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Lappy9000
2010-01-28, 09:40 PM
How do you go about explaining when a player can't come to a game within context of the game world? I've tried serious answers ranging from leaving to visit family to personal quests. I've also tried ridiculous answers ranging from falling down an elevator shaft or being frozen in carbonite.

How do you tend to explain this? All responses from sense to absurdity welcome!

jokey665
2010-01-28, 09:44 PM
Character had dysentery. Poopin' his guts out.

Kallisti
2010-01-28, 09:53 PM
In my groups, either they get taken over by the DM/another player for the session or they just sort of...fail to be there. Nobody asks where they are, and they take no actions except to heal up the party after combat if they've got healing spells.

I've never been in any game where we've bothered to justify it in-character. If it's a roleplaying-heavy game, somebody else we can trust to RP the character takes over for the session. Making up reasons is a pain and really starts to stretch believability for players with poor attendance.

Temotei
2010-01-28, 09:54 PM
They started on fire.

Starscream
2010-01-28, 09:55 PM
If the player doesn't mind, I'll play him as an NPC. He doesn't get XP, but I'll try to arrange for him not to die in his player's absence.

Other options involve having the character captured and rescued by the others, affected by a poison or spell that renders him unconscious so the others have to transport and protect him while he recovers, mind controlled by the villain (same as the NPC option, but now temporarily working for the bad guys), a baleful polymorph, transport to another plane, etc.

If we are starting a new quest I'll just give him some plot reason for not being around, then let it be the plan all along that he swoops in and helps the party just when they need him.

Lappy9000
2010-01-28, 09:56 PM
I've never been in any game where we've bothered to justify it in-character. If it's a roleplaying-heavy game, somebody else we can trust to RP the character takes over for the session. Making up reasons is a pain and really starts to stretch believability for players with poor attendance.That's why we prefer the completely ridiculous justifications :smallbiggrin:

Haberdashery
2010-01-28, 09:56 PM
This.

http://www.onemanga.com/Seto_no_Hanayome/9/20/

drengnikrafe
2010-01-28, 09:56 PM
In my groups, either they get taken over by the DM/another player for the session or they just sort of...fail to be there. Nobody asks where they are, and they take no actions except to heal up the party after combat if they've got healing spells.

I've never been in any game where we've bothered to justify it in-character. If it's a roleplaying-heavy game, somebody else we can trust to RP the character takes over for the session. Making up reasons is a pain and really starts to stretch believability for players with poor attendance.

+1 this.

Generally the DM takes over the character or (in emergency cases, like long-term absences) we let a newbie take the character as his own. Either way, the original intent and style of the character is primarily conserved, while most of the finer points go by the wayside.

EDIT: How could I have forgotten my Gamers reference?
Mark. We treat our character like Mark.

Eldrys
2010-01-28, 10:04 PM
We duct-tape the absentee to a chair and shove them into an extra-dimensional portal, which then conveniently teleports them into the room or campsite we are at when we end the session.

If you can't tell, my group isn't too serious.

Swordgleam
2010-01-28, 10:11 PM
I've never been in any game where we've bothered to justify it in-character. If it's a roleplaying-heavy game, somebody else we can trust to RP the character takes over for the session. Making up reasons is a pain and really starts to stretch believability for players with poor attendance.

That works in most games, but not in all. Mine, to be specific. The party cleric leaves for one session, and in his absence the party agrees to sacrifice someone to a evil god (for good reasons, but still). If he'd been gone the second session, they'd likely have gone through with it. And then how is his character supposed to justify having let that happen?

Most of the time, I'd go with the suggestions above: silly reasons, ignore it in-game, etc. But if your game is like mine and that won't work, you'll have to come up with an in-game reason.

If one player is missing a lot, try to figure out a good in-game reason for that character to be gone a lot. A personal storyline that involves a lot of sidequesting (service to a god, avenging a family member, investigating something personal, courting a lover, etc) is one good way, and spares you a lot of the "he was sick, then he was hungover, then he got lost on the way out of town, what is wrong with this guy?" suspension of disbelief issues.

