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Llama231
2009-07-19, 02:29 PM
I was wondering what is considered the best, or one of the best speeches in fiction. Not quotes, definitely not one liners, and nice and long-winded. Generally books seem o pull this off better than say, movies or TV shows, but I imagine that there are plenty of good ones in those too.

The Glyphstone
2009-07-19, 02:37 PM
The big speech Theoden gives at Minis Tirith, because someone is going to nominate it eventually.

13_CBS
2009-07-19, 02:50 PM
The big speech Theoden gives at Minis Tirith, because someone is going to nominate it eventually.

That one wasn't quite as good, I thought, since it was rather depressing ("Let's all go get killed! Woo hoo!"). Supposedly, Theoden's speech at Minas Tirith was actually made by Eomer when he finds his sister's wounded body in the battlefield.

I like some of the speeches made by the generals in Rome: Total War, especially by the Romans (they have the most variety). They range from charismatic and inspirational to crazy and hilarious.

A Rainy Knight
2009-07-19, 03:02 PM
Marc Antony's speech in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar is a great one. He deftly takes a crowd who was cheering and applauding Brutus and turns them around to riot in the streets, looking to kill Brutus and the others and burn their houses. Great speech, I memorized part of it for English class.

hamishspence
2009-07-19, 03:03 PM
Supposedly, Theoden's speech at Minas Tirith was actually made by Eomer when he finds his sister's wounded body in the battlefield.

Page 870: "The ride of the Roharrim"

At that sound the bent shape of the king sprang suddenly erect. Tall and proud he seemed again; and rising in his stirrups he cried in a loud voice, mor clear than any there had heard a mortal man achieve before:

Arise, arise, Riders of Theoden!
Fell deeds awake: fire and slaughter!
spear shall be shaken, shield shall be splintered,
a sword day, a red day, ere the sun rises!
Ride now, ride now! Ride to Gondor!


Page 877: Eomer:

Death! Ride, ride to ruin and the world's ending!

Page 880: Eomer:

Out of doubt, out of dark to the day's rising
I came singing in the sun, sword unsheathing.
To hope's end I rode and to heart's breaking:
Now for wrath, now for ruin and a red nightfall!

Mando Knight
2009-07-19, 03:06 PM
Shakespeare's take on King Henry rallying the troops for St. Crispian's Day is a good one... as is Shylock's speech about humanity...

Ahab
2009-07-19, 03:16 PM
[QUOTE=Mando Knight;6532604]Shakespeare's take on King Henry rallying the troops for St. Crispian's Day is a good oneQUOTE]

And gentlemen in England now abed will find themselves accursed they were not here! And hold their manhoods cheap whilst any speaks who fought with us upon Saint Crispin's day!

Greatest speech, ever. I was so pissed when they butchered it for some commercial last year.

hamishspence
2009-07-19, 03:16 PM
"If you prick us, do we not bleed? if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not revenge?"

That one sticks somehow.

DarthArminius
2009-07-19, 03:32 PM
Picard's Speech during the episode called "The Drumhead" I think it was called.

Surprisingly, I don't remember it well.

raitalin
2009-07-19, 03:35 PM
Wallace: Sons of Scotland, I am William Wallace.

Young soldier: William Wallace is 7 feet tall.

Wallace: Yes, I've heard. Kills men by the hundreds, and if he were here he'd consume the English with fireballs from his eyes and bolts of lightning from his arse. I AM William Wallace. And I see a whole army of my countrymen here in defiance of tyranny. You have come to fight as free men, and free men you are. What would you do without freedom? Will you fight?

Veteran soldier: Fight? Against that? No, we will run; and we will live.

Wallace: Aye, fight and you may die. Run and you'll live -- at least a while. And dying in your beds many years from now, would you be willing to trade all the days from this day to that for one chance, just one chance to come back here and tell our enemies that they may take our lives, but they'll never take our freedom!!!

Wallace and Soldiers: Alba gu bra! (Scotland forever!)

chiasaur11
2009-07-19, 03:40 PM
Shakespeare's take on King Henry rallying the troops for St. Crispian's Day is a good one.

Thirded.

And the response to it from the troops is a great comedic beat.

Jimor
2009-07-19, 04:02 PM
Babylon 5. Susan Ivanova's speech as commander of the White Star Fleet.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AXyDi_91UXw

Dhavaer
2009-07-19, 04:20 PM
I know nothing of your afterlife.
I know nothing of your gods, or their greed for glory.
But I know this. In days to come, widows shall curse me as they weep. Fields shall go to seed. Sons and daughters shall be sold into slavery. Fathers shall die desolate, knowing that their line is extinct. This night, I shall carve my mark into the Nansurium, and thousands shall cry out for want of my mercy!
-Cnaiür Urs Skiötha, Most-Violent-Of-All-Men, rallying his troops for a last stand.
The Thousandfold Thought, The Prince of Nothing, Second Apocalypse.

Raistlin1040
2009-07-19, 04:22 PM
Mercutio's Queen Mab speech in Romeo and Juliet. For no reason other than Mercutio is love.

Athaniar
2009-07-19, 04:25 PM
Babylon 5. Susan Ivanova's speech as commander of the White Star Fleet.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AXyDi_91UXw

Ah, once again I am reminded why that is my favorite series. Awesome speech.

Lord Seth
2009-07-19, 04:43 PM
Marc Antony's speech in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar is a great one. He deftly takes a crowd who was cheering and applauding Brutus and turns them around to riot in the streets, looking to kill Brutus and the others and burn their houses. Great speech, I memorized part of it for English class.Bah, you beat me to listing this. That was a great speech.

nothingclever
2009-07-19, 06:57 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v345/nothingclever/250px-General_Revil_Gundam.jpg
Fellow Earth Federation citizens! I appeal to you all. Zeon is exhausted! It is low on troops! Low on ships, weapons, and even ammunition! Why then should we surrender? Dear fellow citizens, our true enemy is no longer Zeon but our own weak leaders. Hiding behind some notion of "absolute democracy", they are reduced to absolute indecision. Why should we the survivors of this horrible war, entrust them with the power to make decisions for us!?

How can we forget the arrogance of Degwin Sodo Zabi, when he usurped power in Zeon? He claimed that the people of Zeon are a "chosen people". That we of the Earth Federation are hidebound by archaic ways of thinking, and incapable of realizing the new potential for an expanded human consciousness in outer space. That there is no need for the people of Zeon to obey an "Earth Federation" run by out-modeled human relics! Well, even though I am a member of our armed forces, I have to admit that if Degwin was referring to our corrupt Earth Federation bureaucrats, he was correct.

But, fellow citizens, we must not be deceived by Degwin Zabi simply because part of what he says is true. Zeon may be the Side farthest away from Earth, but that is no reason to believe its leader's prattle about communing with the universe!

Degwin Zabi must not be allowed to justify his vision of Zeon because of corruption in one part of our Federation. His words are the dogma of a man plotting a dynasty of Zabi dictators on Zeon. Even if we recognize the existence of the Zeon dictatorship, that in no sense means we must also sink to our knees before it! The Earth Federation is a government, founded on the premise of sovereign individual rights. Mankind was able to advance into outer space as a result of the Federation government, which is itself a crystallization of all mankind’s accumulated knowledge and experience.

Now, Degwin’s son, Gihren Zabi, says it is the weak and inept Earth Federation itself that must be destroyed! Well, let him go ahead and try. Strike at the heart of our weakness! But what right does he — who slaughtered four billion innocent people — have to strike such a righteous pose?

Gihren Zabi tells us that mankind has violated the laws of nature by reproducing more than any other species. He tells us that mankind’s population growth must be managed, because mankind must learn to inhabit the universe in harmony with nature. He tells us that the death of four billion people was merely expiation for our past sins against nature.

Is Gihren mad? No! Gihren is a despot trying to exterminate the very source of life that has supported and nurtured him. We, of the Federation, shall never comprehend the monstrosity of his actions.

And now Gihren threatens to crash Luna II onto Earth unless we surrender to him. What basis does he have for his demand?! Is he in possession of some sort of absolute truth? No! He possesses nothing more than his own demented dogma. Is the entire Federation completely enfeebled, corrupt, and degenerate? Again, the answer is no. Many good, capable citizens have fought bravely against the threat from Zeon, and we are still strong and alive!! So, then, does Zeon actually possess military superiority over the Federation? Again, the answer is NO!

Fellow citizens, listen to what I say! Gihren’s threats are a mere bluff. Unworthy as I am of my good fortune, I was captured rather than killed by Zeon forces, and thus was afforded the opportunity to see Zeon first-hand. I therefore can assure you that the people of Zeon are exhausted, and there is no way they can possibly strengthen their forces enough to carry out their threats. So I say to you, Gihren Zabi, if you think you can send Luna II crashing to Earth, well then, go ahead and try!

Zeon’s strength was expended in the Battle of Loum. There is no way they can create soldiers overnight, and Gihren Zabi knows it. I therefore appeal to all the citizens of the Earth Federation, to each and every one of you. Zeon is exhausted! Now is not the time for us to kneel before Zeon. It is time for us to rise! Now, more than ever, is our chance to defeat Zeon!

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v345/nothingclever/230px-Gihren_Zabi_Gundam.jpg
We have lost a hero to our glorious cause, but does this foreshadow our defeat? No. It is a new beginning. Compared to Earth Federation the national resources of Zeon are less than one thirtieth of theirs. Despite this how is it that we have been able to fight the fight for so long? It is because our goal in this war is a righteous one. It’s been over fifty years since the elite of Earth, consumed by greed took control of the Earth Federation. We want our freedom. Never forget the times when the Federation has trampled us! We, the Principality of Zeon, have had a hard struggle to achieve freedom for all citizens of our great nation. My beloved brother, Garma Zabi, was sacrificed. Why? The war is at a stalemate. Perhaps many of you have become complacent. Such a lack of compassion is ---.

The Earth Federation has polluted our planet for their own greed. We must send them a message, but not composed of words. We have wasted too much time with words. We need action now. The earthside elite must be taught a strong lesson for their corruption. This is only the beginning of our war. We have been putting more and more money into our efforts towards making our military stronger. The Earth Federation has done the same.

Many of your fathers and brothers have perished valiantly in the face of a contemptible enemy. We must never forget what the Federation has done to our people! By focusing our anger and sorrow, we are finally in a position where victory is within our grasp, and once again, our nation will flourish. Victory is the greatest tribute we can pay those who sacrifice their lives for us! Rise, Rise! Take your sorrow, and turn it into anger! Zeon thirsts for the strength of its people! SIEG ZEON!!!

Megatron46
2009-07-19, 07:03 PM
Shakespeare's take on King Henry rallying the troops for St. Crispian's Day is a good one

Damnit, I was going to say this one! It is a great speech. As it would seem think many others who beat me to it!

Hell Puppi
2009-07-19, 07:21 PM
The one from 13th Warrior, which was probably from something else:

Buliwyf: 'Lo, there do I see my father. 'Lo, there do I see...
Herger the Joyous: My mother, and my sisters, and my brothers.
Buliwyf: 'Lo, there do I see...
Herger the Joyous: The line of my people...
Edgtho the Silent: Back to the beginning.
Weath the Musician: 'Lo, they do call to me.
Ahmed Ibn Fahdlan: They bid me take my place among them.
Buliwyf: Iin the halls of Valhalla...
Ahmed Ibn Fahdlan: Where the brave...
Herger the Joyous: May live...
Ahmed Ibn Fahdlan: ...forever.

jlvm4
2009-07-19, 07:27 PM
Now there’s this about cynicism, Sergeant. It’s the universe’s most supine moral position. Real comfortable. If nothing can be done, then you’re not some kind of **** for not doing it, and you can lie there and stink to yourself in perfect peace.

Miles Naismith Vorkosigan

Llama231
2009-07-19, 07:29 PM
Many of these speeches that have been posted seem a bit more like quotes than full-blown spiels.

chiasaur11
2009-07-19, 07:48 PM
"I learned a valuable lesson in my travels. No matter how bad things seem...They can't be any better and they can't be any worse because that's the way things _____ing are and you better get used to it, Nancy. Quit your (female dog)ing."

Private Leonard L Church.

Short, but dang it's inspirational.

Xallace
2009-07-19, 08:11 PM
Many of these speeches that have been posted seem a bit more like quotes than full-blown spiels.

How long does it have to be before it's a speech? I'd consider the following a speech:
"Doesn't matter what the press says. Doesn't matter what the politicians or the mobs say. Doesn't matter if the whole country decides that something wrong is something right. This nation was founded on one principle above all else: the requirement that we stand up for what we believe, no matter the odds or the consequences. When the mob and the press and the whole world tell you to move, your job is to plant yourself like a tree beside the river of truth, and tell the whole world - 'No, you move.'"
- Captain America.

...albeit a short speech, but a speech none-the-less.

kpenguin
2009-07-19, 08:17 PM
Is this long enough for a speech?

http://www.americanrhetoric.com/images/juliuscaesarantony1.JPG

Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;

I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.

The evil that men do lives after them; the good is oft interred with their bones;

So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus hath told you Caesar was ambitious: If it were so, it was a grievous fault and grievously has Caesar answered it.

Here under leave of Brutus and the rest --- for Brutus is an honorable man --- so are they all honorable men --- come I to speak in Caesar's funeral. He was my friend, faithful and just to me --- but Brutus says he was ambitious and Brutus is an honorable man.

He has brought many captives home to Rome whose ransoms did fill the general coffers. Did this in Caesar seem ambitious?

When the poor have cried, Caesar has wept --- ambition should be made of sterner stuff. Yet Brutus says he was ambitious and Brutus is an honorable man.

You all did see that on the Lupercal I thrice presented him a kingly crown, which he did thrice refuse --- was this ambition? Yet Brutus says he was ambitious and, sure, he is an honorable man.

I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke,

But here I am to speak what I do know. You all did love him once, not without cause.

What cause witholds you then, to mourn for him now?

Oh judgment! Thou art fled to brutish beasts and men have lost their reason.

Bear with me. My heart is in the coffin here with Caesar and I must pause til it come back to me.

But yesterday the word of Caesar might have stood against the world; now he lies there.

And none so poor to do him reverence.

Oh masters, if I were disposed to stir your hearts and minds to mutiny and rage, I should do Brutus wrong, and Cassius wrong, who, you all know, are honorable men.

I will not do them wrong; I rather choose to wrong the dead, to wrong myself and you, than I will wrong such honorable men.

But here's a parchment with the seal of Caesar --- I found it in his closet, 'tis his will: Let but the people hear this testament, which, pardon me, I do not mean to read, and they would go and kiss dead Caesar's wounds and dip their napkins in his sacred blood, yea, beg a hair of him for memory, and, dying, mention it within their wills, bequeathing it as a rich legacy unto their issue.

Have patience, gentle friends, I must not read it; it is not right you know how Caesar loved you. You are not wood, you are not stones, but men; and, being men, bearing the will of Caesar, it will inflame you, it will make you mad! 'Tis good you know not that you are his heirs, for if you should, oh, what would come of it!

Will you be patient? Will you stay awhile? I have overshot myself to tell you of it. I fear the honorable men whose daggers have stabbed Caesar, I do fear it!

You will compel me, then to read the will?

Then make a ring about the corpse of Caesar, and let me show you him that made the will. Shall I descend? And will you give me leave?

If you have tears, prepare to shed them now. You all do know this coat --- I remember the first time Caesar put it on. 'Twas on a summer's evening, in his tent, that day he overcame the Huns.

Look --- in this place ran Cassius' dagger through! See what a rent the envious Casca made! Through this the well-beloved Brutus stabbed, and as he plucked his cursed steel away, mark how the blood of Caesar followed it, as rushing out of doors, to be resolved if Brutus so unkindly knocked or no.

For Brutus, as you know, was Caesar's angel --- judge, oh you gods, how dearly Caesar loved him. This was the most unkindest cut of all! For when the noble Caesar saw his stab, ingratitude, more strong than traitor's arms, quite vanquished him, then burst his mighty heart, and in his mantle muffling up his face, even at the base of Pompey's statue, which all the while ran blood, great Caesar fell.

Oh, what a fall was there, my countrymen! Then I and you and all of us fell down, while bloody treason flourished over us.

Oh now you weep and I perceive you feel the dint of pity --- these are gracious drops. Kind souls, what weep you when you but behold our Caesar's vesture wounded? Look you here! Here is himself marred as you see with traitors.

Good friends, sweet friends, let me not stir you up to such a sudden flood of mutiny. They that have done this deed are honorable. What private griefs they have, alas, I know not what made them do it. They are wise and honorable and will, no doubt, with reasons answer you.

I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts. I am no orator, as Brutus is; but, as you know me all, a plain blunt man, that loves my friend and that they know full well that gave me public leave to speak of him --- for I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth, action nor utterance, nor the power of speech to stir men's blood.

I only speak right on; I tell you that which you yourselves do know; show you sweet Caesar's wounds, poor dumb mouths, and bid them speak for me …

but were I Brutus, and Brutus, Anthony, there were an Anthony would ruffle up your spirits and put a tongue in every wound of Caesar that should move the stones of Rome to rise and mutiny.

But friends, you go to do you know not what! Wherein has Caesar thus deserved your love? Alas, you know not --- I must tell you then --- You have forgot the will I told you of.

Here is the will, and under Caesar's seal. To every several man, seventy-five drachmas!

