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Down Comforter
2010-02-22, 09:35 PM
So I consider myself a bit of a techie but my computer has an issue that I cannot figure out. My computer has been going strong for about a year and a half now (built it myself), but about two hours ago it refused to boot up after going into hibernation mode.

Whenever I try to start the darn thing, everything powers up, but I get no post code and the power + reset buttons on the front don't work. I've tried removing all the hardware, swapping out the RAM, drives, and video card separately, all to no avail. I'm at a total loss as to what I should do?

So anyhow, does anyone have any suggestions? If nothing hardware related that might help, somewhere else I could ask?

Thanks in advance.

Pika...
2010-02-22, 09:49 PM
http://s.ecrater.com/stores/133343/4b2aef44ce1b2_133343b.jpg

valadil
2010-02-22, 11:11 PM
Sounds like your power supply is shot. These things die after a while. Last time I bought one they were actually rated in terms of how many hundreds of thousands of hours they'd last.

Dr.Epic
2010-02-22, 11:17 PM
http://s.ecrater.com/stores/133343/4b2aef44ce1b2_133343b.jpg

LOLZ!!!!:smallbiggrin:

Erloas
2010-02-22, 11:24 PM
If the system powers up but you don't get any beep codes or any sort of post and you've switched out RAM and video card then pretty much the only thing left is the motherboard.
The quickest check is generally pull everything but video card, RAM and processor and see what happens. If nothing happens remove the video card and try again, and if that doesn't work remove the RAM. Both of those will cause beep codes, if you aren't even getting the beep codes then the motherboard is completely gone.

It could be the power supply too, but if the fans, drives, etc are spinning up then thats probably not the problem.

What are the brands and models of your motherboard, processor, and power supply, and secondly RAM and video card?

chilepepper
2010-02-23, 02:15 AM
I concur with Erloas. In my experience (10ish years) no beep is going to be either bad motherboard or processor.

KuReshtin
2010-02-23, 04:55 AM
If the system powers up but you don't get any beep codes or any sort of post and you've switched out RAM and video card then pretty much the only thing left is the motherboard.

My first thought as well.

Reinboom
2010-02-23, 06:06 AM
Even though it powers up, I must also still emphasize the power supply notion. What you described can still occur if the computer is getting some power, but not enough - such as if a wire to the processor or motherboard burned out (lo and behold!)

If you have a spare power supply that you could easily use, I would test that first. If it still doesn't work... yep. Another one in for MoBo.

Erloas
2010-02-23, 09:32 AM
Even though it powers up, I must also still emphasize the power supply notion. What you described can still occur if the computer is getting some power, but not enough - such as if a wire to the processor or motherboard burned out (lo and behold!)

If you have a spare power supply that you could easily use, I would test that first. If it still doesn't work... yep. Another one in for MoBo.

While thats true, most power supplies don't seem to marginally fail, they seem to either fail completely or at least work to the point of a low load. Seeing as how the difference in power required is very small between spinning up the fans and drives and a few other things and to get it far enough into the boot sequence to get to the beep codes and at least start to initialize the video is not that great, I doubt a supply would have enough power for the first and not the second if that was the case.

Down Comforter
2010-02-23, 06:01 PM
My first thought was that it was indeed a mobo failure although I'd hoped not, because they're a pain to replace. I tried this:

The quickest check is generally pull everything but video card, RAM and processor and see what happens. If nothing happens remove the video card and try again, and if that doesn't work remove the RAM. Both of those will cause beep codes, if you aren't even getting the beep codes then the motherboard is completely gone.

...with no beep codes at all, so I'm just going to assume that I'll be spending this weekend installing a new motherboard.

wojonatior
2010-02-23, 09:24 PM
I am sorry for your loss.:smallfrown:
I wish it didn't have to be this way.

Magdela
2010-02-23, 11:42 PM
My first thought was that it was indeed a mobo failure although I'd hoped not, because they're a pain to replace. I tried this:


...with no beep codes at all, so I'm just going to assume that I'll be spending this weekend installing a new motherboard.
You built it yourself, it should not take any more than 15 minutes to replace a mobo, just unplug everything, yank out the guts, unscrew the motherboard, then do everything in reverse. (oh and don't forget to take off the side panels! :P)

Also, remember to check if new motherboard and case will work together. Form factor is often overlooked but important and I've seen veterans mess it up. (though most consider it the companies fault for not putting enough holes in the case)

Reinboom
2010-02-24, 12:17 AM
While thats true, most power supplies don't seem to marginally fail, they seem to either fail completely or at least work to the point of a low load. Seeing as how the difference in power required is very small between spinning up the fans and drives and a few other things and to get it far enough into the boot sequence to get to the beep codes and at least start to initialize the video is not that great, I doubt a supply would have enough power for the first and not the second if that was the case.

There are very few ways for power to "marginally fail" in general. Electric current simply does not work that way. However, the wires that direct power to the processor can still be burned, torn, or 'busted' - which is not such an uncommon prospect. This would cause everything to work completely, minus post commands, at the very least and would give exactly what was described.
Besides, it's cheaper to check for. And it's usually more wise to make sure it's not just something small in such cases.