For occasional absences, make up whatever works best with the situation. Was sick, was in town hunting for a particular item, found an NPC in the dungeon (pretend this happened just after the end of last session) that has to be shepherded back to town, etc.

randomhero00
2010-01-28, 10:16 PM
They don't technically go anywhere, they just sort of float in the peripheral. It varies if they end up taking any action (played through the DM) if they do its very minimal and they can't die unless the entire party dies. After all, realistically, you wouldn't be a heroic adventurer every single day of your life. Sometimes you'd take it easy.

The other option in my other game is that they stay behind at the main camp, to recoup. Psychologically or whatever.

Greenskin
2010-01-28, 10:23 PM
When my friend never showed up we just said his character was at the brothel, He was playin an elf sorccer..... so yeah enough said.

Roland St. Jude
2010-01-28, 10:25 PM
If the player can't make it, his character dies.

Temotei
2010-01-28, 10:33 PM
If the player can't make it, his character dies.

That's awesome. :smallbiggrin:

DM: Jerik jumps off the cliff onto a bed of huge adamantine spikes which are also coated with poison and have contingency fireball, lightning bolt, disjunction, power word kill, symbol of pain, symbol of death, sunburst, harm, cloudkill, bane, blasphemy, blindness/deafness, unholy blight, unholy aura, undeath to death, and slay living spells.
Players: Why?
DM: The DM needs to justify their actions now?

Lappy9000
2010-01-28, 10:36 PM
If the player can't make it, his character dies.So much paperwork :eek::sigh:

KillianHawkeye
2010-01-28, 10:38 PM
I have a DM in my group who always kidnaps the character when a player can't make it. We usually have to spend most of the next session trying to rescue them.

storybookknight
2010-01-28, 10:44 PM
In our group, we play something else.

No, seriously. If one week, someone can't make it to game, lately we've been breaking out Munchkin or Settlers of Cataan.

Alternately, we play Feng Shui, or Savage Worlds, or something else that lends itself well to one-shots.

SurlySeraph
2010-01-28, 10:48 PM
If the player can't make it, his character dies.

Good for Cthulu, great for Paranoia, questionable for most games.

Demented
2010-01-28, 10:52 PM
Good for Cthulu, great for Paranoia, questionable for most games.

But very suitable for TV shows.

See: Tasha Yar.

El Dorado
2010-01-28, 10:56 PM
Missing characters go into the Sleeping Bag. The character isn't present for the adventure and doesn't gain XP. We don't bother with a reason for the absence (unless it's for several sessions, in which case "she decided to leave for a time has now returned" is the best you'll get).

Clunky? Yes. Suspension of disbelief broken? Yes. But it saves on paperwork.

Assassin89
2010-01-28, 11:01 PM
My group has the advantage of a main base/demiplane of operations. This means that an absent member is returned to base/gated back.

shadow_archmagi
2010-01-28, 11:05 PM
I always give missing players XP.

They get punished enough by

1.
Josh: "HORSES!"
Adam: HOHOHHOHOHO
Zed: "What?"
Adam: NEIGH OF JUSTICE
Josh: Hohohhohoho
Zed: "What?"
Me: They went through some demonic stables. They weren't quite the same.

2.
DM: So you find a sack of gold
Adam: So that's half for me
Josh: and half for me
DM: Are you leaving any for Zed?
Adam: Let's vote on it
Josh: I vote no
Adam: I also vote no
Josh: It would appear unanimous.

ZombieGenesis
2010-01-28, 11:15 PM
Take "The Gamers" approach.
X stands in background, has nothing of importance to say.

Until he berserks, oh yes~
Haha, though I suppose there are many other options. My favourite being in my first game one of my friends couldn't come for one of the sessions, and at the start of the next session it was his turn to speak with the NPC of the hour. When the round started he basically made up for his absence with.
"Oh, sorry, I was thinking about sex."

Knaight
2010-01-28, 11:19 PM
Depends on group size. If it is you(GM) plus 3 players, you can run 4 games. One with all 3, and one for each possible combination of 2. If only one person shows up, run personal history games that predate the adventure.

drengnikrafe
2010-01-28, 11:28 PM
Take "The Gamers" approach.
X stands in background, has nothing of importance to say.

