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View Full Version : How long has the word "do" had an alternate sexual meaning?



Flame of Anor
2009-06-04, 12:03 AM
Don't laugh, it's a serious question. Was it there by the time of Shakespeare? Because, if so, I just noticed an awesome pun in A Midsummer Night's Dream. Speaking of awesome puns, by all means indulge in them, but keep them PG.

Mando Knight
2009-06-04, 12:04 AM
Ever since people needed a euphemism for the action, I suppose.

Felixaar
2009-06-04, 12:11 AM
I read an article on cracked.com once that had the idea that a very large portion of Shakespeares work is rife with sexual innuendo - so, if you went by that theory, it might've been very likely. Of course, I cant comment on the truth of it.

Also, "Damn it! Nothing rhymes with 'Doin' you.'"

High-five for the reference.

Jack Squat
2009-06-04, 12:12 AM
Don't laugh, it's a serious question. Was it there by the time of Shakespeare? Because, if so, I just noticed an awesome pun in A Midsummer Night's Dream. Speaking of awesome puns, by all means indulge in them, but keep them PG.

If what I was told is true, back in shakespearean times, "nothing" was another term for "vagina". Not only does this give great hilarity whenever someone answers "what're you doing" with "nothing", but also gives insight to Shakespeare's play "Much Ado about Nothing"

Rutskarn
2009-06-04, 12:14 AM
I read an article on cracked.com once that had the idea that a very large portion of Shakespeares work is rife with sexual innuendo - so, if you went by that theory, it might've been very likely. Of course, I cant comment on the truth of it.

Also, "Damn it! Nothing rhymes with 'Doin' you.'"

High-five for the reference.

SMBC, of course.

Jack Squat: That's correct. Also, there's a certain part in Hamlet that's basically a cascade of references to lady-parts. There's an exchange something like this:

Hamlet: That's a fine thought to rest between a lady's legs.
Ophelia: What's that?
Hamlet: Nothing.

(paraphrased heavily)

Ravens_cry
2009-06-04, 12:28 AM
If what I was told is true, back in shakespearean times, "nothing" was another term for "vagina". Not only does this give great hilarity whenever someone answers "what're you doing" with "nothing", but also gives insight to Shakespeare's play "Much Ado about Nothing"
"That's a fair thought to lie between a maids legs." "What is, my lord?"
"Nothing."
Of course that's Hamlet, but yes, Shakespeare is full of the crass. And why not? Like Looney Tunes and Tex Averys work, it had to appeal to a wide audience, both the genteel and the everyone else. So it had a lot of what we now call 'Parental Bonus. In fact, it's only hidden because of the changes in the language.

The Rose Dragon
2009-06-04, 12:31 AM
Also, "Damn it! Nothing rhymes with 'Doin' you.'"

High-five for the reference.

Do I get retroactive high-five for trying to get you to explain the metaphor of that lady being alike that spring rose?

Serpentine
2009-06-04, 12:34 AM
The exchange from the Cracked (http://www.cracked.com/blog/6-reasons-shakespeare-would-write-for-cracked-if-he-were-alive-today/) article:

Hamlet: Lady, shall I lie in your lap?

Ophelia: No, my lord.

Hamlet: I mean my head upon your lap?

Ophelia: Ay, my lord.

Hamlet: Do you think I meant country matters?

Ophelia: I think nothing my lord.

Hamlet: That’s a fair thought to lie between maid’s legs.

Ophelia: What is, my lord?

Hamlet: No thing.

Ophelia: You are merry, my lord.

On first look, it seems like a simple and pretty boring misunderstanding about whether Ophelia will let Hamlet lay his head in her lap while they watch a play. But take into account the fact that in Elizabethan England, “nothing” was slang for vagina (because it’s shaped like an “O”), “thing” was slang for ****, “head” meant tip of the penis, “merry” meant sexually aroused and “country matters” was taken to mean “matters pertaining to the ****,” and you get this much more interesting exchange:

Hamlet: Hey, can I stick my wangle in your pooter?
Ophelia: Seriously? Your mom’s like, right over there.

Hamlet: What if I just put the tip in?

Ophelia: Very well, my lord.

Hamlet: You get it? I’m talking about your ****.

