PDA

View Full Version : Alternative Arcane Caster Classes



Bosh
2006-04-13, 12:06 PM
I cooked up these three classes a while back for a homebrew world that was rumbling around my head too loudly for me not to set some of it down on paper.

I haven't done too much work on this homebrew recently, since I realized that it would take more time than I currently have to make it work. But I thought that I'd throw these classes out there for other people to use (since I think they are fairly nifty) and to comment on in case I ever think of a way to incorporate one of these classes into one of my games. They're meant to be fairly flavorfull and flexible but slightly weaker than PHB casters classes since they're meant for a world in which magic is rare, hated and feared and few defences against it exist. Of the three, I'm the least happy with the sorcerer, too many bells and whistles...

So without further ado:

Spell points spent per spell level

Level 0: Two free spells per caster level, 1 point thereafter
Level 1: 1
Level 2: 2
Level 3: 3
Level 4: 5
Level 5: 8
Level 6: 13
Level 7: 21
Level 8: 34 *
Level 9: 55
Level 10: 89
Level 11: 144


The Mage

Hit dice d4

Skill Points 2+Int/Level
(2+Int) x4 At first level

Class Skills are the same as those of a PHB Wizard.

Proficient with simple weapons only, not proficient with any kind of armor or shields. If a Mage wears armor he suffers the standard risk of arcane spell failure.

Casts spells as a spell caster of equal level to his class level

May learn any divine or arcane spell from any source. If a spell appears on more than one list and is a different spell level on one list than on the other, then use the spell level in the wizard/sorcerer list (or the cleric list if it is both a cleric and a druid spell, but not a wizard/sorcerer spell).

May not take item creation feats.

Key ability scores:

Intelligence: raises the number of spells that a Mage knows.
Charisma: raises the number of Spell Points that a Mage has.
Wisdom: wisdom modifies the difficulty of making saves against all spells cast by a Mage.

This multiple ability dependency makes fighter/mage “gish” characters less viable, makes it less likely that a mage will have decent scores in physical stats, and allows Mages to differentiate themselves by how they prioritize their three metal states. However, intelligence is somewhat more useful to a Mage than it is to Sorcerers and Wilders.

Alignment: Mages may be of any alignment, but are usually Lawful.

Flavor text: Mages are the most subtle and skilled of arcane magic users, although some would say that they are merely the most conservative and timid. They gain their power through years of intense study under the guidance of another Mage. They believe that the source of the entire universe is nothing more than the vitality of the souls of humans. They consider everything besides human souls to be an imprisoning illusion at best and a dangerous parasite at worst. They long to shake off what they view as the imprisoning constrictions of the human body and live on as beings of pure magic. In their view, the power of their magic grows as they loosen the bonds between their soul and their body and let more of the power of their souls radiate out into the world.

However, there is a minority of Mages who worship Doranek the Lord of Lies/The Liberator/The Teacher/The Seventh/The Lost God and view him as the patron and creator of human souls who is seeking to guide them out of the prison of the material world and will do so upon his return. They view Sorcerers who worship Doranek as the vilest of heretics and style themselves The Bearers of the Flame.

Ever since they were driven underground by the Church, Mages have laid low in the countryside and have conserved their strength for the day when they would be able to pursue their studies in peace. They are organized in a loose network of circles, with each circle consisting of a teacher and several students. But as time has passed, their networks have become looser and rifts have appeared in their organization. Although the majority of Mages still favor a policy of secrecy at all costs, a growing minority favors a more active policy.

Relations with other classes:

Clerics and other divine casters: Mages usually do their best to remain out of sight of the Church or any other religious group. However, if a zealous Inquisitor begins asking the wrong questions, the local circle will usually either move on or make sure that the inquisitor becomes permanently incapable of asking such questions.

