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Pika...
2009-10-15, 08:22 PM
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/68/Prydonian.jpg


The Timelords, as they call themselves, are an enigma to not only the races of the Prime Material, but to creatures from across the known multiverse. This is largely due to the fact that in their "natural" forms it can be argued whether they even truly exist at all. Only once they take upon themselves the guise of a mortal race can their existence not be denied.

These beings in their natural forms are as alien to our forms, and to the current makeup of the multiverse, as the Obyriths are to the younger and currently dominant races of demons. So much so that like the Obyrith they are presumed to be survivors of what some scholars call the "Primordial Times".

Their race inhabits the Temporal Energy Plane, also known as the Elemental Plane of Time. The Temporal Energy Plane is arguably the harshest of the Elemental Planes, and until the Timelords were discovered the plane was considered devoid of native life (though if the Timelords are truly natives to this plane is currently unknown).



Natural Form:
Within the Temporal Energy Plane the Timelord race's natural form is almost impossible to describe. Some mortal beings with a high enough Intelligence to comprehend their physical forms explain them as entities made up of material similar to the dust, winds, and very time blowing through the Temporal Energy Plane in a way where they can semi-merge with and catch the winds to take them where they please. Others describe them as ghost-like entities so far removed from our level of existence as almost being completely tethered and stranded on separate worlds. Whatever the case, they are clearly immune to the detrimental effects of the temporal winds of this elemental plane.



Adopted Forms:
While in their natural forums they are believed to be as close to truly immortal as any being can be short of true godhood. However, to the surprise of many mortal beings every now-and-then a Timelord will tire of his agelessness and abandon the Temporal Energy Plane in favor of another plane more full of adventure and other living beings. These Timelords becomes known as "rogues" by their kind.

Although a Timelord suffers no ill-effects from traveling the planes in their natural forms, most eventually choose to take on the form of a mortal creature to facilitate communications, and enhance their ability to "experience" the various cultures worlds they travel. This process is known as a "regeneration".

At first the Timelord chooses a species of creature with no LA or Racial HD (the first regeneration is far too difficult for a Timelord to attempt a very difficult creature) to mimic it's physical form. It gains the physical appearance, size modifiers, and Extraordinary Abilities and Reach of a member of said race, but nothing else (such as Racial physical or mental modifiers, Spell-Like abilities, Supernatural-Abilities, etc). Due to various reasons beyond the understanding of anyone but Timelord (or possibly other very ancient beings such as Drgaons), (most believe it is a bi-product of them not truly being of flesh form) in whatever form they take a Timelord has a -4 racial negative to their Constitution score.

Although they are now in their new "mortal" form, they still do not age. Instead they remain seeming as a Young Adult member of the race they chose indefinitely.

If a Timelord were ever to be slain (taken to -10) in it's adopted form it's body goes through a form of "regeneration" in which it cannibalizes it's former shell, and combined with some of the Timelord's own inner-temporal-power manages to create a new body for the Timelord. A Timelord is capable of regenerating a total of thirteen times before he is no longer able to repeat the process, and Lord Death comes to claim his soul.

Whether this thirteen regeneration limit is the natural limit of a Timelord's inner-energy, or a doctrine from the Timelord Council is a matter of much debate between mortal scholars.

However, the Timelord's initial form taken does not count towards it's thirteen regenerations. The downside is that the Timelord, due to it's current (usually unconscious) state during the process, is unable to select the species his physical form will emulate during the regeneration process.

But having taken mortal form does not forever ban them from their home plane. Even in their current form, regardless of how many regenerations removed from their original form they have become, a Timelord retains it's immunity to the affects of the Temporal Energy Plane. Indeed, numerous have left our world claiming it was time for them to retake their positions guarding the ancient citadel (another hint to the Citadel of Eternity's existence).


(Note: When a Timelord "regenerates" use the Reincarnation Table in the PHB, make your own, or feel free to use mine which will be posted later below.)



Society:
Very little is found in the ancient records of either elven or dwarven libraries concerning Timelord societies, or in truth much on anything concerning the Temporal Elemental Plane.

What is known is that some "rogue" Timelords have spoken of an overruling council that supposedly governs the actions and edicts of their entire species.

Scholars have been investigating this "council" for millenia, but little has been learned. The most that mortal researchers have to go on is anecdotal statements supposedly said by Timelords. However, amongst this a few things seem consistent enough to be considered hints. The most puzzling of these, if it would prove to be true, is the claims that the council resides within the fabled Citadel of Eternity.

If the council does indeed rest within the walls of the mythical citadel then it would mean the citadel exists, and the secret or secrets within it are not mere stories and legends. In addition, one of the few other consistent hints claim that armies of Timelords stand ready around it the citadel's walls in case entities somehow manage to make it pass the eroding winds and massive time wrinkle spinning around the legendary citadel.


