I'm not sure about either of them, but Turkish Delight and Doner Kebabs immediately come to mind and are each extremely delicious.

You haven't had real kebab until you eat it in its city.

Which, coincidentally, is in Turkey.

I wonder how I'm gonna get over my döner cravings if I ever move abroad.


V- Ah, but brazillian coffee is internationally known for being the best.

Coffee is to the Turks what tea is to the Chinese and Japanese cultures. There is an entire ceremony that revolves around coffee when you ask a family for their daughter (it is slowly fading away recently, but it is still quite common). A cup of coffee is a basis for 40 years of loyal friendship.

Turks value their coffee very highly, you see.

Canadian
2009-05-10, 10:13 AM
American BBQ and deli sandwiches are pretty much it for great American food.

The rest is mostly junk food. I'd say America has created far more "snacks" or "junk food" than actual food items for meals.

Quincunx
2009-05-10, 10:18 AM
You don't ever get over the cravings for your home food if the ingredients aren't available.

In that respect, I should never have read this thread.

Stormthorn
2009-05-10, 11:41 AM
American BBQ and deli sandwiches are pretty much it for great American food.

The rest is mostly junk food. I'd say America has created far more "snacks" or "junk food" than actual food items for meals.

And for this you are welcome.

Innis Cabal
2009-05-10, 12:06 PM
I disagree my friend, clearly Australians invented the ancient art of BBQ-Fu; WE CAN BARBEQUE ANYTHING! :smallcool:

I'm afraid cultural anthropologists would disagree ;D

Thats not real BBQ. Its all good but its just not what we've got.



The rest is mostly junk food. I'd say America has created far more "snacks" or "junk food" than actual food items for meals.

We don't even begin to brag about the range of junk food we have next to the Brits, Pot Roast crisps? Turky and gravy? Ya.....we're not the junk food kings

lord of kobolds
2009-05-10, 12:15 PM
We don't even begin to brag about the range of junk food we have next to the Brits, Pot Roast crisps? Turky and gravy? Ya.....we're not the junk food kings

We do have twinkies, though...

Innis Cabal
2009-05-10, 01:29 PM
I'm not sure thats a shining mark on us....

RabbitHoleLost
2009-05-10, 01:34 PM
I'm not sure thats a shining mark on us....
Screw that, I love Twinkies.
Actually, I like Swiss Rolls better.
mmm, Little Debbie snacks.

Rutskarn
2009-05-10, 01:46 PM
95% of Little Debbie snacks taste like mummified cardboard.

Innis Cabal
2009-05-10, 01:50 PM
Screw that, I love Twinkies.
Actually, I like Swiss Rolls better.
mmm, Little Debbie snacks.

Never said they weren't great! And I much prefer Swiss Rolls

TheThan
2009-05-10, 02:23 PM
With all the talk about greasy American food, I though I'd right a short essay on the classic big American burger. keep in mind there are two types if hamburger. the classic big burger, topped with all manner of toppings, and the small and simple version, these are the classic sliders, belly bombs and gut grenades, the sort you get at football games and white castle (crystal to you southerners).

A proper classic America burger is not a greasy nasty mess you find in most fast food restaurants. Instead they are rich and juicy (though not greasy) with a variety of toppings and seasonings. The hamburger patty on the American big burger is either grilled or cooked on a griddle. Whichever method you choose, selection of the right meat is paramount. Whether you buy pre-ground beef or do it yourself (or have it done by a butcher), you want to go with chuck (or 80% lean ground beef). Chuck is about 20% fat, which sounds like a lot, but really its about perfect for our purposes. Ground beef that is too lean won’t hold together while ground beef that is too fatty makes for nasty greasy burgers.

Now that we got the selection of meat down, we can move onto seasoning. It’s my opinion that the best seasonings you can throw on a hamburger patty is salt and pepper. See the meat already has a lot of flavor in it and the salt and pepper brings it out so its in the for front.

Now comes the hard part, cooking a large slab of ground beef through is not easy. Ground meat doesn’t like long cooking times. So what I recommend is to shape the patties into large flat disks. You want them to be a little larger around than the buns you have chosen. The idea is that it will shrink in size as it cooks, you will lose a lot of the juices (but not all of it). With a little practice you can get it down to cover the whole bun. Keeping the patties as flat as you can will help prevent the meat from “mounding up”, when this happens you won’t be able to keep any condiments on it. 160 degrees is the safe zone for ground meat, though I prefer mine to be about 170, simply to be on the safe side. After that simply top with your choice of toppings and side dishes and enjoy.


