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Tomb_Raven
2006-06-10, 08:39 PM
Heya...

Havnt seen a thread like this yet... well that is to say on this topic. So here we idolise discuss Douglas Adams.

He wrote the most amazeing radio show ever The Hitch Hikers Guide to the Galaxy. Imo its a work of pure genious. The dialog is so amazeingly balanced and well written.

Who else has enjoyed his works? And why?

Personaly i think i prefered the books to the radio series for hitch hikers...

Also i had an old copy of dirk gentlies lieing around and when i saw it was Douglas Adams i picked it strait up, sadly its very disapointing :( got reeealy bored through the second chapter. Just my opinion

Whats yours?

Raven

http://i80.photobucket.com/albums/j194/Tomb_Raven/Guide8.gif

TinSoldier
2006-06-10, 09:10 PM
Dirk Gently was okay, but The Hitchhiker's Guide was the best. They didn't even screw up the recent movie, bless thier souls.

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy was a very influential work to me.

SpoonlessJedi
2006-06-10, 09:20 PM
I've been worshipping The Great Douglas Adams since I was four years old and read the five books of the Hitchhiker's Trilogy. My pet computer, whom I built when I was seven, is named Douglas, after said lord of literature.

Pretty much everything he did was excellent, even the rough, unedited pieces compiled in The Salmon of Doubt. Dirk Gently was great, but he'll never measure up to the masterwork of Arthur Dent and "What is six times nine?" Seriously, I cried when Douglas Adams died a few years ago. It was more heartbreaking than when James Doohan died last summer.

I smiled when I saw this thread... ^_^ Sorry, but Mr. Adams was the greatest.

TinSoldier
2006-06-10, 09:23 PM
Wow! You read Douglas Adams at the age of four? I bow to your superior intellectual capacity, madam!

Sophistemon
2006-06-10, 09:26 PM
Well, though I didn't read Douglas Adams when I was four (I was enjoying Stephan King, which explains a lot) I, too, greatly enjoyed the Guide. Adams was a master of dialogue. Plots... not so much. But his dialogue was brilliant.

Midnight Son
2006-06-10, 09:27 PM
I have only read his Hitchhiker's Guide series, so I can't speak to anything else. For the most part I found it quite amusing and interesting. I only have two things(one I disliked and one I find uncontinuous) that bug me about the Hitchikers Guide to the Galaxy:

1. I disliked almost all of the fifth book.
2. Spoiler When Zaphod climbs out through the window into the universe made especially for him, he never climbs back in. As such, everything that happens after that point does not actually happen.

SpoonlessJedi
2006-06-10, 09:28 PM
Well, though I didn't read Douglas Adams when I was four (I was enjoying Stephan King, which explains a lot) ...

I respect your taste and share your joy, but I seriously hope I never meet you down a dark alley...

Sophistemon
2006-06-10, 09:36 PM
Aw, I'm not that bad. All it did was give me a morbid sense of humor, also known as 'black' or 'dark' humor. I find funny in things that most people would not.
As to the spoiler, that was the point. Adams was planning more books, even though he Spoiler: killed off most of the main cast in the final book/Spoiler.
Too bad he died before he could.

Tomb_Raven
2006-06-10, 09:41 PM
Personaly i think the movie wasnt bad as such too much hmmm.... but it could have been amayeing. Had they left it but not screwed around with the dialog and all time greatest speaches it would have been twice as good. I mean what sort of crap is "freeze, im a robot not a refridgerator". I bet Douglas turned in his grave at that one... Shakes head...

Midnight Son
2006-06-10, 09:42 PM
Well, if he didn't want most people thinking he screwed the pooch somehow, he should have found a way to keep writing even after he died. Inconsiderate, I say...inconsiderate.

Sophistemon
2006-06-10, 09:57 PM
Well, you know that he was an atheist, right? A form of life after death would have been abhorrent to him.

Spuddly
2006-06-10, 09:58 PM
Hmmm, some sort of madlibs program maybe. Teaching robots to be funny can't be that hard, can it?

Midnight Son
2006-06-10, 09:59 PM
Does life after death require a god. no wait. don't answer that. I like this discussion too much.

TinSoldier
2006-06-10, 10:03 PM
Personaly i think the movie wasnt bad as such too much hmmm.... but it could have been amayeing. Had they left it but not screwed around with the dialog and all time greatest speaches it would have been twice as good. I mean what sort of crap is "freeze, im a robot not a refridgerator". I bet Douglas turned in his grave at that one... Shakes head...You know that the story continually evolved from radio play to book to movie(s) with each iteration right? And that Douglas was involved in each rewrite?