Notes:
-You can read up on the Temporal Energy Plane and the Citadel of Eternity in the Manual of the Planes.



Religion:
Due to their ageless nature, and knowing that their species most likely predates the current gods most Timelords do not follow any faiths.

Ironic as it may seem, a large majority of those Timelords who do pray tend to serve the overdeity Death of all entities. Why is uncertain, and indeed this is based mostly on the rogue Timelords who have traveled the Prime Material, but the fact that an ageless race thought by some to be composed of the essence of time itself worships Lord Death brings many questions to mind.



Ability to Time Travel:
The Timelords claim that in their natural forms they are able to carefully ride the winds of the Temporal Energy Plane attempting to reach not only worlds and planes, but even time periods of their choosing. They claim this is far from accurate, but some recorded Timelord spoken statements claim that their ruling council poses the power to alter the winds of their plane to provide access to precisely any point and time without error.

Rogues use this technique to find their Prime Material world or plane of choice before they eventually decide to adopt a mortal form. However, once transformed they lose their natural ability to travel the temporal winds effortlessly. However, they are still able to instinctively navigate the winds, and if aided by some means of travel Timelords past-and-future have managed to sail the winds.





Timelord Racial Traits:

Initial Adopted Form: A Timelord begins play resembling a member of a race with no LA or Racial HD of it's choice. It receives the physical appearance, size modifier, Extraordinary Abilities and Reach of a member of said species.
Regardless of it's current mortal form, a Timelord has a constant -4 to Constitution.
13 Regenerations. (See above)
Even though a Reincarnation Table is used for the Regenerations, the PC never gains the new races' physical modifiers. It retains those it rolled at level 1.
LA+0

Milskidasith
2009-10-15, 08:29 PM
Too weak for a LA 0 race.

Pika...
2009-10-15, 08:31 PM
Too weak for a LA 0 race.

Really? :smalleek:

The first thing I thought I was going to hear was 13 reincarnations was insanely overpowered...

industrious
2009-10-15, 08:32 PM
13 resurrections in exchange for -4 CON? Seems more than fair to me.

Milskidasith
2009-10-15, 08:38 PM
The thing is, a -4 con is a huge penalty, and 13 resurrections only benefits if you, you know, get killed. It might be balanced in the end, but I'd rather be somebody that plans on not dying than somebody who relies on the fact that there just won't be enough sessions for me to run out of reincarnations.

paddyfool
2009-10-15, 08:43 PM
They should blatantly get a boost to mental stats (probably all three, but Int above all).

industrious
2009-10-15, 08:45 PM
agreed with paddy. And a hefty bonus to Knowledge checks on top of that.

Pika...
2009-10-15, 08:48 PM
The thing is, a -4 con is a huge penalty, and 13 resurrections only benefits if you, you know, get killed. It might be balanced in the end, but I'd rather be somebody that plans on not dying than somebody who relies on the fact that there just won't be enough sessions for me to run out of reincarnations.

I see. I guess that depends on what kind of game your DM runs.

Plus, my reincarnation tables accounts for al the WotC (and some Dragon Magazine) LA+o races, and a few better ones for very good rolls. So I am hoping that would make them more fun?




They should blatantly get a boost to mental stats (probably all three, but Int above all).




agreed with paddy. And a hefty bonus to Knowledge checks on top of that.

But that would make them so broken and unplayable I imagine. :smallfrown:

I had been debating it already.

Milskidasith
2009-10-15, 08:51 PM
Grey elves get +2 dex and +2 int for a -2 to con and a -2 to a dump stat. Getting mental attribute boosts (+2 int, +2 cha?) wouldn't be out of the question, especially when you are losing the best stat.

Also, Reincarnation has no mental modifiers; it's all physical, and you don't get anything else. At best, you could have the appearance of a bugbear, but without the actual strength to back it up.

Pika...
2009-10-15, 08:55 PM
Grey elves get +2 dex and +2 int for a -2 to con and a -2 to a dump stat. Getting mental attribute boosts (+2 int, +2 cha?) wouldn't be out of the question, especially when you are losing the best stat..

I always thought Grey Elves were broken and munchkins liekd them for that reason. Hence why WotC only had like 9-10 races with a boost to Int.

Perhaps a +2 Int would be good?


ps. Con is the best stat?!




Also, Reincarnation has no mental modifiers; it's all physical, and you don't get anything else. At best, you could have the appearance of a bugbear, but without the actual strength to back it up.

So are you recommending I let the reincarnation rules work normally? Giving them the physical traits (or penalities) when they reincarnate?

Milskidasith
2009-10-15, 09:00 PM
I always thought Grey Elves were broken and munchkins liekd them for that reason. Hence why WotC only had like 9-10 races with a boost to Int.

