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Pocketa
2010-02-18, 10:57 PM
I can't find the answer online, so I'm asking here.

I took the PSAT, I got my scores back a while ago.


A girl told me that if I did not have an asterisk by my score, I was automatically a National Merit Scholar. I doubt this, but it would be cool if it was true. I had no asterisk.

I was wondering if it was true or not.

kthanks!

Vaynor
2010-02-18, 11:01 PM
You need to be in the 99th percentile to be eligible for National Merit. I'm not sure exactly what the score needed is, it changes every year, but in general it's around 210 (but I think you can be around 200-205 to be commended), from what I know. I'd definitely make sure though, best way to find out is to call them or send them an email.

Edit: It should list the percentile on your score report, if it's not 99% then you are most likely not eligible for the National Merit Scholarship.

JoshuaZ
2010-02-18, 11:09 PM
Google is your friend. <URL:http://www.collegeadmissionsbeast.com/2008/01/you-got-your-psat-score-now-what.html> says "When there is NOT an asterisk next to the Selection Index on the score report, the student is potentially in the range for consideration. An asterisk means the score won't be in range. The national average Selection Index is 147." But the whole process is much more complicated. You should read the linked page.

Sneak
2010-02-18, 11:29 PM
Basically, I think you just wait until they mail you. (http://www.nationalmerit.org/nmsp.php#entryreq) Which, hopefully, will happen sometime soon. Cuz I'd like to know.

I think they may have posted the cutoff score already, but I'm not sure, and I have no idea where to find it.

Vaynor
2010-02-18, 11:39 PM
I'm pretty sure I had an asterisk, and I definitely did not get National Merit. Too late anyhow, college apps are already out.

Dragonrider
2010-02-19, 01:22 AM
Yeah, they send you a thing. Then you have to send back this impossible form with an essay attached in a little box (either handwritten or cut out and pasted in).

But it's worth it for the money it gets you. :smalltongue: I only get a couple thousand dollars to the school I'm attending now, but if I'd chosen a state school I probably would have gotten a full ride.

Generic Archer
2010-02-19, 03:51 AM
You can get into the 99th percentile and still use the word "gotten"??

I'm glad I went through the Australian system as the one you went through clearly doesn't teach English.


Dane

raitalin
2010-02-19, 04:10 AM
You can get into the 99th percentile and still use the word "gotten"??

I'm glad I went through the Australian system as the one you went through clearly doesn't teach English.


Dane

got·ten  /ˈgɒtn/
–verb
a pp. of get.

Lack of an asterisk means you're eligible, but it doesn't guarantee it. For instance if you got a GPA of 2.8 and nearly non-existent extracurriculars, like me.

Totally Guy
2010-02-19, 05:18 AM
You can get into the 99th percentile and still use the word "gotten"??

As far as I'm aware there are many places where that word is perfectly acceptable.

The internet is a good place to plce to learn that things are perceived differently in different places, knowing what's true where is the key to a good relationship with the internet folks.

snoopy13a
2010-02-19, 08:36 AM
I'm glad I went through the Australian system as the one you went through clearly doesn't teach English.




Too bad the Australian system clearly doesn't teach manners.

Yarram
2010-02-19, 08:39 AM
Too bad the Australian system clearly doesn't teach manners.

Ooh SNAP! You gotta admit she had us on that one. :smallbiggrin:

Rawhide
2010-02-19, 08:57 AM
*cough*
http://www.miketodd.net/encyc/gotten.htm
*cough*
http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jlawler/aue/gotten.html
*cough*


Anyone have any butter menthols?

Anuan
2010-02-19, 09:09 AM
Too bad the Australian system clearly doesn't teach manners.

One bad apple always ruins it for the rest of us :smallwink:

Douglas
2010-02-19, 09:25 AM
This is all from several-years-old memory and may have some incorrect details.

IIRC from when I went through it, each state (I think) has a quota for how many people can be National Merit Semifinalists and the top that many people on the PSAT qualify. 99th percentile pretty much means you made it regardless. The actual threshold can be a bit lower, possibly in the 96-98th percentile range depending on your state's quota and student performance that year. The list of all National Merit Semifinalists is published, and a lot of colleges use it to target some of their recruiting mail. I remember getting an offer of a full free ride plus a free laptop computer from one college just because I was a Semifinalist.

After that they start looking at other stuff. Grades, class standing, and I have no idea what else. That determines who gets to be a National Merit Finalist. National Merit Finalists then get considered for scholarship money, and those that get it are National Merit Scholars. How much money you get can vary a lot depending on who's sponsoring you and where you're going. If you indicate a particular college you want to go to, you might get a substantially larger scholarship specific to and provided by that college, or you could get a generic relatively small scholarship you can take anywhere, or there might be other possibilities. Somewhere in either the Finalist or Scholar step, you have to write an essay and mail it in. I don't remember exactly which step the essay was for any more.

I ended up with a $1000 per semester for 8 semesters scholarship from my college of choice. My sister got a universal one time $2500, I think, and I don't remember what my brother got.

Edit: Now that I think about it, I think the essay was part of qualifying as a Finalist, and I'm actually not sure how much they look at your grades.