He never saw it as a static story. As long as the movie was in the making, he was still constantly re-writing the script. And the people who made the movie knew him very well and think the final product would meet with his approval.

TinSoldier
2006-06-10, 10:05 PM
Does life after death require a god. no wait. don't answer that. I like this discussion too much.Yeah, I don't want to get into that because while I don't believe in life after death, I do believe in God. Don't reply here, just let that thought percolate through your brain.

Sophistemon
2006-06-10, 10:05 PM
Well, in any case, he didn't believe in an afterlife. He was an environmentalist. He cared about the planet, and he cared about the here-and-now.

Spuddly
2006-06-10, 10:07 PM
He also wrote some very good radio shows and later books.

His movie was a travesty. Ugh, it was terrible!

Sophistemon
2006-06-10, 10:10 PM
Never say that again. The modern audience just couldn't handle its majesty.

Tomb_Raven
2006-06-10, 10:10 PM
But that particular thing imo would have pained him as much as me. It was laaaaame i doubt he would have liekd that. Or the way they cropped the "interesting rhythimic devices which seem to counterpoint the surrealism of the underlieing metaphor etc. " bit. That was one of my favourite bits in all time and they cut it to shreds :(

Also i doubt the world portrayed in the movie, the universe i mean is anything how h imagined it. It seems way too bleak and vogon orientated. In his books its much more colourfull (unless you are on the planet nowhere with the bog hogs (not sure if thats the name)) a lively place full of parties with improbabilit generators flinging underwear around. And the neverending quest for drinks. The movie seems a bit... dull... in that respect.

And most importantly they completely omited the towel entry in the guide, the towels must have been a complete oddity and mistery to people who havnt read the book.

WTF why are those guys running away from a man with a towel.

Also its a nice entry. I dunno... it just didnt portray the universe in the way that i and i think douglas had imagined it.

Raven
EDIT: His movie was amazeing... lovely i loved it :D now remake that with modern technology to flesh out the aliens and gadgets and things and you have perfection

Tomb_Raven
2006-06-10, 10:15 PM
Just cos it is very apropriate...

one of my old sig banners...

http://i80.photobucket.com/albums/j194/Tomb_Raven/Guide8.gif

SpoonlessJedi
2006-06-10, 10:18 PM
The thing about Mr. Adams' works that made them so great was the reeking sense of obvious English humour that most Americans fail to grasp. His books were detailed enough that they could include some aspects that Americans find appealing, but mainly revolved around English humour, much like the Monty Python movies.

The recent movie, however, had to be boiled down given the obvious restrictions of a motion picture, and thus really didn't include many "things" for your average American viewer, other than a few nerd-culture references. The rest consisted strictly of what English intellectuals and nerds would find amusing, much like the Monty Python television series.

I love tying different aspects of geek culture together, even if they don't make much sense. Forgive my obscure referencing.

Tomb_Raven
2006-06-10, 10:23 PM
I agree.

Most british humour such as Black Adder, monty python, Douglas Adams and the like is lost on your average american.

They prefer Mr. Bean. They find it insanly funny. I dont get it. Sigh nevermind. Im guessing its only geeky or nerdy humour cos its actualy intelectual and witty. Wit being the most important worda nd part of the humour. Not many peole go into that any more. Sad. And guess what? I blame Charley Chaplin. Baldrick balancing a slug is much better than him ;)

Raven

Spuddly
2006-06-10, 10:24 PM
The thing about Mr. Adams' works that made them so great was the reeking sense of obvious English humour that most Americans fail to grasp. His books were detailed enough that they could include some aspects that Americans find appealing, but mainly revolved around English humour, much like the Monty Python movies.
*
The recent movie, however, had to be boiled down given the obvious restrictions of a motion picture, and thus really didn't include many "things" for your average American viewer, other than a few nerd-culture references. The rest consisted strictly of what English intellectuals and nerds would find amusing, much like the Monty Python television series.

Quoted for truthiness.

TinSoldier
2006-06-10, 10:25 PM
As an American (US Citizen, that is) I really appreciate most British humor.

I loved the movie, but it looked more like a TV movie than a Big-Screen movie.

Tomb-Raven, I think I was the one who requested to make that sig. Just saying ;).

I do wish they had done a better job about the towel. To this day, a towel is the single most important that I make sure I have wherever I go.