Perhaps a +2 Int would be good?


ps. Con is the best stat?!




So are you recommending I let the reincarnation rules work normally? Giving them the physical traits (or penalities) when they reincarnate?

Con is the best stat in general, yes. While it isn't the best stat for casters, or the best stat for... uhhh... anybody, it's always of secondary or at least tertiary importance to any given character, so yes, losing constitution is generally a good thing. Also, grey elves aren't nearly broken; a +2 to a mental ability score, even Int, while nice, isn't amazing, and again, you are basically trading 1 HP per level for 1 skill point and +1 to the save DC of your spells.

As for reincarnation: No, that would just let people randomly become more powerful than others (Bugbear) or become even weaker (Kobold.) I'm just saying it isn't really that great of an ability compared to just ressurecting as a normal race (if only so that you don't have to deal with the problems of "How do we know that random new Kobold is really The Doctor?")

Djinn_in_Tonic
2009-10-15, 09:06 PM
This is difficult to judge, as this races power entirely depends on the length of campaign your GM plans to run. A one-shot or short campaign would have trouble with this "practically invincible" character, while a longer one might not be bothered.

Another unanswered question is what happens if the body is destroyed, disintegrated, or annihilated? What if the soul is trapped, or the body is instantly animated as an undead?

Personally, I don't think I'd allow this...it's far to difficult to judge the balance. Still, if you want to make it balanced...hmmm...

I say this is worth at least a level adjustment, as it's a very powerful ability at the right time and place, especially since it seems to be instantaneous. But again, I can't say for certain: it's vastly overpowered in some games, but maybe even underpowered in others.

The_Admiral
2009-10-17, 06:10 AM
This is difficult to judge, as this races power entirely depends on the length of campaign your GM plans to run. A one-shot or short campaign would have trouble with this "practically invincible" character, while a longer one might not be bothered.

Another unanswered question is what happens if the body is destroyed, disintegrated, or annihilated? What if the soul is trapped, or the body is instantly animated as an undead?

Personally, I don't think I'd allow this...it's far to difficult to judge the balance. Still, if you want to make it balanced...hmmm...

I say this is worth at least a level adjustment, as it's a very powerful ability at the right time and place, especially since it seems to be instantaneous. But again, I can't say for certain: it's vastly overpowered in some games, but maybe even underpowered in others.

Do you even watch the later episodes of Doctor Who?
If the body is disintergrated or anniliated on time of death it will not regenerate but if the body is animated as an undead then it will regenerate because regeneration is a biological process that releases something called the "Rassilon Imprimatur" according to spin off media.
Heres a link
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regeneration_(Doctor_Who)

The Dark Fiddler
2009-10-17, 06:19 AM
I honestly think Timelords should be an LA race.

Or the type of race that PCs aren't meant to have, unless everyone is one.

And Timelords never struck me as particularly frail or physically weak, so the - CON seems out of place (but I have only seen the New Series, so maybe something in the Old Series shows this).

Mulletmanalive
2009-10-17, 06:37 AM
Time lords have never been weak or frail in the series.

Unless you count the fact that the first three Doctors were all old men [not so much in the case of Patrick Troughton, who was middle aged and just looked haggard]

The master occasionally displayed almost superhuman strength, lifting people off the ground with one hand and the Doctor repeatedly demonstrated the benefits of having redundant organs, being mostly immune of poisons and on one occasion, being stabbed.

It's worth noting that a regenerating Timelord's presonality changes to reflect their new container, though their memories are unchanged. It wouldn't be unreasonable to just give them a hefty Knowledge bonus and have them reroll their stats every time.

Chrono22
2009-10-17, 06:48 AM
Eh, interesting concept. I'd go with a more "4th dimensional beings in 3d bodies" route.
So... mechanically I'd stat one as...
+2 wisdom (need I explain?)
+2 intelligence
-2 strength
-2 constitution

+1 insight bonus on reflex saves
Timeless: don't age, are immune to the effects of time-related magical effects, powers, or special abilities.
Manifest Destiny: once/day can choose to forgo the result of a die roll, and roll again. Keep the higher of the two results.
...
I'd probably throw in a few other qualities for flavor and to fill out the race, but that's the basics.

The Dark Fiddler
2009-10-17, 07:52 AM
-2 strength
-2 constitution

Why? Timelords aren't weak.



Timeless: don't age, are immune to the effects of time-related magical effects, powers, or special abilities.

I don't agree with this; in the new series, the Master aged the Doctor to the point of being about a third his old height and completely wrinkled and such. I'd say instead, they CAN age, but cannot die from old age.

