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View Full Version : Is it strange to envy the homeless?



Pika...
2009-09-29, 10:57 PM
I know this might seem extremely unusual, but often when I come down my local roads at night I ponder this, as well as many times while at home or elsewhere. Just now on my way home I saw a homeless man walking somewhere, and I started thinking about it again.

I often wonder what it would be like if I would win the lotto, a court settlement, or something and had the money to simply put all my belongings in storage (or pay a relative to care for them), put a small fraction of the cash in a bank account, hide the card well within a backpack with some basic necessities, and just take off onto the streets. Never once returning to a single place. Just walking, and perhaps taking a bus now-and-then. Hit a hotel room to bathe and shave on occasion, and just go.

Is this simply absurd to most of you? Or has anyone thought of similar things before reading this thread?

arguskos
2009-09-29, 11:01 PM
That's basically my ideal life, the freedom to roam as I wished. I don't envy folk for being so poor they HAVE to choose that life, but I do envy those who choose it voluntarily, since it's what I've always dreamed of doing...

Fawkes
2009-09-29, 11:01 PM
Actually, quite (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asceticism) a few (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beat_Generation) people have thought of it.

Recaiden
2009-09-29, 11:01 PM
But you wouldn't be homeless. You would just not be living in your home. You would still have what you need, and you would still have money. It wouldn't be the same.

Tackyhillbillu
2009-09-29, 11:03 PM
This needs to be mentioned. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b2zGFXaPn0o)

Thatguyoverther
2009-09-29, 11:08 PM
Nope it's not that strange.

I've thought about it too. Although probably somewhere warm, freezing to death in winter isn't on my to do list.

BizzaroStormy
2009-09-29, 11:09 PM
Hmm, i've thought of a slight variation on this being that I "live" in a modified school bus. The only problem with such a lifestyle is that you won't be able to keep many friends if you travel around and a bank would want an actual address to let you have an account.

Catch
2009-09-29, 11:19 PM
There's a gentleman in my hometown who has chosen such a lifestyle, in protest, and has resided in the same place for nearly ten years, outside a parking garage downtown. He's something of a controversy there, especially in a suburban, wealthy, and predominately white community.

A brief article (http://archives.chicagotribune.com/2009/jul/06/local/chi-naperville-homelessjul06) from Chicago's main paper describing him, his lifestyle, and the opposition to his choice.

Personally, I respect the choice to live an unburdened lifestyle, and sypathize with the stigma associated with being "homeless," especially when your very existence is inconvenient and anathema to a community's worldview.

valadil
2009-09-30, 08:36 AM
I think it's easy to romanticize about the pros of that sort of lifestyle. Try to remember the cons as well if you actually start planning for it.

Yora
2009-09-30, 08:51 AM
Is it strange to envy the homeless?
You are not envying the homeless. They just show you your own dissatisfaction with your own life.

/wiseoldman

I'm just reading "A glimps of nothingness" by Van de Wetering. It has a paragraph of a buisnessman, who finds peace in life after a heart attack and from the knowledge, that the next one will most likely kill him. So he stops to worry about success and profit, but his buisness seems to run as well as before, maybe even better.
Really a nice read, it's kind of a successor of "The empty mirror", which has also many moments of insight.

MethosH
2009-09-30, 08:54 AM
This isn't exacly homeless...
This is...

A hitchhickers life
http://fandomania.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/hitchhikers_guide_to_galaxy2005teaser.jpg

Trog
2009-09-30, 08:57 AM
First of all this (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lyj6t-5THic). :smallamused:

Second, I think you have wanderlust *suspects you of being a kender*. >.>

Um... where am I? Oh, right. So third and lastly I think the urge to travel is pretty common. The means to do so isn't. Also what isn't as common is people wanting to be free of most of their possessions. Though there is a growing group of minimalists (a view a try to adhere to if I can) who try to eliminate as much of their possessions as they can.

Hmm... speaking of this makes me want to start a thread on it. *wanders off*

Yora
2009-09-30, 08:58 AM
This isn't exacly homeless...
This is...