Tomb_Raven
2006-06-10, 10:32 PM
Im not trying to insult anyone in particular or general with my comments on americans. im just saying that from personal experiance 2 americans have had a true apreciatin for the humour. Thats to say they didnt only laugh at the the base slap stick and crude jockes.

Oh yeah :D It was you who requested it. One of my old paint jobs :D

I mean the new movie is a bit random and inconsistent which would be fine if it was more intergrated in the movie. For example they just happened to jump to where the coords for magrathea are. Its like a massive coincidence but it looks like a mistake. Had the theme been more extensive like in the books/radio it could have been a funny part/aspect of the movie.

Also for me the movie is too full of things only fans of the books will find funny. The gazelle that the vogon sits on for instance or the jewled scuttling crabs.

Raven

EDIT: Rather than towels, im an avid dressinggown person (bathrobe for those onthe wrong side of the ocean)

Sophistemon
2006-06-10, 10:40 PM
Hey, I get British humor! Most of your jokes secretly make fun of your meaningless monarchy!

Kidding. Please don't kill me.

Midnight Son
2006-06-10, 10:42 PM
As I have said before, I am an American, but I love me some good British humour. I liked the movie. yes, it wasn't as good as the book, but are movies, which have to be fairly short as a rule, ever as good as the book? You just can't fit everything in that a fan of a book will want to see. Also, studios are apt to make changes based on what they think will make the movie more popular. The fact that they are rarely right just shows that studios are run by Spoonheads.

Sophistemon
2006-06-10, 10:43 PM
It's not about the movie to Hollywood. It's about the money. Which is why for every truly innovative idea we'll get a thousand knockoffs and remakes.

Space-Is-Curved
2006-06-10, 10:48 PM
The only works of his that I have read are the Hitchhikers series. The books are fantastic, but seem to get worse as they go. I absolutely loved the way the infinate improbability drive was described, something they didn't portray that great in the movie, though I did love that "I think I'm a sofa" line. I don't know how much of the "English humor" I understand, but it's enough to think the books are hilarious.

Douglas managed to put humor in just about every sentance through his writing.

"They floated in the air in the same way that bricks don't" If i completely misquoted that, I'm sorry. I do not have my copy at hand.

I remember at summer camp one year I forgot to bring a towel. I was miserable. Then I read the Guide and now I bring one everywhere.

If anyone doubts my fan-itude, look at my sig. ;D

Tomb_Raven
2006-06-10, 10:50 PM
I just want to stress that im generalising... im saying that americans in general. And there is no way you can disagree with that. You live there :P dont kill me either

Sophistemon
2006-06-10, 10:50 PM
Yeah. Why, in the movie, was the ship shaped like a teacup? Why wasn't shaped like a running shoe?

Midnight Son
2006-06-10, 10:56 PM
I just want to stress that im generalising... im saying that americans in general. And there is no way you can disagree with that. You live there :P dont kill me eitherI won't disagree wit you there, but stating things like that on this board, where most American members will at least have some appreciation, is not necessarily the smartest move.

TinSoldier
2006-06-10, 10:56 PM
I just want to stress that im generalising... im saying that americans in general. And there is no way you can disagree with that. You live there :P dont kill me eitherTrue. Not all US citizens get British humor.

TR, aren't you German? Do Germans have a sense of humor :D ?

Tomb_Raven
2006-06-10, 10:57 PM
Dunno... and the doors didnt say " glad to be of service etc," they just sighed which made me sigh. Ah well i can understand why they didnt do so much in the movie. I liked the adition of the temple sermon to the great grean archleseizure and the comming of the great white handkerchief.

my fav quote:

"The Hagamemnon would have done to Charles Darwin about the same as what a group of Alcturan Stunt Apples would have done to Sir. Isaac Newto"

*i buggered the quote a bit but have no referance on hand to correct with

EDIT: Lol no i am not german i mearly live here. im half English half Polish. And no germans dont have a sense of humour. I am allowed to make fun of any nation i like cos im British :P and we are allowed ot do that cos we can take the piss out of ourselves just as well :P

Bah i know generalising is bad. I know loads of nice and intelligent americans and i know a lot of erm... typical ones. You cant really generalise about anything but im going to never the less.

Im sure there are good Douglas Quotes that directly would benefit my defence in this position but i cnat think of any :( except for his description of new york

Spuddly
2006-06-10, 11:09 PM
I think it's fair to say that Brits and Americans have different senses of humor. This is quite clear when you watch American sitcoms and British sitcoms.

