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Sucrose
2010-02-12, 06:14 PM
Well, folks, in the interest of improving my diet, I'm looking into eating less meat. At present, the only options that I can think of offhand are lasagna, tofu, and curry. Does anyone have more ideas for ways that I can feel as full as I normally do after downing a burger?

As an aside, this thread is not for debating the merits of the vegetarian lifestyle. There are people on both sides of the issue with little intent to budge on it. My hope is to create a useful resource for myself, and, hopefully, a few other people.

I realize that there's a similar thread somewhere in the back of this forum, but I wasn't able to find it in the first three pages, so I decided to avoid risking threadomancy.

RS14
2010-02-12, 06:21 PM
I'm personally fond of almost any pasta with mushrooms. Particularly ravioli.

Samosas, though I've never made them myself. Many soups--split pea soup comes to mind. Falafel. Almost any vegetable can be cooked on its own. Some favorite are creamed corn, fried okra, lima beans (Yes, I was raised in the south). Some people like fried tomato slices. Bell peppers can be roasted, and are good on bread. Fried plantains.

Faulty
2010-02-12, 06:28 PM
Pasta and lentils are good. I highly suggest you pick up a vegetarian or vegan cook book.

Sucrose
2010-02-12, 06:37 PM
I'm personally fond of almost any pasta with mushrooms. Particularly ravioli.

Samosas, though I've never made them myself. Many soups--split pea soup comes to mind. Falafel. Almost any vegetable can be cooked on its own. Some favorite are creamed corn, fried okra, lima beans (Yes, I was raised in the south). Some people like fried tomato slices. Bell peppers can be roasted, and are good on bread. Fried plantains.

Good point about the soups, and I'll have to try the fried veggies idea to see if it grants me satiety. After looking up the Samosas, I agree that they could serve pretty well.


Pasta and lentils are good. I highly suggest you pick up a vegetarian or vegan cook book.

That would also be a good idea. Regrettably, I'm an impoverished college student, so my aim is to get as many ideas as possible, and try to rip recipes for them from the web. I do hope that my local grocery store has lentils. It seems as though a few of the better recipes require them.

Spiryt
2010-02-12, 06:49 PM
I always liked porrdige from Fagopyrum (:smallconfused:?).

Or from millet. With mushrooms.

Syka
2010-02-12, 07:03 PM
Look up Indian recipes in general. Some involve meat, but there are plenty which are vegetarian/vegan.

Like spicy chickpeas in a tomato based sauce with jasmine rice. And pepper (not the spicy kind, the green and yellow kind), cucumber, and olices in a vingerette thing. And all sorts of vegetable medley type things (those I fell in love with at Krishna lunch).

Spaghetti is also vegetarian. Many pasta dishes are/can be.



But yeah...Indian food. Most American vegetarian cuisine I've had is fairly bland, but I have never had a bad experience with Indian vegetarian food.

Checking out Krishna recipes in particular are good for veggie food. You'll likely have a lot of religious stuff come along with looking it up, but it's worth it for the food!

Sucrose
2010-02-12, 07:17 PM
The porridge option seems pretty straightforward, and can presumably be improved by adding whatever flavors one wishes to it, like fruit and such.

Thank you for the general indication toward Indian recipes, Syka. After looking at a few, it seems as though some of them have rather esoteric ingredients. How necessary are things like coconut shavings and coriander leaves? Are most of the flavors preserved so long as I use the right base and spices?

Syka
2010-02-12, 07:23 PM
I'm really not sure. I know most of the spices should be available at a local supermarket, and some of the more obscure ingrediants should have substitutions or be available at ethnic supermarkets. Indian food shares a lot of ingrediants with Chinese food, so if you have a Chinese market, they should have some of the stuff. I live in a fairly small area and I know of a few ethnic markets around me, but I'm sure this varies by area.

Really...you may want to look to Asian cuisine in general.