Exeson
2010-02-19, 09:45 AM
You can get into the 99th percentile and still use the word "gotten"??

I'm glad I went through the Australian system as the one you went through clearly doesn't teach English.


Dane

See? now this just makes you sound like an *******. Turns out that being clever does not make you impervious to mistakes, Who knew? :smalltongue:

skywalker
2010-02-19, 02:16 PM
Too bad the Australian system clearly doesn't teach manners.

Wicked burn!


I'm pretty sure I had an asterisk, and I definitely did not get National Merit. Too late anyhow, college apps are already out.

Since when do you apply to college as a junior?!


IIRC from when I went through it, each state (I think) has a quota for how many people can be National Merit Semifinalists and the top that many people on the PSAT qualify. 99th percentile pretty much means you made it regardless. The actual threshold can be a bit lower, possibly in the 96-98th percentile range depending on your state's quota and student performance that year. The list of all National Merit Semifinalists is published, and a lot of colleges use it to target some of their recruiting mail. I remember getting an offer of a full free ride plus a free laptop computer from one college just because I was a Semifinalist.

This is me. I went ahead and took that there full free ride at Generic State School.


After that they start looking at other stuff. Grades, class standing, and I have no idea what else. That determines who gets to be a National Merit Finalist. National Merit Finalists then get considered for scholarship money, and those that get it are National Merit Scholars. How much money you get can vary a lot depending on who's sponsoring you and where you're going. If you indicate a particular college you want to go to, you might get a substantially larger scholarship specific to and provided by that college, or you could get a generic relatively small scholarship you can take anywhere, or there might be other possibilities. Somewhere in either the Finalist or Scholar step, you have to write an essay and mail it in. I don't remember exactly which step the essay was for any more.

I ended up with a $1000 per semester for 8 semesters scholarship from my college of choice. My sister got a universal one time $2500, I think, and I don't remember what my brother got.

Edit: Now that I think about it, I think the essay was part of qualifying as a Finalist, and I'm actually not sure how much they look at your grades.

You write the essay between semi-finalist and finalist. They definitely look at your grades. I had the highest score in my school and a better essay than at least half of the other semifinalists, but I was the only semifinalist from my school to not make finalist.

IIRC, all this "you're a scholar" and all that business occurs when you're a senior. I could be wrong, but I don't remember being told I was a semifinalist until then. I remember getting my score in spring, but not being told about my position until senior year.

Dragonrider
2010-02-19, 03:15 PM
IRC, all this "you're a scholar" and all that business occurs when you're a senior. I could be wrong, but I don't remember being told I was a semifinalist until then. I remember getting my score in spring, but not being told about my position until senior year.

For me it went, IIRC:

October 2007 (as a junior): take PSAT
December 2007: get scores
Summer 2008: get news back of being a semifinalist
Fall 2008 (as a senior): fill out application for finalist/scholar/whatsit
Fall/winter 2008: apply to colleges
Spring 2009: get notification of being a "scholar"

The National Merit people send notification of your status to the school you put down as your top choice. If I remember correctly. It was all a blur of irritating paperwork. :smalltongue: That's pretty much how you can describe the whole application process, actually...



You can get into the 99th percentile and still use the word "gotten"??

I'm glad I went through the Australian system as the one you went through clearly doesn't teach English.

Well, actually, I never went to school. :smallbiggrin: But there ain't nothin' wrong with past participles. *nods* At least I said "would have gotten", not "would of gotten"...:smallwink:

Long story short: we Americans talk dumb. :smallsmile:

Deathslayer7
2010-02-19, 03:21 PM
yes you apply for colleges when your a junior. Senior year is when you narrow it down and choose one that you got accepted into.

I myself got accepted into Ohio State University, but didn't go due to financial reasons. So here I am at UNLV with about a 1,000 scholarship per semester and paying about $2500 for tuition. More affordable and wouldn't put me $200,000 dollars in debt after 4 years. :smalleek:

But that's not saying much since they are cutting higher education budgets again, but I won't go into that. :smallannoyed::smallsigh:

Dragonrider
2010-02-19, 03:27 PM
yes you apply for colleges when your a junior. Senior year is when you narrow it down and choose one that you got accepted into.

What? You APPLY as a junior? No, at least, not in my world . . . because they accept you for the year after you apply. Maybe you LOOK FOR colleges as a junior . . . ?



Also: on the subject of words that sound barbaric over the pond: Americans are known to say "different from" or "different than", but I've yet to hear a single one say "different to". It's unheard of. Impossible. Yet I was reading a British-published textbook yesterday and I came across it. Apparently it's academically acceptable.

You whackos. :smallbiggrin:

ForzaFiori
2010-02-19, 03:28 PM
IIRC, when I took it last year, I didn't get an asterisk, so I qualified, but apparently wasn't high enough in my state to get a letter for semi-finals. Oh well. My SAT and ACT were good enough to get me scholarships.

blackfox
2010-02-19, 03:54 PM
IIRC the asterisk means you either did or did not hit the qualifying score for the first round of the national merit scholarship whatever it is. Since you have to write an essay (ugh, essay) for the second round, it's almost certain that the asterix has nothing to do with it. You will not know for certain if you are a National Merit Scholar till the middle of your senior year.