Tomb_Raven
2006-06-10, 11:12 PM
True, which is why the magority of americans dont find british humour funny. *shrug* although nowadays the hip brit prolly wouldnt get it either. whats the world comming to.

Raven

Spuddly
2006-06-10, 11:17 PM
Do Brits find American stuff funny? Or is just too funny for you guys?

TinSoldier
2006-06-10, 11:25 PM
EDIT: Lol no i am not german i mearly live here. im half English half Polish. And no germans dont have a sense of humour. I am allowed to make fun of any nation i like cos im British :P and we are allowed ot do that cos we can take the piss out of ourselves just as well :PThanks for clarifying that. Let me say that a lot of Americans find British humor funny. Hence the success of Monty Python and Benny Hill, Red Dwarf, Fawlty Towers, etc.

Of course, we like Canadian humor too, such as the Red Green show.


Bah i know generalising is bad. I know loads of nice and intelligent americans and i know a lot of erm... typical ones. You cant really generalise about anything but im going to never the less.

Im sure there are good Douglas Quotes that directly would benefit my defence in this position but i cnat think of any :( except for his description of new yorkMy Dad always told me I was Scottish, Irish, and Danish. I've found that my ancestry is more Danish and German than anything else. My wife is mostly Norwegian. I'm sure our ancestry has some sense of humor, though. We're a pretty funny bunch. Or maybe it's just sarcasm ;D

Spuddly
2006-06-10, 11:27 PM
Well, if you were raised American, your ancestry probably has little to do with your sense of humor. More of a cultural thing.

Scientists have yet to find the funny gene.

TinSoldier
2006-06-10, 11:29 PM
I think I have a funny gene. It's located somewhere near my elbow.

Tomb_Raven
2006-06-10, 11:30 PM
Im sure they do it being so base :P

No im kidding, yeah we like it. I especialy liek a lot of the simpsons and futurama. It realy very funny.

Anyway i think this is kinda drifting so lets shake hands and make up.

Raven

Spuddly
2006-06-10, 11:35 PM
I especialy liek a lot of the simpsons and futurama.

I think those two shows are the closest to British comedy mainstream America produces. Take Friends or uh... I don't watch TV, so I really know what's on. But it's definitely the same type of funny British humor is.

American humor is loud and obvious. Compare the stand up Robin Williams and Jim Carrey (originally a Canadian) with Eddie Izzard.

Gary_Howard
2006-06-11, 05:00 AM
So what about those Americans who find that the English get their jokes far better than their fellow Americans do?

This board is probably CHOCK full of them, actually.

Case in point:
When I was about 13, at school, we were supposed to fill in the end of a sentence for English class. "Make it funny!" the teacher told us.

The sentence: "Gilbert believes in himself, but ________________."

Everyone else in the class had some variation on "but he shouldn't throw himself off buildings." Or "but he shouldn't try to fly." (essentially the same thing, anyway..)

Mine was, "but others prefer more mainstream religions."

I thought I had comedy GOLD. (Well, yes, I was 13.) When I read mine, though, not only did nobody laugh.. but nobody could seem to understand what the humor was supposed to BE. A few moments of awkward silence, and the English teacher sort of fumbles, "Well.. it's a very DRY kind of humor."

Then again, I'm a confirmed Anglophile.. seen it all from Jeeves and Wooster to Mulberry; thought the HHG (hey, original topic, fancy meeting you here) was the funniest book ever the first time I read it, currently have a British flag hanging on the door to my room (funny things you find cleaning) and frankly, I am DYING to put the "u" back in "humour." Don't have clearance, though. Is there a form you have to fill out? Can I get authorisation authorization while I'm at it, or is that a seperate ministry?

Edit: Move AUX; Do insertion

fryer1
2006-06-11, 06:05 AM
2. Spoiler When Zaphod climbs out through the window into the universe made especially for him, he never climbs back in. As such, everything that happens after that point does not actually happen.
Actually, (spoiler -->)Zarniwoop turns off his briefcase, which is generating the fake universe.


Also i doubt the world portrayed in the movie, the universe i mean is anything how h imagined it. It seems way too bleak and vogon orientated. In his books its much more colourfull (unless you are on the planet nowhere with the bog hogs (not sure if thats the name)) a lively place full of parties with improbabilit generators flinging underwear around. And the neverending quest for drinks. The movie seems a bit... dull... in that respect.