Question- are you avoiding all meats, or just red meat, or land-based animals, or what?

ETA: I'll try and find my Krishna Recipe book and PM you the recipes in there. There's everything from Indian, to Mexican, to Mediterranean in there. A LOT of the stuff is fresh made, though. Like there are a few bread recipes which are basically make-it-from-scratch stuff.

Sucrose
2010-02-12, 07:28 PM
I'm really not sure. I know most of the spices should be available at a local supermarket, and some of the more obscure ingrediants should have substitutions or be available at ethnic supermarkets. Indian food shares a lot of ingrediants with Chinese food, so if you have a Chinese market, they should have some of the stuff. I live in a fairly small area and I know of a few ethnic markets around me, but I'm sure this varies by area.

Really...you may want to look to Asian cuisine in general.


Question- are you avoiding all meats, or just red meat, or land-based animals, or what?

I'm mostly avoiding red meat, given that it's generally the least healthy, but even that isn't a hard and fast rule. Mostly, I'm just trying to cut down on all of my meat consumption at once.

Edit: That sounds fantastic!:smallsmile: I'll grant that I may not have the patience to bake my own bread, though...

Project_Mayhem
2010-02-12, 07:30 PM
I myself am not vegetarian, but my house-mates all are, and operate on student budgets. Tortillas, with peppers, onions, mushrooms, cheese and the spices/sauces always go down well. Veggy chilli also always goes down a spot. The afore mentioned soup is often good value.

Just remember not to simply stop eating meat and leave the rest of your diet the same. You need to replace the stuff your dropping - beans and stuff for protein etc. I should mention, that if you're only doing this for health reasons, not ethical ones, you should consider carrying on with fish. It's the hardest thing to replace.

Asta Kask
2010-02-12, 07:33 PM
Have you looked at quorn?

Syka
2010-02-12, 07:33 PM
Yeah, do your research to make sure you're getting everything you need. Much of the stuff we get from meat (protein, iron, etc.) we can also get from other methods; I spoke with the Krishna's and they make sure the lunches they serve have all the needed nutrients.


As for the recipes, I'll warn that I haven't tried them myself, but most look fantastic. The lack of attempt on my part was more laziness and not having time more than lack of desire.

RebelRogue
2010-02-12, 07:59 PM
As for soups, I learnt this extremely simple cauliflower one from my brother (who's a chef).

Chop up the cauliflower and simmer it in a bit of good oil. Olive oil or rapeseed oil is what I usually use. Then cover it in vegetable stock (chicken stock works fine too, if you don't mind this non-vegetarian aspect) and add salt and pepper to taste. Boil until the cauliflower is tender, and use an immersion blender to liquify it while it's still hot. Optionally, cream can be added before blending, but it's not really necessary.

Serve with bread. I'm suprised how good this is every time I make it.

Edit: Just to chime in on the nutrition aspect: as long as you eat meat once in a while and keep a varied diet you should be fine. It's only straight vegetarians and vegans that need to take special precautions. It doesn't hurt to read a bit, of course :smallsmile:

Nameless
2010-02-12, 08:03 PM
How many vegetarian thread have we had now?

Anyway, I don't really see how a vegetarian diet is a healthier option then many other diets, but good luck. Also, DON'T have quorn. If you want to keep your taste buds safe... don't. :smalleek: I do recommend those corn things with bread crumbs. OwO

THAC0
2010-02-12, 08:05 PM
You need to find which foods have protein. That's why you feel so full after eating a burger and not after eating a salad.

Beans and quinoa are my favorite protein additions.

RebelRogue
2010-02-12, 08:08 PM
Chickpeas are your friends when it comes to non-animalistic proteins. They're great in soups and salad alike and of course in hummus and falafel.

Ellardin
2010-02-12, 08:28 PM
Try experimenting with Rice and see what you like .

