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Lither
2011-01-27, 11:38 PM
Not OotS style.

Anyway, for a personal project I am working on, I am attempting to improve my drawing style. Anyway, this is my current standard. The image was sketched on paper first, then moved to the computer, where I got rid of unneccessary lines and coloured.

This was done after more than a few months of studying drawing techniques.

Linked (http://i1231.photobucket.com/albums/ee515/TrueLither/RedWizard.jpg?t=1296119669) due to size. This was a concept character. It took me three days to complete.

Terrible, isn't it? :smallsmile:

Thing is, I know where I need to improve, I just don't know how to improve where I need to improve.

As you can see, I have problems with drawing people. Especially clothes. I can never get the folds done right, or they look unrealistic. Also, shading. I never know where to shade, and that problem is likely linked to why I can't draw folds.

Any suggestions on how to improve would be helpfull.

Also, does anybody know how to turn anti-aliasing off in GIMP? It annoyed me when I picked up where I left off a day later, and it's playing around with the quality of the images.

Savannah
2011-01-28, 12:37 AM
I find using reference images and drawing what I see, not what I think I should see helps a lot. I also found the book Drawing People by Barbara Bradley to be very helpful. It talks a lot about clothes and fabric, as well, so that'll help both issues. Maybe see if your library has a copy?

Keveak
2011-01-28, 01:36 AM
I used and still uses various tutorials (http://th01.deviantart.net/fs70/PRE/i/2011/024/c/4/anime_eye_coloring_tutorial_by_twilightwolf1231-d23v090.png)and "How (http://mistiousstar.deviantart.com/art/How-to-draw-Manga-Tut-134135958?q=boost%3Apopular%20how%20to%20draw&qo=1)to (http://mini-chibi-club.deviantart.com/art/How-to-Draw-Teh-Chibi-2025718?q=boost%3Apopular%20how%20to%20draw&qo=0) draw (http://ember-snow.deviantart.com/art/TUTORIAL-How-to-Draw-Manga-2-110956438?q=boost%3Apopular%20how%20to%20draw%20an ime&qo=5)..." guides on Deviantart, that's the best help I can give without knowing how you draw stuff. :smallsmile:

leakingpen
2011-01-28, 10:45 AM
Im confused why you spoilered a link....

Otherwise, practice practice practice. Unless you spend YEARS on it, you aren't going to get clothes picture perfect. A lot of artists have their own little shorthands, lines that are accepted by the viewer as a symbol of this or that, and make it look right. Look at a lot of webcomics, find a style that works for you, and trey and copy their clothes a bit.

Fri
2011-01-28, 11:16 AM
I used and still uses various tutorials (http://th01.deviantart.net/fs70/PRE/i/2011/024/c/4/anime_eye_coloring_tutorial_by_twilightwolf1231-d23v090.png)and "How (http://mistiousstar.deviantart.com/art/How-to-draw-Manga-Tut-134135958?q=boost%3Apopular%20how%20to%20draw&qo=1)to (http://mini-chibi-club.deviantart.com/art/How-to-Draw-Teh-Chibi-2025718?q=boost%3Apopular%20how%20to%20draw&qo=0) draw (http://ember-snow.deviantart.com/art/TUTORIAL-How-to-Draw-Manga-2-110956438?q=boost%3Apopular%20how%20to%20draw%20an ime&qo=5)..." guides on Deviantart, that's the best help I can give without knowing how you draw stuff. :smallsmile:

My favourite 'tutorial' is this. I don't even know whether it can be called a tutorial or not, it's just general tips. Whether you're just starting or already drawing for a while, this is good.

http://fri-freeman.deviantart.com/favourites/?offset=48#/ddeq1f

Prime32
2011-01-28, 11:38 AM
I would suggest starting with a nude figure and drawing clothes over it, if you don't already.

Start with the advice in stage 1 of Fri's link - draw a vertical line to represent the spine, and shape things around it. Draw the rough shape of the ribcage, shoulders and pelvis, then extend lines from them for the paths of the limbs.