And most importantly they completely omited the towel entry in the guide, the towels must have been a complete oddity and mistery to people who havnt read the book.

WTF why are those guys running away from a man with a towel.


The film is only of the first book, so the planet NowWhat and the flying party haven't appeared yet.

Also, i think the randomness of the towel makes it funny, it's a towel for Bob's sake!


Case in point:
When I was about 13, at school, we were supposed to fill in the end of a sentence for English class. "Make it funny!" the teacher told us.

The sentence: "Gilbert believes in himself, but ________________."

Everyone else in the class had some variation on "but he shouldn't throw himself off buildings." Or "but he shouldn't try to fly." (essentially the same thing, anyway..)

Mine was, "but others prefer more mainstream religions."


That's a great ending to the sentence, it cracks me up. Shows the difference between British and American humour, seeing as i'm British.

Tomb_Raven
2006-06-11, 07:17 AM
Case in point:
When I was about 13, at school, we were supposed to fill in the end of a sentence for English class. *"Make it funny!" the teacher told us.

The sentence: *"Gilbert believes in himself, but ________________."

Everyone else in the class had some variation on "but he shouldn't throw himself off buildings." Or "but he shouldn't try to fly." *(essentially the same thing, anyway..)

Mine was, "but others prefer more mainstream religions."



HAHAHA thats realy funny :P

Personaly i would have writen.

but he doesnt want to encourage a new form of streat art.

or

but he doesnt believe in pop art.

hmmm British stand ups are also realy good Jasper Carrot for example is one of my favourites. Old now :( i dont watch much tv anymore so i dunno any realy new ones.

Raven

Cyr
2006-06-11, 08:40 AM
So what about those Americans who find that the English get their jokes far better than their fellow Americans do?

This board is probably CHOCK full of them, actually.

Case in point:
When I was about 13, at school, we were supposed to fill in the end of a sentence for English class. *"Make it funny!" the teacher told us.

The sentence: *"Gilbert believes in himself, but ________________."

Everyone else in the class had some variation on "but he shouldn't throw himself off buildings." Or "but he shouldn't try to fly." *(essentially the same thing, anyway..)

Mine was, "but others prefer more mainstream religions."

I thought I had comedy GOLD. *(Well, yes, I was 13.) *When I read mine, though, not only did nobody laugh.. but nobody could seem to understand what the humor was supposed to BE. *A few moments of awkward silence, and the English teacher sort of fumbles, "Well.. it's a very DRY kind of humor."

Then again, I'm a confirmed Anglophile.. seen it all from Jeeves and Wooster to Mulberry; thought the HHG (hey, original topic, fancy meeting you here) was the funniest book ever the first time I read it, currently have a British flag hanging on the door to my room (funny things you find cleaning) and frankly, I am DYING to put the "u" back in "humour." *Don't have clearance, though. *Is there a form you have to fill out? *Can I get authorisation authorization while I'm at it, or is that a seperate ministry?

Edit: Move AUX; Do insertion
Honestly I laughed out loud right there (took me a second for me to get it, I'm not good with written humour because I can't hear tones which throws off my sense of humour badly.). I laugh out loud like once monthly without somebody laughing and overpowering my weak strength of personality forcing me to laugh (I laughed of my own free will). *And, for reference, I'm a 13 year old american so we aren't all oblivious. On the other hand, I am the homeschooled child of an english teacher, which may or may not have something to do with it.

Spoonless Jedi: You built your own computer? At the age of Seven? Dear god, I do hope you work for NASA or somethign so my puny little ego doesn't have to poof out of existence (seriously, what the hell?). Wait a second, your born on a leap year day and count your age as the number of birthdays you've had don't you?

Hitchhikers Guide to Galaxy: I don't get it.

Midnight Son
2006-06-11, 01:38 PM
So what about those Americans who find that the English get their jokes far better than their fellow Americans do?

This board is probably CHOCK full of them, actually.

Case in point:
When I was about 13, at school, we were supposed to fill in the end of a sentence for English class. *"Make it funny!" the teacher told us.

The sentence: *"Gilbert believes in himself, but ________________."

Everyone else in the class had some variation on "but he shouldn't throw himself off buildings." Or "but he shouldn't try to fly." *(essentially the same thing, anyway..)

Mine was, "but others prefer more mainstream religions."

