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Zom B
2010-01-22, 09:45 AM
When I cook ramen noodles, I more or less follow the package. Usually, I dump the seasoning in as the noodles are cooking so that they soak up the flavor, and sometimes I will drain the noodles and then re-submerge them in room-temperature water, letting the residual heat from the noodles warm the water before adding seasoning, but that is if I am hungry and want them at an edible temperature now. In other words, both end up giving me broth, forming soup. Ramen Noodle Soup, to be exact.

According to my wife, you're supposed to drain the noodles, put them in a bowl, add butter and the seasoning and stir, so that all of the noodles are coated in a fine chicken-flavored slurry-like substance.

To what school of thought do you adhere?

Calenestel
2010-01-22, 10:07 AM
Neither.

I add the seasoning to the water BEFORE it starts to boil, along with an egg (white and yolk both) and some soy sauce. Everything's finished when the water has boiled for half a minute. Usually I save a little of the broth.

Aure Entuluva!
Calenestel

Starscream
2010-01-22, 10:13 AM
I follow a very specific recipe developed over years of trial and error. It consists of carefully placing the packet of Ramen in the trash and then ordering some Thai or Chinese.

Seriously, I spent my entire college education eating Ramen, and if I never do again it will be too soon.

valadil
2010-01-22, 10:24 AM
According to my wife, you're supposed to drain the noodles, put them in a bowl, add butter and the seasoning and stir, so that all of the noodles are coated in a fine chicken-flavored slurry-like substance.


My fiancee does that too but without the butter. She doesn't claim that's how it's supposed to be, she just doesn't like soup.

I too follow the directions to the letter, but include a few of my own. Breaking up the ramen is not permitted - it should be one long noodle folded into a brick, as $DIETY_OF_YOUR_CHOICE intended. Any noodle crumbs and dust remaining in the packet should be added. The brick may be flipped after one minute's boiling to ensure equal cooking on top and bottom. At the second minute mark, stirring is permitted, but only until entire noodle is submerged. At 15 seconds flavor packet should be mixed in - the boiling water will help stir it more thoroughly, but you don't actually want to cook any of the carefully selected herbs and spices. Ramen should be eaten hot and steaming. It may sit for up to 5 minutes, but past that and the broth will be absorbed into the noodles.

Okay, I'm not really that anal about it. But I did put salt on my ramen back in high school.

Mattarias, King.
2010-01-22, 10:54 AM
:smalltongue: This thread makes me hungry for some ramen. Making some now. Put in seasoning as it starts boiling. Considering extra stuff.. What do you guys add?

Totally Guy
2010-01-22, 10:58 AM
We don't call it Ramen. I think it's just instant noodles. Brand name?

Anyway, my tit is to add only enough water to cook it. Then reduce the water to nothing with heat.

Then there's the potential to fry it by adding a little oil.

Prime32
2010-01-22, 11:04 AM
Brand name?Japanese word.

Calenestel
2010-01-22, 11:16 AM
:smalltongue: This thread makes me hungry for some ramen. Making some now. Put in seasoning as it starts boiling. Considering extra stuff.. What do you guys add?

Se above. Works fine even if your timing is different. :smallcool:

C

Trog
2010-01-22, 11:18 AM
I used to make the Maruchan Ramen soup back in college - never drained it. Nowadays if I have it I get some other brand that has packets of sauce and soy and seasoning powder and hot pepper powder and some sort of onion-y sprinkles to go on it. You mix all that together in a bowl and add the drained ramen to it. Good stuff and still cheap. P=

EDIT: This kind is what I'm talking about.
http://www.noodleson.com/store/images/indomie/migoreng.rendang.jpghttp://www.noodleson.com/store/images/indomie/migoreng.satay.jpg

Mary Leathert
2010-01-22, 11:24 AM
Well, since this Ramen restaurant opened in this city, I have mostly eaten my ramen by going there. Way more tasty than making instant noodles, especially the broth.

