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Mystic Muse
2010-06-11, 12:51 PM
Three rings for the elven kings under the sky
Seven for the Dwarf lords in their halls of stone
Nine for mortal men doomed to die
One for the dark lord on his dark throne
In the land of Mordor, where Shadows lie

So, the one ring. What Enchantments would you put on a ring to create it? The two things I can think of are a slow acting mark of iniquity (Evil version of mark of justice) and a permanent Scrying enchantment with the stipulation that the person has to be wearing it.

Is there anything else/better you guys can think of? I'm mostly working off the movies here.

kestrel404
2010-06-11, 12:54 PM
It's a Lich's phylactery, disguised as a ring of invisibility. That's how I've always seen it. Maybe there are some extra powers attached (being able to command anyone wearing one of the other rings would be entirely reasonable), but it really boils down to that.

gbprime
2010-06-11, 12:54 PM
Well unless it's a PC wanting to actually MAKE an artifact himself, why bother defining it? And if it is a PC wanting to make an artifact... what the heck level are you guys, and wouldn't a custom Epic Spell be better?

Just make it a regular magic item with the customized item rules, and pay the extra to make it intelligent and evil, then crank up it's ego so it can threaten to control the player that carries it.

Darkxarth
2010-06-11, 12:56 PM
The issue is that the One Ring has different and scaling powers depending on who's wearing it. When a Hobbit wears it, a creature who is already easy to overlook, he becomes invisible. If Gandalf, Elrond, or Galadriel were to don the One Ring, it would do much more than simply make them invisible. And we know, even from the movies, that the One Ring did not make Sauron invisible.

Really, it is the very definition of Artifact and should be treated as such.

Ormagoden
2010-06-11, 01:03 PM
Well unless it's a PC wanting to actually MAKE an artifact himself, why bother defining it? And if it is a PC wanting to make an artifact... what the heck level are you guys, and wouldn't a custom Epic Spell be better?

Just make it a regular magic item with the customized item rules, and pay the extra to make it intelligent and evil, then crank up it's ego so it can threaten to control the player that carries it.

That doesn't really answer or address the OP's question.


I think the lich's phylactery is a great idea. Lets take it a few steps further.

1) Ring is "phylactery"
2) Wearing the ring triggers greater invisibility as long as it's worn.
3) Use taint rules for wearing it. (hobbits acquire taint much more slowly.)
4) Ring can dominate the wearers of other rings of power. (Targets get saves.)
5) Wearing the ring allows the Lich to scry your position (no save) and cast spells directly on you no matter the range. (maybe limit spells to fear or enchantment and such)

Did I miss anything?

Yora
2010-06-11, 01:06 PM
3) Use taint rules for wearing it. (hobbits acquire taint much more slowly.)
4) Ring can dominate the wearers of other rings of power. (Targets get saves.)
In communist Mordor, evil ring dominates YOU!

2xMachina
2010-06-11, 01:08 PM
Item familiar. Also, phylactery

With high ego score. And likes his original master.

Lapak
2010-06-11, 01:36 PM
I think the lich's phylactery is a great idea. Lets take it a few steps further.
*snip*

Did I miss anything?While you have a start there, you missed every not-strictly-defined power the ring has: the way it makes its wearer more masterful and commanding even if they came from humble beginnings, the way it amplifies the abilities of whoever wears it, the fact that a Gandalf or a Galadriel wielding it would be an unstoppable force. It contains the forged and focused power of a minor deity, after all. Oh, and the way it extends the life of the wearer, and the fact that beings tied to the ring can see through the invisibility, and its ability to influence events around itself and/or physically move to pass from owner to owner.

hamishspence
2010-06-11, 01:39 PM
Maybe it could be a Legacy Item a la Weapons of Legacy (not every legacy item has to be a weapon)

This would capture the "more powerful in the hands of very powerful characters" feel.

That said, the rules in Weapons of Legacy aren't very good- and might need adjustment.

Bharg
2010-06-11, 01:39 PM
The ring didn't turn Sauron invisible, right?
He also had to like... WEAR it or pooof! Ashes

Telonius
2010-06-11, 01:43 PM
First and most obviously, it's a Ring of Invisibility (or possibly Etherealness). I'd say telepathy within 30 feet, and ability to cast Suggestion. It demonstrated the ability to use something like a Demand effect on Gollum. ("If ever you touch me again...")

The Ego contests actually sound like a reasonable simulation of it.


An Ego Contest Ensues

An item familiar normally resists being picked up and used by another character. If the item familiar has an Ego score, it automatically tries to resist being wielded by anyone other than its linked master, even if the link has been severed (possibly because the master is dead). The rules for Ego conflicts can be found under Items against Characters. Normally, an intelligent item resists its owner only when a conflict of personality or purpose ensues. An item familiar assumes that any use of it by someone other than its linked (or previously linked) master is a conflict, and so it resists every time the new owner attempts to make use of it.