Until he berserks, oh yes.

I have to do this, and you can't stop me.

BLOOD! DEATH! AND VENGENCE!

"Dude, don't forget his battle cry!"
"Oh. Right. [dull and lifeless]'blood, death, and vengence.'[/dull and lifeless]"

Lappy9000
2010-01-28, 11:30 PM
My group has the advantage of a main base/demiplane of operations. This means that an absent member is returned to base/gated back.I like this. It'll be something to keep in mind for higher levels. Thanks :smallcool:

Reinboom
2010-01-28, 11:41 PM
If the player can't make it, his character dies.

Y'know, having played in games alongside you and given your attendance habits... you would be writing up a new character constantly with that statement. :smallconfused:

Roland St. Jude
2010-01-28, 11:46 PM
Y'know, having played in games alongside you and given your attendance habits... you would be writing up a new character constantly with that statement. :smallconfused:

You must have me confused with someone else. I recall one OpenRPG game we were in together and I had near perfect attendance until I dropped out. Unless Fax was holding sessions without telling me, or maybe didn't tell you when I dropped. :smallannoyed:

EDIT: I'm not going to argue about this publicly though, especially not given that I'm joking, obviously. :smallsigh:


So much paperwork :eek::sigh:

If a player can't make it, he dies?

banthesun
2010-01-28, 11:52 PM
If the player can't make it, his character dies.

If you're playing paranoia, this sentiment can make an entire session worth of recurring gags (I wouldn't wamt them to die less than the other players now would I :smallamused:).

Lappy9000
2010-01-28, 11:56 PM
If a player can't make it, he dies?For the bureaucracy of Spirit World, of course! :smallbiggrin:

Swordgleam
2010-01-29, 12:01 AM
If you're playing paranoia, this sentiment can make an entire session worth of recurring gags (I wouldn't wamt them to die less than the other players now would I :smallamused:).

Now that you mention it, skipping a session of paranoia would actually give you an advantage, since you wouldn't have to pay for new clones.

Reinboom
2010-01-29, 12:15 AM
You must have me confused with someone else. I recall one OpenRPG game we were in together and I had near perfect attendance until I dropped out. Unless Fax was holding sessions without telling me. :smallannoyed:

EDIT: I'm not going to argue about this publicly though, especially not given that I'm joking, obviously. :smallsigh:

I might be misremembering, either way, that doesn't stop you from being a giant WHITE TEDDY BEAR.
(Also, I was in the game with Bellflower as well, as a side note :smalleek: )



In my latest large scale campaign, the 'world' and the mechanics were set in such a way as to allow characters to rotate in and out of existence.
The setting is that of a school academy, loosely modeled upon Oxford. The campaign begins 55 years before a "point of singularity". Everybody in the campaign existed at the spot they showed up in some time before that, of at least 144 years before the point of singularity (and upwards of around 1597 years before the point, anymore and the consistency of language starts getting a little too iffy).
They could not leave the area as the outer rings of the academy had a hazy blue, but smooth, surface that would randomly flash a momentary 'white' in seemingly random, but sequenced, spots.

Every 55 minutes, everything about the area 'reset', rewound itself back to the beginning of the 55 minutes. Themselves, and random gear they were carrying, would not reset. They also did not gain any experience for completing a situation they had already completed.
In this world, there would be others that also randomly do not reset. Quite a few of the events that occurs/occurred revolve around this revolving door.
After extended periods of interaction, the size of the outer bubble would grow, including more of the academy, the situation in the academy would 'jump forward' a few years, and the time between resets would decrease, the first jump rendering it to 34 minute lapses.

Without going into too much more detail, what happened when a player would not show for a session would be that there character would suddenly disappear. For all reasoning, and if they showed up next session, the explanation would be that they were lapsed away in to a different time shift. If they missed more than 3 sessions in a row without a good reason, that character would be killed by something in one of those shifts.
It is encouraged for the players to explain to the other players, in character, what happened to their character when they suddenly disappear.