Classic America big burger:

The basics
Hamburger Bun
Cheese (your choice, American, Swiss and cheddar are popular)
Hand ground beef patty (Variety of seasonings, from simple salt and pepper to peppercorns and whiskey)
Lettuce
Tomato
Red onions
Ketchup
Mustard (brown, though yellow is often used)
Mayonnaise (preferably home made)

Side dishes
Onion rings (battered and deep-fired onions)
French fries (aka chips, the most popular)
Potato chips (not the same thing as the above)
Peperoncini peppers

Options
French fries (yes on the burger, its not as weird as it sounds)
Onion ring (see above)
BBQ sauce (replaces the ketchup)
Pickles
Jalapeños
Those huge green peppers, name is eluding me
Salsa
Mushrooms
Grilled pineapple (seriously its pretty good)
Blue cheese
Guacamole
Fried egg

Beverages
Cola/pop is by far the most popular
Beer (nicely chilled is the American way to drink it, hence the name “Cold ones”)


My personal favorite burger:

Bread
Cheese (America)
Hand ground beef patty (with salt and pepper seasoning)
Lettuce
Tomato
Red onions
Mustard (brown)
Mayonnaise (preferably home made)
Onion ring
BBQ sauce
Fried egg

Side dish:
French fries

[/b]Beverage [/b]
Cola/pop: DR. Pepper is my favorite

zeratul
2009-05-10, 02:28 PM
Oh and aside from Hamburgers, BBQ, and Deli food, Tons of seafood dishes originated here due to the sheer surplus we have of it in a lot of the coastal regions.

RabbitHoleLost
2009-05-10, 02:44 PM
New England Clam Chowder, OMNOMNOMNOM <3

Innis Cabal
2009-05-10, 02:45 PM
Oh and aside from Hamburgers, BBQ, and Deli food, Tons of seafood dishes originated here due to the sheer surplus we have of it in a lot of the coastal regions.

And how great are most of them? Really? Tunafish salad?

Heck people....egg salad and potato salad. Honestly, whats better then some potato salad on toast? Nothing, thats what. Its the most amazing comfort food you'll ever eat. Ever

Dallas-Dakota
2009-05-10, 02:45 PM
I, for one, don't actually like most traditional foods of my country. Traditional dutch foods in my case.

TheThan
2009-05-10, 03:00 PM
And how great are most of them? Really? Tunafish salad?

Heck people....egg salad and potato salad. Honestly, whats better then some potato salad on toast? Nothing, thats what. Its the most amazing comfort food you'll ever eat. Ever

Yeah,

TheThan’s secret family recipe for potato salad is still unmatched. Trust me I’ve tried a great many other recipes and none compare.

Innis Cabal
2009-05-10, 03:13 PM
Yeah,

TheThan’s secret family recipe for potato salad is still unmatched. Trust me I’ve tried a great many other recipes and none compare.

Thats really what...well all good food is about, not some resturant, but the things you've made with your family, and your families made over the years to an art. Every good American kitchen has its own potato salad, BBQ and apple pie recipe. Its a requirment

Kaytara
2009-05-10, 03:42 PM
I believe apple pie was mentioned at the start of this thread... Bwuh? Apple pie? When did that become American? XD I mean, apples grow everywhere and a quick search on Wikipedia mentions the peculiarities of the recipe from the 14th century and whatnot.. America didn't even exist back then, as a country.

Now that we've got that out of the way... ^^

Personally I find that anyone arguing for the ingenuity of American food has a tricky case - America is a very young country and one that was populated by immigrants, no less. It's inevitable that the vast majority of recipes is able to be traced to their European or Asian predecessors... Although, if America invented ice cream, then that is definitely a heap of awesome right there. :)

Still, I don't particularly like roast meat or anything with too much bread in it, so American cuisine doesn't sound so appealing to me...

I prefer my food Ukrainian, really, with all the soups and things with rice and vegetables.... I mean, the borsch itself is worth dying for, whether it's standard or the "green" variety. ^^ And then there's the cakes and pastries.... I've yet so see a variety like that in any country I've visited. The hard yet juicy "chocolate potato" or the "lemon pastry" or the "honey pastry", all of them so different and so delicious... And the chocolate sweets, too, with every filling you can imagine, from waffles to gelatin to "bird's milk", often numerous fillings in a single sweet.... It's one of the things I miss most here in Germany, where I cannot seem to find anything but Schnitzel this and Schnitzel that and crumbly dry cookies for dessert...

kpenguin
2009-05-10, 03:58 PM
I believe apple pie was mentioned at the start of this thread... Bwuh? Apple pie? When did that become American? XD I mean, apples grow everywhere and a quick search on Wikipedia mentions the peculiarities of the recipe from the 14th century and whatnot.. America didn't even exist back then, as a country.

Or, more to the point, apples didn't even grow in the New World, back then. They were brought over by colonists in the 16th (17th?) century.

Innis Cabal
2009-05-10, 04:04 PM
But there -is- American cuisine....its everywhere...despites where food comes from 1,000 years ago or more...most of the food -other- cultures use came from other places...heck spagehtti isn't italian by your concept of it all.