Wilders: There is a diversity of view on Wilders within the Mage community. Most consider them uneducated fools who serve the useful purpose of drawing attention away from the more secretive Mages. However after several debacles in which unhinged Wilders were involved, a growing number of Mages have decided to deal with them in a more proactive matter. Opinions on proper methods have ranged from instituting broader recruiting so as to prevent the emergence of Wilders, to inducting existing Wilders into Mage circles in an effort to get them under control, to dispatching them before can cause more problems…

Sorcerers: Mages have a deep and abiding hatred for Sorcerers since Sorcerers defile that which Mages value the most: the human soul. But as Sorcerers tend to be concentrated in cities where Mages prefer not to tread, they do not encounter them frequently. However, when Sorcerers do come to the attention of Mages, the Mages often spend years monitoring and planning a way to destroy them without alerting the local clergy. When such a plan is finalized, the sorcerers in question usually have deep regrets about their ever setting out on their dark path. However, as time has passed and the organization of Mages has ossified and fractured such Sorcerer-hunting expeditions have become much less common than they once were; which has allowed the power of sorcerous covens to wax in many of the great cities.

Non-casting classes: Mages generally have a great deal of contempt non-magic users and attempt to keep them at as great a distance as possible. However some of them can be useful for advancing Mage purposes…

http://img468.imageshack.us/img468/1518/magetable16en.jpg

Mage Spells Known

http://img450.imageshack.us/img450/3172/magetable21jr.jpg

Bonus Spells Known

http://img450.imageshack.us/img450/4558/magetable36kb.jpg

Bonus Spell Points by Class Level

http://img450.imageshack.us/img450/549/magetable45ps.jpg

The tables above show the number of spells that a Mage knows per level. Also a Mage with high intelligence knows more spells (but he cannot know any spells of a level that are higher than the highest level spell he would’ve received otherwise) and a Mage with higher charisma receives more spell points.

Special Abilities:

Bonus Metamagic feats: exactly as a PHB Wizard. A mage cannot cast a metamagic-modified spell that has a higher level than the highest level of spell that he currently knows.

Still Mind: as the 3rd level monk ability, the minds of Mages are highly disciplined by their intensive training and as a result 3rd Level Mages receive a +2 bonus to saves against enchantment spells and effects.

Cast No Shadow: 6th level Mages no longer cast any shadow no matter what the lighting conditions may be and their footfalls are noticeably quieter than those of other humans. They receive a +1 bonus to hide in shadows and move silently but would be well advised to cover their lack of a shadow with illusion spells if they do not want to come to the attention of the Church

Damage Reduction: as a barbarian. As their grasp of their craft develops the connection between the mage’s soul and their bodies weakens, making their body somewhat less substantial and thus more difficult to damage.

A Thousand Faces: As a standard action, a 7th level Mage may cast Alter Self as a spell-like ability three times a day. Nothing can dispel the effects of A Thousand Faces and anti-magic fields have no effect on it, however it does not affect the Mage’s lack of a shadow.

A Thousand Faces II: As a free action, a 7th level Mage may cast Alter Self as a spell-like ability three times a day and as a standard action Polymorph Self as spell-like ability once a day. Nothing can dispel the affects of A Thousand Faces II and anti-magic fields have no effect on it, however it not affect the Mage’s lack of a shadow.

A Thousand Faces III: As a free action a 20th level Mage may Alter Self at will and as a free action may cast Polymorph Self three times a day. Nothing can dispel the affects of A Thousand Faces III and anti-magic fields have no effect on it, however it not affect the Mage’s lack of a shadow.

Empty Step: As a free action a 12th level mage becomes ethereal for one round. This functions as the ethereal jaunt spell.

Empty Step II: As a free action an 18th level mage can become ethereal for a number of rounds equal to half of his class level. This functions as the ethereal jaunt spell.

------------------------------------------------------------------

The Wilder

Hit dice d4

Skill Points 2+Int/Level
(2+Int) x4 At first level

Class Skills are the same as those of a PHB Sorcerer.

Proficient with simple weapons only, not proficient with any kind of armor. If a Wilder wears armor he suffers the standard risk of arcane spell failure.

Casts spells as a spell caster with 3/4 of his character level (rounded up)

May choose any divine or arcane spell from any source. If a spell appears on more than one list and is a different spell level on one list than on the other, then use the spell level in the wizard/sorcerer list (or the cleric list if it is both a cleric and a druid spell, but not a wizard/sorcerer spell).

May not take item creation feats.

Key ability scores:

Intelligence: raises the number of spells that a Wilder knows.
Charisma: raises the number of spells points that a Wilder has.
Wisdom: wisdom modifies the difficulty of making saves against all spells cast by a Wilder, and a high wisdom score is very useful for a Wilder who wants to maintain his sanity.