Ophelia: Yeah, I kind of picked up on that. I’m too am thinking about vaginas.

Hamlet: That’s a good thing to do between a lady’s legs. **** vaginas, I mean.

Ophelia: What is, my lord?

Hamlet: Vagina penis.

Ophelia: Correct me if I’m wrong, but you seem horny, my lord.

TheThan
2009-06-04, 12:35 AM
I dunno, but your very name, “flame of Anor” can be taken as a euphemism. Guess that shows that just about anything and be corrupted.

averagejoe
2009-06-04, 02:03 AM
I dunno, but your very name, “flame of Anor” can be taken as a euphemism. Guess that shows that just about anything and be corrupted.

It's my contention that this arises from sex being a taboo subject, but everyone wants to talk about it anyways.

Of course, I have no proof of this or basis other than because I think so.

Starscream
2009-06-04, 02:05 AM
When I read the title of this thread my first reaction was "You mean it has more than one sexual meaning?"

The Rose Dragon
2009-06-04, 02:06 AM
Why is sex taboo anyway? Everyone that lives at the moment comes from a long, proud line of people who probably had sex at least a few times in their life (unless they were really lucky to impregnate / get impregnated their very first time).

It's like making talking about defecating taboo.

...wait, it is?

Never mind, then.

Castaras
2009-06-04, 02:09 AM
Don't laugh, it's a serious question. Was it there by the time of Shakespeare? Because, if so, I just noticed an awesome pun in A Midsummer Night's Dream. Speaking of awesome puns, by all means indulge in them, but keep them PG.

All of Shakespeare's stuff had a lot of sexual innuendo, so it's very likely. :smallamused:

And really, when my friend can make a loaf of bread sound wrong (long thin and crusty), you realise that anything can be turned into sexual innuendo if you work hard enough at it.

billtodamax
2009-06-04, 02:28 AM
And really, when my friend can make a loaf of bread sound wrong (long thin and crusty),

Great, now I'll be bleaching my brain for hours.

Archonic Energy
2009-06-04, 05:50 AM
you realise that anything can be turned into sexual innuendo if you work hard enough at it.

as said by Joey of Friends fame
Rachel: How do you make that [sound] dirty?
Joey: Oh, it's easy. Yeah, I-I can do it with anything. Watch, uh, Grandma's chicken salad.

doesn't sound too bad right...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IA4JbvmsiHg&feature=PlayList&p=5A887B9AC30FED2D&index=15

Narmoth
2009-06-04, 06:21 AM
Or manowar songs. Really, you'll die of laughter if you change all references to hard, long objects with, well, hard to long objects

Eldan
2009-06-04, 06:39 AM
All of Shakespeare's stuff had a lot of sexual innuendo, so it's very likely. :smallamused:

And really, when my friend can make a loaf of bread sound wrong (long thin and crusty), you realise that anything can be turned into sexual innuendo if you work hard enough at it.

You know, eating breakfast really becomes much more interesting that way :smallbiggrin:

Ashtar
2009-06-04, 08:21 AM
Ashtar's guide on how to transform anything into sexual innuendo:
Add "said the actress to the bishop" to the sentence.

Example:

You know, eating breakfast really becomes much more interesting that way, said the actress to the bishop.

See what I mean?

Flame of Anor
2009-06-04, 08:22 AM
I know that Shakespeare has a !@#$-load of sexual innuendo and puns, I was just wondering if this was one of them. It just seemed to me that "do" was a more modern slang term.


Ashtar's guide on how to transform anything into sexual innuendo:
Add "said the actress to the bishop" to the sentence.

I guess it's basically calling "that's what SHE said" on yourself.

Mauve Shirt
2009-06-04, 08:28 AM
My friend discovered that the best way to sound sleazy is to add "...ladies." to everything. But I suppose that's not the same.

Eldan
2009-06-04, 08:37 AM
But I suppose that's not the same... ladies.

You are right. Not that impressive. Said the Actress to the Bishop.

Dirk Kris
2009-06-04, 09:28 AM
The exchange from the Cracked (http://www.cracked.com/blog/6-reasons-shakespeare-would-write-for-cracked-if-he-were-alive-today/) article:

Hamlet: Lady, shall I lie in your lap?