Kneenibble
2010-02-12, 08:48 PM
So quite rightly you see a lot of gestures towards various pulses, Sucrose. If you're starting out on the wide and wonderful road of bean cookery I suggest you start with two particularly easy favourites that you can find for about $1/pound (any more is gouging) that goes a long way: split and peeled red lentils, and split and peeled moong dal. The former look like little bright orange flat circles, the latter like little bright yellow grains.

A soup with these dudes is the easiest thing in the world and contains immense room to play and improvise. Saute an onion in some grease, then add a cup of the lentils, five cups of water, and salt (2 teaspoons is about what I'd add I think, but I never measure salt), bring to a boil, and simmer it gently for 10 minutes (red lentils) or 15 (moong dal). The soup is wide-open to add spices or vegetables in any combination your heart desires: add them to the onion and saute them for a few minutes just before the water and lentils. Diced sweet potatoes are especially nice.

Serve the soup with some toast or a bun or some rice, and you've got yourself a really nutritious and cheap and fast meal. I eat this pretty much every day, although I have an elaborate formula of many spices that goes in. Cumin, black mustard seeds, and black cardamom (popped in the hot oil before the onion goes in), coriander, turmeric, cayenne, sweet paprika, red chile flakes, hing, black salt, black pepper, ginger, garlic, a little lemon juice or vinegar, and garam masala right at the end when it's off the simmer.

edit Personally I find that canned beans have a really gross flavour and texture and I never use them, but if you want to use chickpeas and other meatier beans, you might want to start with canned because they take time and experience to cook properly from dry.

Jorkens
2010-02-13, 04:57 AM
Really...you may want to look to Asian cuisine in general.
Madhur Jaffrey's Eastern Vegetarian Food is really worth checking out for general asian veggie cooking. I've probably cooked more from that than any other recipe book.

Plus it was first published in the UK about 30 years ago, so it doesn't make too many assumptions about what sort of obscure ingredients you can get hold of - most of it will work with just a reasonable set of spices, soy sauce, garlic, ginger etc. (And does it help you to know that coriander leaves are the same thing as cilantro? It was a big step forward for me in using american recipes when I realized that cilantro wasn't actually something immensely obscure and hard to find.)

Corlindale
2010-02-13, 05:04 AM
I'm in pretty much the same situation as the OP, I'm also trying to cut down on meat consumption. As has been said before, the most important thing is to remember your protein sources. Lentils, beans, chickpeas, soy products, eggs and cheese are the most popular options.

I second the lentil soup recommendation, it's very nutritious, tasty, filling, cheap and easy. I like to make it a sort of lentil-tomato soup, spiced with curry, cumin, koreander, bay leaves, lemon juice and mango chutney. Blend and add coconut milk when it's boiled for a nice creamy consistency.

Soups in general are great vegetarian meals - I lived as a vegetarian for the entire month of January as an experiment, and I think various soups made up the majority of my meals. Most soups benefit greatly from bread on the side.

Here is a couple of nice soup recipes from my favourite recipe site:

Black Bean Vegetable Soup (http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Black-Bean-Vegetable-Soup/Detail.aspx) - A surprisingly delicious soup despite the apparently few and "boring" ingredients. Very easy and cheap to make.

Red Lentil Soup (http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Vegan-Red-Lentil-Soup/Detail.aspx) - A good example of what a lentil soup might look like.

Ham and Potato Soup (http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Delicious-Ham-and-Potato-Soup/Detail.aspx) - This is a fantastic potato soup, which can easily be modified to be vegetarian. It has a very nice and creamy consistency. Replacing the ham with mushrooms could work well, for instance. Also remember to replace the chicken bouillon with vegetable bouillon.