This multiple ability dependency makes fighter/mage “gish” characters less viable, makes it less likely that a Wilder will have decent scores in physical stats, and allows Wilders to differentiate themselves by how they prioritize their three metal states. However, wisdom is somewhat more useful for Wilders than it is for Mages and Sorcerers.

Alignment: Wilders may be of any alignment, but are usually Chaotic.

Flavor text: Wilders usually develop their talents alone or with only minimal instruction, which goes a long way to explain the unstructured and dangerous nature of the Wilder path. The majority of wilders has very little idea how their magic functions, merely that it does, and many are in denial of the abilities or curse them as heretical. Even the more knowledgeable and introspective disagree about the nature of their abilities, with the only main uniting thread being that they mostly seem to believe that the source of their powers is the land around them. Some see themselves as weavers of reality who have the skill to reorder things to suit their wishes, others as beings that feed off of the natural world and are thus obligated to protect it and others considers themselves to be parasites gnawing at the fabric of reality to obtain their magical sustenance and curse themselves for every spell that they cast. The frequency with which Wilders descend into insanity has not cleared matters up much.

As is to be expected, Wilders only have the loosest of organizational systems, usually limited to two or three comrades trying to puzzle out their abilities together or one older Wilder and a student or two. Wilders may know vaguely of the existence of others of their kind in others areas, but that is generally the extent of their knowledge. Also being the most conspicuous and common type of arcane spell caster, Wilders are often captured and burned by the Church, which has made it difficult for more complex societies of Wilders to form. However, there are persistent rumors of large bands of Wilders in the deepest of forest and the most secluded of mountain valleys.

Relations with other classes:

-Clerics and other divine spell casters: Since Wilders are not organized enough to indoctrinate new Wilders (who have an annoying tendency to make their appearance first known in a blaze of magical mayhem), younger Wilders often have the same belief system that prevail in the society around them. This often leads to futile attempts on their part of reconcile themselves with the Church. More experienced Wilders have a wide range of opinions on religion, but most have little love for the Church due to its habit of burning to death any Wilders it can get its hands on.

-Mages: Most Wilders who know of the existence of Mages view them as conceited and pompous and many of them love nothing better than to have an opportunity to humiliate an especially prideful Mage. Despite this, it is quite rare for Wilders and Mages to fight to the death, unless a group of Mages decides that the time has come to get rid of a particularly reckless or crazed Wilder. In addition, there are those Wilders who grovel before Mages in an attempt to convince them to teach their more disciplined art and those who think that there is a great deal that Wilders and Mages could learn from each other.

-Sorcerers: Those Wilders who have encountered Sorcerers fear them more than they do the Church. After all, burning is a good clean death and the same cannot be said for the soul-draining agony that awaits Wilders who are captured by Sorcerers.

-Non-casting classes: Wilders are the arcane spell casting class that is the most likely to attempt to maintain normal human relationships with people who cannot shoot fire out of their fingers. However, doing so is not easy for Wilders and they often find themselves themselves pushed to the fringes of society where they often fall in with adventurers who are known to take in Wilders in exchange for some very useful magical fire power which does not have any superiors to answer to.

http://img468.imageshack.us/img468/771/wildertable15do.jpg

Wilder Spells Known

http://img479.imageshack.us/img479/3729/wildertable23ne.jpg

Bonus Spells Known

http://img479.imageshack.us/img479/9017/wildertable37qs.jpg

Bonus Spell Points by Class Level

http://img479.imageshack.us/img479/6046/wildertable45hq.jpg

Special Abilities:

The tables above show the number of spells that a Wilder knows per level. Also a Wilder with high intelligence knows more spells (but he cannot know any spells of a level that are higher than the highest level spell he would’ve received otherwise) and a Wilder with higher charisma receives more spell points.

Spell Substitution: A wilder can use the metamagic-like Spell Substitution ability to cast any spell that he does not know. A substituted spell costs the same number of spell points as a spell one spell level higher.