A hitchhickers life
http://fandomania.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/hitchhikers_guide_to_galaxy2005teaser.jpg


Here you have your uncertified third degree of buddhism, good Sir. :smallbiggrin:

MethosH
2009-09-30, 09:01 AM
Here you have your uncertified third degree of buddhism, good Sir. :smallbiggrin:

Well, thank you. I shall add it to my collection. :smallsmile:

arguskos
2009-09-30, 09:06 AM
Well, thank you. I shall add it to my collection. :smallsmile:
You have a collection of... uncertified third degrees of buddhism?! You sir, collect some strange stuff. I collect playing cards. >_> :smalltongue:

Also, KENDER RAEG!! :smallmad::smallwink:

MethosH
2009-09-30, 09:18 AM
You have a collection of... uncertified third degrees of buddhism?! You sir, collect some strange stuff. I collect playing cards. >_> :smalltongue:

Also, KENDER RAEG!! :smallmad::smallwink:

Well, I collect collections. :smallamused:

xPANCAKEx
2009-09-30, 09:27 AM
OP

i think you'd enjoy evasion out on crimethinc press

AslanCross
2009-09-30, 10:27 AM
Wandering around knowing you have possessions elsewhere is pretty cool.

Getting your house torn away by a flood or caved in by a landslide is definitely not enviable.

Trog
2009-09-30, 10:42 AM
Wandering around knowing you have possessions elsewhere is pretty cool.

Getting your house torn away by a flood or caved in by a landslide is definitely not enviable.
Ooo, yeah. I suppose you have a lot of recent experience with this what with the recent flooding and all. Yeah, agreed. Choosing a homeless/wandering life is certainly much better than having homelessness thrust upon you. That would suck.

quicker_comment
2009-09-30, 05:20 PM
You do not need money to live the life of a homeless person. You need a lack of it. If you have money and want none, there are many worthy charities out there who would be glad to take your money off your hands. You can start your new life any time you want.

If you really want this to the point where you do it, then yes, that's unusual.

If you don't, however, I don't think you actually want the reality of homelessness. You just want total freedom, or relief from a normal, square, stressful life. That's a fairly common thing to desire, and imagining that freedom as coming from being "homeless" is simply a beat-romantic spin on it.

Felixaar
2009-10-01, 12:48 AM
I do that sort of thing on a regular basis, unfortunately not rich enough to do it full time. But theres a difference betwen that and being truly homeless, because when you decided to roam with freedom throughout the world and beyond, and it's what you truly love doing, then you take your home with you wherever you go, or make a home of the entire planet rather than some small locale.

skywalker
2009-10-01, 01:35 AM
You do not need money to live the life of a homeless person. You need a lack of it. If you have money and want none, there are many worthy charities out there who would be glad to take your money off your hands. You can start your new life any time you want.

If you really want this to the point where you do it, then yes, that's unusual.

See Chris McCandless (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Into_the_Wild_%28film%29).

I would advise you that the homeless are some of the most frequent crime victims :smallfrown:

Yora
2009-10-01, 02:34 AM
You don't really have to live wandering to live in peace. It's far easier to learn how to live with the troubles of a normal live, so they don't bother you anymore.
Just leaving every time you don't like something seems rather cheep to me. And probably you still carry your problems with you.

GoC
2009-10-02, 07:54 AM
My ideal life would involve three things:
Mordenkainen's magnificent mansion
Hero's feast
Teleport

TRM
2009-10-02, 09:18 AM
See Chris McCandless (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Into_the_Wild_%28film%29).

I would advise you that the homeless are some of the most frequent crime victims :smallfrown:
The thing to remember if you decide to emulate Chris McCandless, is that you shouldn't go into the Alaskan wilderness without supplies or maps and then eventually freeze to death.


There's a gentleman in my hometown who has chosen such a lifestyle, in protest, and has resided in the same place for nearly ten years, outside a parking garage downtown. He's something of a controversy there, especially in a suburban, wealthy, and predominately white community.