I thought I had comedy GOLD. *(Well, yes, I was 13.) *When I read mine, though, not only did nobody laugh.. but nobody could seem to understand what the humor was supposed to BE. *A few moments of awkward silence, and the English teacher sort of fumbles, "Well.. it's a very DRY kind of humor."

Then again, I'm a confirmed Anglophile.. seen it all from Jeeves and Wooster to Mulberry; thought the HHG (hey, original topic, fancy meeting you here) was the funniest book ever the first time I read it, currently have a British flag hanging on the door to my room (funny things you find cleaning) and frankly, I am DYING to put the "u" back in "humour." *Don't have clearance, though. *Is there a form you have to fill out? *Can I get authorisation authorization while I'm at it, or is that a seperate ministry?

Edit: Move AUX; Do insertionHad I been in your class you would have had at least one hearty laugh from that.

On the topic of American humor, has How I Met Your Mother made it overseas yet? It's the only sitcom I watch these days. Who knew "Doogie Howser" could be so funny.

SpoonlessJedi
2006-06-11, 01:44 PM
Spoonless Jedi: You built your own computer? At the age of Seven? Dear god, I do hope you work for NASA or somethign so my puny little ego doesn't have to poof out of existence (seriously, what the hell?). Wait a second, your born on a leap year day and count your age as the number of birthdays you've had don't you?


Ha. I wish I had the qualifications to work for NASA. Unfortunately, as a mere college student, I simply work for Best Buy, giving advice on which hard drives to buy.

Coincidentally, I've always been fascinated with our leap-year system, and would be thrilled to have a birthday on February 29. Sadly, my parents did not take this into consideration when spawning me.

Thanks for the ego-boost, though, Cyr. ^_^

Don Beegles
2006-06-11, 02:38 PM
I don't Gary Howard, that made me laugh quite a bit.

Personally, I loved the Hitchhiker's Guide, and to a lesser extent Dirk Gently, and they're right up there with Discworld for funniest books I've ever read.

As for English vs. American humour/-or I am an American, but generally prefer British. Some of the funniest movies I've ever watched are Holy Grail and the Life of Brian (not Meaning of Life, it didn't appeal to me), and I just finished watching the boxed set of Flying Circus. Of course, Monty Python is not the be all, end all of British humour, but the only thing I found with it being really not funny was near the end of the series where it just sort of fizzeld out for me. And in fact, the biggest problem I had there was that it felt like they had some very good joke, but they were killing them by trying to squeeze too many of them into each sketch and being drowned in the attempted comedy. Some of the links and recurring jokes used between their sketches were hilarious, namely the one used in the Travel Agency episode where the phone rings and the person answers it, says "yes" several times and then takes off his shoe, tells the size, puts it back on, says "yes some more,...


I teleported home one night
With Rob, and Sid, and Meg
Rob stole Meggie's heart away
And I got SIdney's leg.

SpoonlessJedi
2006-06-11, 09:34 PM
Praise Adams! Now there's a frood who knew where his towel was!

Seriously, I can't stand to let this thread sink to the nether reaches of "not the first page." Yeah, I know the conversation died, but... but... this is the greatest thread ever!

CelestialStick
2006-06-12, 12:05 AM
Praise Adams! Now there's a frood who knew where his towel was!

Seriously, I can't stand to let this thread sink to the nether reaches of "not the first page." Yeah, I know the conversation died, but... but... this is the greatest thread ever!

While I love Hitchhicker's Guide and try to find an excuse to say "so long, and thanks for all the fish as often as possible," my favorite Douglas Adams book is The Long, Dark Tea Time of the Soul, a sequel to Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency, a wry investigation of the troubles plaguing the Norse gods in 20th century Britain. Marvelous.

Tomb_Raven
2006-06-12, 07:35 AM
So how about you tell us your favourite douglas adams quotes?

Raven

Ill post some of mine later

Don Beegles
2006-06-12, 11:04 AM
Favorite quotes? Do you really want to do that, because just about anything he said could be considered a great quote. Here are a couple that I can think of right off the top of my head:

I teleported home one night
With Rob, and Sid, and Meg
Rob stole Meggie's heart away
And I got SIdney's leg.

You are the most benightedly unintelligent piece of organic matter that it has ever been my most supreme displeasure not being able to avoid meeting.

Midnight Son
2006-06-12, 12:49 PM
We apologize for the inconvenience.

MostlyHarmless
2006-06-12, 05:23 PM
"Oh no, not again"

If you think my screen name was randomly chosen out of a hat, you are much mistaken.

