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Endarire
2010-10-12, 11:54 PM
Intro
The phrasing comes from a casual D&D player who's part of my group. He dislikes needing to research anything, and he's asked the group for help more times than he'd like. He wants to be effective while referencing a minimum of source material. He's also tired of my suggesting "Human Druid."

What do you recommend?

Candidate Classes
Crusader
Druid
Swordsage
Warblade
Wizard

(Cleric is absent from this list since referencing so many sources, like Complete Divine for Divine Metamagic, isn't his thing.)

Nohwl
2010-10-12, 11:57 PM
cleric doesn't need too many sources. you can do fine with players handbook and complete divine.

Scow2
2010-10-12, 11:57 PM
I suggest Warblade. Not too many maneuvers to have to choose from (And he starts with all of them prepared)

It's flexible, awesome, and if he screws up, he still has Full BAB, d12 HD, and a decent save or two.

true_shinken
2010-10-13, 12:17 AM
Druid is a hassle. Your stats change during wild shape and you have to keep a list of forms, you have to choose your animal companion... and you still have the same other responsabilities from the other classes (skills, feats, ability scores, etc).

Any martial adept, Warlock, Beguiler, Dread Necromancer, Warmage and Dragon Fire adept all spring to mind. Barbarian is kinda hard to screw up, too - if he gets Power Attack + pounce, that's probably already enough.

Gavinfoxx
2010-10-13, 12:18 AM
Shapechange Druid is pretty good. Just fill up with battlefield control spells, have the stats of the animals you summon, and have your shapechange form stats figured out.

JKTrickster
2010-10-13, 12:24 AM
I would recommend Crusader actually. Even though the Granted mechanic is weird at first, they virtually require nothing else to remember and are self autonomous from the start. No actions for refreshing is awesome and the limited amount of maneuvers means the least amount of bookkeeping.

GoodbyeSoberDay
2010-10-13, 12:27 AM
I would recommend Crusader actually. Even though the Granted mechanic is weird at first, they virtually require nothing else to remember and are self autonomous from the start. No actions for refreshing is awesome and the limited amount of maneuvers means the least amount of bookkeeping.I think Warblade wins the bookkeeping match by a hair due to the delayed damage pool.

Crow
2010-10-13, 12:36 AM
I know it's not on the list, but Barbarian.

But does your player not want to have to dig through multiple books while playing the class, or not dig through any books at all? If it's the first option, nevermind my suggestion. If it's the second...Well, my casual players don't want to have to sift through spells and maneuvers just so they can play the game, even if they are limited to just one book.

Kylarra
2010-10-13, 12:43 AM
Can't pass up an opportunity to recommend Dragonfire Adept (http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=dnd/ex/20060912a&page=2) again. Easily my favorite class and easy to play. All you need to do is have a decent con, take entangling exhalation and you can't go wrong.

GoodbyeSoberDay
2010-10-13, 12:46 AM
When I think of bookkeeping, I think of "time spent looking things up and doing written legwork." If you only have to look up stuff in one book, that reduces bookkeeping, but doesn't eliminate it. I'd say a standard barbarian whose feats have written page references is generally low bookkeeping.

What I do in my 4e group is make excel character sheets that lay out what every power does, including explicit attack bonuses, damage rolls and other effects. Some upfront bookkeeping for me turns into much less bookkeeping in-game for everyone. Assuming you use computers I don't see why you couldn't do the same thing for martial characters with their meager options, or even a low level martial adept.

DementedFellow
2010-10-13, 12:49 AM
Why isn't sorcerer in the list? No preparation needed. Core spells are powerful. It is -the- newbie-friendly caster.

The Shadowmind
2010-10-13, 12:56 AM
Another recommendation for the warlock.

If the other players are decently optimized, then I would like to add this house rule: The chart is no longer the warlock's invocations known, but the number of invocations know each day. Or in simpler terms, allow them to swap invocations known each day. Do the same with the Dragonfire adept.