Bhu
2010-02-13, 07:33 AM
If you want vegetarian recipes/info try the following list:

American Vegan Society http://www.americanvegan.org/
Ann Wigmore Institute http://www.annwigmore.org/
Arnolds Way http://arnoldsway.com/
Fat Free Lowfat Vegetarian Recipe Archive http://www.fatfree.com/
Great Vegetarian Recipes http://www.webvalue.net/recipes/
Happy Cow's Global Guide to Vegetarian Restaurants http://www.happycow.net/search.html
International Vegetarian Union http://www.ivu.org/
Kake L. Pugh http://www.earth.li/~kake/
Links to Vegan Recipe Sites http://www.notmilk.com/veganrecipes.html
Lithuanian Vegetarian Recipes http://mywebpages.comcast.net/MKarustis/AmberRoots/LithVeg.html
Living and Raw Foods http://www.living-foods.com/index.shtml
Living and Raw Foods http://www.rawfoods.com/
Marie Oser the Veggie Chef http://www.veggiechef.com/
Michael Greger the Vegan M.D. http://www.veganmd.org/
Nomi Shannon the Raw Gourmet http://rawgourmet.com/
North American Vegetarian Society http://www.navs-online.org/
Our Vegan Recipe Collection http://www.catteacorner.com/recipes.htm
SoyStache.com http://www.soystache.com/
The Fresh Network http://www.fresh-network.com/
The Meat Free Zone http://www.all-creatures.org/mfz/
The Raw Family http://rawfamily.com/
The Vegan Connection http://www.veganconnection.com/
The Vegetarian Resource Group http://www.vrg.org/
The Vegetarian Travel Guide http://www.vegetarianusa.com/
Towards Freedom http://www.towardsfreedom.com/
VegDining.com Worldwide guide to vegetarian restaurants http://www.vegdining.com/Home.cfm
VegSource.com http://www.vegsource.com/
Vegan Action http://www.vegan.org/
Vegan Mania recipes http://www.veganmania.com/
Vegan Monthly http://www.vegan.org.nz/vegan-m.php
Vegan recipes http://www.notmilk.com/soyrecipe.html
Vegan.com http://www.vegan.com/
Vegetarian Pages http://www.veg.org/
Vegetarian Society http://www.vegsoc.org/index.html
Vegetarians in Paradise http://www.vegparadise.com/
Vegweb http://vegweb.com/
Viva Veggie http://www.vivavegie.org/home.html

If you want some Indian recipes try these:

About Indian Food http://indianfood.about.com/
Amul http://www.amul.com/recipes/
Andhra Kitchen http://www.andhrakitchen.com/
Bawarchi beware popup http://www.bawarchi.com/
Beyond Curries http://www.massala.com/
Bhawarchi beware popup http://www.bhawarchi.com/
Chennai Online http://www.chennaionline.com/food/recipes/
Choose India http://www.chooseindia.com/recipe/
Cooking Club http://www.indiaparenting.com/cookingclub/index.cgi
Cooking Marvel http://www.cookingmarvel.com/
Cooking with Bela http://www.geocities.com/cookingwithbela/
Cuisine Cuisine.com beware popup http://www.cuisinecuisine.com/HomePage.htm
Daawat.com http://www.daawat.com/
Delicious India http://www.deliciousindia.com/
Eve's India http://www.evesindia.com/cuisine/
Gadnet .com http://www.gadnet.com/recipes.htm
Hindustanlink http://www.hindustanlink.com/recepiet/index(r).htm
Home Cooking http://members.tripod.com/homPag/
Hot Dishes http://www.hotdishes.com/
India Color Pages http://www.indiacolorpages.com/bawarchi/htmls/recipezone.phtml
India Curry http://www.indiacurry.com/recipes.htm
India Express beware popup http://www.indiaexpress.com/cooking/
India HQ You'll get an annoying full page ad, but there's a link to click to get rid of it http://www.indiahq.com/_ihq/ihq_channel/channels.asp?channel_id=cooking
India OZ http://www.indiaoz.com.au/Indian_Recipes/
India Xroads beware popu, has some Chinese recipes too http://www.ceeby.com/cookings/
Indiainfo.com http://food.indiainfo.com/recipes/index.html
Indian Cooking http://media.namaste.com/forum/
Indian Delicacies http://www.indiandelicacies.com/
Indian Feast beware popup http://indianfeast.tripod.com/
Indian Foods http://www.indianfoodsco.com/Recipes/Home.htm
Indian Recipes http://www.indianchild.com/indian_recipes.htm
Indian Takeaway Cooking Made Easy http://freespace.virgin.net/gj.d/
Indiaserver.com http://recipes.indiaserver.com/
Indolink http://www.indolink.com/Recipe/
Infodiary http://www.infodiary.com/recipes/
Information Corner http://www.informationcorner.com/recipe.asp
Khanakhazana http://www.khanakhazana.com/
Khoj http://www.khoj.com/Life_and_Family/Recipe/
Krsnas Prasadam http://www.harekrsna.com/practice/prasadam/recipes/recipes.htm
Mamta's Kitchen http://www.mamtaskitchen.com/
Net Guru India http://www.netguruindia.com/recipe/index.asp
New Kerala http://www.newkerala.com/
Pakistani and Indian Cooking http://www.geocities.com/Tokyo/Field/8292/
Recipe Delights http://www.recipedelights.com/index5261j.htm
Rumela's Web http://www.rumela.com/recipe/continental_recipes_indian.htm
Saffron Spices http://www.saffronspices.com/intnav.htm
Samachar Food Channel http://www.samachar.com/food/index.shtml
Sarojini and Rao's South Indian Cooking Lessons http://www.exit109.com/~mstevens/indian.shtml
Sysindia.com http://www.sysindia.com/kitchen/index.html
Tarladlal.com http://www.tarladalal.com/
The Curry House http://www.curryhouse.co.uk/
YumIndia http://www.yumindia.com/