The saying "As American as Apple Pie" has been a saying here since long before even my parents were alive. We've taken all the cusines of the world and blended them in ways they'd not have otherwise, and thats distnctly American. No matter how you can trace it, there are things that are American. Soda pop was Arabic, but we took it and made it something different, we invented the soft drink, we invented the modern hamburger, we invented the waffle cone and ice cream. We made apple pie what it is now. Chinese American cusine, Japanese American Cusine....how amazing they are, but they're no more Chinese then the cathloic church. BBQ is american, despite the fact people have been roasting meat on a fire since they crawled from the ooze. But it is American, we've perfected it, we've made it something no other culture has ever done. Char Sui is amazing, i'll admit, but nothing beats an American BBQ rib

Trog
2009-05-10, 04:16 PM
Food that tastes good isn't always good for you. So as far as American food being bad for you I think anywhere you have red meat, sugar, oil and butter, etc. available you're bound to have "bad for you" food, American or not. That said we do make (and apparently export) a lot of junk food / snacky items. None of which, you'll note, appear below with the exception of soda.

Native American Fry Bread
Cornbread (with Maple Butter P=)
Deep-dish Chicago-style Pizza
Root Beer Floats (made with draft root beer when at all possible)
Soda
Chili
Cincinnati-Style Chili
Chili dogs & Chicago-style hot dogs (Get some good skin-on hot dogs not that Oscar Mayer crap)
Hamburgers (Make your own on a grill over a fire - NOT from a fast food place kkthnx)
Peanut Butter
Jambalaya
Cajun Blackened anything
Homemade southern fried chicken. Best ever: A&Q Chicken in Arkansas.
Turkey with stuffing and cranberry sauce
Pecan Pie, Apple Pie (mom's)
Hot Wings
Milwaukee County Stadium Brat Sauce... or whatever they call it now. (Yes this is a condiment. Put it on a good brat.)
And I haven't had it but I bet Turducken is good (turkey, stuffed with duck, stuffed with chicken)

xyzzy
2009-05-10, 04:30 PM
Recently I've discovered that hamburgers with (not kidding!) oatmeal and cranberries is really good.

tyckspoon
2009-05-10, 04:43 PM
I don't remember the pizza place name. It's close to that Subway and that McDonalds by the Hyatt's hotel.

And dire? Dire as in awfully weak, can see through you kind of coffee or dire as in strong, bitter, black, delicious, filled with caffeine rush and strong bitter aftertaste coffee?
Because I couldn't find the latter there. Although, I can give you that steak n' shake served me a half decent mug of coffee.
One... half decent mug of coffee... in 5 days... :smalleek:
It was terrible.

Not sure what that particular place is either, but if it's in a fast-food block with a Subway and a McDonald's it's probably not a shining example of how the US can do pizza. If you're coming to this year's GenCon I'll see if I can get you out to Bazbeaux's on Mass. Ave. 's good stuff there.

For coffee... probably the best bet is to buy some beans and grind & brew your own. You can get halfway decent beans here, and you can control the brewing time yourself (and be absolutely certain you're getting a nice fresh cup instead of something that's been sitting on a hot plate for an hour.)

Oh, yes- as for American originals, I nominate the chupaqueso. (http://www.chupaqueso.com/basic-howto-with-pictures/)

Rutskarn
2009-05-10, 04:43 PM
I'm considered a freak, because when I eat hamburgers, I eat them a.) without a bun, and b.) without any topping save onion and pickle.

SMEE
2009-05-10, 04:56 PM
Not sure what that particular place is either, but if it's in a fast-food block with a Subway and a McDonald's it's probably not a shining example of how the US can do pizza. If you're coming to this year's GenCon I'll see if I can get you out to Bazbeaux's on Mass. Ave. 's good stuff there.

For coffee... probably the best bet is to buy some beans and grind & brew your own. You can get halfway decent beans here, and you can control the brewing time yourself (and be absolutely certain you're getting a nice fresh cup instead of something that's been sitting on a hot plate for an hour.)

My friends kindly got me coffee ground so I could try to have some decent coffee.
Turns out that the coffee brewer provided by the hotel couldn't take the minimum amount of coffee ground to make a coffee that would be at least almost strong without clogging and not working.

That was very disappointing too. :smallfrown:

I'll be at GenCon this year. I'll be staying at the Canterbury, and I plan to take my friends to dine on Fogo de Chão. :smallcool:
I'll be bringing my own coffee ground and coffee brewer, though. :smallannoyed:

And I gladly accept the offer to be shown a decent pizza place. I hope they serve coffee there too.

Recaiden
2009-05-10, 04:57 PM
I'm considered a freak, because when I eat hamburgers, I eat them a.) without a bun, and b.) without any topping save onion and pickle.

That is pretty strange. Why no bun or lettuce?

Lupy
2009-05-10, 05:03 PM
Eh, you're just in the wrong part of the US. Here in the South, it's almost a sacrilege to serve seafood any other way than fried up alongside French fries or a baked potato and (of course) hush puppies (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hushpuppy).