Mad Mask
2011-01-28, 11:53 AM
I would personally recommend any of Burne Hogarth's books on drawing. Dynamic Wrinkles and Drapery would be the most appropriate in your case, but I encourage you to look at the others; they've all drastically improved my drawing skills.

Additionally, I would encourage you to try black-and-white line art. This will help you focus purely on the most essential parts of your drawing, and will greatly improve the shape of your figures. Once you've figured (no pun intended) out this part, then you can concentrate on the colours and shading.

Prime32
2011-01-28, 11:55 AM
Additionally, I would encourage you to try black-and-white line art. This will help you focus purely on the most essential parts of your drawing, and will greatly improve the shape of your figures. Once you've figured (no pun intended) out this part, then you can concentrate on the colours and shading.I second this. It is much easier to colour some finished lineart than it is to add colours as you go, and there are no leaky pixels.

Lither
2011-01-28, 10:54 PM
I find using reference images and drawing what I see, not what I think I should see helps a lot. I also found the book Drawing People by Barbara Bradley to be very helpful. It talks a lot about clothes and fabric, as well, so that'll help both issues. Maybe see if your library has a copy?

I checked the library. It doesn't have it. Thanks anyway.


I used and still uses various tutorials (http://th01.deviantart.net/fs70/PRE/i/2011/024/c/4/anime_eye_coloring_tutorial_by_twilightwolf1231-d23v090.png)and "How (http://mistiousstar.deviantart.com/art/How-to-draw-Manga-Tut-134135958?q=boost%3Apopular%20how%20to%20draw&qo=1)to (http://mini-chibi-club.deviantart.com/art/How-to-Draw-Teh-Chibi-2025718?q=boost%3Apopular%20how%20to%20draw&qo=0) draw (http://ember-snow.deviantart.com/art/TUTORIAL-How-to-Draw-Manga-2-110956438?q=boost%3Apopular%20how%20to%20draw%20an ime&qo=5)..." guides on Deviantart, that's the best help I can give without knowing how you draw stuff. :smallsmile:


My favourite 'tutorial' is this. I don't even know whether it can be called a tutorial or not, it's just general tips. Whether you're just starting or already drawing for a while, this is good.

http://fri-freeman.deviantart.com/favourites/?offset=48#/ddeq1f

Thanks. I didn't even know Deviantart had tutorials. They never came up when I searched.



I would suggest starting with a nude figure and drawing clothes over it, if you don't already.

Start with the advice in stage 1 of Fri's link - draw a vertical line to represent the spine, and shape things around it. Draw the rough shape of the ribcage, shoulders and pelvis, then extend lines from them for the paths of the limbs.

That's my technique to start with.

AmberVael
2011-01-28, 11:24 PM
Otherwise, practice practice practice.

This. Studying techniques is all well and good, but you'll do better on pure practice than pure studying.

Don't get me wrong- to do well in any sort of artistic field it is almost required that you get some decent training and learn from what others have done. But it can only help you increase what you already have. If there is no basis, then you won't get anywhere.

It can be tiring, and hard to come to grips with, but practice is really the only way to improve. Other things just help increase the pace. So... keep all the tips and things you learn in mind, but foremost? Just keep doing. Work on something every day, and you'll start getting better.

References are your friend though. Not even reference books or official models or anything, just good old Google image search can be an amazing resource (though be careful what you search for, obviously :smallamused:). They give you a better idea of what you should be shooting for.

Dispozition
2011-01-30, 06:20 AM
References are your friend though. Not even reference books or official models or anything, just good old Google image search can be an amazing resource (though be careful what you search for, obviously :smallamused:). They give you a better idea of what you should be shooting for.

Just piping in here. If it legal for you to do so, I would actually advise you turn the safe search off when you search for references. Porn is an amazing source of body shape and shading if you know what you're looking for.

leakingpen
2011-01-30, 05:00 PM
on the same note, there are a LOT of people who use deviantart to post (usually tasteful) semi and full nudes for the purpose of being artists references.