Sucrose
2010-02-13, 08:31 AM
Wow, quite a few responses since I last checked on this. Thank you to everyone for the information that you've provided!

For those of you concerned about replacing the proteins and such that one gets from meat, I personally plan to continue eating meat, just in dramatically reduced quantities.

That way, I only get what I need, rather than the far greater than average quantity that I generally am getting at the moment. That said, since protein does encourage satiety, and is the backbone of many of my meals, I still find the recommendations for reasonable replacements quite handy.

Thank you again! In a bit, I'll be going to the grocery store, to try to collect some of the ingredients that you've recommended.

Jorkens
2010-02-13, 09:08 AM
http://smittenkitchen.com/ is a very good recipe blog for veggie and contains-some-meat-but-isn't-just-a-big-slab-of-beef recipes. (And cakes. Lots of cakes.)

It's written by a new yorker, though, so it does assume that you have good access to a wide range of fresh ingredients - if you don't then you might have to pick and choose recipes a bit.

Haruki-kun
2010-02-13, 11:06 AM
For those of you concerned about replacing the proteins and such that one gets from meat, I personally plan to continue eating meat, just in dramatically reduced quantities.

That way, I only get what I need, rather than the far greater than average quantity that I generally am getting at the moment.

http://i163.photobucket.com/albums/t288/Vaarsuvius89/thumbsup2.jpg


That said, since protein does encourage satiety, and is the backbone of many of my meals, I still find the recommendations for reasonable replacements quite handy.

Eggs and Milk are the best substitutes. Proteins from Dairy are the most easily absorbed, and Eggs are close. On the vegetable side, Soy and nuts have the most protein.

DISCLAIMER: I'm sorry if I missed any vegetable that has more protein than soy or nuts or if there's some other protein that's more easily absorbed, resist the urge to prove me wrong please.

lol internet

Gwyn chan 'r Gwyll
2010-02-13, 11:13 AM
Lentils and rice combine to make a full protein in your body. A great meal is lentils cooked with spinach and tomato, on rice. (even if the flavour is much improved by the addition of salt pork, but considering this is a vegetarian thread)

Ponce
2010-02-13, 11:22 AM
There are countless ways to cook potatoes, and they are highly nutritious and ridiculously cheap.

