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View Full Version : I need a craft hobby.



Neko Toast
2009-09-27, 05:19 PM
Really. I would enjoy having some sort of craft hobby that involves mindless repetitive tasks with the end result being some sort of object. I know my friend across the hall does chain-mail type stuff.

Does anyone have a hobby like this? Is there one that's particularly easy to learn and pick up? I just need something to do in my spare time.

Egiam
2009-09-27, 05:20 PM
Crocheting? It's slightly more manly than knitting.

Assassin89
2009-09-27, 05:21 PM
...Knitting? Make sweaters, blankets, scarves, etc.

TheBST
2009-09-27, 05:23 PM
Origami's pretty relaxing. And fun to pull off at parties.

Cruxador
2009-09-27, 05:33 PM
Grab yourself a tree and a knife, make yourself a toothpick.

Perenelle
2009-09-27, 05:34 PM
well after reading "mindless repetitive tasks with the end result being some sort of object.", I immediately thought of paper clip chains. you could make like.. ginormous paperclip chains that hang all over the place. :smalltongue:

or you could weave. It looks pretty fun and easy to do.

Starscream
2009-09-27, 05:36 PM
Papercraft can be fun. You just need a printer and glue. I made a neat Stay-Puft Marshmallow Man (http://paperkraft.blogspot.com/2008/06/ghostbusters-papercraft-stay-puft.html) that now adorns my desk.

Yeah, it's silly, but mindlessly time consuming and something to keep your hands busy while watching DVDs.

Dragonrider
2009-09-27, 05:36 PM
Crocheting? It's slightly more manly than knitting.

I second this. I <3 crocheting and have a closetful of hats and two blankets to prove it. :smalltongue:

I don't think Slayer is too worried about being manly, though. :smallamused:

cycoris
2009-09-27, 05:37 PM
Crocheting? It's slightly more manly than knitting.

Sailors knit, they don't crochet. Therefore if one wanted to argue manliness, you'd just have to assume that swashbuckling pirates knitted too.

That said, I think crocheting is more fun and more versatile than knitting. And it requires less mental energy.

Crimmy
2009-09-27, 05:38 PM
If you ever think about coming to Mexico for raw material, jewelry is your call.

I currently have a bucketload of Mexican obsidian (the black crystallic variant), some agatha, quartz, jade, fake gold, lots of leather strings, leather pieces for sewing, and metal caps for cut jewels.

And if you get your hands on something like bone, or some hard leather, you could also do some carving.

Neko Toast
2009-09-27, 05:44 PM
Knitting or crocheting sounds fun, but seems like it's a bit difficult to learn unless someone taught it to me.

AslanCross
2009-09-27, 06:35 PM
Build miniature siege engines. (http://www.stormthecastle.com/trebuchet/how-to-build-a-trebuchet.htm)

I think there are a bunch of websites that have instructions on how to build miniature trebuchets.

xPANCAKEx
2009-09-27, 06:55 PM
start drawing/painting

or take up a sport

or paint models?

Neko Toast
2009-09-27, 07:00 PM
start drawing/painting

or take up a sport

or paint models?

You actually made me chuckle a bit there. Me, drawing or playing a sport? Psh.

I think I might take up knitting... anyone know of any good how-to guides?

xPANCAKEx
2009-09-27, 07:03 PM
whats wrong with you taking up a sport?

or persuing art?

Crimmy
2009-09-27, 07:05 PM
If you ever think about coming to Mexico for raw material, jewelry is your call.

I currently have a bucketload of Mexican obsidian (the black crystallic variant), some agatha, quartz, jade, fake gold, lots of leather strings, leather pieces for sewing, and metal caps for cut jewels.

And if you get your hands on something like bone, or some hard leather, you could also do some carving.

I say he's right.

Mauve Shirt
2009-09-27, 08:35 PM
Needlepoint/cross stitch/embroidery is delightfully mindless and repetitive.

Starscream
2009-09-27, 08:46 PM
or paint models?

I tried! They won't stand still, and complain that the paint won't wash off!

Spiryt
2009-09-27, 08:49 PM
some sort of hobby that involves mindless repetitive tasks with the end result being some sort of object.

Does anyone have a hobby like this?

Posting on forums.

Although it usually doesn't even result in any object. :smallbiggrin:

Assassin89
2009-09-27, 08:55 PM
Posting on forums.