My all time favorite line is:

"The ships hung in the sky in much the same way that bricks don't."

Don Beegles
2006-06-12, 06:15 PM
Another one:

"I'd trust him ot the end of the Earth."
"And when is that exactly?"
"Oh, about twelve minutes"

Tomb_Raven
2006-06-13, 09:47 AM
"Zaphod, id like you to know that i respect you. Just not very much."

Shinfai
2006-06-13, 04:52 PM
i have only read the first three and they are fatastic

i need to get around to reading the rest ...

but they rock hardcore!

and he is a genius

CelestialStick
2006-06-17, 05:55 PM
Am I the only one who has read The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul?! :(

Don Beegles
2006-06-17, 07:07 PM
I did and the other Dirk Gently, and they were good as well. I can't put my finger on which was better: those or the Hitchhiker's Guides.

"Let's go out and meet the ineffeable, and see if it might be effed after all."

CelestialStick
2006-06-18, 12:50 AM
I did and the other Dirk Gently, and they were good as well. I can't put my finger on which was better: those or the Hitchhiker's Guides.

"Let's go out and meet the ineffeable, and see if it might be effed after all."
Is that a quotation from Adams? I don't recall it.

I absolutely love The Long, Dark Tea-Time of the Soul. Even the title is wonderful! But I mean, modern detectives and Norse gods, mixed with Adams' nutty sense of humor? Gotta love it.

Bookman
2006-06-18, 12:56 AM
haha I LOVE the hitchiker's series.....sadly the only thing of his I've read. I might pick some up if I start reading again regularly

CelestialStick
2006-06-18, 03:46 AM
haha I LOVE the hitchiker's series.....sadly the only thing of his I've read. I might pick some up if I start reading again regularly

I'd recomend reading Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency first. The Long, Dark Tea-Time of the Soul is a sequel.

Which reminds me: can anyone tell us where Thor makes a cameo appearance in Hitchhiker's Guide? :D

Last_resort_33
2006-06-18, 03:15 PM
Ford's massive bluff check to get Arthur down to the pub

fryer1
2006-06-18, 03:21 PM
I'd recomend reading Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency first. *The Long, Dark Tea-Time of the Soul is a sequel.

Which reminds me: can anyone tell us where Thor makes a cameo appearance in Hitchhiker's Guide? :D
At the flying party, where Arthur successfully manges to kill him, well, make him fall out of the party at least.

Don Beegles
2006-06-18, 03:30 PM
My quote is from Dirk Gently, IIRC, though it may be The Long, Dark Teatime of the Soul

CelestialStick
2006-06-18, 03:35 PM
At the flying party, where Arthur successfully manges to kill him, well, make him fall out of the party at least.

I'm afraid I don't even recognize the reference. I was talking about the scene in the restaurant at the end of the universe where Thor walks in with babes on either arm. :D

Ivellios
2006-06-21, 02:17 PM
The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy is great! In fact, i'm re-reading the series right now.

Don Beegles
2006-06-21, 03:54 PM
Evidently, Celestial_Stick, Thor doesn't have a cameo at all, and so its a trick question. That's very clever.

IonizedChicken
2006-06-21, 04:29 PM
I loved Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. But for me the books got worse and worse with each one. Or maybe it was just me getting used to Douglas' writing style.

Also love, in small doses, Terry Pratchett, who's writing style is a bit similar.

CelestialStick
2006-06-21, 04:37 PM
Evidently, Celestial_Stick, Thor doesn't have a cameo at all, and so its a trick question. That's very clever.
Nope. It's not a trick question. Thor does have a cameo, in the restaurant at the end of the universe, like I said.

Don Beegles
2006-06-21, 05:06 PM
But he also appears in Life, the Universe, and Everything, so he doesn't have a Cameo (www.dictionary.com/browse/cameo), which is a brief appearance of a prominent actor, as in a single scene of a motion picture.

*Psst, work with me here, I'm trying to hide that you didn't get the other reference.*

CelestialStick
2006-06-21, 05:21 PM
But he also appears in Life, the Universe, and Everything, so he doesn't have a Cameo (www.dictionary.com/browse/cameo), which is a brief appearance of a prominent actor, as in a single scene of a motion picture.

*Psst, work with me here, I'm trying to hide that you didn't get the other reference.*
Oh, sorry. I didn't mean to ruin your bit.

Don Beegles
2006-06-21, 05:32 PM
No harm done. I've ruined any number of bits in my time. Hell, I've ruined any number of bits in teh alst ten minutes, probably.