Roland St. Jude
2010-01-29, 12:27 AM
I might be misremembering, either way, that doesn't stop you from being a giant WHITE TEDDY BEAR.
(Also, I was in the game with Bellflower as well, as a side note :smalleek: )


:smallsmile: Oh yeah! I had forgotten the game with Bellflower. I certainly owe Fax for allowing me to play an urskan and a pixie in back to back games. (Sorry if I snapped at you there a minute ago. :smallredface:)

As for what most games I DM do? Offer a choice: fade to the background for no XP, let me play the character with diminished (but not zero) risk of death for partial XP, or let some other player control your character with all the risks and reward normally involved for a PC. If the game left off in a spot where "fade to the background" can be replaced with something more logical in-game, like stay in town, we do that.

Every time someone asks this question, it makes me think of the KoDT comic arc when Dave and Bob run Sarah's character for a while. :smallbiggrin:

BladeSingerXIV
2010-01-29, 12:50 AM
The group I'm in right now (D&D 4.0, custom setting), the DM ruled that our characters slide into a coterminal dimension wherein the absent player's character never existed, then slide back when they returned. This happened recently, introducing a character that had never been there in the first place. That was a weird session.

Fuzzie Fuzz
2010-01-29, 01:05 AM
For our games, the player is taken control of by the other players, with DM guidance. So to use the example from earlier in the thread, if a cleric's player isn't there, and the other players want to make a sacrafice to an evil god, the DM says that Character X probably wouldn't like that. Seems to work pretty well for us.

Swordgleam
2010-01-29, 01:10 AM
For our games, the player is taken control of by the other players, with DM guidance. So to use the example from earlier in the thread, if a cleric's player isn't there, and the other players want to make a sacrafice to an evil god, the DM says that Character X probably wouldn't like that. Seems to work pretty well for us.

Followed by what, me not DMing for the next half our as I argue with the party as to why my goddess doesn't want them to sacrifice to that god? :smalltongue:

Having other people, or the DM, play the character works for a lot of parties. It works for a lot of parties I've DMed. But it wouldn't work for my current party, and therefore doesn't work for all parties.

Another_Poet
2010-01-29, 01:23 AM
A character shouldn't disappear just because their player can't make it to a session or two. Another player should just run them, doing their best to keep in the spirit of the way the normal player usually runs that character.

Seriously, there is no good reason to interrupt in-game continuity because someone got the flu or went out of town. The only reason I can think of is that the players don't trust each other to not use their players as cannon fodder and become protective of their char sheets.

No one's going to get cooties on your sheet. If they're your friends, or even just people you respect enough to spend 6 hours a week with, then they can run your character for you and do their best not to get him killed.

The cool thing is that running someone else's character can lead to a lot of fun when one player tries to imitate another player's style. Just two weeks ago I had to run my friend Joel's fighter because he had family obligations. I'm kind of a rules lawyer in our group but when it came to my turn I innocently asked, "I can kill someone and then five-foot-step before I Cleave, right?"

They looked at me like I was an alien. I smiled. "It's what Joel would have asked."

They laughed. He asks that every week.

Swordgleam
2010-01-29, 01:30 AM
"I can kill someone and then five-foot-step before I Cleave, right?"

I'm so happy I finally got the feat that lets me do that (in Iron Heroes).

Another_Poet
2010-01-29, 01:34 AM
I'm so happy I finally got the feat that lets me do that (in Iron Heroes).

Nice! I was just reading a review of Iron Heroes today. I would switch over next week if I hadn't just switched us to Pathfinder. Any more system changes and I think we'll start seeing some player fatalities (primarily due to mindsplosion).

absolmorph
2010-01-29, 04:56 AM
If a character isn't participating, they're in the wagon.
Said wagon is magical and has a crap load of stuff in it (including a library and a room full of ice), so it makes some sense.
Or, alternatively, they had to go do something else. The sessions of the game I'm playing in rarely cover a lot of time (the longest was a couple months, because my paladin took a city and was basically like "hey, I need [list of things] done. Have fun." It turned out well), so it's pretty simple.

