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valadil
2010-04-19, 03:06 PM
Not sure if this is the right forum for miniatures. Apologies in advance if I guessed wrong.

I've been painting minis for 10 years. I'm a pretty decent painter, but I still suck at gluing them together in the first place. Only last year did I finally manage to attach a mini to a base without attaching myself to my mini.

So last night I picked up one of these (http://campaign-game-miniatures.0catch.com/2579.jpg). The extended arm is a separate piece. I filled the armpit with Games Workshop brand miniature glue and held the arm in place for a solid ~45 minutes (or however long your average Doctor Who episode is). Was the mini attached after the episode? Of course not (otherwise I wouldn't be posting here, now would I?).

So I applied more glue. Instead of holding it in place for another 45 minutes, this time I bound the arm to the giant with a rubber band and braced it with a binder clip. Left him out over night. Got up this morning, took the rubber band off and his arm sagged off.

Obviously I'm doing something wrong. I'm pretty sure I have a bad bottle of glue (I don't remember other bottles ever taking more than 15 min to dry before). It's likely that I'm using too much glue too, but this is a big, heavy arm, and I don't think a little droplet will hold it in place.

Anyway, I wondered if anyone had any tips for gluing minis together? This is my least favorite part of the whole D&D miniature hobby. Every time I do it I swear off minis that aren't a single piece, even though they're more fun to paint.

Are there any tools designed for holding them in place? I'm reluctant to use clamps and binder clips because I don't want to damage the soft metal. Rubber bands are easier said than done, and this is only the second time I've resorted to them. I usually end up lying a mini on its side and balancing the attachable appendage against office supplies or other minis, but there's gotta be a better way.

Keris
2010-04-19, 05:15 PM
Not sure if this is the right forum for miniatures. Apologies in advance if I guessed wrong.
This is the Arts and Crafts forum, so making models should be fine. There's also the Warhammer models thread over in Gaming (Other), and I'm certain I've seen other brands than GW in there, so you should be fine with D&D minis. They also know a lot more than I do about assembling miniatures. :smalltongue:

So last night I picked up one of these (http://campaign-game-miniatures.0catch.com/2579.jpg). The extended arm is a separate piece.
That's a Reaper mini, right? Is it pewter/white metal or resin?

I filled the armpit with Games Workshop brand miniature glue and held the arm in place for a solid ~45 minutes. Was the mini attached after the episode? Of course not.
By "miniatures glue", which variety do you mean? Games Workshop markets both polystyrene cement (used for plastic kits) and super glue (which you use for everything else). If you're trying to glue a metal model with poly cement, you're going to have some troubles. :smalltongue:


It's likely that I'm using too much glue too, but this is a big, heavy arm, and I don't think a little droplet will hold it in place.
You'd be surprised how far a little glue goes. And as I understand it, superglue needs contact with the air (and the moisture in it) to bond, so swamping the joint will mean it takes far longer to set.


Anyway, I wondered if anyone had any tips for gluing minis together?
For joints with a lot of weight on, try pinning. You'll need a pin vice or other small drill (able to fit about a 1mm bit), Games Workshop markets one for about $15. Drill a small hole into the miniature, and insert a metal rod (you can use a bit of a paperclip for this). Then press the joint together to mark where it lines up on the other part, and drill that side as well. Then stick the whole thing together with superglue.

valadil
2010-04-19, 05:43 PM
Thankee for the feedback :-)


This is the Arts and Crafts forum, so making models should be fine. There's also the Warhammer models thread over in Gaming (Other), and I'm certain I've seen other brands than GW in there, so you should be fine with D&D minis. They also know a lot more than I do about assembling miniatures. :smalltongue:

That's a Reaper mini, right? Is it pewter/white metal or resin?

Correct. I think it's white metal, but I'm not sure.