Although it usually doesn't even result in any object. :smallbiggrin:

Problem. Draco already does this as recreation. Draco is looking for something more tactile.

Partof1
2009-09-27, 09:00 PM
Lots of people customize miniatures, for DDM, and SWM and stuff. Those can end up being pretty cool.

Helanna
2009-09-27, 09:05 PM
I personally knit in order to have something to do with my hands, but I can never find anything I'm particularly interested in making. Also, I'm not very good at it. :smalltongue:

I also want to take up woodworking and chainmail, but can't get the materials (Don't you need special knives for woodworking? Or, say, one that you don't mind dulling?)

blackfox
2009-09-27, 09:06 PM
Re: Knitting, if you can learn the *Australian* and not the *English* method, I've found it's a lot easier and faster.

Re: Other crafts, I like making jewellry. There's lots of books out there for beginners, and if you go to any public library they'll be in the nonfiction section somewhere. Can get a bit expensive, but then again so can other crafts. The other benefit of this one is that once you start doing beadwork and give people earrings and stuff for their birthdays, they'll start giving you beads. :smalltongue:

Trog
2009-09-27, 09:11 PM
Get yourself a few of these
http://www.hirstarts.com/casting/step9.jpg
from here (http://www.hirstarts.com/index.html)
and make some of these
http://www.hirstarts.com/dungeon/dun316.jpg

Delaney Gale
2009-09-27, 09:16 PM
I'm a knitter, and I find it can be both quite mindless and quite involved.

Mindless:

http://images4-cache.ravelry.com/uploads/jaxypants/12513608/photo64_medium.jpg

Lengthwise herringbone scarf.

Involved:

http://images4-cache.ravelry.com/uploads/jaxypants/9135231/img_2331_medium.jpg

Shetland-style lace shawl.

I haven't heard of the Australian style of knitting, but there's generally "picking" and "throwing"- yarn held in left hand or yarn held in right hand. Throwing is quite easy but slow if you don't have the motions down. I do an altered "flicking" version of throwing where I tension the yarn over my middle finger, which I developed because of non-related injuries.

I can crochet as well, but I prefer knitting because you can't go back and fix mistakes in crochet as easily as knitting. Also I just like the way knitting looks better for most applications.

If you're sold on crochet, amigurumi (Japanese stuffed crocheted toys) is quite cheap to make (it does better in crappy acrylics!) and adorable. And if you decide you want to learn knitting or crochet, there's no better place to go than www.ravelry.com. It's a huge social network of fiber crafters!

Delaney Gale
2009-09-27, 09:19 PM
I also want to take up woodworking and chainmail, but can't get the materials (Don't you need special knives for woodworking? Or, say, one that you don't mind dulling?)

My gaming buddy makes some rather nifty chainmail with only a standard power drill, a pair of tin snips, and two pairs of needlenose pliers. He uses the drill to wind long coils of 14g aluminum (note: that's a guess based on my piercings versus the wire, not necessarily accurate), then trims rings off with the tin snips and uses the pliers to bend them into place. I'm planning on getting some beading-sized needlenose pliers and some commercial jump rings to make some chainmail jewelry.

Crimmy
2009-09-27, 09:26 PM
Delaney, try to edit posts. doubleposting is usually frowned upon.
:smallfrown:


See?
Also, since nobody is saying it, wood sculpting is nice, you can get nice things from it.
Only things you'll absolutely need will be a good knife, and wooden branches/logs.

If you want protection, some good leather gloves and protection glasses are great.

blackfox
2009-09-27, 09:26 PM
I haven't heard of the Australian style of knitting, but there's generally "picking" and "throwing"- yarn held in left hand or yarn held in right hand.I hold the yarn in my left hand, or really my left middle finger... Learned from my dad, who learned in Australia. And when he came back to America everyone was like 'wait, what?' seeing him knit.

Knaight
2009-09-27, 09:32 PM
Braid slings.
http://slinging.org/index.php?page=advice-and-how-to-s

All of those are nice projects, plus the end result is usable, and can be given away easily to most anyone. Plus slinging is really fun.

Riffington
2009-09-27, 09:33 PM
Sailors knit, they don't crochet. Therefore if one wanted to argue manliness, you'd just have to assume that swashbuckling pirates knitted too.

I'd assume that pirates crocheted. After all, unlike knitting it involves a hook.

/ducks

Knaight
2009-09-27, 09:39 PM
Yeah, you better duck!:smallfurious:

blackfox
2009-09-27, 09:42 PM
Yeah, you better duck!:smallfurious:Goose! *flees* :smalltongue:

Neko Toast
2009-09-27, 09:47 PM
I think I might take up knitting/crocheting, whichever one is a little easier for beginners. But again, does anyone know of any good how-to guides, be it a book or a website?

Maelstrom
2009-09-28, 04:41 AM
Try Chainmail...been doing it for years, and there are a ton of applications/variations to keep your interest...

Here's a great site as a resource:

http://theringlord.com

Zeb The Troll
2009-09-28, 04:51 AM
I immediately thought of paper clip chains. you could make like.. ginormous paperclip chains that hang all over the place. :smalltongue:


Try Chainmail...been doing it for years, and there are a ton of applications/variations to keep your interest...

Here's a great site as a resource:

http://theringlord.comI say combine these two and make "paper clip chain" mail. :smallcool:

xPANCAKEx
2009-09-28, 07:21 AM
when you finish a set of chainmail, what do you do with it?

obviously with scalves and the like you can either wear it and give it as a gift.... chainmail might be less socially accepted

"what is it? what is iiiiiiiiit? OH.... what.... is ... it?"
"a chainmail shirt, dear"
"how.... thoughtful?"
"its for when you have to battle wolves and orcs next time you're going to the store"

Mauve Shirt
2009-09-28, 07:31 AM
They sell chainmail lingerie at the MD renfest. :smalltongue: That'd be a most interesting gift.

xPANCAKEx
2009-09-28, 07:49 AM
They sell chainmail lingerie at the MD renfest. :smalltongue: That'd be a most interesting gift.

probably not the most comfortable... or hygenic

Zeb The Troll
2009-09-28, 08:18 AM
It's not quite what you'd think. The parts that are actually in contact with the tender bits are formed sheet metal with the chain part only being there as an accessory basically. I do think, however, that it would be kinda cold to wear, even in warm weather. I don't know, something about metal on bare skin and all. Some of the patrons wear them but I've never been bold enough to ask.

Quincunx
2009-09-28, 09:01 AM
Chainmail is COLD and PINCHING! . . .not that I ever tried it on or anything. (shifty eyes)

If there isn't some stitch'n'bitch gathering in your vicinity, Slayer Draco, I'd be surprised. Ask around where the yarn is being sold, they'll know. Pro: someone to ask instead of instructions to read, and twiddling yarn is a visual learning process. Semi-con: almost guaranteed 100% female.

Going to drool over that lovely lace shawl now.

Dallas-Dakota
2009-09-28, 09:33 AM
They sell chainmail lingerie at the MD renfest. :smalltongue: That'd be a most interesting gift.
I've known one or two women that would LARP in chainmail bikini's.
>.>

I really hated that I missed that Disarm spell. :smalltongue:

Also: Yes, chainmail. Can be very mindless and such. Also if you sell it, you can make a good profit out of it. >.> Just make sure to use a good pair of gloves. Also, VERY easy to learn.

Mauve Shirt
2009-09-28, 09:44 AM
Yeah, even though the covering part is sheet metal, still, cold and pinching. Unless you spend extra, they have leather on the bazillion-dollar ones.
I started to get into chainmail last year, actually. I bought the necessary supplies and everything, but I'm a lazy bum who can barely handle 2 hobbies. It's pretty awesome what you can make. There's a chick on campus who makes and sells her stuff. You can also get rings in pretty colors!

Raewyn
2009-09-28, 11:14 AM
I would enjoy having some sort of craft hobby that involves mindless repetitive tasks

World of Warcraft?

Sorry, couldn't resist. :smallwink:

Coidzor
2009-09-28, 11:47 AM
If you want to try taking up some kind of carving, soap is a good, cheap medium to get through most of the accidents with, since you won't be applying enough pressure to the blade to do any serious damage to yourself or others if you slip up. And the soap on the blade would help with any accidental wounds.

You'd need to learn how to sharpen a pocket knife well though before you could move on to wood though.

Another thing is look into clay crafting. They have craft-clays in the stores that you can actually fire in a conventional oven.

Or you could start reading up on the art of the massage. It's generally pretty easy to find people willing to let you practice on 'em, male or female. Especially given you're a girl. It's not necessarily a craft, but it is pretty tactile.