If the new owner wins the Ego contest, he can wield the item safely for 1 hour but cannot access any of the abilities the item familiar gained through its link (such as invested XP, skill ranks, or spell slots, or any special abilities it has that arenít simply a feature of the magic item). An item familiar may talk to its new owner (if it has that capability), but it feels at best unfriendly and could be extraordinarily hostile. If an item familiarís alignment matches that of its new owner, the item familiar may become less hostile over time but always forces Ego contests when possible.

The New Owner Can Attempt a Link

The new owner can attempt to link to the item by selecting the Item Familiar feat (assuming he meets the prerequisite). What occurs next depends on his character level compared to the character level of the highest-level previous owner.

New Owner Is Same or Higher Level
The link succeeds. The new owner gains all the benefits of the abilities of the item familiar, and the item familiarís alignment changes to match that of its new master. If the item familiar had invested skill ranks and/or spell slots, those investments become accessible to the new owner, adding to his totals. If the item familiar has spell slots, the new master can access them only if he could already cast spells of the appropriate levels.

New Owner Is Lower Level
The link partially succeeds. The alignment of the item familiar changes to match that of its new master, and the new owner can use all the item familiarís special abilities and powers. However, the new master cannot benefit from any invested skill ranks or spell slots until his character level equals or exceeds that of the item familiarís highest-level previous owner.



Also:


An item familiar gains its masterís alignment and, if the character changes alignment, it generally changes alignment accordingly. However, if this alignment change would be in direct conflict with the item familiarís special purpose (if any), the item does not change alignment, and it immediately severs the link between itself and its master. The link can only be reestablished when the master changes to a nonconflicting alignment.

Totally Guy
2010-06-11, 01:44 PM
When worn it grants...

+10 to Fort saves
True Seeing
+8 to Diplomacy, Bluff, Concentration and Sense Motive
+4 to caster level
Access to hear to thoughts of any wearers of the other rings.
Greater Invisibility

Each unique use of the item requires a will save. DC= 35 - users Wisdom score.

Failure indicates that the character chooses a(n additional) Flaw with no benefit.

The ring's maker knows when it is used. He may make a Use Magic Device or Spellcraft check to locate the user. DC is 30 - 3x the number of flaws possessed by the character.

(Didn't spent too long looking at the numbers... Feel free to suggest sensible ones.)

AstralFire
2010-06-11, 01:44 PM
I would give the ring a different effect based on the race, character level, and dominant role/power source of the person that wields it. The invisibility is only its effect on Hobbitses.

hamishspence
2010-06-11, 01:45 PM
He also had to like... WEAR it or pooof! Ashes

Not really. Being "killed" and having the ring cut off (which was the way it worked in The Silmarillion) caused his spirit to leave the body.

But under normal circumstances, I don't think the rule was that only the Ring kept his body alive.

And in the books, he "takes form again" before the events in The Hobbit. So he doesn't need the ring to have a body.


I would give the ring a different effect based on the race, character level, and dominant role/power source of the person that wields it. The invisibility is only its effect on Hobbitses.

In the book, Gandalf refers to the effects of the Great Rings in general on "mortals"- and that if a mortal uses the ring to make themselves invisible a lot, they begin to fade.

Also, Isildur (human) used the Ring to hide from Orcs, before it betrayed him and slipped off.

Mystic Muse
2010-06-11, 01:47 PM
Okay, the user is going to be a human if that helps.

Bharg
2010-06-11, 01:49 PM
Also notice that the ring wants to return to his creator and will haunt anyone else with terrible pictures, letting him hear voices that appear to be the thoughts of other persons, general paranoia, no recovery, change of alignment, true sight maybe yes... invisibility.... but the creator will know where you are if you use it.

Something like this, too?

Leecros
2010-06-11, 01:49 PM
Just make it one less than "The Two Ring" and you'll be fine.:smallwink:

Aeromyre
2010-06-11, 01:49 PM
Three rings for the elven kings under the sky
Seven for the Dwarf lords in their halls of stone
Nine for mortal men doomed to die
One for the dark lord on his dark throne
In the land of Mordor, where Shadows lie

So, the one ring. What Enchantments would you put on a ring to create it? The two things I can think of are a slow acting mark of iniquity (Evil version of mark of justice) and a permanent Scrying enchantment with the stipulation that the person has to be wearing it.

Is there anything else/better you guys can think of? I'm mostly working off the movies here.

Add a milfton of ego, the character should always be battling for his will, sauron will always be tempting him.

And yes i said "Milfton" feel free to quote me :smalltongue:

Telonius
2010-06-11, 01:51 PM
The more I'm thinking about it, the more I think that it's Ethereal rather than Invisible.