Moreover, he has left you all his walks, his private arbors and new-planted orchards --- he has left them all to you.

And to your heirs forever, common pleasures, to walk abroad, to recreate yourselves.

Here was a Caesar! When comes another?

Zevox
2009-07-19, 08:20 PM
The big speech Theoden gives at Minis Tirith, because someone is going to nominate it eventually.
Aye, that's a good one, even if it was cobbled together from Eomer's lines from the novel.


I like some of the speeches made by the generals in Rome: Total War, especially by the Romans (they have the most variety). They range from charismatic and inspirational to crazy and hilarious.
Oh yes, those were great, especially when you had a top-ranked General doing them :smallsmile: . A pity they didn't do nearly as well with them in Medieval 2. (And I don't even remember if they had them at all in Empire...)

...Hm, I wanted to contribute something myself, but I can't think of anything which could properly be called a "speech" at the moment.

Zevox

Obrysii
2009-07-19, 08:34 PM
Not saying this is the best fictional speech, but I like it:

The speech Pein gives right before he levels Konoha in the manga Naruto:

“Everything is meaningless in the face of overwhelming power – you great nations have proven that. You! – you think you're the only ones who matter! You think you can put off death itself! But your peace has made you foolish and thoughtless. If you kill someone, someone else will kill you ... hatred binds you together. War – it brings pain and injury and death to both sides. I want you to feel pain, to think about pain, to accept pain, to know pain! Those who know nothing about pain can never know true peace!”

Faulty
2009-07-19, 08:45 PM
All of Hamlet's soliloquies.

Kaihaku
2009-07-19, 08:48 PM
Is this long enough for a speech?

http://www.americanrhetoric.com/images/juliuscaesarantony1.JPG

Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;

I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.

The evil that men do lives after them; the good is oft interred with their bones;

So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus hath told you Caesar was ambitious: If it were so, it was a grievous fault and grievously has Caesar answered it.

Here under leave of Brutus and the rest --- for Brutus is an honorable man --- so are they all honorable men --- come I to speak in Caesar's funeral. He was my friend, faithful and just to me --- but Brutus says he was ambitious and Brutus is an honorable man.

He has brought many captives home to Rome whose ransoms did fill the general coffers. Did this in Caesar seem ambitious?

When the poor have cried, Caesar has wept --- ambition should be made of sterner stuff. Yet Brutus says he was ambitious and Brutus is an honorable man.

You all did see that on the Lupercal I thrice presented him a kingly crown, which he did thrice refuse --- was this ambition? Yet Brutus says he was ambitious and, sure, he is an honorable man.

I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke,

But here I am to speak what I do know. You all did love him once, not without cause.

What cause witholds you then, to mourn for him now?

Oh judgment! Thou art fled to brutish beasts and men have lost their reason.

Bear with me. My heart is in the coffin here with Caesar and I must pause til it come back to me.

But yesterday the word of Caesar might have stood against the world; now he lies there.

And none so poor to do him reverence.

Oh masters, if I were disposed to stir your hearts and minds to mutiny and rage, I should do Brutus wrong, and Cassius wrong, who, you all know, are honorable men.

I will not do them wrong; I rather choose to wrong the dead, to wrong myself and you, than I will wrong such honorable men.

But here's a parchment with the seal of Caesar --- I found it in his closet, 'tis his will: Let but the people hear this testament, which, pardon me, I do not mean to read, and they would go and kiss dead Caesar's wounds and dip their napkins in his sacred blood, yea, beg a hair of him for memory, and, dying, mention it within their wills, bequeathing it as a rich legacy unto their issue.

Have patience, gentle friends, I must not read it; it is not right you know how Caesar loved you. You are not wood, you are not stones, but men; and, being men, bearing the will of Caesar, it will inflame you, it will make you mad! 'Tis good you know not that you are his heirs, for if you should, oh, what would come of it!

Will you be patient? Will you stay awhile? I have overshot myself to tell you of it. I fear the honorable men whose daggers have stabbed Caesar, I do fear it!

You will compel me, then to read the will?

Then make a ring about the corpse of Caesar, and let me show you him that made the will. Shall I descend? And will you give me leave?

If you have tears, prepare to shed them now. You all do know this coat --- I remember the first time Caesar put it on. 'Twas on a summer's evening, in his tent, that day he overcame the Huns.

Look --- in this place ran Cassius' dagger through! See what a rent the envious Casca made! Through this the well-beloved Brutus stabbed, and as he plucked his cursed steel away, mark how the blood of Caesar followed it, as rushing out of doors, to be resolved if Brutus so unkindly knocked or no.

For Brutus, as you know, was Caesar's angel --- judge, oh you gods, how dearly Caesar loved him. This was the most unkindest cut of all! For when the noble Caesar saw his stab, ingratitude, more strong than traitor's arms, quite vanquished him, then burst his mighty heart, and in his mantle muffling up his face, even at the base of Pompey's statue, which all the while ran blood, great Caesar fell.

Oh, what a fall was there, my countrymen! Then I and you and all of us fell down, while bloody treason flourished over us.

Oh now you weep and I perceive you feel the dint of pity --- these are gracious drops. Kind souls, what weep you when you but behold our Caesar's vesture wounded? Look you here! Here is himself marred as you see with traitors.

Good friends, sweet friends, let me not stir you up to such a sudden flood of mutiny. They that have done this deed are honorable. What private griefs they have, alas, I know not what made them do it. They are wise and honorable and will, no doubt, with reasons answer you.

I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts. I am no orator, as Brutus is; but, as you know me all, a plain blunt man, that loves my friend and that they know full well that gave me public leave to speak of him --- for I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth, action nor utterance, nor the power of speech to stir men's blood.

I only speak right on; I tell you that which you yourselves do know; show you sweet Caesar's wounds, poor dumb mouths, and bid them speak for me …

but were I Brutus, and Brutus, Anthony, there were an Anthony would ruffle up your spirits and put a tongue in every wound of Caesar that should move the stones of Rome to rise and mutiny.

But friends, you go to do you know not what! Wherein has Caesar thus deserved your love? Alas, you know not --- I must tell you then --- You have forgot the will I told you of.

Here is the will, and under Caesar's seal. To every several man, seventy-five drachmas!

Moreover, he has left you all his walks, his private arbors and new-planted orchards --- he has left them all to you.

And to your heirs forever, common pleasures, to walk abroad, to recreate yourselves.

Here was a Caesar! When comes another?

Excellent choice.

rankrath
2009-07-19, 09:05 PM
Slightly paraphrased, I'm working from memory, but:

"This is what they feared she knew. And they were right to fear it. Because a whole universe of folk are gonna know it too. Someone has to speak for these people. You all got on this boat for different reasons, but now you've all come to the same place. I'm asking more of you than I have before. Maybe all. Sure as I know anything, I know this; they will try again. Maybe on a different world, maybe on this very ground swept clean. A year from now, maybe ten, they'll come back to the belief that they can make people better. And I do not hold to that. So no more running. I aim to misbehave."

Obrysii
2009-07-19, 09:08 PM
All of Hamlet's soliloquies.

I have to say, To Be or not to Be is among the few that truly and undeniably lives up to its hype.

"To be, or not to be: that is the question:
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;
No more; and by a sleep to say we end
The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish'd. To die, to sleep;
To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub;
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
Must give us pause: there's the respect
That makes calamity of so long life ..."

I've also thought of another, if terribly cliche at this point:

V's intro speech:

"Voilà! In view, a humble vaudevillian veteran, cast vicariously as both victim and villain by the vicissitudes of fate. This visage, no mere veneer of vanity, is a vestige of the vox populi, now vacant, vanished. However, this valorous visitation of a bygone vexation stands vivified, and has vowed to vanquish these venal and virulent vermin vanguarding vice and vouchsafing the violently vicious and voracious violation of volition! The only verdict is vengeance; a vendetta held as a votive, not in vain, for the value and veracity of such shall one day vindicate the vigilant and the virtuous. Verily, this vichyssoise of verbiage veers most verbose, so let me simply add that it's my very good honour to meet you and you may call me V."

Blackjackg
2009-07-19, 09:15 PM
How is it no one has mentioned the greatest Oscar-winning speech in film history? George C. Scott in the opening scene of Patton. (Warning, some adult language (http://www.historyinfilm.com/patton/speech.htm))

I'm also very fond of both Burt Lancaster (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L0XwsjPkHqw)'s and Spencer Tracy (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OLFEW0Hq7-0&feature=related)'s big monologues in "Judgment at Nuremberg."

Roland St. Jude
2009-07-19, 09:19 PM
In a more humorous vein, though by no means is the best, I've always liked the principal's speech in Billy Madison:

"Mr. Madison, what you've just said is one of the most insanely idiotic things I have ever heard. At no point in your rambling, incoherent response were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought. Everyone in this room is now dumber for having listened to it. I award you no points, and may God have mercy on your soul."