Lentils are much of the same, but in my opinion don't taste nearly as good and are not nearly as satisfying.

Kneenibble
2010-02-13, 02:12 PM
Lentils and rice combine to make a full protein in your body.

This is indeed the received wisdom.

The first problem is that there's next to no protein in rice.

The second is that it is not important to eat all essential amino acids in the same meal, so long as one's diet is varied enough overall to get all of them.

Just sayin'. They do go well together though.

Altair_the_Vexed
2010-02-13, 03:51 PM
If you're looking for healthy as your veggie option, make sure you go for plenty of vegetables. Meat substitutes are generally poor, and not an especially healthy option.

So - my suggestions for good simple veggie meals with health in mind.

Caesar Salad with mozeralla chunks. No chicken. Chicken isn't vegetables.

You know the con carne part of chilli con carne means "with meat"?
Make a chilli without meat - just go with frying up some onions, adding baked beans, tomatoes, kidney beans, and stewing it for ages with all your favourite chilli spices.

Get some Haloumi cheese (much tastier than bean curd), and fry chunk of it with a whole load of oriental vegetables and the sauce of your choice. Good with noodles or rice.


There are countless ways to cook potatoes, and they are highly nutritious and ridiculously cheap.
BOIL 'EM, MASH 'EM, STICK 'EM IN A STEW! (http://www.albinoblacksheep.com/flash/taters)

Lord Herman
2010-03-15, 05:54 PM
I ran across The Veggie Table (http://www.theveggietable.com/) while looking for a vegetarian Mexican dish. It has lots of receipes of every sort, and also some info on vegetarianism in general.

purple gelatinous cube o' Doom
2010-03-15, 06:21 PM
Any eggplant based dish should be a good one to try. That, and go to the Food Network website. You can probably find just about anything you would want there.

Trog
2010-03-15, 10:50 PM
From the Recipe Collection of Trog:

Artichoke Dip:
Artichoke Dip
about 6 to 8 servings

3/4 pound cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup milk or half-and-half
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
2 scallions (white and green), chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
2 large eggs, beaten
1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
2 cups drained jarred or thawed artichoke hearts, patted dry
1 teaspoon kosher salt
Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
Pinch cayenne
Butter, as needed
Assorted crackers

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.
In a food processor, combine the cream cheese, milk, Parmesan, scallions, garlic, eggs, and lemon juice; pulse until smooth. Add the artichokes, salt, pepper, and cayenne, and pulse until just mixed, but still chunky. Transfer the mixture to a buttered, deep 4-cup casserole dish and bake until lightly browned and set, about 1 hour. Serve warm with crackers.
Olive Garden Hot Artichoke-Spinach Dip
1 Cup chopped artichoke hearts (canned or frozen & thawed)

1/2 cup frozen chopped spinach, thawed

8 oz. cream cheese
1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese

1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/8 teaspoon garlic powder
dash black pepper

On the side: Crackers, 
Chips
 or Sliced toasted Pitas

Boil the spinach and artichoke hearts in a cup of water in a small saucepan over medium heat until tender, about 10 minutes. Drain in a colander when done.* Heat the cream cheese in a small bowl in the microwave set on high for 1 minute. Or, use a saucepan to heat the cheese over medium heat just until hot.* Add the spinach and artichoke hearts to the cream cheese and stir well.* Add the remaining ingredients to the cream cheese and combine.
Serve hot with crackers, chips, or toasted pitas for dipping.
Edamame Soup
Edamame Soup Recipe
To make this soup vegan, omit the creme fraiche.
1 teaspoon olive oil

1 medium onion, finely chopped

1 potato, peeled and cut into small cubes,

750 g (1 1/2 lb) frozen edamame beans, defrosted

1 quart (1.2 litres or 2 pints) vegetable stock

2 tablespoons creme fraiche

salt and freshly ground pepper

In a pan, saute the onion and potato in the oil over medium heat, stirring frequently. Cover and allow it to soften for about 4 minutes, until they have both softened. Stir to prevent the mixture from sticking and burning. Add the beans and the vegetable stock. Put the lid on and simmer on a medium heat for 15-20 minutes until the beans are tender. Puree in a food processor or with a hand blender. Stir in the creme fraiche, reheat gently without boiling and serve.
Serves 4.