Other staples of my North Carolina-raise diet are Lexington (NC)-style barbecue (http://www.northcarolinatravels.com/food/barbecue/index.htm), huge breakfast spreads (eggs several ways, bacon, sausage, ham, biscuits, grits (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grits), and anything else you want), fried chicken (and every real Southerner has a grandma that makes "the best" fried chicken), and, of course, sweet tea (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sweet_tea).

He speaks the truth.

Except my Gramma's is the best. (Even if she's actually my friend's biological grandmother, she is still my gramma.)

Additionally, you can't get good sweet tea North of NC, south of Georgia (I'm talking about you, Floridians), or west of Mississippi.

Asbestos
2009-05-10, 05:31 PM
Coffee is to the Turks what tea is to the Chinese and Japanese cultures. There is an entire ceremony that revolves around coffee when you ask a family for their daughter (it is slowly fading away recently, but it is still quite common). A cup of coffee is a basis for 40 years of loyal friendship.

Turks value their coffee very highly, you see.

A well made espresso in Italy blows that silty swill you guys call coffee out of the water. REAL coffee is brewed under enough steam pressure to qualify as steampunk.



On the subject of awesome American seafood I humbly offer the noble Blue Crab, state crustacean of Maryland. Not only is it great in crab cakes, but it is great deep fried whole (when freshly molted) and stuck on a bun. Mmmm... nothing like eating what amounts to a giant fried bug sandwich.

Rutskarn
2009-05-10, 05:40 PM
That is pretty strange. Why no bun or lettuce?

To the first: well, there you're tapping on a deeper-rooted mutation--my distaste for bread. It's a texture thing.

As for no lettuce: I guess I just don't see the point. Lettuce has almost no taste, and I'd just as well do without the texture.

snoopy13a
2009-05-10, 05:47 PM
Not sure what that particular place is either, but if it's in a fast-food block with a Subway and a McDonald's it's probably not a shining example of how the US can do pizza. If you're coming to this year's GenCon I'll see if I can get you out to Bazbeaux's on Mass. Ave. 's good stuff there.



Sbarro is an alright pizza chain. Your better neighborhood pizzerias do a nicer job but Sbarro is a safe choice for a slice if you don't know the area.

If you like Chicago style, the only chain I know of (and the only option in most areas) is Pizzeria Uno.

SDF
2009-05-10, 05:48 PM
I'm considered a freak, because when I eat hamburgers, I eat them a.) without a bun, and b.) without any topping save onion and pickle.

I think that's called a steak. =P

Recaiden
2009-05-10, 05:51 PM
To the first: well, there you're tapping on a deeper-rooted mutation--my distaste for bread. It's a texture thing.

As for no lettuce: I guess I just don't see the point. Lettuce has almost no taste, and I'd just as well do without the texture.

You could put it on some sort of cracker?

Eldan
2009-05-10, 06:11 PM
Well, we've made flat things made out of mincemeat for centuries around here, and we never used buns. So, I guess, that's an american idea anyway. :smalltongue:

Anuan
2009-05-10, 06:22 PM
Coffee is to the Turks what tea is to the Chinese and Japanese cultures. There is an entire ceremony that revolves around coffee when you ask a family for their daughter (it is slowly fading away recently, but it is still quite common). A cup of coffee is a basis for 40 years of loyal friendship.

Turks value their coffee very highly, you see.

My GOD that is awesome!
...Doesn't mean your coffee is superior to Brazil's, however :smallwink:

Canadian
2009-05-10, 09:15 PM
Hamburgers were invented in the city of Hamburg in Germany. They're not American food.

Jack Squat
2009-05-10, 09:26 PM
Hamburgers were invented in the city of Hamburg in Germany. They're not American food.

That's a common myth, actually.

History of the Hamburger (http://www.invention-help.com/innovations/hamburger-invention.html)



There are many different theories as to how and where the first hamburger invention took place. The ground meat used to make hamburgers is traced back to the Mongols. Much like the hamburger of today, the Mongols’ version started as a convenient way to eat on the go. The Mongol cavalry often traveled long distances and sometimes did not dismount their horses for days. Because they needed food that could be eaten easily with one hand and without dismounting, they placed meat patties under their saddles. While riding, the meat would get tenderized. The meat was then eaten raw.

When the Mongols invaded Moscow, they brought with them this type of meat. The Russian’s renamed the meat ‘steak tartare’. This is because the Mongols were called Tartars. Over the years the dish was adapted and modified with raw eggs and chopped onions.

In the 1600’s, ships from Hamburg, Germany began visiting the Russian ports. The Russian dish of steak tartare was taken back to Germany and called ‘tartare steak’.
In the late 1800’s, sailors who had visited Hamburg started calling the meat ‘ Hamburg steak’. The hamburger invention process took a significant leap when food stalls in New York City offered this dish in the hopes of attracting German sailors. Immigrants from Germany to the United States also brought along Hamburg steak. The reason why Hamburg steak was so popular was because the German’s flavored low-grade minced beef, therefore making it affordable to the lower classes as well.
The meat was then cooked to form a filet, and eventually came to be known as ‘Hamburger’.