Vaynor
2010-02-19, 05:15 PM
Since when do you apply to college as a junior?!

I think the real question is this: since when am I not a senior? :smallcool:


Note: In California, at least, you apply in November (for public schools, I think it's Januaryish for most private schools, I don't know, I didn't apply to any (can't afford it, good thing California has great public schools)) of your senior year, get your results back in March/April, and decide in May. I was under the impression this is pretty much universal for U.S. colleges.

skywalker
2010-02-20, 02:45 AM
For me it went, IIRC:

October 2007 (as a junior): take PSAT
December 2007: get scores
Summer 2008: get news back of being a semifinalist
Fall 2008 (as a senior): fill out application for finalist/scholar/whatsit
Fall/winter 2008: apply to colleges
Spring 2009: get notification of being a "scholar"

Yeah, this is pretty much what I remember, with the exception that I was notified of my semifinalist status in fall of *high school senior year* and had a quick turnaround time on the finalist application. And then, you know, leave out the "notification of being a 'scholar'" part...


I think the real question is this: since when am I not a senior? :smallcool:


Note: In California, at least, you apply in November (for public schools, I think it's Januaryish for most private schools, I don't know, I didn't apply to any (can't afford it, good thing California has great public schools)) of your senior year, get your results back in March/April, and decide in May. I was under the impression this is pretty much universal for U.S. colleges.

You take the PSAT as a junior. So you should get your scores (and notification of your status) in a decent amount of time before you apply to colleges as a senior. You implied that you got your scores after you had sent out your apps. If I read that wrong please forgive me.

Vaynor
2010-02-20, 03:04 AM
You take the PSAT as a junior. So you should get your scores (and notification of your status) in a decent amount of time before you apply to colleges as a senior. You implied that you got your scores after you had sent out your apps. If I read that wrong please forgive me.

Oh, I see. I meant that I never heard anything about whether or not I was eligible, so I assumed I was not, but even if I was it doesn't matter now because I've already sent out college apps.

Deathslayer7
2010-02-20, 01:27 PM
What? You APPLY as a junior? No, at least, not in my world . . . because they accept you for the year after you apply. Maybe you LOOK FOR colleges as a junior . . . ?



Also: on the subject of words that sound barbaric over the pond: Americans are known to say "different from" or "different than", but I've yet to hear a single one say "different to". It's unheard of. Impossible. Yet I was reading a British-published textbook yesterday and I came across it. Apparently it's academically acceptable.

You whackos. :smallbiggrin:

you can apply for a junior, you just have to note that you will be coming in next next year. Trust me I was forced to apply for colleges when i was a junior cause of my Math teacher. At least five. I thank her for it but it didn''t do much good for me. I received the paperwork saying i was accepted early senior year, and then we were forced to whittle down our choices of where we wanted to go.

Pocketa
2010-02-22, 12:56 AM
My question is simple. I will restate. I'm not going to read all the flames to get to it.

Is one a National Merit Scholar just because they lack an asterisk by the score, or not?

arguskos
2010-02-22, 12:59 AM
My question is simple. I will restate. I'm not going to read all the flames to get to it.

Is one a National Merit Scholar just because they lack an asterisk by the score, or not?
No. The process for becoming a National Merit Scholar is far more in-depth than a simple "hey, go you!" note on your scores. They will contact you if you are in the running.

toasty
2010-02-22, 01:08 AM
Note: In California, at least, you apply in November (for public schools, I think it's Januaryish for most private schools, I don't know, I didn't apply to any (can't afford it, good thing California has great public schools)) of your senior year, get your results back in March/April, and decide in May. I was under the impression this is pretty much universal for U.S. colleges.

Hmm... I applied in like... August? :D I did that early because I didnt want to do it when I had my (CRAPLOAD) of school that I have now. I made my decision shortly after all the schools accepted me (umm... December?), though I only actually sent my letter of intent yesterday. I did apply for housing before that though... so ya.

I wasn't a national merit scholarship because I did horrible on the PSAT. I did manage to pwn the SAT the second time though (okay... not pwn... my math skills are still lower than I would have liked, but my Critical Reading was great :smallbiggrin:)

And like others have said, gotten is perfectly acceptable. Furthermore, I've noticed my english skills only truly come out when I'm writing those really important essay thingies. Other times I'll have horrible grammar.

skywalker
2010-02-22, 01:32 AM
My question is simple. I will restate. I'm not going to read all the flames to get to it.

Is one a National Merit Scholar just because they lack an asterisk by the score, or not?

:smallannoyed:

Some of us have been perfectly helpful and polite.

Vaynor
2010-02-22, 01:37 AM
No. The process for becoming a National Merit Scholar is far more in-depth than a simple "hey, go you!" note on your scores. They will contact you if you are in the running.

If you are a National Merit Scholar, you will definitely know about it. They'll let you know if you're in the running in a much more explicit manner than an ambiguous asterisk. The asterisk may be a good sign, but there's much more to it than that.

Pocketa
2010-02-22, 02:27 AM
Okay, thread closed, my question was answered.