Hallavast
2010-01-29, 05:25 AM
How do you go about explaining when a player can't come to a game within context of the game world? I've tried serious answers ranging from leaving to visit family to personal quests. I've also tried ridiculous answers ranging from falling down an elevator shaft or being frozen in carbonite.

How do you tend to explain this? All responses from sense to absurdity welcome!

I'm stealing this. Not that I DM a star wars or any kind of futuristic game, mind you. Thanks.

RebelRogue
2010-01-29, 05:30 AM
Character had dysentery. Poopin' his guts out.
We used that for a while. Untill the character of the absent player turned out to be a paladin immune to any disease. Hmm...

Seriously, after many years of thinking up a reasonable in-world explanation, we just let the character "phase out" and worry no more about it. One group I've played in refers to this as the character visiting the "astral toilet" :smallbiggrin:

PhoenixRivers
2010-01-29, 05:32 AM
If a player can't make it, he dies?

But what if the player's a girl?

Edit: And I mean the rare endangered kind that isn't the DM's girlfriend.

Hallavast
2010-01-29, 07:33 AM
We used that for a while. Untill the character of the absent player turned out to be a paladin immune to any disease. Hmm...

Seriously, after many years of thinking up a reasonable in-world explanation, we just let the character "phase out" and worry no more about it. One group I've played in refers to this as the character visiting the "astral toilet" :smallbiggrin:

Hmm... How about "The paladin blew a 0.26 on a breathalizer last night. He's puking his guts out?"

Tyndmyr
2010-01-29, 08:06 AM
If the player can't make it, his character dies.

And if the character can't make it...

onthetown
2010-01-29, 08:17 AM
The character is flaky. They just kind of wander in and out of the party.

We did this with a player who had a drow mage and couldn't often play with us... every time he was missing, our characters claimed it was his "drow magicky powers" :smallbiggrin:


But what if the player's a girl?

Edit: And I mean the rare endangered kind that isn't the DM's girlfriend.

Err, what does that have to do with anything? :smallconfused: I'm not the DM's girlfriend and neither is any other girl I've ever played with, but what does being a girl have to do with the character dying?

Lappy9000
2010-01-29, 08:28 AM
A character shouldn't disappear just because their player can't make it to a session or two. Another player should just run them, doing their best to keep in the spirit of the way the normal player usually runs that character.

Seriously, there is no good reason to interrupt in-game continuity because someone got the flu or went out of town. The only reason I can think of is that the players don't trust each other to not use their players as cannon fodder and become protective of their char sheets. Except that another player jumps in to take up the spot (it's a big party with intermittent absences). Additionally, almost all of the players are not very rules savvy, and have enough of a hard time keeping up with their own material.

For convenience's sake, we like to have the character disappear, and I was looking for some creative ways to justify it in game. And, cooties aside, people don't typically want people to use their characters when they're away.

There are plenty of reasons to interrupt in game continuity (especially when it isn't that important to us)

dsmiles
2010-01-29, 09:11 AM
In my groups, either they get taken over by the DM/another player for the session or they just sort of...fail to be there. Nobody asks where they are, and they take no actions except to heal up the party after combat if they've got healing spells.

I've never been in any game where we've bothered to justify it in-character. If it's a roleplaying-heavy game, somebody else we can trust to RP the character takes over for the session. Making up reasons is a pain and really starts to stretch believability for players with poor attendance.

This, since I keep current copies of all of the character sheets, it's easy to DMPC the character for a session, if need be. Only difference is, mine will participate in combat a little (read: if the party is desperate).

Swordgleam
2010-01-29, 09:37 AM
Nice! I was just reading a review of Iron Heroes today. I would switch over next week if I hadn't just switched us to Pathfinder. Any more system changes and I think we'll start seeing some player fatalities (primarily due to mindsplosion).

Iron Heroes is fantastic! I never thought playing a purely martial character (well, okay, I took one magic thing, but just because my character is paranoid about having his weapons taken away) could be so much fun. It's a blast.

I'm stocking up on cleave-related feats. Pretty soon, I should be critting on a 11+ with my falchion, getting to cleave on crits, taking a 5-foot step and getting a bonus to cleave attacks, and then being able to fling the corpses of my downed enemies as my cleave attack. I also took a level of berserker so I can throw my masterwork bastard swords as an attack, thus answering the question of, "What happens when I have a cleave and no one is within five feet?"