Flatbread, Feta and Chickpea salad

Flatbread, Feta and Chickpea salad
Slice pita in half, brush with 4 tbsp olive oil mixed with 1/2 tsp paprika, put in oven on tray with olive oil.
Diced Red Onion thinly sliced, and finely chopped 1/2 chili pepper (deseeded). saute with olive oil. Chop large handful of parsley. Grate 2 garlic cloves into pan, Add 400g chickpeas (rinsed and drained), grate lemon zest into pan. drizzle tsp olive oil, juice half of lemon, crumble 75g feta into pan, take off heat, toss, parsley in, twist of pepper, put in bowl top with more feta, serve with flatbread.
Naan Bread

Naan Bread
2 C. all purpose Flour
3/4 C. luke warm water
2 tsp canola oil
2.5 Tbsp. yogurt
1 tsp sugar
1 tsp salt
pinch baking soda
1 tsp yeast

add yeast to warm water, mix. Combine dry ingredients, mix. Add oil, mix, add yogurt, mix, add water/yeast mixture, mix together and knead into a dough. put a few drops of oil into hand and knead a few more seconds. Put in large bowl, covered, in fridge for 3-4 hours.
Preheat oven to 500. Use pizza stone.
Put oil on hands and Divide into 6 pieces. dredge in all purpose flour and make into balls. Roll out with rolling pin to 1/4" thick. wet hands and put naan on stone in oven. Bake for 3 minutes. When done brush with melted butter.
Vegetable Curry

Vegetable Curry
2 tbsp vegetable oil
1 shallot, chopped
1 garlic clove, finely chopped, Saute
Add 1 diced green pepper, season with sea salt and pepper
3 tbsp Madras Curry paste in
A few Cardimom pods in
1 small Celeraic (celery root) peeled and chopped & 1/2 Cauliflower (florettes) in
400g Chopped tomatoes & water in
As it starts to boil add 1 large zuchinni roughly chopped & 1/2 Broccoli (florettes) cook 10-12 minutes.
Add fresh corriander and 250 mL greek-style yogurt
Vegetarian Chili

Vegetarian Chili
Yield 6 to 8 servings

Ingredients
• 1 (12 ounce) package frozen burger-style crumbles
• 2 (15 ounce) cans black beans, rinsed and drained
• 2 (15 ounce) cans dark red kidney beans
• 1 (15 ounce) can light red kidney beans
• 1 (29 ounce) can diced tomatoes
• 1 (12 fluid ounce) can tomato juice
• 5 onions, chopped
• 3 tablespoons chili powder
• 1 1/2 tablespoons ground cumin
• 1 tablespoon garlic powder
• 2 bay leaves
• salt and pepper to taste

Directions
1. In a large pot, combine meat substitute, black beans, kidney beans, diced tomatoes, tomato juice, onions, chili powder, cumin, garlic powder, bay leaves, salt and pepper. Bring to a simmer and cover. Let the chili simmer for at least 1 hour before serving.