By "miniatures glue", which variety do you mean? Games Workshop markets both polystyrene cement (used for plastic kits) and super glue (which you use for everything else). If you're trying to glue a metal model with poly cement, you're going to have some troubles. :smalltongue:

By miniature glue I mean the only bottle of glue I could find in the paints section the last time I went to the gaming store nearby. Checking the label, it appears to be plastic glue. Seems likely that that's the culprit.



You'd be surprised how far a little glue goes. And as I understand it, superglue needs contact with the air (and the moisture in it) to bond, so swamping the joint will mean it takes far longer to set.

I've been letting it air out a bit to get sticky before adding the limb. I figured if the outer edge bonded and held quickly the swampy bits inside would bond later.



For joints with a lot of weight on, try pinning. You'll need a pin vice or other small drill (able to fit about a 1mm bit), Games Workshop markets one for about $15. Drill a small hole into the miniature, and insert a metal rod (you can use a bit of a paperclip for this). Then press the joint together to mark where it lines up on the other part, and drill that side as well. Then stick the whole thing together with superglue.

Hrmm. Sounds like a worthwhile investment. Do you think a regular drill with a small bit might work, or do they not go down that small?

Wannabehero
2010-05-13, 10:54 AM
In the past, I overcame my troubles with gluing pewter minatures with three simple steps.

Step 1: Go to your local hardware store. Purchase 10 minute metal epoxy (example here if you want to online order (http://www.rshughes.com/products/078143_14257.html)), ultrafine sandpaper, and a cleaning solvent (rubbing alcohol works fine).

Step 2: Lightly sand the surfaces you want to glue together with the ultrafine sandpaper (folding the sand paper and using the edge to get into crevices and around edges works well) then clean the sanded surface with a wipe of a paper towel soaked with alcohol. Allow a few minutes to insure the alcohol has fully evaporated. While the alcohol is evaporating, mix a small amount of the epoxy according the instructions on the package. I usually use a small folded up square of aluminum foil to hold the epoxy and a toothpick to do the mixing, but you can use whatever works for you.

Step 3: Using a fresh toothpick, apply a small bead of the mixed epoxy to the cleaned surfaces of both parts you want to glue together and spread the epoxy out to a thin, even coating on the gluing surface. Press the two surfaces together firmly. If you can conveniently hold them with one hand, you can use another clean toothpick to remove any excess epoxy that oozes out of the miniature. Hold the pieces together for 15 or so minutes (if using 10 minute epoxy) before letting go.

Voila, you should have a great bond.

Erloas
2010-05-13, 11:40 AM
There are actually several different types of plastics being used for models, mostly depending on the company (and even GW has changed over the years). There are also some that make them out of resins instead.

With all models, but metals especially, you should wash them with soap and water, rinse them really well with just water and them dry them before gluing or painting. They treat the molds with something to keep the model from sticking to it, so they can be easily removed. There can still be traces of this on the model when you get it. Just as it is designed to keep the model from sticking to the mold, it will also keep glues and paints from sticking to the model.

A thin layer of glue is best, if it gets too thick it takes forever to dry and the bond isn't as strong either.

As mentioned, GW makes at least 2 different types of glues. If you look at super glues from other places there are lots and lots of different types. There are at least a dozen different formulas for Loctite's super glues. Some are thicker then others, some have faster dry times, some are more surface insensitive then others. The surface insensitiveness of a glue is really important for metal models because the metal has very few pores and doesn't give the glue a lot of places to bond to and will take longer to dry and set (unlike your skin which virtually every super glue will bond to very well in a very short period of time).
At work we have access to some industrial super glue, loctite 404 (I'm sure it can be found lots of places) and I've always had good luck with that on metal and plastics. Even so, with any large piece, especially metals, I would pin it at as well.

Dallas-Dakota
2010-05-13, 11:57 AM
Glue is like a ninja, too much/many, and it'l/they'l be ineffective. Deadly when alone/ not much.


Geez, comparing objects to persons is much harder then I expected. Otherwise this quote would rockzorz.:smalltongue: