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Tamburlaine
2009-07-29, 04:47 PM
I've recently started reading Duncton Wood by William Horwood. At about 100 pages into the book, I'm not exactly gripped. So my question is this: has anyone else in the playground read it? Does it get better later on?

Mr.Silver
2009-07-29, 07:40 PM
I've recently started reading Duncton Wood by William Horwood. At about 100 pages into the book, I'm not exactly gripped. So my question is this: has anyone else in the playground read it? Does it get better later on?
I've read it, although it was a couple of years ago. I quite liked it (although it is surprisingly dark), so I'd say it probably does.

Cyrano
2009-07-29, 08:58 PM
There is a trilogy of these books, if I recall correctly. I read the first one, came away saying, basically, "That was very interesting, quite well written, and I admired the fact that a serious and gripping story was written about moles." I never did read the second one, despite the fact that I had it right next to me. Make of that what you will.

factotum
2009-07-30, 01:39 AM
It's probably a matter of taste...it's in the same mould as Watership Down (e.g. quite dark themes but done through the subject of anthropomorphised animals), which isn't to everyone's liking.

Serpentine
2009-07-31, 09:35 AM
This sounds really familiar. If I've read it, it was years ago. For people who like this sort of thing, though, I recommend Plague Dogs (by the author of Watership Down), The Animals of Farthing Wood (a TV show, but Wikipedia says there's books) and... Alas, I don't know the name of the last book. It's a book of short stories, and it includes a story about a hedgehog who pines after a beautiful silver ribbon in the distance, and one that involves a hardcore toad and skinning alive.

Ravens_cry
2009-07-31, 01:50 PM
I read it and found it lovely. The moles are pretty much anthropomorphic only in the sense they can talk, along with some technology, writing mostly, if I remember correctly, it isn't Redwall. It's been a while since I read it, but it really charmed me. It's not cutesy, that is for sure.

Tamburlaine
2009-07-31, 03:05 PM
I'm still pressing onwards, and it's holding my interest a little better now, though I think the pacing is a little off. Nice descriptive writing though.

factotum
2009-07-31, 03:27 PM
The moles are pretty much anthropomorphic only in the sense they can talk, along with some technology, writing mostly, if I remember correctly

And they're also intelligent. You really don't get much more anthropomorphic than intelligent animals that can talk--it's not a really long word for "cute"! :smallwink:

Ravens_cry
2009-07-31, 11:23 PM
And they're also intelligent. You really don't get much more anthropomorphic than intelligent animals that can talk--it's not a really long word for "cute"! :smallwink:

Technically (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/-morphic?db=luna)the morphic part refers to the form, though a human-like mind also certainly qualifies. It wasn't completely human-like, however. Humans don't go into heat for one.
A look at almost any children's cartoon with talking animals, not to mention furries and cat-girls and other siuch creatures, and you'll see creatures a lot more 'anthro' in their 'morphic'.

Serpentine
2009-08-01, 07:45 AM
And they're also intelligent. You really don't get much more anthropomorphic than intelligent animals that can talk--it's not a really long word for "cute"! :smallwink:Anthropomorphic:
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/14365/14365-h/images/133-2.png
http://www.funbumperstickers.com/images/Daffy_Duck_9.gif
http://images1.makefive.com/images/200915/19b7c002b051484c.gif

Duncton moles:
This,
http://www.hfpestcontrol.co.uk/img/photos/lg_mole.jpg
except that they talk (only to each other?), are intelligent, and possibly have some basic technologies.

factotum
2009-08-01, 09:18 AM
Let's see what the dictionary says:

anthropomorphic (adjective)
1. ascribing human form or attributes to a being or thing not human, esp. to a deity.
2. resembling or made to resemble a human form: an anthropomorphic carving.

Meaning (1) seems quite clear on this front: the book is assigning human attributes (intelligence and speech in particular) to creatures which are not human (moles), and therefore they are anthropomorphic. As I said above, it does not mean "cartoon" or "cute", as you apparently believe, Serpentine.