There's currently a battle between Seymour, Wisconsin and Athens, Texas as to who actually "invented" the hamburger.

MrWacko
2009-05-11, 12:39 AM
Geeze, we've come 5 pages through the heated debate about food, and no one's mentioned India, home of some 1 billion souls. I myself, being a Californian, probably don't have a clue what is actually served in India, but I do know that whatever touristy version made it to San Francisco is absolutely wonderful. The Tandori, Naan, and Curries are wonderful. My personal favorite is the Chicken Tikka Masala, a mildly thick orange curry, and very spicy. That, some Naan and a bit of rice and my taste buds are in heaven.

I'll comment on my own home's food, though. Hawaii. Wonderful place, wonderful food. It's got origins in things like Japanese, Korean, and American. Kal-Bi beef ribs, Teryaki, mmmmmh. And lets not forget loco-moco's. Ground beef patty, with rich gravy, and rice. Tastes delicious.

But, wandering back to California food, we've got tons of it. It's only mildly different from most other American foods, but in subtle ways. The more locally grown/raised organic meets and vegetables are prominent in most, if not all of it.

Of course, this being America, we "borrow" from everyone else. I don't mind, since it means we get the best of it all. There's good Korean, Chinese, Japanese, Indonesian, Thai, Indian, Greek, Italian, French, Russian, Moroccan, Ethiopian, Puerto Rican, and Mexican food in San Francisco, and that's only what I can remember right now. It'd suffice to say there's no shortage of good food here.

Innis Cabal
2009-05-11, 08:32 PM
5 pages of it was mostly defending the actual American status of foods, which is good to see other people on that front.

but Indain food is great, we've a large population of punjab immigrents living in Akron so the markets they hold are wonderful. Real indian food....not the stuff the resturants try to pass off

toasty
2009-05-12, 12:15 AM
The Tandori, Naan, and Curries are wonderful. My personal favorite is the Chicken Tikka Masala, a mildly thick orange curry, and very spicy. That, some Naan and a bit of rice and my taste buds are in heaven.

Chicken Tikka Masala isn't geniunely India IIRC, but all that other stuff is.

Tandori chicken + butter naan = heaven.

No clue what India food is like in America. I've never had it there. Only had it in India. :D

Felixaar
2009-05-12, 12:35 AM
Coffee is to the Turks what tea is to the Chinese and Japanese cultures. There is an entire ceremony that revolves around coffee when you ask a family for their daughter (it is slowly fading away recently, but it is still quite common). A cup of coffee is a basis for 40 years of loyal friendship.

Turks value their coffee very highly, you see.

Incidentally, in Zambia, when a man wants to marry a woman, he sends a representative of some sort (normally a mentor) to the house of the parents. The mentor declares his charges intentions, and then offers the parents a gift. The gift is hidden inside a pair of plates, one the right way up and one upside down on top of the other to conceal the gifts. The mentor then leaves and comes back after sufficient time had passed. The parents are only allowed to remove the top plate and find out what the gift is if they decide to allow the man to marry their daughter, otherwise they must not touch the plates and leave them for the mentor to collect.

Not really that relevant, but interesting none the less.

Also, barbecue is definitely Australian. For Australia is not a nation of things that were created here, but a nation of things that find a home here. Barbecue... Convicts... Trevor Goddard..

Eldan
2009-05-12, 05:24 AM
Well, on the topic of hamburgers: I do, of course, know Steak Tartare (though I don't like it much, honestly, even if it doesn't involve horses today), but I own a medieval cookbook written by a historian which states that the practice of frying small lumps of mince meat in a pan (which, incidentally, also included some flour, eggs, fish, onions and whatever other thing was around) is pretty old around here.

raitalin
2009-05-12, 06:45 AM
Turkey was dismissed earlier as inferior to chicken. This is nonsense, and probably the result of poorly prepared turkey. I myself disliked the stuff based on numerous Thanksgiving dinners, where it was so dry you had to take a drink with every swallow.

Then I discovered Deep-fried Turkey. And I fell in love.

It's moist, flavorful (much more so than even deep-fried chicken) and has a wonderful texture. Possibly my favorite preparation of meat. Shame it's an expensive, messy all-day endeavor to prepare it. Luckily some stores have started carrying it.

As far as pizza goes, since I started making my own I find most chain pizza to be completely unpalatable. Papa Johns and Dominos are heinous, and Pizza Hut is only good if you eat in as it ages extremely poorly, even in 30 minutes. In Indiana there's a wonderful chain called Pizza King, though some of its locations are a bit run down. Arni's is also a great regional chain. I find the Pizzeria Uno's located outside of Chicago to be highly overrated.