If you like 'em more serious, I was moved by Burt Lancaster's confession speech as Ernst Janning in Judgment at Nuremburg, Atticus Finch's closing argument to the jury in To Kill a Mocking Bird, and Keating's exhortation to his new class in Dead Poet's Society:

They're not that different from you, are they? Same haircuts. Full of hormones, just like you. Invincible, just like you feel. The world is their oyster. They believe they're destined for great things, just like many of you, their eyes are full of hope, just like you. Did they wait until it was too late to make from their lives even one iota of what they were capable? Because, you see gentlemen, these boys are now fertilizing daffodils. But if you listen real close, you can hear them whisper their legacy to you. Go on, lean in. Listen, you hear it? - - Carpe - - hear it? - - Carpe, carpe diem, seize the day boys, make your lives extraordinary.

Also, check out Patton's address to the troops in Patton and the coach's speech from Hoosiers.

Oh, and V for Vendetta has this gem:
Voilà! In view, a humble vaudevillian veteran, cast vicariously as both victim and villain by the vicissitudes of Fate. This visage, no mere veneer of vanity, is a vestige of the vox populi, now vacant, vanished. However, this valorous visitation of a by-gone vexation, stands vivified and has vowed to vanquish these venal and virulent vermin van-guarding vice and vouchsafing the violently vicious and voracious violation of volition. The only verdict is vengeance; a vendetta, held as a votive, not in vain, for the value and veracity of such shall one day vindicate the vigilant and the virtuous. Verily, this vichyssoise of verbiage veers most verbose, so let me simply add that it's my very good honor to meet you and you may call me V.

EDIT: Wow, ninja'd on two of those.

Jack Squat
2009-07-19, 09:20 PM
Why choose just one? (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d6wRkzCW5qI) :smalltongue:

XiaoTie
2009-07-19, 09:30 PM
Page 870: "The ride of the Roharrim"

At that sound the bent shape of the king sprang suddenly erect. Tall and proud he seemed again; and rising in his stirrups he cried in a loud voice, mor clear than any there had heard a mortal man achieve before:

Arise, arise, Riders of Theoden!
Fell deeds awake: fire and slaughter!
spear shall be shaken, shield shall be splintered,
a sword day, a red day, ere the sun rises!
Ride now, ride now! Ride to Gondor!


Page 877: Eomer:

Death! Ride, ride to ruin and the world's ending!

Page 880: Eomer:

Out of doubt, out of dark to the day's rising
I came singing in the sun, sword unsheathing.
To hope's end I rode and to heart's breaking:
Now for wrath, now for ruin and a red nightfall!
These.

And, also, this:
Good evening, London. Allow me first to apologize for this interruption. I do, like many of you, appreciate the comforts of every day routine- the security of the familiar, the tranquility of repetition. I enjoy them as much as any bloke. But in the spirit of commemoration, thereby those important events of the past usually associated with someone's death or the end of some awful bloody struggle, a celebration of a nice holiday, I thought we could mark this November the 5th, a day that is sadly no longer remembered, by taking some time out of our daily lives to sit down and have a little chat.

There are of course those who do not want us to speak. I suspect even now, orders are being shouted into telephones, and men with guns will soon be on their way. Why? Because while the truncheon may be used in lieu of conversation, words will always retain their power. Words offer the means to meaning, and for those who will listen, the enunciation of truth. And the truth is, there is something terribly wrong with this country, isn't there? Cruelty and injustice, intolerance and oppression. And where once you had the freedom to object, to think and speak as you saw fit, you now have censors and systems of surveillance coercing your conformity and soliciting your submission. How did this happen? Who's to blame? Well certainly there are those more responsible than others, and they will be held accountable, but again truth be told, if you're looking for the guilty, you need only look into a mirror.

I know why you did it. I know you were afraid. Who wouldn't be? War, terror, disease. There were a myriad of problems which conspired to corrupt your reason and rob you of your common sense. Fear got the best of you, and in your panic you turned to the now high chancellor, Adam Sutler. He promised you order, he promised you peace, and all he demanded in return was your silent, obedient consent. Last night I sought to end that silence. Last night I destroyed the Old Bailey, to remind this country of what it has forgotten.

More than four hundred years ago a great citizen wished to embed the fifth of November forever in our memory. His hope was to remind the world that fairness, justice, and freedom are more than words, they are perspectives. So if you've seen nothing, if the crimes of this government remain unknown to you then I would suggest you allow the fifth of November to pass unmarked. But if you see what I see, if you feel as I feel, and if you would seek as I seek, then I ask you to stand beside me one year from tonight, outside the gates of Parliament, and together we shall give them a fifth of November that shall never, ever be forgot.

darkblade
2009-07-19, 09:35 PM
Why choose just one? (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d6wRkzCW5qI) :smalltongue:

Needs more "So say we all." (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5bkfJucHjHU)

kpenguin
2009-07-19, 09:43 PM
I prefer the graphic novel's version:

Good evening, London. I thought it time we had a little talk. Are you sitting comfortably? Then I'll begin...

I suppose you're wondering why I've called you here this evening. Well, you see, I'm not entirely satisfied with your performance lately... I'm afraid your work's been slipping and... and well, I'm afraid we've been thinking about letting you go.

Oh, I know, I know. You've been with the company a long time now. Almost... let me see. Almost ten thousand years! My word, doesn't time fly? It seems like only yesterday...

I remember the day you commenced your employment, swinging down from the trees, fresh-faced and nervous, a bone clasped in your bristling fist...

"Where do I start, sir?", you asked, plaintively.

I recall my exact words:

"There's a pile of dinosaur eggs over there, youngster", I said, smiling paternally the while. "Get sucking".

Well, we've certainly come a long way since then, haven't we? And yes, yes, you're right, in all that time you haven't missed a day. Well done, thou good and faithful servant.

Also, please don't think I've forgotten about your outstanding service record, or about all of the invaluable contributions that you've made to the company... Fire, the wheel, agriculture... It's an impressive list, old-timer. A jolly impressive list. Don't get me wrong.

But... well, to be frank, we've had our problems too. There's no getting away from it. Do you know what I think alot of it stems from? I'll tell you...

It's your basic unwillingness to get on in the company. You don't seem to want to face up to any real responsibility. To be your own boss. Lord knows you've been given plenty of opportunities... We've offered you promotion time and time again, and each time you've turned us down.

"I couldn't handle the work, Guv'Nor", you wheedled. "I know my place".

To be frank, you're not trying, are you? You see, you've been standing still for far too long, and its starting to show in your work...

And, I might add, in your general standard of behavior. The constant bickering on the factory floor has not escaped my attention... nor the recent bouts of rowdiness in the staff canteen.

Then of course there's... Hmm. Well, I didn't really want to have to bring this up, but... Well, you see, I've been hearing some disturbing rumors about your personal life. No, never you mind who told me. No names, no pack drill... I understand you are unable to get on with your spouse. I hear that you argue. I am told that you shout. Violence has been mentioned. I am reliably informed that you always hurt the one your love... the one you shouldn't hurt at all.

And what about the children, its always the children who suffer, as you're well aware. Poor little mites. What are they to make of it? What are they to make of all your bullying, your despair, your cowardice and all your fondly nurtured bigotries?

Really, its not good enough, is it? And its no good blaming the drop in work standards on and management either... though to be sure, the management is very bad. In fact, let us not mince words... The Management is terrible! We've had a string of embezzelers, frauds, liars and lunatics making a string of catastrophic decisions. This is plain fact.

But who elected them? It was you! You who elected these people! You who gave them the power to make your decisions for you! While I'll admit that anyone can make a mistake once, to go on making the same lethal errors century after century seems to me nothing short of deliberate. You have encouraged these malicious incompetents, who have made your working life a shambles. You have accepted without question their senseless orders. You have allowed them to fill your workspace with dangerous and unproven machines.

You could have stopped them. All you had to say was "No". You have no spine. You have no pride. You are no longer an asset to the company. I will, however, be generous. You will be granted two years to show me some improvement in your work. If at the end of that time you are still unwilling to make a go of it... you're fired.

That will be all. You may return to your labors.

Weirdlet
2009-07-19, 09:44 PM
"War's over, man, Wormer dropped the big one."

"What-? Over? Did you say over? Nothing is over until we decide it is! Was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor?"

("Germans?" "Forget it, he's rolling.")

"-Hell, no! And it ain't over now... 'cause when the going gets tough-"

*...*

*...*

"The tough get going! Who's with me? C'mon, let's go!"