Vegetarian Thai Green Curry (Vegan/Gluten-free)
Vegetarian Thai Green Curry (Vegan/Gluten-free)
Ingredients:
• PASTE:
• 1 stalk lemongrass, sliced finely (see instructions below)
• 2 tsp. ground coriander (grind whole coriander seeds yourself in a coffee grinder for the best taste!)
• 3 Tbsp. vegetarian fish sauce (available at Vietnamese food stores, or substitute wheat-free soy sauce)
• 1 tsp. brown sugar (optional)
• 1-3 green chillies, deseeded (adjust according to desired spiciness)
• 1 small onion
• 2 cloves garlic
• 1 thumb-size piece galangal (or ginger), peeled and sliced
• 2-3 kaffir lime leaves (fresh, frozen, or dried), snipped into strips or small pieces with scissors
• 1 loose cup fresh coriander leaves and stems
• 1½ tsp. dark soy sauce (substitute 1 Tbsp. wheat-free soy sauce for gluten-free diets)
• OTHER:
• 2-3 kaffir lime leaves (Trog sez: In place of kaffir lime leaves I usually just use a little lime juice.)
• 1 can good-quality coconut milk
• 1 package firm tofu cut into bite-size pieces (for gluten-free diets), OR 1 package wheat gluten “chicken" cutlets
• 1 red bell pepper
• 1 cup snow peas
• 1 cup fresh holy (or sweet) basil, chopped roughly
• 1 small yam or sweet potato, cubed
• 3 Tbsp. oil for frying
• optional: other vegetables of your choice, such as carrots, broccoli, cauliflower, etc...
Preparation:
1. For complete instructions on how to buy and cook with lemongrass, see: All About Lemongrass: Your Guide to Buying, Preparing, and Cooking with Lemongrass.
2. To make the green curry paste, place all paste ingredients in a food processor or blender. Add a little of the coconut milk (enough to keep the blades going). Process well.
3. Place oil in wok or deep frying pan. Turn heat on medium-high and add paste.
4. Stir fry until fragrant (about 1 minute), then add coconut milk.
5. Add wheat gluten or tofu and stir until everything is well mixed.
6. Add kaffir lime leaves and cover.
7. Turn the heat down to medium-low and allow to simmer, stirring occasionally for about 10 minutes.
8. Add bell pepper and yam/sweet potato.
9. Cover and cook another 10 min.
10. Finally, add snow peas, stir, and continue cooking for 2-4 minutes.
11. Do a taste test for salt and spice. If not salty enough, add up to 2 Tbsp. more vegetarian fish sauce, soy sauce, or sea salt. If too salty, add a little fresh lime juice. If too spicy, add more coconut milk until desired mildness is reached.
12. To serve, place on a serving platter or in a large serving bowl.
13. Sprinkle with fresh basil and extra sliced green chillies, if desired.
14. Accompany your curry with Thai jasmine-scented rice, Thai brown rice (if unavailable, try whole grain basmati), or your choice of noodles.

Trog's International Recipe Tip: coriander leaves are, in the U.S., known as cilantro.

Roukon
2010-03-15, 11:03 PM
You mentioned earlier that you were a starving college student, and were looking at vegetarian options. I like this book and most of the meals in it are filling and well done. It can be hard to find, but I think it is worth the time.

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/The-Starving-Students-Vegetarian-Cookbook/Dede-Hall/e/9780446676755/?itm=1&USRI=starving+student+vegetarian

Later Days,
Roukon

golentan
2010-03-15, 11:40 PM
Oh, goodness me, a vegetarian thread. What's your cooking proficiency/preferred seasonings? I have dishes that run the gamut from easy to murderous, and american blandness to take the roof off your mouth curry/hispanic foods to crazy fusion stuff.

Starting easy, I'd recommend updating your existing foodstuffs to vegetarian substitute. Ground Black Beans, for example, will be an adequate replacement for a wide variety of meats (primarily ground). For more solid affairs, I can give you the recipe I use for vegetable sausage.

Of course, my simple, easy favorite is rice, beans, grilled onions, homemade guac, tomatoes and a touch of sour cream wrapped and ready for eatins. And my general advice for cooking vegetarian is simply to familiarize yourself with your spices of choice, pick a good dairy product, and then stand in the vegetable aisle smelling things while picturing different cooking methods.

I like cooking. And I don't eat that much meat when left to my own devices.