People who wore the ring:
Frodo - turned him invisible
Bilbo - turned him invisible
Gollum - turned him invisible
Isildur - turned him invisible
Sauron - no invisible effect
Bombadil - no invisible effect

Those last two are more spirit-like beings. It wouldn't be too much of a stretch, given Tolkien's cosmology, to say that they existed on the spiritual (ethereal) and material planes at the same time.

EDIT: Note that Isildur was human - it turned him invisible too, so it should do that for the human character we're discussing.

Aeromyre
2010-06-11, 01:52 PM
Also notice that the ring wants to return to his creator and will haunt anyone else with terrible pictures, letting him hear voices that appear to be the thoughts of other persons, general paranoia, no recovery, change of alignment, true sight maybe yes... invisibility.... but the creator will know where you are if you use it.

Something like this, too?

Perhaps charm person when he fails his ego will save daily, with Sauron telling him telepathy what to do.
But this can be problematic since players don't enjoy the DM playing them. UNless your character is cool and will play along

Eloi
2010-06-11, 01:53 PM
The more I'm thinking about it, the more I think that it's Ethereal rather than Invisible.

People who wore the ring:
Frodo - turned him invisible
Bilbo - turned him invisible
Gollum - turned him invisible
Isildur - turned him invisible
Sauron - no invisible effect
Bombadil - no invisible effect

Those last two are more spirit-like beings. It wouldn't be too much of a stretch, given Tolkien's cosmology, to say that they existed on the spiritual (ethereal) and material planes at the same time.

EDIT: Note that Isildur was human - it turned him invisible too, so it should do that for the human character we're discussing.

What are the mechanics of Gandalf wearing the ring?

Mystic Muse
2010-06-11, 01:54 PM
Well, since it's my character who's going to be creating this I don't think the DM will be controlling the character.

hamishspence
2010-06-11, 01:54 PM
Maybe its power should be greatest immediately before Sauron's death, and near Sauron's realm, (especially after his reappearence)

In Unfinished Tales, one of Isildur's sons, when an army of Orcs is approaching them, suggests that Isildur use the Ring to command them, and Isildur points out that

A: he dreads the pain of touching it,
and B: he's not strong willed enough to bend the Ring to his will that way.

When he's finally persuaded by his son during the battle to flee to Rivendell, he "slips the ring onto his finger with a cry of pain"

So it looks like the Ring can hurt people who put it on under certain circumstances (maybe because it was only shortly after Sauron's "death").

Tam_OConnor
2010-06-11, 01:58 PM
I'd expect Gandalf wearing the ring would pretty much be like Sauron wearing the ring, what with them both being Maiar. Sauron would either be reborn through him literally, or Gandalf would just be corrupted to Sauron's level. Mortals would be moderately screwed, either way.

Totally Guy
2010-06-11, 02:00 PM
Well, since it's my character who's going to be creating this I don't think the DM will be controlling the character.

The one ring is really powerful but it's interesting because it has a huge cost in the form of the ever-present malevolent being that forged it.

If you take away the cost you just end up with power. And that's pretty boring.

Exercise caution...

hamishspence
2010-06-11, 02:00 PM
I think in Tolkien's Letters, it was explained that Gandalf with the Ring would be far worse than Sauron- yet still act in a Gandalf-ish way.

So the ring wouldn't just turn the wielder into a Sauron clone.

Dr.Epic
2010-06-11, 02:01 PM
It's a Lich's phylactery, disguised as a ring of invisibility. That's how I've always seen it. Maybe there are some extra powers attached (being able to command anyone wearing one of the other rings would be entirely reasonable), but it really boils down to that.

Rings of Invisibility I believe are silver.

Mystic Muse
2010-06-11, 02:01 PM
The one ring is really powerful but it's interesting because it has a huge cost in the form of the ever-present malevolent being that forged it.

If you take away the cost you just end up with power. And that's pretty boring.

Exercise caution...

I know. That's why I'm going to use it as bait for NPCs I'd rather have on my side. (Mostly dragons)

hamishspence
2010-06-11, 02:02 PM
the precise quote from Letters:

Gandalf as Ring-Lord would have been far worse than Sauron. He would have remained 'righteous', but self-righteous. He would have continued to rule and order things for 'good', and the benefit of his subjects according to his wisdom (which was and would have remained great). 'Thus while Sauron multiplied [illegible word] evil, he left "good" clearly distinguishable from it. Gandalf would have made good detestable and seem evil.'

Drogorn
2010-06-11, 02:04 PM
What are the mechanics of Gandalf wearing the ring?

Gandalf never wore the ring.

hamishspence
2010-06-11, 02:05 PM
Gandalf never wore the ring.

The question was basically "mechanically- if Gandalf had worn the Ring- what effect would it have had?"