Personally I prefer Alfredo sauce as a base on my pizzas, sometimes mixed with ranch dressing or mayo and mustard according to the type of pizza I'm making. And my personal favorite topping is chicken, generally with spinach, bacon or tomatoes.

KuReshtin
2009-05-12, 07:01 AM
Turducken!

Nuff said.

RabbitHoleLost
2009-05-12, 07:11 AM
Well, on the topic of hamburgers: I do, of course, know Steak Tartare (though I don't like it much, honestly, even if it doesn't involve horses today), but I own a medieval cookbook written by a historian which states that the practice of frying small lumps of mince meat in a pan (which, incidentally, also included some flour, eggs, fish, onions and whatever other thing was around) is pretty old around here.

Yes, I think this encourages the previous statement that American food was something else before it became an American staple.
From what I've been told, its nearly impossible to get a good American-styled burger outside of the continental US...

Eldan
2009-05-12, 07:27 AM
Can't comment on that, I've never been to the US. :smalltongue:
Though, I must say, I don't find the kind of hamburgers you get here all that special. I mean, they taste good, but they are far from my favourite food. The only people even claiming to make "american" hamburgers around here are the ubiquitous McDonald's, and they serve some kind of lumpy bread with a flavourless, sticky meat-thing in it, letuce that is usually somewhere between white and brown, a piece of rubbery pickle with the consistency of an eraser and sickeningly sweet ketchup.

Fawkes
2009-05-12, 12:21 PM
From what I've been told, its nearly impossible to get a good American-styled burger outside of the continental US...

I know Australia's got 'em, though the toppings are different.


The only people even claiming to make "american" hamburgers around here are the ubiquitous McDonald's, and they serve some kind of lumpy bread with a flavourless, sticky meat-thing in it, letuce that is usually somewhere between white and brown, a piece of rubbery pickle with the consistency of an eraser and sickeningly sweet ketchup.

Yeah, that sounds like McDonalds. :smallyuk: For a good burger, you gotta go to a diner. (Although Wendy's and Whataburger are pretty good, at least for fast food...)

TheThan
2009-05-12, 12:47 PM
That’s a pretty average McDonalds hamburger you describe there. Pretty sad aren’t they.

Good burgers are not at all like that. If you ever get the chance to visit the USA, then ask around I’m sure someone can point you in the direction of a good burger joint or diner.

THAC0
2009-05-12, 12:49 PM
From what I've been told, its nearly impossible to get a good American-styled burger outside of the continental US...

Hey, we have good burgers up here in the 49th state!

reorith
2009-05-12, 01:21 PM
Well, on the topic of hamburgers: I do, of course, know Steak Tartare (though I don't like it much, honestly, even if it doesn't involve horses today), but I own a medieval cookbook written by a historian which states that the practice of frying small lumps of mince meat in a pan (which, incidentally, also included some flour, eggs, fish, onions and whatever other thing was around) is pretty old around here.

pics or it didn't happen. also, why is a historian writing a cookbook?



From what I've been told, its nearly impossible to get a good American-styled burger outside of the continental US...

all the more reason to never leave.

Pyrian
2009-05-12, 01:29 PM
Mmm, I love "Americanized" Chinese food. Mind, I don't usually like actual Chinese food at all! But P.F. Chang's and Pick-Up Stix are very, very good. :smallcool:

Arlion
2009-05-12, 02:13 PM
I dont like American style pizza,and i dont like italian pizza.Its too flat and tasteless,here in argentina,its awsome :smallbiggrin:

Innis Cabal
2009-05-12, 02:54 PM
I dont like American style pizza,and i dont like italian pizza.Its too flat and tasteless,here in argentina,its awsome :smallbiggrin:

And how do they do it?

Catharsis
2009-05-12, 02:54 PM
I love real Italian pizza, difficult as it is to come by even here in Germany. The American "greasy sponge"-type pizzoid is edible at best, about on par with the German parmesan-laden version.

I mostly order Thai when playing D&D, they do that really well here.

As for burgers, what's wrong with Big Macs? Gotta love the sauce. I've had diner-style burgers before, and they're generally too beefy for my taste. Swiss McDonalds recently introduced the "Big'n'Tasty", which looks to be a closer imitation of the diner burger. Never tried it though. Frankly, I've never considered anything a real alternative to the Big Mac since the McDeluxe (Arch Deluxe in the US), which was sadly pulled from the menu here in Europe after a year or two.

Jack Squat
2009-05-12, 03:01 PM
pics or it didn't happen. also, why is a historian writing a cookbook?

He probably isn't really writing it, so much as publishing a collection of recipes from times past.

I'd also like to point out that while it's a precursor to the Hamburger, it is, in fact, not a hamburger. This would be like arguing that much Italian food is actually Greek, seeing that much of Italian food evolved from Greek cuisine.