And that's not even trying to optimize my character! He has plenty of random stuff that's just for fun plot reasons, like his +25ish to intimidate (okay, maybe I optimized that part a little) and his mysticism skills.

Man-at-arms in Iron Heroes ftw.


But what if the player's a girl?

Edit: And I mean the rare endangered kind that isn't the DM's girlfriend.

Then you wouldn't have this problem. :smallbiggrin: I have yet to game with a girl who ever misses sessions, though of course that's just my own anecdotal experience.

d13
2010-01-29, 09:38 AM
They get abducted by an extraplanar giant gorilla... Complete package :smalleek:

Roland St. Jude
2010-01-29, 09:40 AM
But what if the player's a girl?

Edit: And I mean the rare endangered kind that isn't the DM's girlfriend.

A what now?

Raging Gene Ray
2010-01-29, 09:44 AM
A what now?

Ya know, a girl. Like Serpentine.

Gerrtt
2010-01-29, 10:32 AM
When I've DMed I try not to stop in the middle of a dungeon to avoid this situation. If you start a session in town and a player can't make it you don't have to worry about playing their character in addition to doing everything else the DM does.

As for reasons the character can't come along: (some are better than others)

1. Food poisoning; cheap inns, go figure.
2. "Sending" spell from home; family matters demand attention.
3. Imprisonment; from drinking too much in the cheap inn.
4. Hangover; from drinking too much in the cheap inn.
5. Disinterest in whatever quest you may be going on that day.
6. Some moral objection to whatever quest you may be going on that day.
7. Working in some project in town; brewing potions or making items or doing research, ways to help the team without being there.

My preference is always to not have the character there, which is why I try to avoid making the PCs plot central for reasons other than some item they are carrying around. This isn't perfect though. When the player of the party cleric gets real life H1N1 and cant leave the house, there might not be a party left by the end of the session in my games.

shadow_archmagi
2010-01-29, 10:48 AM
Ya know, a girl. Like Serpentine.

Don't be silly, Serpentine isn't REAL.

Raging Gene Ray
2010-01-29, 11:28 AM
Don't be silly, Serpentine isn't REAL.

But if Serp isn't real...Science isn't real (because Serp IS Science)...which means Fantasy is Real, Up is Down, Black is White and I am completely sane!

PhoenixRivers
2010-01-29, 11:59 AM
Err, what does that have to do with anything? :smallconfused: I'm not the DM's girlfriend and neither is any other girl I've ever played with, but what does being a girl have to do with the character dying?
Allow me to clue you in, then. Please, read the statement in the most literal way possible, and the joke should be more clear.

If a player can't make it, he dies?

Note: Roland's not mentioning anything about "the character" dying.

So the question that bears asking is, "what if the "he dies" isn't a "he"... ?

valadil
2010-01-29, 12:02 PM
Depends on the group. Sometimes they get NPCed. Sometimes they go shadowy and indistinct for a session. I actually have a lot of fun trying to write a character out on the fly and making a plot out of it, but that only works so often.

bosssmiley
2010-01-29, 12:07 PM
Character had dysentery. Poopin' his guts out.

To paraphrase DF: "Gamer stops play. Interrupted by crap." :smallbiggrin:

We tend to ascribe the absentee PC's sudden inability to react meaningfully to a weak strain of zombie virus ("It's not a proper zombie flu. It's just the sniffles. He's got man zombie flu!" -- the girls), and demote them to NPC bearer/horse-holder status for the night.

BlckDv
2010-01-29, 03:08 PM
In my campaigns (same rules from AD&D 2nd Ed to present 4e.. including oWoD and West End Star Wars games) we do the following (I'm listing them in a lot more detail than we really use, just to cover the "common sense isn't common" rule of internet communication):

Best Option: The PC is proxied by another player. The missing player must OK this, and the character is subject to all risks (and rewards) as if the normal player was at the table... try not to proxy to the player you griefed last game.