Wilder Surge:

A Wilder can expend more spell points than is safe to cast devastatingly-powerful spells. He can either use metamagic feats to boost the power of his spells higher than those he could normally cast or cast spells that are a higher level than those he could normally cast. However, since a Wilder obviously does not know any spells that are a higher level than those he could normally cast he has to use Spell Substitution in order to cast them. Thus a fifth level wilder who wants to cast a 3rd level spell would have to spend 5 Spell Points but the spell could be any 3rd level spell of the Wilder’s choosing. However, no matter how high of a level of a spell that a Wilder casts, his caster level does not change.

A Wilder can cast as high of a spell level as he has spell points for, but using Wilder Surges entails some risks. For every level above that he could normally cast that a Wilder casts by using a Wilder Surge, a Wilder has a 10% chance of spell failure, minus his wisdom modifier.

Wilder Surge spell failure is different from normal spell failure. For every point by which a Wilder fails a d100 roll to determine spell failure, he suffers one point of wisdom damage (which heals at a rate of one point a week and cannot be healed by any means other than the passage of time). If a Wilder’s wisdom hits zero, he is reduced to a catatonic state for a month before going back up to 1 wisdom. If a Wilder’s wisdom score is reduced to below zero, a Wilder’s soul is permanently destroyed. Furthermore, for each point of wisdom damage a Wilder suffers he has a 1% chance of permanently losing one point of wisdom.

In addition, if a Wilder fails his spell failure check by 10 or more points then the spell that is cast goes horribly wrong (otherwise the spell works normally even if a Wilder fails his spell failure check, Wilder spells do not fizzle they either work properly or bakefire). If it is a beneficial spell it has the opposite of the intended effect, if it is a detrimental spell it hits the Wilder rather than the target, if it is a summoning spell the summoned *creature attacks the Wilder, etc.

Bonus Metamagic Feats: As a PHB Wizard.

Piercing Gaze I: A fifth level Wilder receives a +1 bonus to Sense Motive and to saves against any spells that try to deceive the Wilder’s senses (such as illusions etc.). This does not apply to spells that alter the fundamental nature of something (such as polymorph).

Piercing Gaze II: A tenth level Wilder receives a +2 bonus to Sense Motive and to saves against any spells that try to deceive the Wilder’s senses (such as illusions etc.). This does not apply to spells that alter the fundamental nature of something (such as polymorph).

Piercing Gaze III: A fifteenth level Wilder receives a +3 bonus to Sense Motive and to saves against any spells that try to deceive the Wilder’s senses (such as illusions etc.). This does not apply to spells that alter the fundamental nature of something (such as polymorph).

Deep Eyes I: At sixth level a Wilder’s pupils disappear permanently. This increases a Wilder’s spot and search skills by +1. A Wilder would be well advised to conceal this effect with illusions unless he wants to incur the wrath of the Church.

Deep Eyes II: At twelfth level a Wilder’s irises appear to be permanently in motion: seething, swirling, rippling, etc. This increases a Wilder’s spot and search skills by an additional +1. A Wilder would be well advised to conceal this effect with illusions.

Wilder Senses I: At seventh level a Wilder’s senses become sharp enough that he is able to make Will saves (at -4) against magical and spell-like effects that deceive or alter his senses that do not normally allow saves (such as invisibility).

Wilder Senses II: At fourteenth level a Wilder’s senses become sharp enough that he is able to make Will saves (at -2) against magical and spell-like effects that deceive or alter his senses that do not normally allow saves (such as invisibility).

Wilder Senses III: At twentieth level a Wilder’s senses become sharp enough that he is able to make Will saves (at +0) against magical and spell-like effects that deceive or alter his senses that do not normally allow saves (such as invisibility).

------------------------------------------------------------------

The Sorcerer

Hit dice d4

Skill Points 2+Int/Level
(2+Int) x4 At first level

Class Skills are the same as those of a PHB Sorcerer.

Proficient with simple weapons only, not proficient with any kind of armor if a Sorcerer wears armor he suffers the standard risk of arcane spell failure.

Casts spells as a spell caster of three quarters of his class level (rounded up).

May choose any divine or arcane spell from any source. If a spell appears on more than one list and is a different spell level on one list than on the other, then use the spell level in the wizard/sorcerer list (or the cleric list if it is both a cleric and a druid spell, but not a wizard/sorcerer spell).

May take item creation feats, but magic item creations words differently than it does in the PHB.