Jallorn
2009-10-17, 12:17 PM
http://www.giantitp.com/forums/showthread.php?p=4673929

Chrono22
2009-10-17, 05:38 PM
Why? Timelords aren't weak.
I don't agree with this; in the new series, the Master aged the Doctor to the point of being about a third his old height and completely wrinkled and such. I'd say instead, they CAN age, but cannot die from old age.
I never said my concept had anything to do with Dr. Who. I said I'd conceptualize a "timelord" or denizen of the plane of time as being a fourth dimensional being in a three dimensional body. Not so subtle difference.
And, as far as I can tell, the only direct reference to the television series is the picture in the OP.
So, I don't care about what's canon.

The Dark Fiddler
2009-10-17, 06:06 PM
I never said my concept had anything to do with Dr. Who. I said I'd conceptualize a "timelord" or denizen of the plane of time as being a fourth dimensional being in a three dimensional body. Not so subtle difference.
And, as far as I can tell, the only direct reference to the television series is the picture in the OP.
So, I don't care about what's canon.

Oop, sorry about that.

I guess Timelord = Doctor Who in my mind, no matter what.

Now what is this "Dr. Who"? :P

Pika...
2009-10-18, 12:47 PM
I don't agree with this; in the new series, the Master aged the Doctor to the point of being about a third his old height and completely wrinkled and such. I'd say instead, they CAN age, but cannot die from old age.


Con is the best stat in general, yes. While it isn't the best stat for casters, or the best stat for... uhhh... anybody, it's always of secondary or at least tertiary importance to any given character, so yes, losing constitution is generally a good thing. Also, grey elves aren't nearly broken; a +2 to a mental ability score, even Int, while nice, isn't amazing, and again, you are basically trading 1 HP per level for 1 skill point and +1 to the save DC of your spells.

I see. Thanks.

So basically Con is the best overall/general stat?



As for reincarnation: No, that would just let people randomly become more powerful than others (Bugbear) or become even weaker (Kobold.) I'm just saying it isn't really that great of an ability compared to just ressurecting as a normal race (if only so that you don't have to deal with the problems of "How do we know that random new Kobold is really The Doctor?")

I figured that would make things more fun/interesting.




This is difficult to judge, as this races power entirely depends on the length of campaign your GM plans to run. A one-shot or short campaign would have trouble with this "practically invincible" character, while a longer one might not be bothered.

Another unanswered question is what happens if the body is destroyed, disintegrated, or annihilated? What if the soul is trapped, or the body is instantly animated as an undead?

Personally, I don't think I'd allow this...it's far to difficult to judge the balance. Still, if you want to make it balanced...hmmm...

I say this is worth at least a level adjustment, as it's a very powerful ability at the right time and place, especially since it seems to be instantaneous. But again, I can't say for certain: it's vastly overpowered in some games, but maybe even underpowered in others.

Oops!

Thank you for pointing out all those mistakes on my part.

1. They would still regenerate if their bodies got disinterestedness.
2. They can not be brought back us undead. Perhaps because they never truly died?
3. What if the soul is trapped? I have no idea there? Any ideas folks?
4. I am trying to run long-term games, in an odler editions fashion. No XP tables, and I keep track of years and characters' ages. So theoretically characters can die of venerable age category in my games.
5. Wow. I can not believe I forgot the regeneration time. :smalleek:
Would you folks say it should be measured in rounds, minutes, or longer? I would like to make the PC roll for it, though. I know it has varied somewhat in the show.





I honestly think Timelords should be an LA race.

Or the type of race that PCs aren't meant to have, unless everyone is one.

And Timelords never struck me as particularly frail or physically weak, so the - CON seems out of place (but I have only seen the New Series, so maybe something in the Old Series shows this).




Time lords have never been weak or frail in the series.

Unless you count the fact that the first three Doctors were all old men [not so much in the case of Patrick Troughton, who was middle aged and just looked haggard]

The master occasionally displayed almost superhuman strength, lifting people off the ground with one hand and the Doctor repeatedly demonstrated the benefits of having redundant organs, being mostly immune of poisons and on one occasion, being stabbed.

It's worth noting that a regenerating Timelord's presonality changes to reflect their new container, though their memories are unchanged. It wouldn't be unreasonable to just give them a hefty Knowledge bonus and have them reroll their stats every time.

So many things to consider when stating up a D&D race. So much balancing. But at least it is fun!




Eh, interesting concept. I'd go with a more "4th dimensional beings in 3d bodies" route.
So... mechanically I'd stat one as...
+2 wisdom (need I explain?)
+2 intelligence
-2 strength
-2 constitution

+1 insight bonus on reflex saves
Timeless: don't age, are immune to the effects of time-related magical effects, powers, or special abilities.
Manifest Destiny: once/day can choose to forgo the result of a die roll, and roll again. Keep the higher of the two results.
...
I'd probably throw in a few other qualities for flavor and to fill out the race, but that's the basics.