We know that Gandalf never actually put the ring on.

Eldariel
2010-06-11, 02:09 PM
The Ring acts through its wielder and amplifies its powers; its powers are directly proportional to the powers of the one who wields it. As such, its own powers should be rather small (the book states "shadow jaunt" and "speak language: orcish + black tongue" as powers it gains, proportionally more powerful as it closes to its place of origin).

It clearly places creatures not existing in multiple dimensions to the world of shadows. It also enthralls its wielder; it's obviously an intelligent item with a hefty ego-score. However, the rest of its powers are most likely derivatives of the creature's own powers; powers to command others, powers to wield mighty magic, powers to slay foes and so on; the kinda stuff you'd imagine Sauron in his corrupt form wanting to excel at.

Eloi
2010-06-11, 02:11 PM
Gandalf never wore the ring.

That's why I specified "the mechanics of" and asked the question in the first place. :smalltongue:

hamishspence
2010-06-11, 02:13 PM
What scene in the book has the ring emulating shadow jaunt?

Drogorn
2010-06-11, 02:18 PM
That's why I specified "the mechanics of" and asked the question in the first place. :smalltongue:

Well that's the point! If he never put it on, how would we know what the effects of him putting it on are? All we know is that it would massively boost his power, and that it would be very bad.

Mystic Muse
2010-06-11, 02:22 PM
Wearing the ring allows the Lich to scry your position (no save) and cast spells directly on you no matter the range. (maybe limit spells to fear or enchantment and such)


Perhaps charm person when he fails his ego will save daily, with Sauron telling him telepathy what to do.


Also notice that the ring wants to return to his creator and will haunt anyone else with terrible pictures, letting him hear voices that appear to be the thoughts of other persons, general paranoia, no recovery, change of alignment, true sight maybe yes... invisibility.... but the creator will know where you are if you use it.

These are the main things I think. One other main thing is that the phylactery has to be destroyed in the place it was created. Especially since (AFAIK) you can't recreate a Phylactery making the process extremely risky.

Beorn080
2010-06-11, 02:26 PM
I think in Tolkien's Letters, it was explained that Gandalf with the Ring would be far worse than Sauron- yet still act in a Gandalf-ish way.

So the ring wouldn't just turn the wielder into a Sauron clone.

That's because Sauron dumped 90% of his power into the thing, trying to break the rules as it were and forge something more powerful then was possible. Similar to a wizard who is allowed to go from lvl 20 to lvl 1, and use all that xp to make a ring that grants 5 wishes a day. Sure, the wizard is effectively worthless now, but he can regrow his power, and with the ring to assist him, it would be easy. Sauron just got caught while he was effectively lvl 2 by a lvl 20+ fighter.

The reason Gandalf would be a problem, is because Gandalf is still a lvl 20 wizard.

As for powers.

Greater invisiblity, automatic for mortals, toggle for immortals
True Seeing to 60 ft, everything appears as though Darkvision
Automatically apply the following metamagic: Extend, Enlarge, Empower, Maximize, Heighten to lvl 9, for free.
Timeless Body effect while worn
Mild telepathy

As for disadvantages
CL 1 suggestion to all within 30 ft who have seen the ring. "You wish to possess the ring" Suggestion can modify itself based on telepathy
Beacon of evil. All detect spells that would detect such an item can detect it at triple range, even if the spell has a maximum range. In addition, those who wear one of the other rings of power can detect it in close proximity.
Incorporeal transformation. Ring transforms those wearing it into an incorporeal form. This takes many many years.

hamishspence
2010-06-11, 02:43 PM
Sauron forged the ring long before being "killed" by Isildur and Elendil. A thousand or so years before.

In fact, by the time of the Last Alliance, he'd already travelled to Numenor (with the Ring, according to Letters)- corrupted its society a little further, directed them into war with Valinor, and as a result, Numenor was destroyed.

Sauron survived the destruction (ring and all) returned to Mordor, rebuilt himself: "And the Eye of Sauron the Terrible few could endure"- and then waged war against the elves and the survivors of Numenor.

So it's not a case of Level 2 Sauron vs Level 20 Elendil.

Eldariel
2010-06-11, 02:45 PM
What scene in the book has the ring emulating shadow jaunt?

Whenever they go invisible; they don't merely go invisible, they go to the parallel Plane of Shadow or Shadowworld, closest to the Ethereal Plane in D&D in function (though closest to the Plane of Shadow in effect, of course); that's where the Ringwraiths reside, for example.

The two planes are completely coexistent and effects in one world tend to affect both worlds; and Elven Lords exist on both planes at once, for example.


It's not True Seeing, it simply moves you to a coexistent Plane where you see different things; not everything you can see normally appears when you wear the Ring and there are things you cannot see normally that you can see in the Shadows.