Aran Banks
2010-10-13, 01:01 AM
Yeah, if you hand him the spells, Sorcerers are very nice at low levels where you don't have huge lists of options.

I'd recommend the psion, though. It's nicer, since it has a pool of points as powers that can be regulated through the pool. Very easy to use, and makes the player think about resources.

EDIT: Also, going to echo the Shadowmind, warlocks and invocation classes are EXCELLENT. I'd take one of the warlock revisions around here (on the Fire Speaker or Ebon Initiate or something) and use that.

Scow2
2010-10-13, 01:02 AM
Yeah, if you hand him the spells, Sorcerers are very nice at low levels where you don't have huge lists of options.

I'd recommend the psion, though. It's nicer, since it has a pool of points as powers that can be regulated through the pool. Very easy to use, and makes the player think about resources.

EDIT: Also, going to echo the Shadowmind, warlocks and invocation classes are EXCELLENT. I'd take one of the warlock revisions around here (on the Fire Speaker or Ebon Initiate or something) and use that.

It's also better designed than the Sorcerer, which the Devs hated.

Roc Ness
2010-10-13, 01:12 AM
Sorcerers and Warlocks (and by extension Favored Souls) are probably easier to play than the prepared casters, I think.

Fizban
2010-10-13, 01:52 AM
While sorcerers and favored souls may be easier to play at the table, they are much worse to build, especially for a newbie. Anyone who's ever tried to build one knows that it's hard making sure you have everything you need in that tiny number of spells known. If you make a mistake and learn the wrong spell on level up, it's going to take 4 more levels to fix (or one with PHBII retraining rules, which still hurts), and you're "down" one of your highest level spells the whole time. Wizard is actually much friendlier, since the cost of fixing a bad spell choice is only about 125gp per character level. Both require lots of bookwork to play, since you need to know your spells weather you're preparing them or making absolute permanent choices, and even the PHB has a lot of spells to go through if you've never played a caster.

While the warlock has fewer choices and thus one wrong choice costs a lot more, it also has far less material to go through and takes much less time to check and correct: "What invocations do you have? -list 4 names long- Oh that third one is a trap, grab something else while we roll initiative", vs "Read entire spell list during break- uh half your spells are bad, you need to repick them and then repick the other half because you'll need some of those slots to get the decent versions of your bad spells". Yes, I just suggested ignoring normal retraining rules for the Warlock if they make a bad pick, but for some reason it just doesn't feel as extreme as it would be for a sorcerer, probably because there's just not as much work involved.

I agree that barbarians are just about the easiest class to play. The only big choices they need to make are feats, and it's very easy to say "take Power Attack, and if you don't know what else to take just grab something with rage in the name". And that's all they need: if the player doesn't want to do the work needed to make a controlling fighter then they'll be far more useful dealing damage as a barbarian. For bonus points, they avoid the Weapon Specialization trap at the same time.

Roc Ness
2010-10-13, 02:26 AM
Okay, that's probably true...

Malbordeus
2010-10-13, 04:17 AM
the sorceror specialists, namely

Warmage
Beguier
Dread Necromancer

they get abilities relevant to their class as they level, their spell list is fixed, so you need to look at it maybe once or twice, and they rarely come off as underpowered unless played by an actual muppet. I mean one of those cloth ones on the origional muppet show. without a human controling it.

they also have some flexibility in how they can be played, and a limited ability to customise to a players requirements, so generally.... yeah.

also, random note

Dragon Shaman. everything it uses is listed on about two pages. very minimal on the reading.

Roc Ness
2010-10-13, 04:23 AM
the sorceror specialists, namely

Warmage
Beguier
Dread Necromancer

Warmage would probably be a problem to play past 6th level, though...

Dread Necro and the Beguiler I second for being easy-to-pick-up-and-play classes, though. Especially the Beguiler, as those skill points give a beginner something to do if they're usual tactics don't work.

Prime32
2010-10-13, 04:40 AM
Crusader, if you print out the maneuver cards.

dsmiles
2010-10-13, 04:47 AM
TWF Rogue is easy to keep up with.