Hmm. I like this. Not all of it, but a lot.

What do you all think of:

A) Replacing the -4 Con with the "constant" stats above (added to the normal modifiers of whatever race is rolled).
B) Giving players the physical stats of the rolled race as well (but still no SLA, SNA, etc).
C) Also giving the +1 to Reflex Saves mentioned above?


And what other qualities would you suggest?

And I have heard enough people say Knowledge bonus that it must make sense. What would you all suggest?


ps. Yeah, I was trying to go the 4th dimensional being in a 3rd dimensional body route. I guess I failed getting that across.




I don't agree with this; in the new series, the Master aged the Doctor to the point of being about a third his old height and completely wrinkled and such. I'd say instead, they CAN age, but cannot die from old age.

Well, I figure that they do age, and I like the idea that they do give up "true immortality" in their choice as a fluff/roleplaying issues. Although, if they return to the Temporal Plane of Time they stop aging for as long as they are there (I do not run it as they fast-forward the spent once they leave. not even on the Astral Plane).



I never said my concept had anything to do with Dr. Who. I said I'd conceptualize a "timelord" or denizen of the plane of time as being a fourth dimensional being in a three dimensional body. Not so subtle difference.
And, as far as I can tell, the only direct reference to the television series is the picture in the OP.
So, I don't care about what's canon.

Yeah, sorry about that confusion. :smallredface:

Yes, they were my inspiration., and what I tried themeing them after. Hence in the thread title it says My take on a Timelord race.". I should have been more specific.

And again, I was trying to go for the 4dm beings in a 3rd dimension body, and I am making them so they are (our should I say guarding) a very import/major/big/etc/etc place, secret(s), and being in my homebrewed cosmology.


ps. Oh, and the picture is supposed to be the "council" within the Citadel of Eternity. :smallwink:

Pika...
2009-10-20, 12:00 PM
Too boot, anyone have ANY idea for where to start with the Daliks (sp?)?


Right now I am thinking fluff-wise that they were Illiths (sp again?) who instead of joining the others in running back to the past (the start and end of my multiverse is defined and written down by me in somewhat detail :smallsmile:), some chose to forgo just going back to repeat the process but to try and see what is "beyond" time by attacking the Citadel of Eternity. basically, they are still there.

However, to survive the hardships of the Temporal Plane of Time they needed to build artificial suits to survive there. Perhaps their now smaller size is due to generations of entropy in these suits?


How would any of you even start stating that.

Living construct?

Two layer creature, outer is a construct (aka the suit), while inside is an EXTREMELY week and frail powerful psionic illithid (sp again?)?

Zaydos
2009-10-20, 01:24 PM
Too boot, anyone have ANY idea for where to start with the Daliks (sp?)?


Right now I am thinking fluff-wise that they were Illiths (sp again?) who instead of joining the others in running back to the past (the start and end of my multiverse is defined and written down by me in somewhat detail :smallsmile:), some chose to forgo just going back to repeat the process but to try and see what is "beyond" time by attacking the Citadel of Eternity. basically, they are still there.

However, to survive the hardships of the Temporal Plane of Time they needed to build artificial suits to survive there. Perhaps their now smaller size is due to generations of entropy in these suits?


How would any of you even start stating that.

Living construct?

Two layer creature, outer is a construct (aka the suit), while inside is an EXTREMELY week and frail powerful psionic illithid (sp again?)?

I made some a few years ago. Not sure about the CR; I used them and they were too strong for the CR (each time they appeared a cohort or animal companion died). Actually I might have modified the CR since then, I forget.

The Doctor’s immortal foes, the daleks are feared across many worlds. If you are familiar with the show you will already know about the armored metal battle carriers and the grotesque creatures dwelling within. They have powerful shields and variously lightning, disintegration, and death rays. Sometimes they can even fly.
In the Three Worlds they are construct built by the illithids around overgrown larvae. They wield powerful shields that create an extremely powerful deflection field and give them a buffer against all damage until the shields have been blasted down. They have two dangerous rays, either lightning or disintegration both of which can prove quite lethal and be fired more than once in a round.
They are a new threat, having been first encountered by a group of heroes from the Order of the Seal during the 3rd Vandale Expedition. Their metallic body is resilient to normal weapons and even a magic sword cannot easily cut the magically reinforced adamantine of their forms. They have extremely good aim for a creature with their lack of agility and dangerous attacks for any creature of any sort.