It does not alter your vision, it just shifts you...well, Ethereal Jaunt is the closest, though you'd have to be able to affect the material plane from the Ethereal Plane for that to work, and the "signs in the shadow" should be there; you basically need something that's a combination of the Plane of Shadow and the Ethereal Plane.


EDIT: And Sauron was hit by the destruction of Numenor...just as a Maia, that didn't actually kill him. I recall it just robbed him of his form for a change since when he needed time to recuperate.

hamishspence
2010-06-11, 02:48 PM
Shadow jaunt is a teleportation effect though- we never see Frodo teleport.

Also, we never see that effect in The Hobbit- Bilbo doesn't describe the world as being significantly darker.

Beorn080
2010-06-11, 02:50 PM
Sauron forged the ring long before being "killed" by Isildur and Elendil. A thousand or so years before.

In fact, by the time of the Last Alliance, he'd already travelled to Numenor (with the Ring, according to Letters)- corrupted its society a little further, directed them into war with Valinor, and as a result, Numenor was destroyed.

Sauron survived the destruction (ring and all) returned to Mordor, rebuilt himself: "And the Eye of Sauron the Terrible few could endure"- and then waged war against the elves and the survivors of Numenor.

So it's not a case of Level 2 Sauron vs Level 20 Elendil.

I was talking about respective power levels, not absolute. Likewise, how much of what he did was due to a massively broken magic item as opposed to his own power? If it were D&D, I'd say having a massively broken magic item would render you to be much higher in effective level, and so drop your xp gain. Elendil merely took note of the source of his power, and clipped it off. Its what is called a "trick encounter" in the DM guide IIRC. Impossible until you find the trick, then it becomes easy or even trivial.

Eldariel
2010-06-11, 02:51 PM
Shadow jaunt is a teleportation effect though- we never see Frodo teleport.

Also, we never see that effect in The Hobbit- Bilbo doesn't describe the world as being significantly darker.

Oh, right. Was thinking of Ethereal Jaunt. Point being, when Frodo put on the ring, he did see Glorfindel in his...parallel plane form and I don't remember all the references, but I find it fairly obvious that the Ring makes you invisible by placing you to the parallel plane (which is why using it in the presence of the Ringwraiths would again be so dangerous; since then they'd see you) not by merely making light go through you.

The Ringwraiths are invisible to the naked eye too; they merely wear robes to denote where they are. But if you go to the parallel plane, you can see them.

Lapak
2010-06-11, 02:52 PM
EDIT: And Sauron was hit by the destruction of Numenor...just as a Maia, that didn't actually kill him. I recall it just robbed him of his form for a change since when he needed time to recuperate.Not 'just'; IIRC that's when he lost the ability to take a pleasing/seductive form and was forced into more overt evil.

hamishspence
2010-06-11, 03:05 PM
Frodo wasnt actually wearing the ring when he saw Glorfindel- though that could be attributed to the effects of the Morgul-knife rather than the Ring itself:

To Frodo it appeared that a white light was shining through the form and raiment of the rider, as if through a thin veil.

and later:

With his last failing sense Frodo heard cries, and it seemed to him that he saw, beyond the Riders that hesitated on the shore, a shining figure of white light; and behind it ran small shadowy forms waving flames, that flared red in the grey mist that was falling over the world.

Some of Gandalf's explanations to Frodo do mention the existence of a parallel "wraith world"

"You were in gravest peril when you wore the Ring, for then you were half in the wraith-world yourself, and they might have seized you. You could see them, and they could see you."

And when Gandalf's explaining why the lords of the Eldar "do not fear the Ringwraiths, for those who have dwelt in the Blessed Realm live at once in both worlds" Frodo says:

"I thought that I saw a white figure that shone and did not grow dim like the others. Was that Glorfindel then?"
"Yes, you saw him for a moment as he is on the other side: one of the mighty of the Firstborn."

This is more about the Morgul-knife making Frodo slowly more wraithlike, than the Ring, though.

hamishspence
2010-06-11, 03:13 PM
I was talking about respective power levels, not absolute. Likewise, how much of what he did was due to a massively broken magic item as opposed to his own power? If it were D&D, I'd say having a massively broken magic item would render you to be much higher in effective level, and so drop your xp gain. Elendil merely took note of the source of his power, and clipped it off. Its what is called a "trick encounter" in the DM guide IIRC. Impossible until you find the trick, then it becomes easy or even trivial.

Elendil and Gil-galad fought Sauron, and died. Sauron was "thrown down" and then Isildur removed the Ring.

Not a case of removing the source of Sauron's power, but killing him the hard way, getting killed in the process, and having buddies who take action to prevent Sauron rising up again.