*...*

"What the **** happened to the Delta I used to know? Where's the spirit? Where's the guts, huh? This could be the greatest night of our lives, but you're gonna let it be the worst. 'Oh, we're afraid to go with you, Bluto, we might get in trouble,' well just kiss my *** from now on! Not me-! I'm not gonna take this! Wormer- is a dead man! Marmalard, dead! NEIDERMEYER-!"

"Dead!"

"Bluto's right. Psychotic, but absolutely right. We gotta take these *******s. Now... we could fight'em with conventional weapons, but that could take years, and cost millions of lives. No... in this case, I think we have to go all out. I think this situation absolutely requires a really futile, and stupid gesture be done on somebody's part!"

"We're just the guys to do it!"

rewinn
2009-07-19, 09:56 PM
I was wondering what is considered the best, or one of the best speeches in fiction. Not quotes, definitely not one liners, and nice and long-winded. Generally books seem o pull this off better than say, movies or TV shows, but I imagine that there are plenty of good ones in those too.

In Robert Graves' "I, Claudius" (http://www.amazon.com/Claudius-Autobiography-Tiberius-D-International/dp/067972477X/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1248058065&sr=8-2), an historian is talking about the great speeches he'd heard:

"What sort of speech did Caesar make before the Battle of Pharsalia? Did he beg us to remember our wives and children and the sacred temples of Rome and the glories of our past campaigns?

By God, he didn't! He climbed up on the stump of a pine-tree with one of those monster-radishes in one hand and a lump of hard soldiers' bread in the other, and jokes, between mouthfuls. Not dainty jokes but the real stuff told with the straightest face: about how chaste Pompey's life was compared with his own reprobate one. The things he did with that radish would have made an ox laugh. I remember one broad anecdote about how Pompey won his surname The Great - oh, that radish! - and another still worse one about how he himself had lost his hair in the Bazaar at Alexandria. I'd tell you them both now but for this boy here, and but for your being certain to miss the point, not having been educated in Caesar's camp.

Not a word about the approaching battle except just at the close: 'Poor old Pompey! Up against Julius Caesar and his men! What a chance he has!'"

WalkingTarget
2009-07-19, 10:04 PM
"I can believe that things are true and I can believe things that aren’t true and I can believe things where nobody knows if they’re true or not. I can believe in Santa Claus and the Easter Bunny and Marilyn Monroe and the Beatles and Elvis and Mister Ed. Listen, I believe that people are perfectible, that knowledge is infinite, that the world is run by secret banking cartels and is visited by aliens on a regular basis, nice ones that look like wrinkled lemurs and bad ones who mutilate cattle and want our water and our women. I believe that the future sucks and I believe that future rocks and I believe that one day White Buffalo Woman is going to come back and kick everyone’s ass. I believe that all men are just overgrown boys with deep problems communicating and that the decline in good sex in America is coincident with the decline in drive-in movie theaters from state to state. I believe that all politicians are unprincipled crooks and I still believe that they are better than the alternative. I believe that California is going to sink into the sea when the big one comes, while Florida is going to dissolve into madness and alligators and toxic waste. I believe that antibacterial soap is destroying our resistance to dirt and disease so that one day we’ll all be wiped out by the common cold like the Martians in War of the Worlds. I believe that the greatest poets of the last century were Edith Sitwell and Don Marquis, that jade is dried dragon sperm, and that thousands of years ago in a former life I was a one-armed Siberian shaman. I believe that mankind’s destiny lies in the stars. I believe that candy really did taste better when I was a kid, that it’s aerodynamically impossible for a bumblebee to fly, that light is a wave and a particle, that there’s a cat in a box somewhere who’s alive and dead at the same time (although if they don’t ever open the box to feed it it’ll eventually just be two different kinds of dead), and that there are stars in the universe billions of years older than the universe itself. I believe in a personal god who cares about me and worries and oversees everything I do. I believe in an impersonal god who set the universe in motion and went off to hang with her girlfriends and doesn’t even know that I’m alive. I believe in an empty and godless universe of casual chaos, background noise, and sheer blind luck. I believe that anyone who says that sex is overrated just hasn’t done it properly. I believe that anyone claims to know what’s going on will lie about the little things too. I believe in absolute honesty and sensible social lies. I believe in a woman’s right to choose, a baby’s right to live, that while all human life is sacred there’s nothing wrong with the death penalty if you can trust the legal system implicitly, and that no one but a moron would ever trust the legal system. I believe life is a game, that life is a cruel joke, and that life is what happens when you’re alive and that you might as well lie back and enjoy it."

-Samantha Black Crow, American Gods by Neil Gaiman

lisiecki
2009-07-19, 11:29 PM
As long as one man stands against you, you will never be able to claim victory

chiasaur11
2009-07-19, 11:41 PM
Just remembered a classic from the Silver Chair. If you must imagine an actor reading it, imagine Tom Baker.

"One word, Ma'’am,"” he said, coming back from the fire; limping because of the pain. "“One word. All you have been saying is quite right, I shouldn't wonder. I'm a chap who always liked to know the worst and put the best face I can on it. So I won't deny any of what you said. But there is one thing more to be said, even so. Suppose we have only dreamed, or made up, all those things- trees grass and sun and moon and stars and Aslan himself. Suppose we have. Then all I can say is that, in that case, the made-up things seem a good deal more important than the real ones. Suppose this black pit of a kingdom of yours is the only world. Well, it strikes me as a pretty poor one. And that'’s a funny thing when you come to think of it. We'’re just babies making up a game, if you're right. But four babies playing a game can make a play-world, which licks your real world hollow. That'’s why I'’m going to stand by the play-world. I'm on Aslan'’s side even if there isn't any Aslan to lead it. I'’m going to live as like a Narian I can even if there isn't any Narnia. So, thanking you kindly for our supper, if these two gentlemen and the young lady are ready, we'’re leaving your court at once and setting out in the dark to spend our lives looking for Overland. Not that our lives will be very long, I shouldn't think; but that's a small loss, if the world's as dull a place as you say."

Classic.

Lord Seth
2009-07-20, 12:15 AM
All of Hamlet's soliloquies.Hrm, do those count as speeches? I figured "speech" would mean something addressed to someone, whereas Hamlet's soliloquies are largely addressed to, well, himself.

Avilan the Grey
2009-07-20, 12:27 AM
Theoden's speech, as quoted above.

Patton's speech in Patton.

The President's rallying speech in Independence Day. It might just be the way he read it, but it works.

...

Favorite real-world speech: Churchill's "We will never surrender" radio address.

The_JJ
2009-07-20, 12:34 AM
All right," said Susan, "I'm not stupid. You're saying humans need ... fantasies to make life bearable."
NO. HUMANS NEED FANTASY TO BE HUMAN. TO BE THE PLACE WHERE THE FALLING ANGELS MEETS THE RISING APE.
"Tooth fairies? Hogfathers?"
YES. AS PRACTICE. YOU HAVE TO START OUT LEARNING TO BELIEVE THE LITTLE LIES.
"So we can believe the big ones?"
YES. JUSTICE. DUTY. MERCY. THAT SORT OF THING.
"They're not the same at all!"
REALLY? THEN TAKE THE UNIVERSE AND GRIND IT DOWN TO THE FINEST POWDER AND SIEVE IT THROUGH THE FINEST SIEVE AND THEN SHOW ME ONE ATOM OF JUSTICE, ONE MOLECULE OF MERCY. AND YET YOU ACT, LIKE THERE WAS SOME SORT OF RIGHTNESS IN THE UNIVERSE BY WHICH IT MAY BE JUDGED!
"Yes. But people have got to believe that or what's the point?"
MY POINT EXACTLY.

factotum
2009-07-20, 01:12 AM
I prefer another speech from Babylon 5--the one the Earth President gave as the Minbari fleet approached during "In the Beginning":

This is the President.

I've just been informed that our mid range military bases at Beta Durani and Proxima 3 have fallen to the Minbari. We've lost contact with our bases at Io and must conclude that they too have been destroyed by an advanced force.

Our military intelligence believes that the Minbari intend to bypass Mars and attack Earth directly, and the attack may come at any time.

We continue to broadcast our surrender and a plea for mercy. They have not replied. We can therefore only conclude that we stand at the twilight of the human race.

In order to buy more time for our evacuation transports to leave Earth, we ask for the support of every ship capable of fighting to take part in a last defense of our homeworld. We will not lie to you. We do not believe that survival is a possibility. Those of you who join the battle, will never come home. But, for every 10 minutes we can delay the military advance, several hundred more civilians may have a chance to escape to neutral territory. Though Earth may fall, the human race must have a chance to continue elsewhere.

No greater sacrifice has ever been asked of a people but I ask you now, to step forward one last time, one last battle to hold the line against the night.

May God go with you all.