Daleks D&D
Medium Construct
HD: 14d8+34 (97 hp)
Init: +4
Spd: 30-ft, fly 60-ft (good)
AC: 30 (+12 natural, +8 Deflection), t 18, FF 30.
BAB/Grapple: +7/+7
Atk: +7/+2 melee touch (4d6 electric) or +15/+10 ranged touch (disintegration or 8d6 electric) or +13/+13/+8 ranged touch.
S/R: 5/5
SA: Rays, Intelligent Aim.
SQ: Shields (63 Shield Points), DR 10/adamantine and magic, Flight.
SV Fort +4, Ref +4, Will +8.
Abilities: Str 11, Dex 10, Con -, Int 20, Wis 18, Cha 11
Skills: Knowledge (Arcana) +22, Knowledge (the Planes) +22, Knowledge (Dungeoneering) +22, Knowledge (Psionics) +22, Intimidate +13, Sense Motive +17, Knowledge (Architecture and Engineering) +22. (includes a -4 to all social skills).
Feats: Ability Focus (Disintegration), Improved Toughness, Weapon Focus (Ray), Point Blank Shot, Rapid Shot.
CR: 12.
Rays (Su): A dalek can shoot two rays every turn if it takes a full attack action (3 with rapid shot), or 1 ray with a normal attack. These rays act either as a disintegrate spell (CL 14, Fort DC 19) or deal 8d6 electricity damage, they can mix and match at will. They gain a +2 racial bonus to all such attack rolls.
Intelligent Aim (Ex): A dalek adds its intelligence, instead of Dex, on ranged attack rolls.
Shields (Su): A dalek has Shield Points equal to their hit points before any plusses (such as from Con, Construct traits, or Imp Toughness feat). These Shield Points recover at a rate of 10/round but lack DR. Once its shields points reach 0 they lose their Deflection Bonus to AC and they do not recover shield points until repaired (taking at least 10 minutes).
Flight (Su): A dalek’s flight is supernatural in origin and suppressed by an anti-magic field

---

That was just my take for my campaign which focused with illithids as the main foe and both the warlock PC (named Professor Ardaylismortis, a.k.a. the Professor; because the word "doctor" didn't exist in common) and the DMPC wizard-druid were based on the Doctor in their character and how they won they're battles.

Pika...
2009-10-20, 02:07 PM
I made some a few years ago. Not sure about the CR; I used them and they were too strong for the CR (each time they appeared a cohort or animal companion died). Actually I might have modified the CR since then, I forget.

The Doctor’s immortal foes, the daleks are feared across many worlds. If you are familiar with the show you will already know about the armored metal battle carriers and the grotesque creatures dwelling within. They have powerful shields and variously lightning, disintegration, and death rays. Sometimes they can even fly.
In the Three Worlds they are construct built by the illithids around overgrown larvae. They wield powerful shields that create an extremely powerful deflection field and give them a buffer against all damage until the shields have been blasted down. They have two dangerous rays, either lightning or disintegration both of which can prove quite lethal and be fired more than once in a round.
They are a new threat, having been first encountered by a group of heroes from the Order of the Seal during the 3rd Vandale Expedition. Their metallic body is resilient to normal weapons and even a magic sword cannot easily cut the magically reinforced adamantine of their forms. They have extremely good aim for a creature with their lack of agility and dangerous attacks for any creature of any sort.

Daleks D&D
Medium Construct
HD: 14d8+34 (97 hp)
Init: +4
Spd: 30-ft, fly 60-ft (good)
AC: 30 (+12 natural, +8 Deflection), t 18, FF 30.
BAB/Grapple: +7/+7
Atk: +7/+2 melee touch (4d6 electric) or +15/+10 ranged touch (disintegration or 8d6 electric) or +13/+13/+8 ranged touch.
S/R: 5/5
SA: Rays, Intelligent Aim.
SQ: Shields (63 Shield Points), DR 10/adamantine and magic, Flight.
SV Fort +4, Ref +4, Will +8.
Abilities: Str 11, Dex 10, Con -, Int 20, Wis 18, Cha 11
Skills: Knowledge (Arcana) +22, Knowledge (the Planes) +22, Knowledge (Dungeoneering) +22, Knowledge (Psionics) +22, Intimidate +13, Sense Motive +17, Knowledge (Architecture and Engineering) +22. (includes a -4 to all social skills).
Feats: Ability Focus (Disintegration), Improved Toughness, Weapon Focus (Ray), Point Blank Shot, Rapid Shot.
CR: 12.
Rays (Su): A dalek can shoot two rays every turn if it takes a full attack action (3 with rapid shot), or 1 ray with a normal attack. These rays act either as a disintegrate spell (CL 14, Fort DC 19) or deal 8d6 electricity damage, they can mix and match at will. They gain a +2 racial bonus to all such attack rolls.
Intelligent Aim (Ex): A dalek adds its intelligence, instead of Dex, on ranged attack rolls.
Shields (Su): A dalek has Shield Points equal to their hit points before any plusses (such as from Con, Construct traits, or Imp Toughness feat). These Shield Points recover at a rate of 10/round but lack DR. Once its shields points reach 0 they lose their Deflection Bonus to AC and they do not recover shield points until repaired (taking at least 10 minutes).
Flight (Su): A dalek’s flight is supernatural in origin and suppressed by an anti-magic field

---

That was just my take for my campaign which focused with illithids as the main foe and both the warlock PC (named Professor Ardaylismortis, a.k.a. the Professor; because the word "doctor" didn't exist in common) and the DMPC wizard-druid were based on the Doctor in their character and how they won they're battles.