Eldariel
2010-06-11, 03:16 PM
Frodo wasnt actually wearing the ring when he saw Glorfindel- though that could be attributed to the effects of the Morgul-knife rather than the Ring itself:

To Frodo it appeared that a white light was shining through the form and raiment of the rider, as if through a thin veil.

and later:

With his last failing sense Frodo heard cries, and it seemed to him that he saw, beyond the Riders that hesitated on the shore, a shining figure of white light; and behind it ran small shadowy forms waving flames, that flared red in the grey mist that was falling over the world.

Some of Gandalf's explanations to Frodo do mention the existence of a parallel "wraith world"

"You were in gravest peril when you wore the Ring, for then you were half in the wraith-world yourself, and they might have seized you. You could see them, and they could see you."

And when Gandalf's explaining why the lords of the Eldar "do not fear the Ringwraiths, for those who have dwelt in the Blessed Realm live at once in both worlds" Frodo says:

"I thought that I saw a white figure that shone and did not grow dim like the others. Was that Glorfindel then?"
"Yes, you saw him for a moment as he is on the other side: one of the mighty of the Firstborn."

This is more about the Morgul-knife making Frodo slowly more wraithlike, than the Ring, though.

Alright, but regardless, the passage you quoted from Gandalf should pretty much confirm that the invisibility isn't just being visually undetectable, but being visually somewhere else.

hamishspence
2010-06-11, 03:22 PM
Not quite as extreme as in the case of the Ethereal or the Shadow plane in D&D though- in the case of the Ethereal plane, you can walk through walls on the Material, and in the case of the Shadow plane, it's a whole world of its own which only approximates the Material plane.

The "wraith-world" of LoTR seems a bit less "far" from the material plane, than the D&D Ethereal & Shadow planes are.

It also mentions in The Hobbit that Bilbo still casts a faint shadow while wearing the ring.

Hague
2010-06-11, 03:25 PM
Well, the wraith world in LotR is much different than the Plane of Shadow, so it's difficult to pin down exactly. You go somewhere else, but you still maintain a physical presence in the living world, able to manipulate things and not falling through floors and the like.

hamishspence
2010-06-11, 03:26 PM
Or get bumped into accidentally- an occupational hazard Bilbo has to deal with.

Telonius
2010-06-11, 03:30 PM
So somewhere between invisible and ethereal/shadow, then? Just plain invisible doesn't seem to cut it, unless we're going to call it as giving him True Seeing.

hamishspence
2010-06-11, 03:34 PM
Homebrew your own "Wraith-World" plane, and wearers of The Ring count as being on both planes simultaneously (though not visible on the Material).

J.Gellert
2010-06-11, 04:36 PM
Intelligent item with ridiculously high Ego that causes you to no longer suffer penalties for aging (and ignore your maximum age). Also, one of the following.

If you are a spellcaster: You gain Caster Level +4.

If you are not a spellcaster: You turn ethereal.

Dun dun dunnnn!

Sebastian
2010-06-11, 04:49 PM
I would give the ring a different effect based on the race, character level, and dominant role/power source of the person that wields it. The invisibility is only its effect on Hobbitses.

no, The ring made Isildur invisible, too and he was a human.

And Sauron wasn't invisible because he is the lord of the rings, its powers don't affect him if he don't want to, exactly like for Bombadil, even if for different reasons

Balain
2010-06-11, 05:20 PM
Three rings for the elven kings under the sky
Seven for the Dwarf lords in their halls of stone
Nine for mortal men doomed to die
One for the dark lord on his dark throne
In the land of Mordor, where Shadows lie

I'm guessing you're playing D&D. Players should never make artifacts and that is what the one ring is along with the elven rings, dwarven rings and rings for men.

If you actually look at what is involved in making an artifact, you end up not being a PC anymore. You have to put your soul into the item or some such thing.

Anyways This is based off reading the books and playing a few Middle Earth rpgs, mostly MERP.

The one ring had no direct influence over the other rings, unless you were Sauron himself. If the one ring is destroyed the other rings loses all powers

The ring amplifies the magical powers of the wearer based on it's will, So D&D maybe Wisdom? or just add levels of spellcaster if the wearer is a spellcaster

A mortal wearing the ring becomes invisible. If you are a god or demi-god you can control the invisbility. So in D&D you have greater invisiblity cast on you.

If you aren't the creator of the ring it eats away at your will till you give into it and do what it wants (normally get back to it's creator). A little tougher for D&D, you have to make a wisdom check every so often, with a cumulative -1 every check. When you fail you are controlled by it, or check vs the items ego every so often with the cumulative -1 penalty.

As for Sauron wearing the ring it did all sorts of different things. So if you are the creator and wearing it it can do what ever magical effects you want to put into it.

Talon Sky
2010-06-11, 05:26 PM
Don't forget the Ring can change size at will, and that it keeps the bearer alive....despite a large lack of food or water or sleep.