Darastin
2010-10-13, 06:13 AM
Why isn't sorcerer in the list? No preparation needed. Core spells are powerful. It is -the- newbie-friendly caster.
No, it is not. You really need to put a lot of thought into your spell selection or the character will suck. Sorcerers are easier to handle during actual play, but can be messed up baldy upon creation or gaining levels.

Beguilers, Dread Necromancers and Warmages are newbie-friendly. They have a pre-selected list of spells known and are spontaneous casters. Higly specialized (and in the case of Warmage, with a very weak speciality), but really easy to play and almost impossible to screw up. So, +1 to Malbordeus.

Just my two -cents;
Darastin

Starbuck_II
2010-10-13, 06:21 AM
Duskblade: you buff (blade of Blood), spell channel, and deal damage.

Amphetryon
2010-10-13, 07:12 AM
Wilder deserves at least passing mention. Since its materials are virtually all contained within one source, digging through multiple books isn't the issue it might be with a Druid. Power points are as easy to track as subtraction.

If Warlock is under consideration, DFA should be, too.

Renchard
2010-10-13, 08:30 AM
Spirit Shaman.

Druid spell list can do a lot, but no wildshape to track, and no summons if you don't want them.

A small spell list to track, and change it tomorrow if you don't like it.

Person_Man
2010-10-13, 08:39 AM
Spellthief (http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=dnd/ex/20050107a). Steal Spells makes you the Peter Petrelli of D&D. If your enemy has spells, you can take them and use them or burn them for a buff with Arcane Strike. If you're playing in a party with spellcasters or spell-like ability users you can use and/or borrow their magic as needed. You also have excellent Skills, and can sneak, be the party face, or use any magic item you find with ease. Plus you have a small but useful list of your own spontaneous spells. Assuming that your party or DM doesn't purposefully avoid magic, your power level basically scales with the difficulty of the encounter and the strength of your party, without you having to put any forethought into it.

Devigod
2010-10-13, 08:46 AM
Frankly, I'm surprised nobody has mentioned the Binder. Granted, the class is within Tome of Magic, (which, while not obscure, is not an oft-mentioned sourcebook) but the player merely has to choose from a handful of vestiges each day, and then gets some nifty abilities.

It's easier to handle than spells by far, allows as much or as little roleplaying flavor to go along with it as you want, and is impossible to screw up as far as class advancement goes because one chooses their vestiges each day rather than having to worry about committing themselves to spells/powers/invocations.

jiriku
2010-10-13, 08:50 AM
RECOMMEND


Warblade: easy to build, easy to play, and most maneuvers live in a fairly narrow power band, so it's hard to screw your character up through bad choices. PHB+ToB.

Warlock: like warblade, but squishy and ranged. PHB+CArc (+ optionally CM).

Beguiler: limited list, most spells on the list are decent, and if you make a bad choice, just cast something different next time. PHB+PH2.


DO NOT WANT


Barbarian: unless your party is low-op, barbarians are very one-dimensional compared to many other characters, and can leave him feeling like he has only one trick. Relies on feat chains, which require advanced planning. Best ACFs and feats are scattered through many books.

Dread Necromancer: managing all the minions and summons is a tremendous organizational challenge. Relies on feat chains, which require advanced planning.

Druid: managing the animal companion, wild shape forms, and summons is a tremendous bookkeeping challenge. Druid stuff and animal stuff is scattered through a dozen books besides.

Kylarra
2010-10-13, 10:10 AM
Frankly, I'm surprised nobody has mentioned the Binder. Granted, the class is within Tome of Magic, (which, while not obscure, is not an oft-mentioned sourcebook) but the player merely has to choose from a handful of vestiges each day, and then gets some nifty abilities.

It's easier to handle than spells by far, allows as much or as little roleplaying flavor to go along with it as you want, and is impossible to screw up as far as class advancement goes because one chooses their vestiges each day rather than having to worry about committing themselves to spells/powers/invocations.For me, at least, lack of familiarity kept me from mentioning Binder. I thought of it, but since I've never played one and the only mention I know of is in conjunction with hellfire warlock...yeah.