Ooooooohhhhhhh. @.@


They are perfect for my needs! Just perfect.

May I please steal them, and replace my above fluff for them? Please?!


ps. One question, does it's AC go down when the "shield points" go down?

pss. Sorry, newb here. What is S/R?

pss. I LOVE how you worked the "shield points" mechanic. It just enlightened me to how flexible and simple the D&D 3.5 system is to work with. It just seems to simple and perfect in hindsight.

psss. Would you raise the CR a bit for a low-magic setting?

They would have access to addamantien, perhaps a magic item or two.

Zaydos
2009-10-20, 04:27 PM
Ooooooohhhhhhh. @.@


They are perfect for my needs! Just perfect.

May I please steal them, and replace my above fluff for them? Please?!


ps. One question, does it's AC go down when the "shield points" go down?

pss. Sorry, newb here. What is S/R?

pss. I LOVE how you worked the "shield points" mechanic. It just enlightened me to how flexible and simple the D&D 3.5 system is to work with. It just seems to simple and perfect in hindsight.

psss. Would you raise the CR a bit for a low-magic setting?

They would have access to addamantien, perhaps a magic item or two.

Sure you can steal them and replace the fluff, I stole them from Doctor Who to begin with (and replaced the fluff).

For question two

Once its shields points reach 0 they lose their Deflection Bonus to AC and they do not recover shield points until repaired (taking at least 10 minutes).

For question three: that's just how I abbreviate space/reach.

For the shield points... I got them from Starwars D20.

As for CR; possibly, I'm not actually sure whether this is their original CR or one I upped for a normal magic setting so it probably needs some fiddling in general. I don't really run low magic settings often so I can't say how that would change it.

The_Admiral
2009-10-23, 09:23 AM
Anyone got stats for the cybermen?

look at me
<b>I Am A:</b> Neutral Good Human Wizard/Cleric (1st/1st Level)
<br><br><u>Ability Scores:</u><br>
<b>Strength-</b>12<br>
<b>Dexterity-</b>11<br>
<b>Constitution-</b>11<br>
<b>Intelligence-</b>14<br>
<b>Wisdom-</b>12<br>
<b>Charisma-</b>11
<br><br><u>Alignment:</u><br><b>Neutral Good</b> A neutral good character does the best that a good person can do. He is devoted to helping others. He works with kings and magistrates but does not feel beholden to them. Neutral good is the best alignment you can be because it means doing what is good without bias for or against order. However, neutral good can be a dangerous alignment because it advances mediocrity by limiting the actions of the truly capable.<br>
<br><u>Race:</u><br><b>Humans</b> are the most adaptable of the common races. Short generations and a penchant for migration and conquest have made them physically diverse as well. Humans are often unorthodox in their dress, sporting unusual hairstyles, fanciful clothes, tattoos, and the like.
<br><br><u>Primary Class:</u><br><b>Wizards</b> are arcane spellcasters who depend on intensive study to create their magic. To wizards, magic is not a talent but a difficult, rewarding art. When they are prepared for battle, wizards can use their spells to devastating effect. When caught by surprise, they are vulnerable. The wizard's strength is her spells, everything else is secondary. She learns new spells as she experiments and grows in experience, and she can also learn them from other wizards. In addition, over time a wizard learns to manipulate her spells so they go farther, work better, or are improved in some other way. A wizard can call a familiar- a small, magical, animal companion that serves her. With a high Intelligence, wizards are capable of casting very high levels of spells.
<br><br><u>Secondary Class:</u><br><b>Clerics</b> act as intermediaries between the earthly and the divine (or infernal) worlds. A good cleric helps those in need, while an evil cleric seeks to spread his patron's vision of evil across the world. All clerics can heal wounds and bring people back from the brink of death, and powerful clerics can even raise the dead. Likewise, all clerics have authority over undead creatures, and they can turn away or even destroy these creatures. Clerics are trained in the use of simple weapons, and can use all forms of armor and shields without penalty, since armor does not interfere with the casting of divine spells. In addition to his normal complement of spells, every cleric chooses to focus on two of his deity's domains. These domains grants the cleric special powers, and give him access to spells that he might otherwise never learn. A cleric's Wisdom score should be high, since this determines the maximum spell level that he can cast.
<br><br>Find out <a href='http://www.easydamus.com/character.html' target='mt'>What Kind of Dungeons and Dragons Character Would You Be?</a>, courtesy of Easydamus <a href='mailto:zybstrski@excite.com'>(e-mail)</a><br><br>