So, it's a enlarging/shrinking ring of sustainence as well? ;p

Mystic Muse
2010-06-11, 05:31 PM
Don't forget the Ring can change size at will, and that it keeps the bearer alive....despite a large lack of food or water or sleep.

So, it's a enlarging/shrinking ring of sustainence as well? ;p

Actually, I think that would be the sizing enchantment despite the fact it usually only works for weapons.

I already have a ring of sustenance so that works well.(favorite magic item ever)

Talon Sky
2010-06-11, 05:45 PM
If you aren't the creator of the ring it eats away at your will till you give into it and do what it wants (normally get back to it's creator). A little tougher for D&D, you have to make a wisdom check every so often, with a cumulative -1 every check. When you fail you are controlled by it, or check vs the items ego every so often with the cumulative -1 penalty.

Actually, I think that time has less to do with the Ring's influence over the bearer, it's more to do with the closeness to Mt. Doom.

In the Shire, the Ring has to try hard to dominate someone.

As Frodo got closer to Mordor, the Ring had greater and greater effect.

Finally (most importantly), in Mt. Doom itself, the Ring is nearly impossible to resist. Note both Frodo and Isildur, both of whom could somewhat resist the Ring until they reached the precipice above the lava. Then, it dominated them completely.

So I would say, for every mile you got closer to Mordor, +1 to the Will DC

WalkingTarget
2010-06-11, 05:47 PM
Not much one for homebrew, personally.

One thing to note is that Tolkien's world is not modeled well by core D&D at all, the closest you can really get is by restricting it to E6, in my opinion.

It's an old thread, but a former member did this (http://www.giantitp.com/forums/showthread.php?t=71869) writeup a few years ago of Sauron (which includes ideas for the Ring). It might be handy for pointers if you want to take it in that direction.


The mighty ring of power is a mayor artifact that grants several powers to those you claim it. Claiming it requires that the ring be in the claimer's possession and that he pass a DC 20 willsave. Failure makes Sauron aware of the claimant. Should the ring be claimed Sauron is permanently killed (becomes an impotent ghost).
It grants the following powers to those who claim it:
-As a fullround action Sauron can exert his power through the ring to anyone wearing a ring of power. This acts like a Dominate Monster spell at DC 20. Once dominated a telepathic link is established and Sauron can issue orders to his thrall.
-The ring of power amplifies the wearers personal power by an immense amount. The wearer recieves a 50% enhancement increase in hitdie, saves, save DCs for spells and spell-likes, caster level and skill checks up to a maximum of a +4 increase (+8 for skillchecks). All the wielder's stats also recieve a +2 enhancement bonus. Sauron's stats already have these bonuses included.
-Greater Invisibility at will (but ethereal creatures can see you). People who are using the ring but haven't claimed it always go invisible when wearing it.
-The wearer can see the ethereal plane (whether or not they've claimed the ring).
-The wearer stops aging and can stop the aging of people, places or objects of his choice. Users who haven't claimed the ring stop aging but can't preserve other objects. Certain races are immune to this effect (DM decides which).
Anyone with the ring in his possession must make a willsave DC 10+3 per number of hitdie that would be increased should he claim it. This willsave must be repeated every week. The person with the ring may get bonuses to his willsave depending on his vulnerability to temptation. These bonuses are decided by the DM. On each failure the wearers alignment is shifted one step towards lawful evil.
In order to willingly give up the ring the wearer must make the same willsave. Willingly destroying the ring is virtualy impossible (requires a DC 40 willsave or complete immunity to mind affecting attacks).
Anyone who sees the ring desires it and must make a DC 5 willsave or immediatly try and take it. This save DC increases by 1 each week the person remains near the ring to a maximum of DC 10. After the initial save anyone near the ring only has to make their save once per week.

There was more discussion that I don't think was all factored into his post that I've quoted here, so feel free to take a look through the rest of the thread.

jiriku
2010-06-11, 06:01 PM
So somewhere between invisible and ethereal/shadow, then? Just plain invisible doesn't seem to cut it, unless we're going to call it as giving him True Seeing.

Wearer becomes a dual entity, resident on both the ethereal and material planes at once, like a manifested ghost. Unlike a manifesting ghost, however, the wearer is both corporeal and invisible on the material plane.

Jastermereel
2010-06-11, 07:12 PM
Different effects per race you say? Why not use temporary Racial Paragon Levels. Give the wearer a temporary racial paragon level for every N levels they currently have, rounded up. So, if N were, say, 7, a low level character would get a single paragon level, a mid-range character two, and a high-level character would get the most out of the ring with three. If they take the ring off, the effects go away, but come back immediately when it is put back on.

This, of course, is in addition to the other ideas like it being a unique artifact with an ego, and taint and will saves and scrying and whatnot.