I'd argue that no food dish has ever actually been invented by a single culture, but rather evolved over time by passing through many. So if we're going to be questioning the authenticity of American staples (except in pointing out a direct transfer...such as if we were to claim soft pretzels), might as well do it with other cultures as well.

EDIT: Since I mentioned pretzels, I may as well point out that hard pretzels were created in Pennsylvania in the 1600s.

raitalin
2009-05-12, 03:46 PM
I love real Italian pizza, difficult as it is to come by even here in Germany. The American "greasy sponge"-type pizzoid is edible at best, about on par with the German parmesan-laden version.

As for burgers, what's wrong with Big Macs? Gotta love the sauce. I've had diner-style burgers before, and they're generally too beefy for my taste. Swiss McDonalds recently introduced the "Big'n'Tasty", which looks to be a closer imitation of the diner burger. Never tried it though. Frankly, I've never considered anything a real alternative to the Big Mac since the McDeluxe (Arch Deluxe in the US), which was sadly pulled from the menu here in Europe after a year or two.

If all you've had is the "greasy sponge" then all you've had is a bad pan pizza, along the lines of Pizza Hut or any other place than thinks fat makes up for flavor. The best crust is a thin, soft crust that doesn't get in the way of wonderful toppings.

Big Mac's sauce is Thousand Island Dressing, that's it. I'm pretty sure the Big n' Tasty is the same thing as the Arch Deluxe, except that the latter may have also had the "Special Sauce" on it. Both are simply McDonald's attempt to steal market from the superior BK Whopper. If diner burgers are too beefy for you you can order off the kids menu ;) .

Mr. Mud
2009-05-12, 03:48 PM
Surprisingly, when i think American comfort food, I think Pringles... instantly :smallbiggrin:.

Innis Cabal
2009-05-12, 07:07 PM
Big Mac's sauce is Thousand Island Dressing, that's it. I'm pretty sure the Big n' Tasty is the same thing as the Arch Deluxe, except that the latter may have also had the "Special Sauce" on it. Both are simply McDonald's attempt to steal market from the superior BK Whopper. If diner burgers are too beefy for you you can order off the kids menu ;) .

Its not Thousand Islands Dressing....having worked at a McDonalds during highschool(Worst....job....ever....) its not reall all that close to it at all. They may claim its close to it....but if you actually see the ingrediants (Which I don't think i'm allowed to post) its got a far wider varity

Nor is the Big n' Tasty like the Arch Deluxe, close but different bun and ingrediants.

RabbitHoleLost
2009-05-12, 07:11 PM
Its not Thousand Islands Dressing....having worked at a McDonalds during highschool(Worst....job....ever....) its not reall all that close to it at all. Nor is the Big n' Tasty like the Arch Deluxe, close but different bun and ingrediants.

It tastes just as bad as Thousand Islands Dressing, either way :smallyuk:

Innis Cabal
2009-05-12, 07:16 PM
It tastes just as bad as Thousand Islands Dressing, either way :smallyuk:

They're vile yes XD Though all fast food is really

Fawkes
2009-05-12, 08:19 PM
Surprisingly, when i think American comfort food, I think Pringles... instantly :smallbiggrin:.

Eww... Olestra... :smallyuk:

raitalin
2009-05-12, 09:11 PM
Its not Thousand Islands Dressing....having worked at a McDonalds during highschool(Worst....job....ever....) its not reall all that close to it at all. They may claim its close to it....but if you actually see the ingrediants (Which I don't think i'm allowed to post) its got a far wider varity

Nor is the Big n' Tasty like the Arch Deluxe, close but different bun and ingrediants.

Muahahaha!:

http://americanfood.about.com/od/keytipstechniques/r/secsauce.htm

Bring it on Ronald! Don't know if the part about this being the emergency recipe is true, and it does seem to use French dressing where normal thousand island uses ketchup and has fewer chunks. However it looks and tastes a lot like thousand island to me except, naturally, with more sugar. So If you want the sauce without having to go to McDonalds, there's an option.

Looks like the Arch Deluxe had a different bun, a bacon option and a mayo/mustard special sauce, whereas the Big n' tasty is basically just a Whopper. I stand corrected.

Innis Cabal
2009-05-12, 09:28 PM
Well i'll be. I mean, I assumed it was floating out there...but patent and such.....

Quincunx
2009-05-13, 06:15 AM
Some home cooks take pride in reverse-engineering the recipes of restaurants. You can cook up a 'branded' meal at home and find out how much of the flavor was due to the commercial restaurant set-up as opposed to the ingredients. Try getting a fast food hamburger to be well-charred without a flat grill.

. . .and again, I should never have read this thread. The poor un-American masses desperately need to get licenses for some of the better anti-nausea pills (or label the generics with a copycat name as well).

teratorn
2009-05-13, 06:59 AM
I was a bit worried the first time I want to the USA (I don't like burgers nor pizzas) and was pleasantly surprised by the food. Ribs are great, crab cakes are great, Cajun food is awesome (tried Jambalaya recently after seeing it mentioned on the strips). America is a good place for food, including some good desserts. The things I can't cope with are the awful coffee and the bad olive oil that comes with the salads.