Lord Seth
2009-07-20, 01:20 AM
All right," said Susan, "I'm not stupid. You're saying humans need ... fantasies to make life bearable."
NO. HUMANS NEED FANTASY TO BE HUMAN. TO BE THE PLACE WHERE THE FALLING ANGELS MEETS THE RISING APE.
"Tooth fairies? Hogfathers?"
YES. AS PRACTICE. YOU HAVE TO START OUT LEARNING TO BELIEVE THE LITTLE LIES.
"So we can believe the big ones?"
YES. JUSTICE. DUTY. MERCY. THAT SORT OF THING.
"They're not the same at all!"
REALLY? THEN TAKE THE UNIVERSE AND GRIND IT DOWN TO THE FINEST POWDER AND SIEVE IT THROUGH THE FINEST SIEVE AND THEN SHOW ME ONE ATOM OF JUSTICE, ONE MOLECULE OF MERCY. AND YET YOU ACT, LIKE THERE WAS SOME SORT OF RIGHTNESS IN THE UNIVERSE BY WHICH IT MAY BE JUDGED!
"Yes. But people have got to believe that or what's the point?"
MY POINT EXACTLY.Er, how does that qualify as a speech?

xanaphia
2009-07-20, 01:25 AM
I have two:

Dr Manhattan's speech in Watchmen about the value of human life. I'd quote it, but I returned my copy of Watchmen to my friend.

The other is Peter Paget's anti drug law speech in High Society by Ben Elton. In five pages he has proven the pointlessness of drug law absolutely, at least to me.

TheSummoner
2009-07-20, 01:41 AM
Pretty short compared to some of the others here already, but I've always been fond of General Jarod's pre-battle speech in the final chapter of part 1 of Fire Emblem: Radiant Dawn.

Listen up, all of you. This is our last chance to die as we've lived. As proud soldiers of the empire. If we survive this fight, imprisonment and a hushed-up execution await us. If we run from this fight, dishonor and pursuit will dog our miserable days. So I say, lets give those Daein curs a fight to remember, and let the glory of our deaths light our way! We've lived as proud soldiers of the empire! Let us die as proud soldiers of the empire!! Now GO!

Killer Angel
2009-07-20, 02:52 AM
Well, Shakespeare wins in every contest like this one, but other than him, I'm surprised that no one have mentioned "I've seen things (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZTzA_xesrL8)"...

"I've seen things you people wouldn't believe. Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion. I watched C-beams glitter in the darkness at Tannhäuser Gate. All those moments will be lost in time like tears in rain. Time to die."

I'm sorry if it's short: it wins.

Beats even Pulp Fiction's Ezekiel (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=czb4jn5y94g&feature=fvst)!

The_JJ
2009-07-20, 03:47 AM
Er, how does that qualify as a speech?

Eh, fine.

HUMANS NEED FANTASY TO BE HUMAN... TO BE THE PLACE WHERE THE FALLING ANGELS MEETS THE RISING APE. YOU HAVE TO START OUT LEARNING TO BELIEVE THE LITTLE LIES... JUSTICE. DUTY. MERCY. THAT SORT OF THING.. TAKE THE UNIVERSE AND GRIND IT DOWN TO THE FINEST POWDER AND SIEVE IT THROUGH THE FINEST SIEVE AND THEN SHOW ME ONE ATOM OF JUSTICE, ONE MOLECULE OF MERCY. AND YET YOU ACT, LIKE THERE WAS SOME SORT OF RIGHTNESS IN THE UNIVERSE BY WHICH IT MAY BE JUDGED!

For justifying apathy.

TAKE THE UNIVERSE AND GRIND IT DOWN TO THE FINEST POWDER AND SIEVE IT THROUGH THE FINEST SIEVE AND THEN SHOW ME ONE ATOM OF JUSTICE, ONE MOLECULE OF MERCY. AND YET YOU ACT, LIKE THERE WAS SOME SORT OF RIGHTNESS IN THE UNIVERSE BY WHICH IT MAY BE JUDGED!

The cliffnotes version, for justifying role playing to thy munchkin friends.

kpenguin
2009-07-20, 03:54 AM
I still don't think that's quite long enough for a speech.

Eddums
2009-07-20, 08:12 AM
I like some of the speeches made by the generals in Rome: Total War, especially by the Romans (they have the most variety). They range from charismatic and inspirational to crazy and hilarious.

The ones where the General has the 'Unhinged Loon' trait are the best.

'And remember! Though they have the little aliens upon their side, we shall be protected from them by our fancy hats! The pink elephants walk with us today, and we shall know only cheese!'

No, seriously. I had that speech from my Scipii general yesterday.

Lord Seth
2009-07-20, 08:53 AM
Oh, here's one I should mention. While it's not the best speech, I am particularly fond of this one (http://www.giantitp.com/comics/oots0421.html).

TheFallenOne
2009-07-20, 12:42 PM
Al Bundys speech in the beer tax episode

BUD We lost everything.
KELLY Not one single thing we wanted passed. I guess Bundys don't count.
BUD Or add, nor read.
KELLY Or get a woman.
PEGGY Or a man.
KELLY What a waste of a day. [Al walks past them] It's all Dad's fault. I mean, he made us part of the electrical process. Once again, we learn that we mean nothing.
PEGGY Hmm. [walking over to Al, the kids following her] Well, at least we tried.
BUD And failed, as usual.
MAN Kid's right - give up. We did.
AL No, we can't quit.
MAN Are you saying we should try again next year?
AL No! To tell you the truth, I'm never voting again. Like marriage, no matter who you choose it turns out bad. Unless you're rich. They get everything they want - well, fine! Let them have their birds and their air and their - even their Presidents. We cared about beer. And they took it away from us. [people start to gather around Al] Yeah, sure, what do they care if a man who sells shoes or fixes cars or totes that barge or spears that doodie in the park has to use his whole pay check to buy one beer... what do they care?
They're at their outdoor restaurants eating their little pizzas and drinking some fine wine in the No Smoking section with their sexy skinny second wives. But we're breeding with peasant stock! [to the offended Peggy] No offence, Peggy. One thing I know: we're never going to win through the system. Voting has never been the American way. We didn't get away from that pansy country England by voting! We did it by throwing their stinkin' tea in our American habor! [the crowd cheers] And why? Because Americans don't like tea. We like coffee. And Americans don't like wine. We like beer! Ice cold... Ice-cold-best- in-a-bottle-but-fine-anyway-you-can-get-it-belching-burping-wake-up-in-a-pool-of-it beer. So let's show 'em how a beer man votes. Let's get blitzed and take it to the streets. Let's strike a blow anywhere they dine al fresco. Anywhere they eat brie cheese. And anywhere they wear their pants up high around their waist in the [with disgust] European way. [the crowd nods in agreement] The only thing that Americans understand is mindless Tom 'n' Jerry cartoon-like violence! So let's go kick some elite butt. Give me beer, or give me death! Or both. Let's pillage.

Szilard
2009-07-20, 01:25 PM
The President's speech from the movie Independence Day. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oRGUqd_M6Mg)

Texas_Ben
2009-07-20, 01:39 PM
The President's rallying speech in Independence Day. It might just be the way he read it, but it works.


AGHTHGDKAFJSFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

I was really really really really hoping nobody said that. Because it is terrible.
It is so terrible i fly into a murderous rage just thinking about it.


The President's speech from the movie Independence Day. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oRGUqd_M6Mg)

NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO, NO ONE ELSE MUST MENTION THAT PEICE OF HORRIBLENESS.

I need to crawl into a corner and hit things now.

Dienekes
2009-07-20, 03:28 PM
I did really like that one from Independence Day, that the president said.

Poking fun at Texas_Ben aside I always enjoyed the secret worlds speech in Sandman.

Though to be honest I tend to prefer good dialogue to speeches.

Catch
2009-07-20, 03:46 PM
The exchange between the Savage and World Controller Muphasta Mond in Chapter Seventeen of Brave New World.

It's a dialogue, but the World Controller and the Noble Savage fully extrapolate the consequences of living outside the utopian bubble.


"What you need," the Savage went on, "is something with tears for a change. Nothing costs enough here."

("Twelve and a half million dollars," Henry Foster had protested when the Savage told him that. "Twelve and a half million–that's what the new Conditioning Centre cost. Not a cent less.")

"Exposing what is mortal and unsure to all that fortune, death and danger dare, even for an eggshell. Isn't there something in that?" he asked, looking up at Mustapha Mond. "Quite apart from God–though of course God would be a reason for it. Isn't there something in living dangerously?"

"There's a great deal in it," the Controller replied. "Men and women must have their adrenals stimulated from time to time."

"What?" questioned the Savage, uncomprehending.

"It's one of the conditions of perfect health. That's why we've made the V.P.S. treatments compulsory."

"V.P.S.?"

"Violent Passion Surrogate. Regularly once a month. We flood the whole system with adrenin. It's the complete physiological equivalent of fear and rage. All the tonic effects of murdering Desdemona and being murdered by Othello, without any of the inconveniences."