While it does have some of the fluff of a phylactery, it doesn't really all work out as Sauron isn't exactly reforming around the cursed thing.

Also, is this "The One Ring" or simply a "one ring"-like artifact? For the former, do what you think LotR would have happen and use The Zero Rule to rule over them all.

Custos Sophiae
2010-06-11, 07:13 PM
The more willpower you have, the more you can do with the Ring. If you have enough willpower to defeat Sauron (i.e save against his Dominate SLA) you gain full mastery of the Ring, and with it all his divine ranks and class levels, leaving him in the same impotent state as if the Ring had been destroyed. Sauron is on a par with the weakest among the Valar, so I'd put him somewhere around rank 6-9.

For a measure of willpower, I'd use will save, without any item bonuses. E.g, +4 will save, suggestion 1/day; +20 will save, suggestion at will, dominate 3/day, rebuke undead - filling in between (numbers just for illustration.). The Ring's spells would all be associated with control, but of the undead as well as the living; Sauron invented necromancy in Middle Earth.

The Ring should can also provide xp to power spells, and item crafting - perhaps wlll save x 1000 xp/day. All items created using this power cannot be destroyed while the Ring survives, and will perish with it.

The Ring can enhance its bearer's own natural powers. I'd interpret this to cover both racial and class features.The bearer gets 1 virtual HD/level per +4 will save, which goes to their main class, or to racial HD if that's higher than their class. They only benefit from this while the Ring is in their possession.

A ring bearer does not age. If they loose the Ring, their ageing resumes from the point where they gained the Ring, but at half the normal rate - Gollum wasn't acting like he was approaching 100 in Mordor.

The Ring gets more powerful as it approaches Mount Doom - treat the bearer as though their will save were +4 higher, and the save DC if spells cast by the Ring itself increases inside Morder.

Inside Mordor, the Ring also gives a flat +10 intimidation bonus against the creatures of Sauron (goblinoids, trolls, undead, and werewolves)

The invisibility related powers have already been mentioned..

JonestheSpy
2010-06-11, 11:07 PM
Just to throw a wrench in here, really most of Tolkien's magic works better when thought of as DnD psionics. It's largely all about one's will dominating another, manipulating emotions, picking up people's thoughts, etc. Gandalf's affinity for fire plays out well as pyrokinesis. And it certainly is nothing like the Vancian spell memorization system.

I'm not familiar enough with the psionic rules to get too specific, but I could see the Ring as having a gigantic power point reserve and many stacking metapsionic abilities, but granting very little actual powers except for invisibility - that goes well with enhancing the wearer's abilities that are already there, not granting powers like a typical magic item.

Also, it should be pointed out that the Ring can have effects even when not worn. One of my favorite scenes in the story is when Sam is in the tower of Cirith Ungol clutching the Ring hanging on its chain, and scares the living daylights out of the orc coming down the stairs, who can only see him as a menacing shadowy shape with a gleaming elf-blade...

2xMachina
2010-06-12, 04:21 AM
Actually, I think that would be the sizing enchantment despite the fact it usually only works for weapons.

I already have a ring of sustenance so that works well.(favorite magic item ever)

Magic clothes automatically size to their wearer, so no enchantment is needed.

Cogidubnus
2010-06-12, 05:00 AM
What are the mechanics of Gandalf wearing the ring?

Pun-pun, basically.

Custos Sophiae
2010-06-12, 05:10 AM
Psionics can account for a lot of Middle Earth magic, but many of the big things are done with song, so bards.

In fact, if you restrict psionics to clairsentience and telepathy, and have bardic magic as the only magic, restricted to enchantment and divination, perhaps with a handful of appropriate spells from other schools, you'd have a decent start on Middle Earth's low powered magic. Gandalf uses fire too, but that could be powered by his ring.

Eloi
2010-06-12, 05:36 AM
Pun-pun, basically.

Am I the only one who finds Gandalf, Slayer of EVERYTHING, an interesting concept for as tory?

Eloi
2010-06-12, 05:37 AM
Psionics can account for a lot of Middle Earth magic, but many of the big things are done with song, so bards.

In fact, if you restrict psionics to clairsentience and telepathy, and have bardic magic as the only magic, restricted to enchantment and divination, perhaps with a handful of appropriate spells from other schools, you'd have a decent start on Middle Earth's low powered magic. Gandalf uses fire too, but that could be powered by his ring.

Or it could be a racial ability, he isn't human if I recall correctly.

Emmerask
2010-06-12, 06:00 AM
Or it could be a racial ability, he isn't human if I recall correctly.

Correct, he is a Maiar which are lesser Ainur.
They basically are spirits or aspects of the "father of all".

Cogidubnus
2010-06-12, 07:33 AM
Correct, he is a Maiar which are lesser Ainur.
They basically are spirits or aspects of the "father of all".

Analogous angels xD