Hmm... I should start doing something with my hands again myself... I really enjoyed the leatherworking I did, but it's been ages since I've had the tools, but I should check the taxidermist shop in this compound and see if there's anything I could use...

And then see where I could get some leather in hippy country...

Nameless
2009-09-28, 11:56 AM
Scooby-Doo's? They're mindless and repetitive.

Coidzor
2009-09-28, 12:03 PM
Scooby-Doo's? They're mindless and repetitive.

What? :smallconfused: Watching the movies or something else?

Nameless
2009-09-28, 12:07 PM
What? :smallconfused: Watching the movies or something else?

Well, the Scooby-Doo shows are pretty mindles and repetitive, but I was actually talking about these:
http://www.johnperkins.com/images/LanyardAssembly6String02.jpg

Egiam
2009-09-28, 12:10 PM
I say he's right.

*sigh* *giggle*

Coidzor
2009-09-28, 12:10 PM
Interlocked ring puzzles but of a thinner variety than the traditional old school blacksmiths' puzzles, eh?

WalkingTarget
2009-09-28, 12:24 PM
Not really mindless or a craft, but you could goof around with a Rubik's Cube.

It took me years, but I managed to put together a (now that I've looked into it, a very inefficient) algorithm of my own. That became a somewhat amusing party trick back in college, especially once I got to the point where I could identify when I was almost done and could stop actually looking at the cube while I finished.

It irks me somewhat that most of the ones I see for sale these days come with a booklet with solving instructions. :smallmad:

Coidzor
2009-09-28, 12:25 PM
Oh, and I think Pyrian will eventually pipe up with something about costuming you can look into, but I think you already do a bit of that.

Maelstrom
2009-09-28, 12:29 PM
You folks obviously have not seen some of the jewelry created with different weaves of chainmail... Let me see if I can post some in here...

As for fashion, it's hit the runways (as in fashion shows)

Bracelets

http://www.theringlord.org/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=4173&g2_serialNumber=2
http://www.theringlord.org/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=11701&g2_serialNumber=2
http://www.theringlord.org/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=10605&g2_serialNumber=2
http://www.candtdesigns.com/images/products/dragonback2.jpg
http://www.candtdesigns.com/images/products/jpl5.jpg


Necklaces

http://www.theringlord.org/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=4173&g2_serialNumber=2
http://www.theringlord.org/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=12302&g2_serialNumber=2



Clothing

http://www.theringlord.org/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=8387&g2_serialNumber=2


Just for a few examples...

KilltheToy
2009-09-28, 01:38 PM
I reccomend carving. I can't do anything beyond a pointy stick, but it's a great way to kill some time when you're in the middle of nowhere with a knife. Heck, you don't even need a knife. Just find a rock that's flat and rough (but not too rough, something with the texture of dried mortar is ideal) and rub the stick up and down, switching from one side to the other periodically, until you make a point. I've made shanks out of popsicle sticks with this method. If you sharpen enough sticks, you could play a game very much like lawn darts, just with a lesser chance of death or lawsuits occuring :smalltongue:.

Note, however, that while you likely won't make something capable of killing a person , you can easily make something that can draw blood. I playfully stabbed someone with an aforementioned popsicle stick shank and found out a while later that I'd made a slight wound and drawn blood :smalleek:.

Coidzor
2009-09-28, 02:22 PM
That's gotta be like being on a japanese subway train for that woman though. Unless they actually have something inbetween the flesh and the chain...

Maelstrom
2009-09-28, 04:08 PM
That's gotta be like being on a japanese subway train for that woman though. Unless they actually have something inbetween the flesh and the chain...

No, it's actually very pleasant to have on. The rings are so small and the closures so minuscule that it do not pull, pinch or get stuck in hair... Good stuff

Adlan
2009-09-28, 04:55 PM
I also want to take up woodworking and chainmail, but can't get the materials (Don't you need special knives for woodworking? Or, say, one that you don't mind dulling?)

Specialist tools for woodworking are things that are nice to have, but not essential. I can do alot with a hatchet, and a pocket knife.

Add in a Crook Knife and I can make so much more.

It's a great hobby, and has many sides to get into (I'm mainly green wood work, some lathe work and decorative carving. And then there's the Fletching and being an amateur Bowyer).


As for the knives you don't mind dulling? You'll quickly learn to sharpen your knives.