Key ability scores:

Intelligence: raises the number of spells that a Sorcerer knows.
Charisma: raises the number of spells points that a Sorcerer has and is useful in making his special abilities more effective.
Wisdom: wisdom modifies the difficulty of making saves against all spells cast by a Sorcerer.

This multiple ability dependency makes fighter/mage “gish” characters less viable, makes it less likely that a mage will have decent scores in physical stats, and allows Sorcerers to differentiate themselves by how they prioritize their three metal states. However, charisma is somewhat more useful to a Sorcerer than it is to Mages and Wilders.

Alignment: Sorcerers cannot be Good-aligned and are most often Neutral Evil.

Flavor Text: While Mages slowly but surely accumulate their power over the course of years of careful study and Wilders often put their immortal souls at risk in attempts to bolster their power, Sorcerers have found what they believe to be a much safer and easier course: gaining their power at the expense of the souls of others. While some Sorcerers try to just skim off the froth of people’s souls to power their magic, the majority take great joy in draining the souls of their victims in order to slake their thirst for magical power. Human souls contain great power and there is a great deal of power to be gained in their destruction and because of this there are few things more dangerous than a well-fed Sorcerer, but on the other hand a Sorcerer’s power is much more vulnerable to circumstances and a long trip through the wilderness can be enough to fatally weaken a Sorcerer.

Sorcerers have a very clear view of where their power comes from and they have come up with a number of different rationales to explain why the torment they inflict on others is justified. Some believe that it is the right of the strong to feast on the weak, others that the souls of a few uneducated dregs are a price that humanity should be willing to pay for the advancement of human knowledge and others view their actions as holy sacrifices that are pleasing to Doranek The Lord of Lies/The Liberator/The Teacher/The Seventh/The Blinded Eye/The Lost God who will make his triumphant return one day to wreak his vengeance on the deities who defeated him in the Godswar and rule with the bravest and mightiest of Sorcerers at his right hand.

Sorcerers are organized much more tightly than either Mages or Wilders. This is because an extensive education is necessary in order to become a Sorcerer (but not as extensive as that which is necessary to become a Mage) and Sorcerers tend to live in cities, where the number of victims is the greatest, and thus live in relatively close proximity with each other. But perhaps most importantly, no Sorcerer likes it when others drain souls with insufficient discretion, which makes it important for Sorcerers to impose strict rules on each other in order to maintain their collective secrecy. As a result, most Sorcerers are a part of a city-wide sorcerous hierarchy with a Lord at its apex and from then on down through several quasi-feudal ranks to the initiates. These hierarchies set rules for how, when, where other humans are drained of their souls and punish those Sorcerers who step out of line or poach on the territory of a Lord without his permission. These hierarchies are rife with in-fighting and petty power struggles that often break out into small-scale wars.

Since Sorcerers are far more dependent on normal humans than Mages and Wilders are, they make far greater efforts to insinuate themselves into human society. They especially covet positions in human institutions that could provide them with a ready supply of victims and thus many sorcerers can be found as part of the staff of prisons, insane asylums and the like. They have also infiltrated many urban human power structures and it is rumored that there is an especially powerful and ruthless coven of Sorcerers that is established within the Emperor’s own household.

Relations with other classes:

Clerics and other divine spell casting classes: Idiots who grovel at the feet of deities and thus pass up true power. How pathetic it is that they know nothing of the presence of Sorcerers in their midst. However their flocks can be oh so innocent, naďve and trusting….

Mages: Bookish cowardly fools who think they know everything when they truly know nothing of any importance. The only reason that Sorcerers do not hunt them down more often to harvest their souls is that Mages can be so annoyingly elusive that it is seldom worth the while of the Sorcerers. However, the day will come when Mages learn what true power is.

Wilders: Ignorant bumpkins who know nothing of the power that they are dealing with. They should be destroyed whenever found before they become a danger to those around them. If such destruction means that Sorcerers can sate themselves on the soul of the Wilder in question then so much the better.