Lapak
2009-10-23, 10:34 AM
For the Daleks, I'd argue that a (very) high DR would model their show-incarnations better than a slow-regenerating ablative shield. It didn't matter how many guns were firing at a Dalek - the first appearance of the Daleks in the new series had one sit and absorb the full firepower of a platoon of solders, and even multiple Cybermen taking shots didn't penetrate in another episode. It generally only takes one shot to kill them, but it's always a Really Big Gun that does it. I'd say kick their hit points way down and give them an insanely high DR. Or maybe (this might be better) drop hit points sharply, tone the shield down a bit but have it completely regenerate each turn until destroyed, and give them a relatively high SR until the shield is down?

sigurd
2009-10-23, 02:31 PM
Simple enough - use stats for gray elves only make their lifespan serial not contiguous.

Timelords most often loose their physical forms due to damage or misadventure. Normally in a state of peace a timelord lives up to 300 years in an incarnation and may have between ten and fifteen incarnations.
Assuming a new incarnation is disruptive to recent memory and renders the timelord's body of indeterminate age. They are often much more fit than their appearance.
Reincarnation grants the timelord tremendous powers of recovery from curses\damage and creates a totally new appearance.

sigurd

Pika...
2009-10-25, 08:03 PM
For the Daleks, I'd argue that a (very) high DR would model their show-incarnations better than a slow-regenerating ablative shield. It didn't matter how many guns were firing at a Dalek - the first appearance of the Daleks in the new series had one sit and absorb the full firepower of a platoon of solders, and even multiple Cybermen taking shots didn't penetrate in another episode. It generally only takes one shot to kill them, but it's always a Really Big Gun that does it. I'd say kick their hit points way down and give them an insanely high DR. Or maybe (this might be better) drop hit points sharply, tone the shield down a bit but have it completely regenerate each turn until destroyed, and give them a relatively high SR until the shield is down?


Well, cosnidering that magic is extremely rare in my setting I am not sure what they could use as a big shot.




Simple enough - use stats for gray elves only make their lifespan serial not contiguous.

Timelords most often loose their physical forms due to damage or misadventure. Normally in a state of peace a timelord lives up to 300 years in an incarnation and may have between ten and fifteen incarnations.
Assuming a new incarnation is disruptive to recent memory and renders the timelord's body of indeterminate age. They are often much more fit than their appearance.
Reincarnation grants the timelord tremendous powers of recovery from curses\damage and creates a totally new appearance.

sigurd

Thanks for the information.

Lapak
2009-10-26, 08:52 AM
Well, cosnidering that magic is extremely rare in my setting I am not sure what they could use as a big shot.Makes them a potentially interesting puzzle-enemy. You'd have to find a way to lure them into a trap or something; drop a boulder on them, dump them in lava, hinder their ability to fly and then bull rush them off a cliff...

Pika...
2009-10-26, 01:14 PM
Makes them a potentially interesting puzzle-enemy. You'd have to find a way to lure them into a trap or something; drop a boulder on them, dump them in lava, hinder their ability to fly and then bull rush them off a cliff...

Hmm...

Very well. I think I will have different "models" of suits (each one for the owner's personal customizable tastes). The big shot one will be a sort of curve ball for them.

grautry
2009-10-26, 01:28 PM
Well.

I'm not exactly sure about this race.

Sure, 13 regenerations is very cool and all but let's look at how this would actually play out, shall we?

You can deal with three scenarios:
A) Nobody dies so you don't use those regenerations.
B) If you're actually using those regenerations then you're either dealing with a scenario where death is a real and serious danger and everyone keeps dying
C) Or you're going through a Good Thing You Can Heal (http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/GoodThingYouCanHeal) type of scenario where it's only the Time Lord that keeps dying.

In other words, those regenerations are either a) not very useful b) insanely overpowered(before ressurection becomes possible) c) a gimmick. There's not much middle ground here.

Not too mention that it's not really all that hot either once you get to the level where Raise Dead etc. is a reasonable option. At the same time, once you get to that point a -4 penalty to Constituion is a HUGE PAIN.

So overall, it's a flavourful idea but I don't think it could really work in a campaign.

Pika...
2009-10-26, 01:53 PM
Well, it is a very low-magic world. There was only one Reincarnation done in the past few hundred years, and a Resurrection being cast on a king or mythical hero is the stuff of legends.

Does that make a difference?