Ophelia: No, my lord.

Hamlet: I mean my head upon your lap?

Ophelia: Ay, my lord.

Hamlet: Do you think I meant country matters?

Ophelia: I think nothing my lord.

Hamlet: That’s a fair thought to lie between maid’s legs.

Ophelia: What is, my lord?

Hamlet: No thing.

Ophelia: You are merry, my lord.

On first look, it seems like a simple and pretty boring misunderstanding about whether Ophelia will let Hamlet lay his head in her lap while they watch a play. But take into account the fact that in Elizabethan England, “nothing” was slang for vagina (because it’s shaped like an “O”), “thing” was slang for ****, “head” meant tip of the penis, “merry” meant sexually aroused and “country matters” was taken to mean “matters pertaining to the ****,” and you get this much more interesting exchange:

Hamlet: Hey, can I stick my wangle in your pooter?
Ophelia: Seriously? Your mom’s like, right over there.

Hamlet: What if I just put the tip in?

Ophelia: Very well, my lord.

Hamlet: You get it? I’m talking about your ****.

Ophelia: Yeah, I kind of picked up on that. I’m too am thinking about vaginas.

Hamlet: That’s a good thing to do between a lady’s legs. **** vaginas, I mean.

Ophelia: What is, my lord?

Hamlet: Vagina penis.

Ophelia: Correct me if I’m wrong, but you seem horny, my lord.

Serpy, Serpy, Serpy. How fun.

Xallace
2009-06-04, 09:59 AM
My friend discovered that the best way to sound sleazy is to add "...ladies." to everything. But I suppose that's not the same.

He either got that from Dmitri Martin or comedy had a parallel evolution. ...ladies.

It either doesn't work with everything, or you need the inflection to make it work. Takes a judgement call, I guess, or a fortune cookie. Ooh, I have one here, let's see!


The love of your life will appear in front of you unexpectedly!

...ladies.

Ooh, I had two!


Accept yourself.

...ladies.


So what can we take from this?

Ninja Chocobo
2009-06-04, 10:10 AM
"As the actress said to the bishop" is pretty much a more...archaic(?) version of "That's what SHE said". I prefer it, personally.

Jalor
2009-06-04, 11:32 AM
I don't think there's a single Shakespearean play without sexual innuendo. Check out this scene of Romeo and Juliet, where I have italicized the innuendo;
SAMPSON
True; and therefore women, being the weaker vessels,
are ever thrust to the wall: therefore I will push
Montague's men from the wall, and thrust his maids
to the wall.

GREGORY
The quarrel is between our masters and us their men.

SAMPSON
'Tis all one, I will show myself a tyrant: when I
have fought with the men, I will be cruel with the
maids, and cut off their heads.

GREGORY
The heads of the maids?

SAMPSON
Ay, the heads of the maids, or their maidenheads;
take it in what sense thou wilt.

GREGORY
They must take it in sense that feel it.

SAMPSON
Me they shall feel while I am able to stand: and
'tis known I am a pretty piece of flesh.
And people say Honors English is no fun.

Micate
2009-06-04, 03:51 PM
And really, when my friend can make a loaf of bread sound wrong (long thin and crusty), you realize that everything is a sexual innuendo.

fixed .

GrandMasterMe
2009-06-04, 05:23 PM
by all means indulge in them, but keep them PG.



Hamlet: Hey, can I stick my wangle in your pooter?
Ophelia: Seriously? Your mom’s like, right over there.

Hamlet: What if I just put the tip in?

Ophelia: Very well, my lord.

Hamlet: You get it? I’m talking about your ****.

Ophelia: Yeah, I kind of picked up on that. I’m too am thinking about vaginas.

Hamlet: That’s a good thing to do between a lady’s legs. **** vaginas, I mean.

Ophelia: What is, my lord?

Hamlet: Vagina penis.

Ophelia: Correct me if I’m wrong, but you seem horny, my lord.
Since when is this PG material? Not that I'm complaining but...

Kaelaroth
2009-06-04, 06:03 PM
And people say Honors English is no fun.

People say that? :smalleek:

Philistine
2009-06-04, 10:44 PM
People do.