And yes, this isn't the kind of discussion one should have when hungry. *stomach grumble*

arguskos
2010-01-22, 11:46 AM
I always buy Maruchan, since Top is just meh. Best flavor to date: there's a Spicy Chicken one that comes out every once in a blue moon that's like amazing, but I rarely find it. Anyways, I cook it al dente, drain excess water, put in spice packet (only half in the case of strong flavors, like Pork or Beef), add ancho chili power, smoked sea salt, mustard powder, a dash of onion powder, and some paprika, stir, put in bowl, consume.

Winter_Wolf
2010-01-22, 11:50 AM
Instant ramen I eat by taking the bag and smashing it with my fist, then opening it and eating the dry noodle bits as a finger snack. Alternatively, I'll break the brick into two pieces, put peanut butter in the middle, and have a ramen-peanut butter sandwich...why, yes, I did go to college, however did you know? :smallwink:

But I recently spent a couple days learning how to make my own fresh hand stretched noodles. (la mian (拉面) = pulled noodles) I still don't do it very well, but with a few more days of practice I'll have it down to where I actually dare eat the noodles I produce.

I feel obligated to point out that in China (which is where I am at the moment) a bowl of fresh noodles (with actual meat and/or vegetables!) is actually roughly the same cost as a packet of edible instant noodles, so there's rarely any reason to get the instant crap.

Guinea Anubis
2010-01-22, 11:52 AM
Well, since this Ramen restaurant opened in this city, I have mostly eaten my ramen by going there. Way more tasty than making instant noodles, especially the broth.

And yes, this isn't the kind of discussion one should have when hungry. *stomach grumble*

This makes me wish my city had one.

Zom B
2010-01-22, 12:00 PM
I always buy Maruchan, since Top is just meh. Best flavor to date: there's a Spicy Chicken one that comes out every once in a blue moon that's like amazing, but I rarely find it.

Maruchan (also agree as being generally better-tasting) makes a Creamy Chicken. Unlike the other seasoning packets, the one in this pack is larger, and the broth is, well, creamy instead of brothy. It's absolutely delicious.

arguskos
2010-01-22, 12:14 PM
Maruchan (also agree as being generally better-tasting) makes a Creamy Chicken. Unlike the other seasoning packets, the one in this pack is larger, and the broth is, well, creamy instead of brothy. It's absolutely delicious.
Yeah, that one is pretty good too, if also hard to find around here.

They had a Lime Shrimp for awhile that was like omgwtfbbqamazing too.

Blas_de_Lezo
2010-01-22, 12:20 PM
Here's a tip to cook good ramen

Add flavours when the water starts to boil, then the noodles, this is to find the perfect balance between the flavor being evaporated and getting into the ramen.

Chop some chicken or beef meat and add it, as also some vegetables tiny chopped. Add sault, bit of pepper and some special sauce you have (not spicy please!).

Here's the big deal. When you are about to take out the ramen, break an egg and leave it in a quick boil in. It's delicious!

Pendragonx
2010-01-22, 12:25 PM
yea I recenlty tried Ramen and good Lord, the 'flavor' packet was WAY too salty for my taste buds... which is nuts, as I always appreciate a salty treat.. yikes.. anyway... Maruchan noodles = delicious quick snack... some day i need to experiment with adding in meats and veggies..

Zom B
2010-01-22, 12:31 PM
They had a Lime Shrimp for awhile that was like omgwtfbbqamazing too.

The local store (rhymes with Small-Mart) carries it in the bigger cups (the ones you add hot water to and let sit). That is also a great flavor.

I remember once when I worked in a small weigh scale station, a truck driver wanted to use the microwave to make lunch. His lunch was shrimp ramen (which has a fishy smell to it anyway) with a can of sardines dumped in before he started microwaving it. I'm a big fan of fish, but dear lord, man.

arguskos
2010-01-22, 12:43 PM
The local store (rhymes with Small-Mart) carries it in the bigger cups (the ones you add hot water to and let sit). That is also a great flavor.

I remember once when I worked in a small weigh scale station, a truck driver wanted to use the microwave to make lunch. His lunch was shrimp ramen (which has a fishy smell to it anyway) with a can of sardines dumped in before he started microwaving it. I'm a big fan of fish, but dear lord, man.
...BLECH. That just sounds nasty beyond reason.