Person_Man
2010-10-13, 11:14 AM
Frankly, I'm surprised nobody has mentioned the Binder.

I'm a huge evangelist for the Binder and other often overlooked classes like the Incarnate, Knight, etc. But if the player in question is a casual player who wants to reference as little material as possible, then learning new material (Tome of Battle, Magic, Incarnum, environment books) would probably be a poor choice for him.

Morph Bark
2010-10-13, 11:44 AM
RECOMMEND


Warblade: easy to build, easy to play, and most maneuvers live in a fairly narrow power band, so it's hard to screw your character up through bad choices. PHB+ToB.

Warlock: like warblade, but squishy and ranged. PHB+CArc (+ optionally CM).

Beguiler: limited list, most spells on the list are decent, and if you make a bad choice, just cast something different next time. PHB+PH2.

This plus Swordsage and Dragonfire Adept is probably the easiest list to go by. Crusader works too if you print out the maneuver cards from the WotC site and use them to show which he currently has readied and which expended.

Duskblade is a good one as well, since they also know all spells from their list and it isn't huge.

Depending on the rest of the group, a Rogue with some Ambush feats, Craven, Darkstalker, etc. could work too, but it requires more planning, so probably not. Barbarian with Power Attack and pounce (Lion Totem from Complete Champion or Whirling Frenzy from Unearthed Arcana, which can be combined) is hard to mess up.

And that's it.


I recommend against any prepared casters. When I want to play I often have the same mentality as this player of yours and prepared casters usually are tons more management, especially since they usually have really large spell lists. Magic of Incarnum, while great, is also not recommended in this case due to being a little complex compared to other magic systems within DnD. Binder, while great, will also require him to learn its different mechanics and what all the vestiges do.

Greenish
2010-10-13, 01:01 PM
Duskblade is a good one as well, since they also know all spells from their listReally? I could've sworn they had to pick their spells known.

jiriku
2010-10-13, 01:07 PM
They do. M-Bark is right about swordsage and crusader though, although my money is still on warblade as the simplest of the ToB classes to build and manage. I'd lean against the crusader, though, because tanking requires a more sophisticated understanding of the game than straight DPS.

true_shinken
2010-10-13, 02:05 PM
Duskblade is a good one as well, since they also know all spells from their list and it isn't huge.

I think Duskblades don't know all their spells on their list. I think it's something like 2 spells per level.

Morph Bark
2010-10-13, 02:08 PM
They do. M-Bark is right about swordsage and crusader though, although my money is still on warblade as the simplest of the ToB classes to build and manage. I'd lean against the crusader, though, because tanking requires a more sophisticated understanding of the game than straight DPS.

Indeed. Warblade and Swordsage are easier to play than the Crusader due to their refresh mechanics, but the Warblade's is usually nicer to work with since it goes a lot faster, which is more newbie-friendly as well. And if by leaning you mean the Crusader is a finer choice, I'd agree on the tanking/DPR route there, but that is up to the player himself of course, and DPR (damage per round) is also easier to pull off.

That, and Knight is really the only class with aggro-drawing ability, so he'd have to multiclass to pull the tanking off extra well done.


I think Duskblades don't know all their spells on their list. I think it's something like 2 spells per level.

Checked again. They don't automatically know them all, and get 1 per level, starting with two + Int bonus 0-levels and two level-1s.

Still though, it is one of the better play-as-you-go classes.

Valameer
2010-10-13, 02:49 PM
My wife didn't find her niche in our 3.5 games until she played a sorcerer. Similar reasons: she wanted a class that rocked but took very little research or book keeping. One that filled a niche very nicely, but didn't have to do everything.

I worked out a 1-through-20 spell list with her right from the get go, so leveling up was a breeze. She finally found herself involved in the game by being one of our main area-of-effect damage dealers, utility casters, and being untouchable in battle if she felt like it.

Also, out of combat, she had plenty of fun getting involved in mischief with unseen servant, high charisma and the like.