Err...

Em Blackleaf
2009-06-04, 10:55 PM
I learned that Shakespeare is dirty in English class this year. My English teacher was the one who pointed all of the innuendos in Romeo and Juliet out. :smalltongue:

blackfox
2009-06-04, 10:59 PM
I read an article on cracked.com once that had the idea that a very large portion of Shakespeares work is rife with sexual innuendo - so, if you went by that theory, it might've been very likely. Of course, I cant comment on the truth of it.Very, very true. Go looking for it. There's a lot in Othello and Midsummer Night's Dream, from what I remembered, and some passages in Macbeth. And quite a lot in Romeo and Juliet and Hamlet, as people have said. These plays weren't just for nobles--commoners had to have something to laugh at, and just by virtue of not being around a court they wouldn't understand how the intrigue there works, for Hamlet etc.

Collin152
2009-06-04, 11:01 PM
People say that? :smalleek:

Yes, but not in English.

Cleverdan22
2009-06-04, 11:55 PM
My friend discovered that the best way to sound sleazy is to add "...ladies." to everything. But I suppose that's not the same.

No, your friend is correct. One of my friends does it too. Just watch.

I'm gonna go take a shower...ladies.

Who wants a bite?...ladies.

Let me do it...ladies.

(Of course one way to make everything really creepy is to add children).:smalleek:

Jack Squat
2009-06-04, 11:59 PM
No, your friend is correct. One of my friends does it too. Just watch.

I'm gonna go take a shower...ladies.

Who wants a bite?...ladies.

Let me do it...ladies.


Help, I've fallen in a well!...ladies

Alleine
2009-06-05, 01:05 AM
Ah, I'd forgotten about adding ladies! ... ladies.

And shoot, if I'd known all of this stuff, I might have stayed in honors english ... ladies.

Castaras
2009-06-05, 02:25 AM
Really, this is all extremely silly. ...boys

That works better than ladies for me. :smallwink:

Oh, and even straight ones like Henry V have innuendo...

"A little touch of Harry in the night" *snrk*

Serpentine
2009-06-05, 02:57 AM
These plays weren't just for nobles--commoners had to have something to laugh at,Actually, to my understanding his plays were much more for the commoners than the nobles. High art they were not!

Mr.Silver
2009-06-05, 06:10 AM
Actually, to my understanding his plays were much more for the commoners than the nobles. High art they were not!

Quiet you fool! Do you want the elitist literature snobs to kill you or something? Don't let them know that you can describe Shakespeare as anything but the sheer highest form of creation the universe will ever see. It makes them angry.

Serpentine
2009-06-05, 07:03 AM
My father just about is an "elitist literature snob" - at the very least, he's a thespian - has acted in and directed a number of Shakespearian performances, and used to teach drama and English (or was it history?), and he's the one who educated me on the gaping plot-holes in Shakespeare's works. I think I'll be alright :smalltongue:

Mr.Silver
2009-06-05, 10:49 AM
My father just about is an "elitist literature snob" - at the very least, he's a thespian - has acted in and directed a number of Shakespearian performances

No no, the ELS isn't usually in theatrical work, they tend to be more tied in the 'literary' group. Hence the name.

TheBST
2009-06-05, 12:16 PM
Actually, to my understanding his plays were much more for the commoners than the nobles. High art they were not!

It's about even, really. Lots of blood, guts, innuendo and melodrama but also a lot of classical references and other things that would've been lost on the average commoner.

A pet theory I have is that Shakespeare wanted to write poetry and bashed off crowd-pleasing plays (most of the plots based off of historical events or the works of others) in order to pay the bills, but he tried to cram as much of his poetic material into them as possible, and was able to mess around more with dramatic conventions as his esteem increased (look at Titus Andronicus and then see what Hamlet did with the revenge tragedy subgenre). I think he just wanted to write sonnets more than anything.

Headless_Ninja
2009-06-05, 03:16 PM
Yeah. I thought a lot of the innuendo was to get the attention of people wandering in and out - going to the theatre wouldn't necessarily mean you'd stay for the whole thing in Shakespeare's time, and you wanted people to not just turn up but also stay and see enough of your play that they'd come back next time.... Ladies