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Admiral Squish
2010-09-01, 12:10 AM
So, I'm going to begin making a webcomic. Or, rather, I'm going to begin POSTING a comic I've already started. I'm vaguely hoping that donations will be able to help me continue paying my artist.

So, I need a little help. I basically know nothing about producing a webcomic. Does anyone have anything they can tell me? Any sites they can recommend for hosting? Ways to increase readership? Ways to gather more donations? ANYTHING?

Dr.Epic
2010-09-01, 12:42 AM
The only advise I would give is update often enough so readers don't lose interest. This could be as seldom as once a week, but if you just let the comic be at a stand still people might stop reading. Also, for general comic advise, check out Scott McCloud's Making Comics.

Jokasti
2010-09-01, 12:44 AM
I don't know of any sites besides the genetics like DrunkDuck, Keenspot, etc. I've heard good things about ComicPress. To increase readership: go where the readers are, namely other webcomic sites. Post a thread on xkcd, penny arcade, here, anywhere. To get good donations, have good material, both art and writing. Merch is the name of the game when it comes to getting money. People want something for something, not nothing.
Good luck!

Dr.Epic
2010-09-01, 12:55 AM
Merch is the name of the game when it comes to getting money. People want something for something, not nothing.
Good luck!

Merchandise? Isn't that a little unnecessary at this stage? Not to mention would that cost money to produce them and you have no idea if they're even be bought.

Maximum Zersk
2010-09-01, 01:08 AM
Also, for general comic advise, check out Scott McCloud's Making Comics.

This, so much. It's a great book, and has a whole lot information that extends beyond just making comics.

Admiral Squish
2010-09-01, 04:58 AM
The only advise I would give is update often enough so readers don't lose interest. This could be as seldom as once a week, but if you just let the comic be at a stand still people might stop reading. Also, for general comic advise, check out Scott McCloud's Making Comics.

My brother has that book, and a couple more from him. Very good books, I could probably use a refresher, though.


I don't know of any sites besides the genetics like DrunkDuck, Keenspot, etc. I've heard good things about ComicPress. To increase readership: go where the readers are, namely other webcomic sites. Post a thread on xkcd, penny arcade, here, anywhere. To get good donations, have good material, both art and writing. Merch is the name of the game when it comes to getting money. People want something for something, not nothing.
Good luck!

Drunkduck, Keenspot, and Comicpress, huh? I'll have to give them a look.


Merchandise? Isn't that a little unnecessary at this stage? Not to mention would that cost money to produce them and you have no idea if they're even be bought.

Yeah, I'm not sure how I'd merchandise it, anyways.

T-O-E
2010-09-01, 07:40 AM
I wouldn't even think of making any money or even breaking even at this stage.

Domochevsky
2010-09-01, 09:05 AM
Indeed. Making money or even breaking even at this stage is not an option. You need a consistent readership before you can think about that.

Talking about readership... depending on how often you update you may also want to think about adding a comment section for your comic or even a forum if things get high. (Although i would advice against a forum for the time being.)

You should also get your own domain/webspace (It's pretty cheap usually, like 15 bucks a year).
Avoid mass-hosters like drunkdunk and keenspot. They've got a rep for being kinda shoddy due to all the crap that gets hosted there. (90% and all that.) :|

That being said, consistency is key. Update at the same day and preferably and the same hour of the same day. A comicCMS will most likely help with that.

Bayar
2010-09-01, 09:11 AM
Merchandise? Isn't that a little unnecessary at this stage? Not to mention would that cost money to produce them and you have no idea if they're even be bought.

I remember that there is a company around the internet that does the merchandise for you and just gives you a cut of the profits for the design. But can't remember it's name ATM.

Dogmantra
2010-09-01, 11:22 AM
I remember that there is a company around the internet that does the merchandise for you and just gives you a cut of the profits for the design. But can't remember it's name ATM.

Cafepress?

Domochevsky
2010-09-01, 11:38 AM
deviantArt?

Dr.Epic
2010-09-01, 02:14 PM
I remember that there is a company around the internet that does the merchandise for you and just gives you a cut of the profits for the design. But can't remember it's name ATM.

That's a sweet deal. What sort of stuff do they make? Books? Shirts? Mugs? Buttons? Posters?

ukuleleninja
2010-09-01, 02:47 PM
I just made My first webcomic, and i Found that the most handy tool in inkscape was the whole section under "path". especially duplicating shapes, drawing over them and usingm "intersection". hope this helps.

also, look at other peoples webcomics, and see what they do good and bad.

Admiral Squish
2010-09-01, 05:17 PM
Okay, allow me to clarify: I've got an artist and a letterer. I'm just the writer.

I have NO MONEY. I was hoping that donations would let me start paying my artist again to make more pages. So, I have no choice but to go for some kinda free hosting site, at least for now. Plus, free hosting sites tend to have tools that make it easier for me to work, whereas there is much more learning to be done for making my own site.

As for looking at other people's sites, I look at a LOT of webcomics. I don't think there will be much problem there.

JTPetro
2010-09-01, 05:32 PM
Hello! I just started a webcomic (http://www.jejunecomic.com/) myself. I'm no expert by any means, but if I can help someone avoid the aggravations I've faced, I'll be happy.

I agree wholeheartedly about keeping to an update schedule. I picked once per week, on Fridays. Not too demanding at this junction, and I can always up it to 2x or 3x a week once I get rolling. I also read webcomics myself, and THE biggest reason for losing interest/forgetting to check it is no updates when promised. If life gets in the way and you have to decrease your updates, tell your readers and change your website to reflect that. :smallwink: Even when not many people are reading yet, keep people informed. It fosters a professional attitude, plus you never know who's lurking!

I thought about trying Comicgenesis, Keenspace etc, but in the end I bought hosting through Dreamhost and installed Wordpress with Comicpress. I really suck at design, which is the one drawback, but at least it's all mine. I pay about $120 a year for Dreamhost's "Happy Hosting" plan. There may be cheaper options out there, but I went with Dreamhost because I heard good things about them.

Cafepress is a good idea, but not right now. You need a significant archive/readership before you can even hope of getting any profit. I don't have that yet myself, because I've only just started. Once I have more archive for potential readers to look at, I will more aggressively "market" my webcomic. I've thought about things like Facebook ads, etc....but that's for the future.

It's so tempting to want to be popular and successful right away! Sometimes it feels like I toil in secrecy on my little labor of love, but I must be patient! :smallbiggrin:


Okay, allow me to clarify: I've got an artist and a letterer. I'm just the writer.

I have NO MONEY. I was hoping that donations would let me start paying my artist again to make more pages. So, I have no choice but to go for some kinda free hosting site, at least for now. Plus, free hosting sites tend to have tools that make it easier for me to work, whereas there is much more learning to be done for making my own site.

As for looking at other people's sites, I look at a LOT of webcomics. I don't think there will be much problem there.

I saw this after I posted. I would suggest sites like Comicgenesis, Drunk Duck, etc. What I did was research them each and make a list of their pros and cons. If I wasn't hosting myself, I'd probably pick Comicgenesis. It has a sizable community, but not so huge you'll drown. It has forums and site design options. But, again, it's all personal choice.

And even though you don't have the means to host on your own now, it might be something to consider in the future. You might want to move out on your own once you become popular.