From that character on, she's finally had her handle on the game, how to contribute to the team, and things to do out of combat.

Ruinix
2010-10-13, 03:13 PM
duskblade, simple, fast, and hard to {Scrubbed} up, and they r very efectives.

Kylarra
2010-10-13, 03:28 PM
My wife didn't find her niche in our 3.5 games until she played a sorcerer. Similar reasons: she wanted a class that rocked but took very little research or book keeping. One that filled a niche very nicely, but didn't have to do everything.

I worked out a 1-through-20 spell list with her right from the get go, so leveling up was a breeze. She finally found herself involved in the game by being one of our main area-of-effect damage dealers, utility casters, and being untouchable in battle if she felt like it.

Also, out of combat, she had plenty of fun getting involved in mischief with unseen servant, high charisma and the like.

From that character on, she's finally had her handle on the game, how to contribute to the team, and things to do out of combat.Well yeah, if you know what you're doing and/or have someone preplanning your spell list for you, then spontaneous casters with limited spells known are decent for this minimal bookkeeping thing, but they're also really easy to screw up if you don't have a or b.

Cespenar
2010-10-13, 05:24 PM
I would suggest against Crusader. It has the dumbest recovery mechanic possible, and ends up in a lot of hassle unless you use printed cards or something like that, which is suggested somewhere above. A warblade is much more sensible.

Warlock, etc. are also no-brainers.

A psion would be an excellent choice if the "easy" factor is there to warm a new player into the game, as power points are way more intuitive, easy, and fun than the stupidity that is the Vancian system.

dsmiles
2010-10-13, 05:40 PM
A psion would be an excellent choice if the "easy" factor is there to warm a new player into the game, as power points are way more intuitive, easy, and fun than the stupidity that is the Vancian system.

SWEET JEEBUS! Finally, another believer that psionics is inherently easier and more fun than Vancian magic! My prayers have been answered. :smallbiggrin:

Seriously, psionics and power points are very easy, and so much fun to tinker with. Especially Metacreativity and Telepathy.

Zaq
2010-10-13, 10:28 PM
I'm a huge evangelist for the Binder and other often overlooked classes like the Incarnate, Knight, etc. But if the player in question is a casual player who wants to reference as little material as possible, then learning new material (Tome of Battle, Magic, Incarnum, environment books) would probably be a poor choice for him.

I'm going to disagree with this. One of the weaknesses of classes like that is in fact a strength in this case... they're mostly confined to one book. You don't have to go hopping all over the place to find a DFA's breath effects, a Binder's vestiges, or a Warblade's maneuvers. They're all right there in one book. (Yes, ok, there are a COUPLE vestiges outside of ToM, but you're nitpicking and you know it.)

BenTheJester
2010-10-13, 11:20 PM
SWEET JEEBUS! Finally, another believer that psionics is inherently easier and more fun than Vancian magic! My prayers have been answered. :smallbiggrin:

Seriously, psionics and power points are very easy, and so much fun to tinker with. Especially Metacreativity and Telepathy.

Yes, but it requires you(and your DM) to learn an additional system.

Valameer
2010-10-14, 12:41 AM
Well yeah, if you know what you're doing and/or have someone preplanning your spell list for you, then spontaneous casters with limited spells known are decent for this minimal bookkeeping thing, but they're also really easy to screw up if you don't have a or b.

I'm sure someone around here would be more than happy to help :smallsmile:. Once feats and spells are picked out from 1 to 20, you're ready to go. Just need to research the few spells you get as you acquire them. That's like, two paragraphs to read every level up. Not bad.

Morph Bark
2010-10-14, 04:00 AM
I'm going to disagree with this. One of the weaknesses of classes like that is in fact a strength in this case... they're mostly confined to one book. You don't have to go hopping all over the place to find a DFA's breath effects, a Binder's vestiges, or a Warblade's maneuvers. They're all right there in one book. (Yes, ok, there are a COUPLE vestiges outside of ToM, but you're nitpicking and you know it.)