Non-casting classes: For Sorcerers the vast majority of humans fall into two categories: pawns and meals. However, since it is often necessary for Sorcerers to involve themselves deeply in human affairs in order to ensure themselves a regular supply of victims, there are many normal humans who have what they believe are deep and meaningful relationships with Sorcerers.

http://img468.imageshack.us/img468/109/sorcerertable16qz.jpg

Sorcerer Spells Known

http://img366.imageshack.us/img366/2952/sorcerertable21lf.jpg

Bonus Spells Known

http://img366.imageshack.us/img366/9346/sorcerertable34ja.jpg

Bonus Spell Points by Class Level

http://img366.imageshack.us/img366/6059/sorcerertable42ws.jpg

The tables above show the number of spells that a Sorcerer knows per level. Also a Sorcerer with high intelligence knows more spells (but he cannot know any spells of a level that are higher than the highest level spell he would’ve received otherwise) and a Sorcerer with higher charisma receives more spell points.

Special Abilities:

Leech: A Sorcerer can gain additional spell points by feeding off the Souls of others. The maximum number of Soul points that a Sorcerer can hold is equal to four times his normal number of Spell Points (including bonus Spell Points for high charisma). However, any Spell Points that he has in addition to his normal Spell Points (by any means) decay at a rate of 5% a day (rounded up).

If a Sorcerer has double his normal number of Spell Points, his caster level increases by one. If Sorcerer has triple his normal number of Spell Points, his caster level increases by two and if he has his maximum number of spell points his caster level increases by three. However his caster level cannot be higher than his Sorcerer class level.

A Sorcerer can passively drain power from others around them without them feeling any ill effects. The number of Spell Points that he can gain depends on a number of factors. The maximum number of points that a Sorcerer can gain in this manner is equal to 2 + Sorcerer Level/2 per day.

Location:
The Wilderness: 0 Spell Points/Day
Low Density Inhabited Area (small towns, suburbs, etc.): +1
City: +2

Companions:
Spends most of the day by himself: +0
Constantly has a few close companions (spell-casters, including other sorcerers do not count towards this number, and neither do the devoutly religious): +1
Is generally attended by a sizable group (spell-casters, including other sorcerers, do not count towards this number, and neither do the devoutly religious): +2

Sleeping arrangements:
Sleeps by himself: +0
Shares a bed with another person or sleeps with several people in the same room (spell-casters, including other sorcerers do not count towards this number, and neither do the devoutly religious): +1
Shares a bed with another person and sleeps with several people in the same room (spell-casters, including other sorcerers do not count towards this number, and neither do the devoutly religious): +2

Soul Drinking: If a third level or higher Sorcerer performs ritual human sacrifice (a complicated procedure that takes 30 minutes – 1 minute/class level), the victims death provides the Sorcerer with additional Spell Points. He Sorcerer nets 1 Spell/Point per Wisdom score of the victim plus 1 per class level (2 per class level if the victim is a Sorcerer, Mage or Wilder).

Fell Eyes: Beginning at forth level, when a Sorcerer currently possesses more than double his normal number of Spell Points his eyes take on a red hue that seems to be just on the edge of luminescence. When a Sorcerer possesses more than triple his normal number of Spell Points his eyes glow a bright malevolent red. A Sorcerer would be well advised to use illusions or other means to hide this effect.

Fell Strike: A metamagic-like ability, which Sorcerers gain at fifth level, that increases the level of the spell cast by one level, but every human killed by the spell gives the Sorcerer one additional spell point.

Spell Drinking: If any spell is targeted at a seventh level or higher Sorcerer and if (for whatever reason) the spell has no effect on the Sorcerer then the Sorcerer gains half of the spell points that were expended in the casting of the spell.

Bind the Soul: An 8th level or above Sorcerer is capable of using Item Creation feats to create magical items. A Sorcerer must pay full GP and XP prices as listed in the PHB, but in addition he must bind a soul to the item in order to give it power. In order to create an item a Sorcerer must ritually kill an immobilized victim and draw his soul into the item as it is created. The victim’s wisdom score plus character level (Sorcerer, Mage and Wilder levels counting double) x 200 x 2 if there is some logical connection between the victim and the item (for example using the soul of a warrior to enchant a piece of armor), x 3 if there is a close connection between the victim and the item (for example using the soul of a combat medic to enchant a healing potion), or x 4 if there is a personal connection between the victim and the item to be enchanted (for example using the soul of a warrior to enchant his favorite sword, which is a heirloom that has been in the family for generations) must equal or exceed the GP cost of the item. Additional victims maybe a sacrificed, but they do little good, providing only a quarter of the value per level/wisdom point as the first victim. As a result, the creation of powerful magical items can be rather gruesome affairs. The only other way that magical items can be created is through direct divine intervention or through the efforts of various non-human races.