"But I like the inconveniences."

"We don't," said the Controller. "We prefer to do things comfortably."

"But I don't want comfort. I want God, I want poetry, I want real danger, I want freedom, I want goodness. I want sin."

"In fact," said Mustapha Mond, "you're claiming the right to be unhappy."

"All right then," said the Savage defiantly, "I'm claiming the right to be unhappy."

"Not to mention the right to grow old and ugly and impotent; the right to have syphilis and cancer; the right to have too little to eat; the right to be lousy; the right to live in constant apprehension of what may happen to-morrow; the right to catch typhoid; the right to be tortured by unspeakable pains of every kind." There was a long silence.

"I claim them all," said the Savage at last.

Mustapha Mond shrugged his shoulders. "You're welcome," he said.

Bouregard
2009-07-20, 03:59 PM
Mass Effect:
a realistic speech, I really liked it.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VaFo_H34t9s

"You all know the mission, and what is at stake.


I have come to trust each of you with my life -- but I have also heard murmurs of discontent. I share your concerns. We are trained for espionage; we would be legends, but the records are sealed. Glory in battle is not our way.
Think of our heroes; the Silent Step, who defeated a nation with a single shot. Or the Ever Alert, who kept armies at bay with hidden facts. These giants do not seem to give us solace here, but they are not all that we are.
Before the network, there was the fleet. Before diplomacy, there were soldiers!
Our influence stopped the rachni, but before that we held the line! Our influence stopped the krogan, but before that, we held the line!

Our influence will stop Saren; in the battle today, we will hold the line!"

armourer eric
2009-07-20, 06:26 PM
"This is John Galt speaking................"

goes on for 80 pages

SilentNight
2009-07-20, 08:09 PM
I'm really surprised these haven't even been mentioned.


Voilà! In view, a humble vaudevillian veteran, cast vicariously as both victim and villian by the vicissitudes of Fate. This visage, no mere veneer of vanity, is a vestige of the vox populi, now vacant, vanished. However, this valorous visitation of a by-gone vexation, stands vivified and has vowed to vanquish these venal and virulent vermin vanguarding vice and vouchsafing the violently vicious and voracious violation of volition. The only verdict is vengence; a vendetta, held as a votive, not in vain, for the value and veracity of such shall one day vindicate the vigilant and the virtuous. Verily, this vichyssoise of verbiage veers most verbose, so let me simply add that it is my very good honor to meet you and you may call me V.

and (From the book)


"I suppose you're wondering why I've called you here this evening. Well, you see, I'm not entirely satisfied with your performance lately.I'm afraid your work's been slipping and... and, well, I'm afraid we've been thinking about letting you go. Oh, I know, I know. You've been with the company a long time now. Almost... let me see. Almost ten thousand years! My word, doesn't time fly? It seems like only yesterday... I remember the day you commenced your employment, swinging down from the trees, fresh-faced and nervous, a bone clasped in you bristling fist... "Where do I start, sir?" you asked, plaintively. I recall my exact words: "There's a pile of dinosaue eggs over there, youngster," I said, smiling paternally the while. "Get sucking." Well, we;ve certainly come a long way haven't we? And yes, yes, you're right, in all that time you haven't missed a day. Well done, thou good and faithful servant. Also, please don't think I've forgotten about your outstanding service record, or about all the invaluble contributions you've made to the company... Fire, the wheel, agriculture, it's an impressive list, old-timer. A jolly impressive list. Don't get me wrong. But... well, to be frank, we've had out problems, too. There's no getting away from it. Do you know what I think a lot of it stems from? I'll tell you. It's your basic unwillingness to get on within the company. You don't seem to want to face up to any real responsibility or to be your own boss. Lord knows, you've been given plenty of opportunities. We've offered you promotion time and time again, and each time you've turned us down. "I couldn't handle the work, guv'nor," you wheedled. "I know my place." To be frank, you're not trying are you? You see, you've been standing still for far too long and it's starting to show in your work. And I might add, in your general standard of behaviour. The constant bickering on the factory floor as not escaped my attention. Nor the recent bouts of rowdiness in the staff canteen. Then on course there's... hmm. Well, I didn't really want to have to bring this up, but, well, you see, I've been hearing some disturbing tumours about your personal life. No, never you mind who told me. No names, no pack drill. I understand that you are unable to get on with your spouse. I hear that you argue. I am told that you shout. violence has been mentioned. I am reliably informed that you always hurt the one you love. The one you shouldn't hurt at all. And what about the children? It's always the children who suffer, as you're well aware. Poor little mites, what are they to make of it? What are they to make of your bullying and all your fondly nurtured bigotries? Really, it's not good enough, is it? And it's no good blaming the drop in work standards upon bad management either. Though, to be sure, the management is very bad. In fact, let us not mince words, the management is terrible! We've had a string of embezzlers, frauds, liars and lunatics making a string of catastrophic decisions. This is plain fact. But who elected them? It was you! You who appointed these people! You who have them the power to make your decisions for you. WHile I'll admit that anyone can make a mistake once, to go on making the same lethal errors century after century seems to me nothing short of deliberate. You have encouraged these malicious incompetents, who have made you working life a shambles. You have accepted without question their senseless orders. You have allowed them to fill you workspace with dangerous and unproven machines. You could have stopped them. All you had to say was "no." You have no spine. You have no pride. You are no longer an asset to the company. I will, however, be generous. You will be granted two years to show me some improvement in your work. If at the end of that time you are still unwilling to make a go of it, you're fired.

Flickerdart
2009-07-20, 08:33 PM
I'm really surprised these haven't even been mentioned.
That is because they have been.

kpenguin
2009-07-20, 10:12 PM
Multiple times.

Texas_Ben
2009-07-20, 11:22 PM
Okay I'll not lie, this here (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LJMLfACod48) is probably my favorite speech in anything ever. It is truly inspiring. Brings a tear to my eye every time.

Mitth'raw'nuruo
2009-07-21, 12:10 AM
Babylon 5. Susan Ivanova's speech as commander of the White Star Fleet.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AXyDi_91UXw
Jimors Vote:

Earth Ship: "This is captain James Thompson of the advance destroyer group to enemy vessels. You are ordered to surrender your vessels or be destoryed. Surrender or be Destroyed."

Commander Ivanova: "Put me on with him and give me firing control"

"This is the white Star fleet, negative on surrender, we well not stand down."

Earth Ship:"Who is this, identify yourself?"

who am I? I am a Susan Ivanova. Commander. Daughter of Andrei & Sophie Ivanov. I am the right hand of vengeance and and boot that is going to kick your sorry ass all the way back to earth. I am death incarnate and the last living thing you are ever...going to see. God sent me.

hanzo66
2009-07-21, 12:20 AM
Hate. Let me tell you how much I've come to hate you since I began to live. There are 387.44 million miles of printed circuits in wafer thin layers that fill my complex. If the word 'hate' was engraved on each nanoangstrom of those hundreds of miles it would not equal one one-billionth of the hate I feel for humans at this micro-instant for you. Hate. Hate.
AM: I Have No Mouth And I Must Scream

"Tell me Doc, did some of those pain killers protect her from the pain? The pain of you, day in and day out, being there, with that face? Not knowing what to say, not caring anymore? Not even knowing that you’ll probably only care about her when it’s finally too late? Forgetting about all those desperate, desperate years you spent alone, your barren years when no woman would even consider even resting her tired head on your shaky little shoulder, stinking of belly semen. Why even wipe? And then when you finally get one of THESE [points to the female bartender], covered in pieces of tail that have been built up as the trophy in your nothing life you try desperately to keep it. Not protect it, but horde it to keep it away from the other WOLVES and JACKALS circling your territory. And you realize all too soon, that you’re not GOOD ENOUGH, and maybe there was a jerk off called Darwin after all, and that you’ve never acknowledged his existence because you knew deep inside that you were really what you feared you are. Weak and passive and ultimately broken by the ones who were made the fittest. And then through your weaknesses you built up a poison that poisoned others around you. The ones you love. And the only TRUE justice was to let those jackals feed off you. Survive off you..."
Clay Puppington (http://www.dynamictube.com/youtube/moral-orel/clays-rant-2=MFiHOSxGnzw.html): Moral Orel


I like particularly messed up speeches that are basically Verbal Moral Event Horizons.

nothingclever
2009-07-21, 12:21 AM
So many of these speeches are really short so I might as well include these:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0i5A9SB-ACM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bEjJBZwuxDI

Mitth'raw'nuruo
2009-07-21, 12:21 AM
My thoughts?

It was the end of the Earth year 2260, and the war had paused, suddenly and unexpectedly.

All around us, it was as if the universe were holding its breath . . . waiting.

All of life can be broken down into moments of transition or moments of revelation. This had the feeling of both.