Stupid Git

CelestialStick
2006-06-21, 05:59 PM
No harm done. I've ruined any number of bits in my time. Hell, I've ruined any number of bits in teh alst ten minutes, probably.



Stupid Git


lol

Caillach
2006-08-01, 02:43 PM
I love "long dark tea time of the soul" ;D what a great book!
Douglas Adams is definately one of my favorite Authors. My only problem with his books are their endings. I dunno if I'm just really dense but they don't make much sense to me.

McDeath
2006-08-02, 03:10 AM
I really like all his work, but you can't deny that Mostly Harmless is bloody depressing, as only a book by an Englishman can be. Adams admitted in an interview that he wrote it during a difficult period, and it was a very dark book.

Death, your friend the Reaper
2006-08-02, 08:52 AM
His books were brillent. Mostly harmless was a bit wierd with them dying and Zaphood didn't get much screening time!

The Trilogy is one of my favourite set of books i have read and i have to say the way he constructed it shows a far greater intelligence than some of the other novels i have read.

Hooloovoo
2006-08-06, 07:02 AM
Massive fan here. -Just look at my username! (if you've read the trillogy/pentllogy you'll know what it is.)

Can quote the books endlessly, and do...

A sample text to a friend: "Working yet another late night at the pizza shop. The first ten hour shift was the worst. The second ten hour shift, -that was the worst shift too. After that it went into a bit of a decline..."

Favorite line:
"you just come along with me and have a good time. The galaxy's a fun place. You'll need to have this fish in your ear."

_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-
R.I.P. Douglas Noel Adams.
-A cool frood who always knew where his towel was.
So long, and thanks...
-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_

Thiel
2006-08-06, 02:01 PM
I love Hichhikers Guide to the Galaxy.
Odly enough, the part I liked the best was the Guide to the Guide.

Tptmanno1
2006-08-08, 02:08 AM
One of my favorite authors, I love the randomness and how with a flip of a page he's off to something completly unrelated, and yet still amazingly funny.

senior_stabby
2006-08-08, 11:41 AM
i lve him and i know this guy who the only books he will read are the hitchhikers guide.

Shea Landford
2006-08-09, 09:39 PM
Douglas Adams trumps even Rich. The books are the best, but the new movie was really good, mostly because Douglas did most of it himself. I like the Dirk Gently dou quite a lot actually. But his best work is indeed the Hitchhikers "trilogy".

Clay_Cthulhu
2006-08-26, 01:38 PM
GREAT AUTHOR...I first heard his stories on a tape recording of the BBC's Episodes of THE HITCH HIKERS GUIDE TO THE GALAXY and it was up and up from there!

Tptmanno1
2006-08-27, 10:29 PM
I would love to get my hands on the original radio broadcasts

Tarnag40k
2006-08-28, 12:08 PM
I loved the books but am A bit disapointed by the fact that the books, radio broadcasts, and records all have differing versions of the same story. It would have been better if he could keep them all the same

Midnight Son
2006-08-28, 09:38 PM
I loved the books but am A bit disapointed by the fact that the books, radio broadcasts, and records all have differing versions of the same story. It would have been better if he could keep them all the same
He did that on purpose. IIRC, he said that the world he created kept changing in his head, so every time he made a new version of it, it changed. I personally enjoy it as I get a new story for every time I switch formats.

Chamomile
2006-08-28, 10:09 PM
Wow, I'm a huge fan of Douglas Adams. Has anyone read Last Chance to See? It's an environmental travelogue, where he examines the status and fates of various endangered species. It's quite moving, but still really funny.

Of course, the Hitchhiker's books are my favorite. I can read them a million times and they never get old. The miniseries from the '80s is awesome. Gotta love the special effects.

The movie, incidentally, wasn't particularly funny. The character of Trillian was less annoying than the miniseries, but that was about all it had going for it.

"Ford," he said, "you're turning into a penguin. Stop it."

WeaponMasterLDO
2006-09-02, 09:24 PM
One of my favorite authors, I love the randomness and how with a flip of a page he's off to something completly unrelated, and yet still amazingly funny.

Indeed. I just got "Mostly Harmless" to read on a camping trip, and I really liked it. Personlay though, I didn't like the movie as much, but I might have to see it again.

My philosophy with all the trilogy is, that when someone tries to make sense of them, run like crazy.

"Ah! A herring sandwich! I like herring sandwiches."