Second Option: DM Proxy, if the normal player OKs being proxied but no player wants the burden, the DM runs the PC. PC gets full XP/treasure etc. and may be killed, but will not solve plot points or volunteer to make skill checks (will make checks other players ask for)

Third Option: If the party broke last game in camp or at a safe place such as an Inn or friendly farm, the missing player's PC stays behind to "follow up on rumors" or "deal with a personal issue" the missing player does not get a share of rewards for that session unless another PC shares in game. The missing player is given a summary of their "off screen" activity which will not kill them but may involve them taking damage or other temporary harm, this may create a new plot hook or side quest for the party.

Last Option: If the game broke in combat or in another situation where a PC could not catch up later or wander off, the PC "drools in the background". They are assumed to be following the party in a daze, not participating in combat or using any skills, but able to have objects "fetched" from their bag if needed (such as the missing player's PC was carrying the Gold Key of Doom), or take more or less automatic actions (such as the missing player's PC has to vouch for the party to enter a fortress) The PC does not earn any rewards for the session unless another PC chooses to share IC, but the PC is also not subject to death or harm, with the special exception that if the whole party is captured, the "drooling" PC is also taken into custody.

Kaldrin
2010-01-29, 03:12 PM
My favourite, and often used in my old group, was to say the character fell through a plot hole. Later when they returned, they would fall from the plot hole into that scene.

Ravens_cry
2010-01-29, 03:15 PM
We generally have either another player play them, or they just don't interact. If they miss enough though, they are out of the game.

Sliver
2010-01-29, 03:37 PM
In games I played (IRC usually) characters of missing players were ignored.. They were there, they just didn't fight.. They got nothing out of it unless the other players were really kind to share treasure though..

Killing players for not showing up is a bit harsh, but reasonable I guess.. D&D (and other games) is serious business, I hear they say..

Ormur
2010-01-29, 04:00 PM
1. The character is assigned to another player or the DM and is uncharacteristically quiet and unresponsive today.

2. Hangover.

Glass Mouse
2010-01-29, 05:51 PM
My favourite, and often used in my old group, was to say the character fell through a plot hole. Later when they returned, they would fall from the plot hole into that scene.

Haha. I wish I was a native English speaker, just so I could steal this.


In my groups?
1) The Schrodinger character. Character takes no actions, is not accounted for in any way; still is assumed to have been present. We usually joke about dissolving into pink clouds, but really, we just ignore the problem.
2) The excuse. Player must explain, in character, why s/he didn't attend. Character may be blamed; there may even be IC consequences of their absence (mostly, not knowing important stuff, not having a relation to certain NPCs, etc.).

Group 1 has had only one absence which they had to explain. The GM (me) had planned a character-focused plot (at the player's request), only the character's player didn't show up.
The problem was solved by imprisoning the character, thus giving the others the motivation to do the plot anyway, but still... I kinda learned my lesson about expecting stable attendence from that group.

Group 2 usually downright cancels if one player can't make it. We used to be a group of 3 players, but after adding another member, abscence is more accepted. Still, I think we've each missed one session during the last 1 years, my one being three months' absence.
Our excuses have been, in order:
- getting fed up with the rest of the party and travelling in a different direction, then "randomly" stumble across the group again.
- going out to drink; probably passing out somewhere while the others do stuff (short IC session).
- my favorite: being abandoned by the party in a huge forest. Oh yeah, the character was pissed when he found the others again. :smallgrin:

Serpentine
2010-01-30, 07:04 AM
Don't be silly, Serpentine isn't REAL.
But if Serp isn't real...Science isn't real (because Serp IS Science)...which means Fantasy is Real, Up is Down, Black is White and I am completely sane!Wait, what? :smallconfused:
:eek:
>disappears in a puff of logic<

>if she existed, she would mention that she generally has characters controlled by other players, kidnapped or, in cases that allow it (such as Druids) they just go off and do something else of vital importance, like return a llama<

Sliver
2010-01-30, 07:40 AM
Wait, what? :smallconfused:
:eek:
>disappears in a puff of logic<

Sounds like someone needs to change their location data..