A brief article from Chicago's main paper describing him, his lifestyle, and the opposition to his choice.
What is he protesting about? :smallconfused:

skywalker
2009-10-02, 10:46 AM
The thing to remember if you decide to emulate Chris McCandless, is that you shouldn't go into the Alaskan wilderness without supplies or maps and then eventually freeze to death.

He had several close shaves even before that, tho. He actually had a pretty good plan (for him, anyway) going into Alaska, he just didn't really understand how the weather would change his ability to travel.

Jack Squat
2009-10-02, 11:00 AM
He had several close shaves even before that, tho. He actually had a pretty good plan (for him, anyway) going into Alaska, he just didn't really understand how the weather would change his ability to travel.

Yeah. I think the real lesson is don't just go into it full-blast, with no training whatsoever. I know in the movie it shows him getting some basic hunting advice - which he disregards when it comes to preparing the moose he killed- and he's got a plant book, but that was about it. He'd never been hiking or camping before (so far as we know), and had grown up in a well-off middle class family. Moving off to be completely self-sufficient in Alaska was too big of a step, even if he'd spent a little time traveling around and working when he needed to buy things.

Also, if you don't know that rivers swell in the spring because of melting snow (and rain) both in your area and upstream, I can't have too much sympathy if you end up killing yourself off. He also could have built a raft of sorts to cross, even if he ended up far downstream, he'd have been able to make it back to civilization.

Linkavitch
2009-10-02, 11:00 AM
I think it'd be fun to try. Get a big back pack, pack some clothes, other necessities, money, and just go live. Unfortunately, I don't live near enough to any homeless people that I could emulate. (At least, none that I know about. We only get, like, three hitchhikers a year where I live)

Syka
2009-10-02, 11:08 AM
That's not homelessness you are envying. What you speak of is having a nomadic lifestyle, not homelessness. Those who are homeless generally don't wander just for the sake of wandering. They do one of two things: settle down in an area and try to make a go of it, or they wander for the sake of finding a living.

There ARE those who are homeless by choice, but by that I mean they are generally localized in one area (like a guy a few counties away who lived in a small patch of forest...some jerkass teens beat him to death a few years back :smallfrown:), I've never heard of a homeless by choice person who wandered. I've always heard them referred to as nomads or...that one phrase I can't remember that refers to the people who used to hitch rides on trains and all.


I do envy the nomadic lifestyle, but I like having a homebase I can come back to.

Vetreon
2009-10-02, 01:30 PM
That's not homelessness you are envying. What you speak of is having a nomadic lifestyle, not homelessness. Those who are homeless generally don't wander just for the sake of wandering. They do one of two things: settle down in an area and try to make a go of it, or they wander for the sake of finding a living.

There ARE those who are homeless by choice, but by that I mean they are generally localized in one area (like a guy a few counties away who lived in a small patch of forest...some jerkass teens beat him to death a few years back :smallfrown:), I've never heard of a homeless by choice person who wandered. I've always heard them referred to as nomads or...that one phrase I can't remember that refers to the people who used to hitch rides on trains and all.


I do envy the nomadic lifestyle, but I like having a homebase I can come back to.

Hobo must be the word you were looking for.

Solaris
2009-10-02, 01:37 PM
See Chris McCandless (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Into_the_Wild_%28film%29).

I would advise you that the homeless are some of the most frequent crime victims :smallfrown:

And most often eaten by bears.
Up here by Ain't Right it's not the cold that gets the hobos, it's the bears.

Jack Squat
2009-10-02, 01:41 PM
Hobo must be the word you were looking for.

Or vagrant.

Adlan
2009-10-02, 04:42 PM
A wandering lifestyle is what you seek, not homelessness.

Homelessness, destitution and poverty are not things to be desired, living hand to mouth, on the vagaries of an uncaring society.

But a Wandering life? That's different. You might try to follow the seasons, and work the harvests, or perhaps learn bushcraft, and live off the land. You might not have a fixed abode, but I doubt you'd fit into what is normally considered homeless.