My cravings for snacks and such are hard to satisfy in the States. No place for a bowl of boiled snails and no roasted pig-ear salads. My country's cuisine never made it into the USA, don't know why. :smallconfused: Well, now it's time for lunch and I've still not decided if I should go for intestines with beans, or chicken blood rice.

Ninja Chocobo
2009-05-13, 09:06 AM
Also, barbecue is definitely Australian.
Verily. I met a guy who barbecued when he went to Antarctica, in 200km/h winds.


For Australia is not a nation of things that were created here, but a nation of things that find a home here.

What about for e.g. the pavlova? (to any NZers who disagree: you're wrong)

They're vile yes XD Though all fast food is really

That depends on your definition of fast food, really. The Australian chain Oporto is consistently delicious, as are doner kebabs, which you can find every three blocks or so in urban areas.
But yeah McDonalds and Pizza Hut are the worst things to happen to hamburgers and pizza respectively.

RMS Oceanic
2009-05-13, 10:04 AM
But yeah McDonalds and Pizza Hut are the worst things to happen to hamburgers and pizza respectively.

I agree with you whole heartedly on McDonalds, but not at Pizza Hut. Maybe that's because whoever held the Franchise for PH in Northern Ireland styled them as an actual restaurant, and had stuff like pasta and salad as well as nice pizza. At least until said Franchisee went bankrupt and the restaurants closed. :smallfrown:

You know what America should absorb next? The Ulster Fry! Sausage, Bacon, Eggs, Beans, Mushrooms, Black Pudding, Toast, Mini Pancakes, Potato Bread and Soda Farls!

And by "Sausage", I mean 100% Irish Pork, not a Frankfurter.

teratorn
2009-05-13, 11:45 AM
The Australian chain Oporto is consistently delicious, as are doner kebabs, which you can find every three blocks or so in urban areas.

Oporto is a fast-food chain? What do they sell? cheap Port win? (I live now in Oporto so I'm quite curious).

Telonius
2009-05-13, 12:01 PM
Hmm, does Americanization include ideas by recent immigrants? If so, I think Marshmallow Peeps count.

Come to think of it, marshmallows in general have been pretty thoroughly Americanized, even though they'd been used in Europe for centuries.

Graham crackers are an American invention, a variant on the traditional cookie/biscuit.

And of course, Hershey's is an American take on chocolate (which everybody stole from the Aztecs).

Combine all three of those, and you get the S'more. A perfectly delicious, perfectly American food, a cobbled-together mishmash made of three separate things we stole from other people. :smallcool:

snoopy13a
2009-05-13, 12:23 PM
I agree with you whole heartedly on McDonalds, but not at Pizza Hut. Maybe that's because whoever held the Franchise for PH in Northern Ireland styled them as an actual restaurant, and had stuff like pasta and salad as well as nice pizza. At least until said Franchisee went bankrupt and the restaurants closed. :smallfrown:



Pizza Hut started off in America as restaurants with servers and a salad bar. People could also carry out and some would deliver. Now some Pizza Huts are carry out/delivery only and others are sit-down restaurants. Having pasta is a relatively new thing, at least over here.

Pizza Hut pizza is a bit unique. It has a relatively thick chewy crust (in my experience, only Chicago style is thicker) and it is almost like pizza being served on greasy bread. Of course, all of the major pizza chains in the US (excluding Sbarro which is NY style and Pizzeria Uno which is Chicago-style) are a bit unique in their crust. Little Caesar's is the nastiest of the bunch with their niche being cheap prices and quick carry out ($5 for ready made pizzas). Domino's is a relatively thin crust but not as thin or greasy as NY Style. I haven't had Papa John's in a long time but I think I remember them as being somewhere in-between Domino's and Pizza Hut crust-wise.

Ninja Chocobo
2009-05-14, 09:07 AM
Oporto is a fast-food chain? What do they sell? cheap Port win? (I live now in Oporto so I'm quite curious).

Chicken burgers, mostly. Their sauces are extraordinary, however, spicy or not.

Jack Squat
2009-05-14, 09:30 AM
Little Caesar's is the nastiest of the bunch with their niche being cheap prices and quick carry out ($5 for ready made pizzas).

To be fair, Caesar's used to be pretty decent back before they changed their recipe. I also take more issue with their sauce than their crust.

I suggest for anyone wanting good Americanized pizza to not go to a national chain. Even the lower quality ones tend to be better than the best nationwide chains.

Innis Cabal
2009-05-14, 04:21 PM
Oh absolutly though if you can make them at home, then your way better off. The Joy of Cooking has a wonderful crust recipe, and it can be made to be thin, thick or fluffy and inbetween those two....its amazing...we make pizza at least once a week here