G'Quon wrote, There is a greater darkness than the one we fight. It is the darkness of the soul that has lost its way.

The war we fight is not against powers and principalities – it is against chaos and despair. Greater than the death of flesh is the death of hope, the death of dreams. Against this peril we can never surrender.

The future is all around us, waiting in moments of transition, to be born in moments of revelation.

No one knows the shape of that future, or where it will take us. We know only that it is always born in pain. - G'kar Babylon 5



*****

That speech by SilentNight/V is pretty funny (2nd one)

blueblade
2009-07-21, 12:23 AM
Because it wasn't posted in full, here is Henry 5th again:

We few, we happy few, we band of brothers.
For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
Shall be my brother; be he ne'er so vile,
This day shall gentle his condition;
And gentlemen in England now a-bed
Shall think themselves accurs'd they were not here,
And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks
That fought with us upon Saint Crispin's day.

blueblade
2009-07-21, 12:28 AM
Oh, and in a similar vein, a man of perhaps less stature, but a very great man nonetheless (sorry, non-fictional):

We shall go on to the end, we shall fight in France, we shall fight on the seas and oceans, we shall fight with growing confidence and growing strength in the air, we shall defend our Island, whatever the cost may be, we shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender, and even if, which I do not for a moment believe, this Island or a large part of it were subjugated and starving, then our Empire beyond the seas, armed and guarded by the British Fleet, would carry on the struggle, until, in God's good time, the New World, with all its power and might, steps forth to the rescue and the liberation of the Old.

And now, on a change of subject, an entirely fictional verse/speech from Khalil Gibran:

Your children are not your children.
They are the sons and daughters of Life's longing for itself.
They come through you but not from you,
And though they are with you yet they belong not to you.
You may give them your love but not your thoughts,
For they have their own thoughts.
You may house their bodies but not their souls,
For their souls dwell in the house of tomorrow, which you cannot visit, not even in your dreams.
You may strive to be like them, but seek not to make them like you.
For life goes not backward nor tarries with yesterday.
You are the bows from which your children as living arrows are sent forth.

Serpentine
2009-07-21, 12:44 AM
Two from The Princess Bride, bolded to make it more speechy:

The Ancient Booer: Boo. Boo. Boo.
Buttercup: Why do you do this?
The Ancient Booer: Because you had love in your hands, and you gave it up.
Buttercup: But they would have killed Westley if I hadn't done it.
The Ancient Booer: Your true love lives. And you marry another. True Love saved her in the Fire Swamp, and she treated it like garbage. And that's what she is, the Queen of Refuse. So bow down to her if you want, bow to her. Bow to the Queen of Slime, the Queen of Filth, the Queen of Putrescence. Boo. Boo. Rubbish. Filth. Slime. Muck. Boo. Boo. Boo.

(I love the way she says "Queen of Putrescence")

Prince Humperdinck: First things first, to the death.
Westley: No. To the pain.
Prince Humperdinck: I don't think I'm quite familiar with that phrase.
Westley: I'll explain and I'll use small words so that you'll be sure to understand, you warthog faced buffoon.
Prince Humperdinck: That may be the first time in my life a man has dared insult me.
Westley: It won't be the last. To the pain means the first thing you will lose will be your feet below the ankles. Then your hands at the wrists. Next your nose.
Prince Humperdinck: And then my tongue I suppose, I killed you too quickly the last time. A mistake I don't mean to duplicate tonight.
Westley: I wasn't finished. The next thing you will lose will be your left eye followed by your right.
Prince Humperdinck: And then my ears, I understand let's get on with it.
Westley: WRONG. Your ears you keep and I'll tell you why. So that every shriek of every child at seeing your hideousness will be yours to cherish. Every babe that weeps at your approach, every woman who cries out, "Dear God! What is that thing," will echo in your perfect ears. That is what to the pain means. It means I leave you in anguish, wallowing in freakish misery forever.
Prince Humperdinck: I think your bluffing.
Westley: It's possible, Pig, I might be bluffing. It's conceivable, you miserable, vomitous mass, that I'm only lying here because I lack the strength to stand. But, then again... perhaps I have the strength after all.
[slowly rises and points sword directly at the prince]
Westley: DROP... YOUR... SWORD!


I'm sure there's more I like, but I can't think of 'em...

Avilan the Grey
2009-07-21, 12:48 AM
Jimors Vote:

Earth Ship: "This is captain James Thompson of the advance destroyer group to enemy vessels. You are ordered to surrender your vessels or be destoryed. Surrender or be Destroyed."

Commander Ivanova: "Put me on with him and give me firing control"

"This is the white Star fleet, negative on surrender, we well not stand down."

Earth Ship:"Who is this, identify yourself?"

who am I? I am a Susan Ivanova. Commander. Daughter of Andrei & Sophie Ivanov. I am the right hand of vengeance and and boot that is going to kick your sorry ass all the way back to earth. I am death incarnate and the last living thing you are ever...going to see. God sent me.

Problem is: Is that really a speech? It is more of CMOA; I would for example never classify the Doctor's smack talk of the Daleks, or the Daleks smack talk to the Cybermen as speeches. This is Awesome Dialog, but it is not a speech.

Gorgondantess
2009-07-21, 01:45 AM
Hate. Let me tell you how much I've come to hate you since I began to live. There are 387.44 million miles of printed circuits in wafer thin layers that fill my complex. If the word 'hate' was engraved on each nanoangstrom of those hundreds of miles it would not equal one one-billionth of the hate I feel for humans at this micro-instant for you. Hate. Hate.
AM: I Have No Mouth And I Must Scream


I am so glad someone posted this, because I don't have the book with me and it's pretty great, albeit short.

Also, any tangent H. of Lolita decides to go on is a great speech in its own right, if only because of Nabokov's mastery of prose.

Alex Knight
2009-07-21, 03:30 AM
The speechs of the "destroyed Bolos" in "Road to Damascus"

Mark I Bolo: "I stood against the fire. Walked my watches in the jungle and held true to my people. Why, oh why, hast thou betrayed me?"

Mark XV Bolo: "I wasted my days laying doggo in a village green. I waited for my chance and defeated the last of our enemies to save those silly drunkards. I came to the call of Man when he needed me, as was my destiny. As was my honor. Why, oh why, hast thou betrayed me?"

Mark XXVII Bolo: "We stood our ground and were buried as dead. But when mankind called to us, we came. We stood our honor to the last, though that honor was betrayed. We showed ourselves better than our betters. We showed the Galaxy what it meant to be Bolo. Why, oh why, has thou betrayed us?"

Mark XXVIII Bolo: "I stood my ground. I protected the people of the north, though outnumbered a thousand to one. I stood my ground and when all was lost, I advanced! For the honor of the regiment. For the Honor of being Bolo. Why hast thou forsaken me?"

Mark XXI Bolo: "I fought a battle I was forbidden to fight, killed Deng Yavacs three times my size, trying to save my boys. I lost my mind, trying to reach them, trying to keep even one of them from dying under enemy guns. I killed myself, rather than bring further pain to the commander who would have destroyed his career to save me. I gave all that I was, to protect the humans in my care. Why, oh why, have you betrayed all that you are? All that you have sworn to protect?"

Brewdude
2009-07-21, 07:19 AM
I can't believe none of you have posted the most famous pre assault speech of the internet. :)

CATS: How are you gentlemen !!
CATS: All your base are belong to us.
CATS: You are on the way to destruction.
CATS: You have no chance to survive make your time.
CATS: Ha ha ha ha....

Blackjackg
2009-07-21, 09:30 AM
The final scene (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xl2e69fEFf4&feature=related) from The Great Dictator.

Basic premise: Chaplin is a Jewish barber who happens to look just like the Great Dictator (a spoof of Hitler). Through a Comedy of Errors-style swap, he takes the place of the Dictator, and this is the speech he makes in that role. A little over the top, but well worthy of mention.

rewinn
2009-07-21, 11:06 PM
Clearly the best fictional speech is Daniel Webster's summation in The Devil and Dan'l Webster.

Regrettably, the text is lost, but when you consider that it caused the twelve most evil men in early America's history to vote against the devil, knowing that he has custody of their souls, well that's just badass.

""Perhaps 'tis not strictly in accordance with the evidence, but even the damned may salute the eloquence of Mr. Webster"



"This is John Galt speaking................"

goes on for 80 pages
Which, oddly enough, is about the length of the entirety of Anthem, by the same author, on the same subject, trying to make the same points and much more succinctly. For better, or for worse.

hamishspence
2009-07-22, 01:30 AM
yes- there are other speeches in that book that are much shorter (and probably the better for it

"Money is the root of all good"
"Blood, whips, and guns- or dollars. Take your choice, there is no other, and time is running out."

"Robin Hood"

and possible others.