Mind Drinking: A ninth level or higher Sorcerer who is able to come within physical contact with a Wilder, Sorcerer or Mage may drain off their Spell Points at a rate of 4/round as a standard action (unless the victim makes a Will Save vs. a DC of 5 + the Sorcerer’s level + his Chr modifier). The Sorcerer gains 2 spell points/round while the other two dissipate. Once the draining begins it continues until the victim is drained dry (unless the Sorcerer is killed or rendered unconscious) while the victim must make a Fortitude Save vs. a DC of 5 + the Sorcerer’s level + his Chr modifier in order to pass out due to the excruciating pain and the Sorcerer is free to act as he wishes. Once the victim is drained dry he wakes up without any spell points, two points of wisdom damage (which are healed at the rate of one per week and cannot be healed by any means besides the passage of time) and loses one point of wisdom permanently unless the victim makes a Will Save vs. a DC of 10 + the Sorcerer’s level + his Chr modifier).

Fell Gaze: A 11th Level Sorcerer can attempt to utilize his Fell Gaze on anyone who meets his eyes for a full round. The victim must make a Will Save vs. a DC of 5 + the Sorcerer’s level + his Chr modifier or suffer two points of wisdom damage (which are healed at the rate of one per week and cannot be healed by any means besides the passage of time) and if the victim fails the save by five or more points he loses one point of wisdom permanently. One use of the Fell Gaze nets a Sorcerer two Spell Points. The victim feels nothing but a sharp stab of pain. The fell gaze can only used up to three times per day plus the Sorcerer’s charisma modifier.

Savor of the Soul: A fourteenth Level Sorcerer can gain spell points by inflicting a hideously-painful but non-lethal ritual on an immobilized victim (taking 60 – class level minutes). He can drain either wisdom points or negative levels damage (which are healed at the rate of one per week and cannot be healed by any means besides the passage of time); the victim also suffers one permanent point of wisdom damage. Every wisdom point or class level temporarily drained nets the Sorcerer one Spell Point.

Feast for the Soul: If a 16th Level Sorcerer is in a crowded area he can drain one Spell Point/round (for a maximum of ten rounds/day) off of the people surrounding him (that’s one Spell Point collectively, not each). The victims suffer no ill effects except for a feeling of nausea and unease.

Fell Sweep: As fell strike, but each death caused by the applicable spell nets the Sorcerer two spell points.

Fell Aura: A maximum of ten times a day a 20th Level Sorcerer can activate a 20’ radius aura around him that forces all within it to suffer two points wisdom damage (unless they make a save vs. 5 + the sorcerer’s level + his Chr modifier) which are healed at the rate of one per week and cannot be healed by any means besides the passage of time. The victims feel nothing except for a feeling of disquiet and a stabbing pain. The Sorcerer gains one Spell Point for each point of wisdom lost by his victims.

------------------------------------------------------------------

What do ya'll think?

LordOfNarf
2006-04-13, 12:10 PM
its not exact, but is smells awful like psionics.

Tryranus_Magus
2006-04-13, 12:11 PM
WOW! :-/

I'm not even going to pretend like I read that whole thing. I just have to say that if you put all that down from the top of your head, keep going. You pretty much tackled your own source book.

Bosh
2006-04-13, 12:18 PM
its not exact, but is smells awful like psionics.

Yeah, quite a bit. Tried to make the flavor different though. There's a few mechanics that I like about my design that psionics doesn't have, notably how I have each of the three mental stats be useful for all of the casters but in different ways.


I'm not even going to pretend like I read that whole thing. I just have to say that if you put all that down from the top of your head, keep going. You pretty much tackled your own source book.
Yeah, well I based the spellcasting progression off of bards but all of the flavor text and whatnot were off the top of my head. The problem with this system is to get all of my ideas down on paper WOULD require a full sourcebook and I don't have quite the time to do that what with a full time job and whatnot. I hope that at least the flavor text and some of the ideas will be interesting to other people.

Pop Goes the Weasel
2006-06-05, 09:54 PM
That is beastly! The sorcerer is probably the coolest base class ever.