Even so, there is a difference in how complex the systems are or how easy they are to play-as-you-go. Invocations, psionics and maneuvers are really easy (especially if you use maneuver cards or he is already used to video games with a 'mana' magic system). Incarnum or truenaming, even a homebrew fix of it, much less so.

Amphetryon
2010-10-14, 07:46 AM
SWEET JEEBUS! Finally, another believer that psionics is inherently easier and more fun than Vancian magic! My prayers have been answered. :smallbiggrin:

Seriously, psionics and power points are very easy, and so much fun to tinker with. Especially Metacreativity and Telepathy.

I've argued this for quite a while :smallsmile:. I deliberately steered my group of newbie players toward psionic classes instead of Vancian classes for that very reason.

Psyx
2010-10-14, 07:55 AM
Eh... every suggestion you gave requires pretty much constant referencing due to spells and powers. It's even worse with clerics and druids, given that they can mem anything every day.

How about something that doesn't cast spells. No need to reference, then.

If he has to cast spells he's going to need to reference. Best thing then is to cut down on the issue by having a tiny spell list, or a limited number of accessible spells.

Il_Vec
2010-10-14, 08:22 AM
Yes, but it requires you(and your DM) to learn an additional system.

An additional system that frankly, has less material to read than the PHBII has spells.

Morph Bark
2010-10-14, 08:26 AM
Eh... every suggestion you gave requires pretty much constant referencing due to spells and powers. It's even worse with clerics and druids, given that they can mem anything every day.

How about something that doesn't cast spells. No need to reference, then.

If he has to cast spells he's going to need to reference. Best thing then is to cut down on the issue by having a tiny spell list, or a limited number of accessible spells.

With maneuvers, vestiges, soulmelds, etc. he will also need to reference things until he and the DM know the effects well enough to not need that.

No referencing at all is easiest with the rogue and barbarian, I'd say. Or commoner, expert and warrior, but everyone knows those classes are broken beyond repair.

Person_Man
2010-10-14, 08:53 AM
I'm going to disagree with this. One of the weaknesses of classes like that is in fact a strength in this case... they're mostly confined to one book. You don't have to go hopping all over the place to find a DFA's breath effects, a Binder's vestiges, or a Warblade's maneuvers. They're all right there in one book. (Yes, ok, there are a COUPLE vestiges outside of ToM, but you're nitpicking and you know it.)

I concede the point on the Dragonfire Adept, who is quite easy to play and hard to mess up. Breath fire, use Invocations off of a short list.

Tome of Battle is debatable. If someone is nice enough to pick your maneuvers for you and print out cards, then yes, it's pretty simple. Otherwise, wading through a bunch of new material and choosing new maneuvers and stances from the very wide selection every time you gain a level can be difficult. On top of that, each class readies and renews it's maneuvers in a different manner, which can be confusing to newbs.

But I couldn't disagree more on the Binder. It takes a very high level of rules mastery to play well. You can't just pick vestiges. Because if you do, you suck. Royally. It's pretty much requires that you read a few guides to use it, and all of the best vestiges are online, requiring that you go beyond the "one book" if you want to keep up with casters.

Kylarra
2010-10-14, 10:21 AM
I'm sure someone around here would be more than happy to help :smallsmile:. Once feats and spells are picked out from 1 to 20, you're ready to go. Just need to research the few spells you get as you acquire them. That's like, two paragraphs to read every level up. Not bad.Again, I concede that with help it is possible, but that's not always going to be an option. For various and sundry reasons, I'd consider that about on the same level as every other non-prepared caster being prebuilt for you.

Psyx
2010-10-14, 10:37 AM
With maneuvers, vestiges, soulmelds, etc. he will also need to reference things until he and the DM know the effects well enough to not need that.

I was kind of including those in 'casting'.

I'd personally go Rogue / Ftr / Barbie / Mo... no... maybe not that last one.