Also, on topic ish, I've seen a recipe for ramen brownies before. They were pretty tasty too, though I've lost the recipe now.

Zom B
2010-01-22, 12:45 PM
I've used crushed ramen in meatloaf instead of bread crumbs before. The outcome was surprisingly pretty good.

RE: Ramen brownies. I'm looking for a recipe. Not finding it, but I did find one for Chocolate Ramen Cakes (http://www.ramenlicious.com/recipes/chocolate-ramen-cakes.html) as well as other questionably ethical uses (http://www.ramenlicious.com/recipes/dessert-noodle-recipes.html).

Innis Cabal
2010-01-22, 01:41 PM
I add dark soy typically to the water, and forgo the packet for meat and vege's instead of the salt.


They also make a good substiution in yakisoba, if you want to make it on the cheap and not get good ramen noodles.

reorith
2010-01-22, 06:41 PM
1. open ramen package
2. remove seasoning
3. eat brick of noodles
4. heat 250 millilitres of water to 35C
5. drink the water
6. ???
7. profit

Tequila Sunrise
2010-01-22, 08:54 PM
To what school of thought do you adhere?
Maruchan ramen is alright for a quick meal, but I miss Korean ramen. I use just half a spice package, a bare minimum of water and a lot of rice cakes. It can burn your tongue right out of your skull, but dam if I don't love that spiciness!

Maximum Zersk
2010-01-22, 08:58 PM
Interesting thread.

For me, I usually just put the packet into a bowl, add hot water, microwave for 6 minutes, then add seasoning.

Though, reading this thread makes me want to try something a bit different.

Speaking of which. *Runs off to make ramen*

13_CBS
2010-01-22, 09:01 PM
Korean ramen noodles:

Boil appropriate amount of water in pot.

Once water boils, put in noodles. Cook for 2-3 minutes.

Once cooked, put in powder, stir.

Serve.

Kurien
2010-01-22, 09:38 PM
I normally include some cooked leafy vegetable, typically nappa or bokchoy, in instant ramen. Boiled hotdogs are also a frequent side, although that is inferior to real meat. Always use plenty of water.

wxdruid
2010-01-22, 09:41 PM
My daughter is fond of ramen. There are two different ways she eats it.

1. Takes the noodles out of the packet, sprinkles the seasoning on and eats them.

2. She cooks them according to instructions.

Fridesgerte
2010-01-22, 09:55 PM
My favorite way of doing Ramen (usually chicken, sometimes beef):

1. measure water into pot.
2. toss 1 to 1 1/2 cups of frozen vegetables into the water (I prefer the bagged broccoli/carrot/cauliflower mix)
3. heat until water starts to boil.
4. shove veggies to the side and add noodles
3. let cook until tender, turning brick over once and stirring to separte the noodles as soon as the brick softens up.
5. take off heat, add seasoning package, toss well and enjoy!

By the time the noodles are done the veggies are cooked but not mushy. Also, the broth doesn't seem as salty as when done this way.

Equis
2010-01-22, 10:03 PM
I am slightly disappointed. I thought that this thread would be about the xenopsychological implications of the Hierarchy of Exclusion and the classification of species using the Djur -> Varelse -> Ramen -> Framling -> Utlanning scale. My mistake, I guess.

That said, I share the same sentiments as Starscream; Never again, if I can help it.

druid91
2010-01-23, 12:39 AM
1. open ramen package
2. remove seasoning
3. eat brick of noodles
4. heat 250 millilitres of water to 35C
5. drink the water
6. ???
7. profit

you got part of my way there,

take two packages out remove the seasoning from both cook on brick as the instructions say only using 1 and 1/2 packets of seasoning. then munch on the second brick as you wait.

ForzaFiori
2010-01-23, 01:16 AM
I am a fan of the soup school, mainly because if you are REALLY low on cash, you can drain the liquid as a drink (Yes, I have done this before, on a boy scout trip gone horribly wrong).

I'm gonna have to try some of this gourmet ramen recipes y'all are talking about sometime... I have a huge box of the stuff downstairs.