Devigod
2010-10-14, 11:16 AM
Tome of Battle is debatable. If someone is nice enough to pick your maneuvers for you and print out cards, then yes, it's pretty simple. Otherwise, wading through a bunch of new material and choosing new maneuvers and stances from the very wide selection every time you gain a level can be difficult. On top of that, each class readies and renews it's maneuvers in a different manner, which can be confusing to newbs.

Not to mention the fact that every few levels, martial adepts can relearn higher level maneuvers in the place of lower level ones they already know, and they count other class levels as 1/2 initiator levels, and thus may sometimes benefit from holding off from ToB classes until later. These are the two most complicated and prohibitively irksome elements of ToB, at least in my book.


But I couldn't disagree more on the Binder. It takes a very high level of rules mastery to play well. You can't just pick vestiges. Because if you do, you suck. Royally. It's pretty much requires that you read a few guides to use it, and all of the best vestiges are online, requiring that you go beyond the "one book" if you want to keep up with casters.

While I can see that there are clearly some vestiges that are better than others, as far as simple/unoptimized (or even decently optimized) play goes, binders are still pretty solid. Picking Buer grants easy fast-healing, something decidedly difficult to pull off without spellcasting or LA. The other up-side to vestiges is that if you make a poor choice, it's only going to affect you for the day (less, if you pick up Expel Vestige,) unless you're dense, and there are no binding (geddit?) character choices (i.e. spells, maneuvers, powers) that you'll come to regret later.

Escheton
2010-10-14, 04:22 PM
Monkblade.
Couple of monklvls, rest warblade, dip swordsage at opportune lvls.

This would leave you with a char that has wis to armor unarmed and armed.
2 minimum full attacks, at least 1 good standard action hit. utility maneuvers, and a few combat feats that come in handy.
He wont be great at anything, but you can wing it in any situation and feel better then average.
Even though compared to min-maxed over max-min-ish he would bite the dust.
Not everyone's cup of tea, but seems like what would work for a gamer like this.

dsmiles
2010-10-14, 06:24 PM
An additional system that frankly, has less material to read than the PHBII has spells.

And easy. Let's not forget easy. Almost intuitive, for that matter.

Morph Bark
2010-10-14, 06:56 PM
Yes, but it requires you(and your DM) to learn an additional system.

level 1 power = 1 power point
level 2 = 3 pp
level 3 = 5 pp
etc. (basically, [level x 2] - 1 = amount of pp needed)

Class shows how many pp you get and how many powers you have at a certain level. Check a specific table for bonus power points. The rest is all the same as spellcasting.

Done.

Psyren
2010-10-14, 09:59 PM
Yes, but it requires you(and your DM) to learn an additional system.

Have you played a video game RPG in the past decade? Congrats, you understand PP.

FelixG
2010-10-15, 05:26 AM
Warlock would be good

Only have to reference your book when you level up :D

NineThePuma
2010-10-15, 10:03 AM
Have you played a video game RPG in the past decade? Congrats, you understand PP.

This. Really.

Psionics is much easier and understandable than the core casting system, what with its 'Mana' like system. I personally encourage players to focus on Psionics because it isn't at all complicated and it's hard to screw up. Honestly, when you can turn a Psion into ANYTHING...

Hida Reju
2010-10-17, 04:14 AM
I also agree with the Warmage option, it's basically a ranged archer with a energy type for all occasions.

1. Spell list is easy to use (Point and it burns, freezes, melts, ect)
2. Actions easy to pick and have everyone around you plan for.
3. Optimization is hard but minor things like Versatile Spellcaster and Practiced metamagic work fine. Also the alternate character option from PHB2 gives you a few spells to add to the list.
4. Yes after lvl 6 direct damage will fall behind a bit but it will always be something you can rely on. Hell you get the orbs and disintegrate not counting save or dies. You even get some fog spells and cloudkill for minions. It could be a lot worse.

But really you are playing a ranged spell archer that basically ignores AC and hits on touch. Pump CHA and CON and go to town. Since I like skill points I pick human and try to get a 14 Int so my early Burning hands/acid rays/Magic missile/rain of stone mop up.

It really is that easy to play for a first time player and its still better than RAWR I charge it.