Galdor
2011-02-21, 05:49 PM
It usually helps to do some observational drawing before making up your own scene, but the best advice I can give is to keep working. If you want to be a good artist, keep drawing and improving your skills each time around, and you should see some noticeable improvement.

Glass Mouse
2011-02-21, 10:11 PM
I'm gonna echo everyone else and say: draw!

Reading about drawing is awesome and definitely a good way to learn, but you can't remember more than a few things at a time. When you learn something, you should apply it to a bunch of drawings and then - when it's internalised - move on to learn the next trick.
So, well... Draw. The more you learn to do without thinking, the more you can think and reinvent.

Also, if there's one thing you should keep in mind, it's "why". Workings. Don't just recognize how things look - realize why they look that way. How do they work, how do they fit together. A leg isn't just there, it's attached to a skeleton and covered by muscles that work a certain way.
This is, obviously, a lot of work and something that will come in time. I just think it's very good to keep in mind.

Another advice is to read this (http://thepunchlineismachismo.com/archives/657). I stumbled across it the other day, and it has really good advice.
Especially the "draw something you find fun!" is useful. If it's boring or frustrating all the time, draw something else. Or, if drawing truly isn't fun, find another hobby. There's no reason to draw just for the sake of drawing.

A fourth piece of advice (not sure if it's useful to you, but here goes) is to give yourself a good reason to draw. Start a webcomic. Cook up an RPG setting and start illustrating it. Draw illustrations to every adventure you and your D&D group go through. Anything story- or setting-like.
If you're the least bit like me and some other people I know, you'll enjoy drawing a lot more if it's part of something bigger than the particular drawing.

Fifth, a little bit of blatant advertising. You could join the Playground's challenge (http://www.giantitp.com/forums/showthread.php?t=178673)(or anything similar) if you have trouble motivating yourself and could use someone to answer to. It's a good way to stay on track.

But yeah... Draw, draw, draw, draw.

Also, draw.

HellfireLover
2011-02-22, 05:48 AM
Practice, practice, practice, as others have said. I'm going to echo Glass Mouse and say it's really, really important that you understand how the different 3D shapes of the body intersect and interact. Bodies contour, which affects everything you then put onto them (clothing etc), so it's important to get that down.

Speed drawing is great for helping you get the basic shapes and ideas down onto the page without being bogged down in detail. Pick a moving subject (cats are great for this, so are passers-by in a public place, or small children - basically any subject you have absolutely no degree of control over) and try to get down the basics of form in a few strokes. Use a pencil at first before moving onto permanent marks, but don't erase - you'll lose valuable time. I use a dip pen for my (slightly infrequent) forays into speed drawing and it always amazes me how much it loosens up my style and injects movement into these static lines on the page.

Necro_EX
2011-02-22, 06:20 AM
I'd suggest maybe picking up a drawing manikin. The smaller ones can be purchased at a local craft store for 3-7 bucks, and they rarely go even near 20 bucks for a decent one. They're great for start out on figure drawing, and they keep their usefulness well into your career as an artist, they're a wonderful replacement for models, especially since beginners and most amateur artists just don't have access to them.

The reason I suggest one is that this image is rather...flat. You'll want to give everything more body, more form. Most people do so by sketching out a rough body composed of basic shapes (cylinders, spheres, rectangles) over the wireframe body, and then adding the detail over that. I really think that'll help you most of all.

Now, a manikin is far from necessary, and plenty of people have suggested getting some books or using some online tutorials, which I think is an excellent source for beginning as a sketch artist, it'll really teach you form and even the basics of foreshortening and shading. I started with a book by Katy Coope (http://chaoslace.phormix.com/) which looking back on it now looks very underdeveloped, but it really did help me to learn the basics of figure drawing.

Hope that was helpful. :D

endoperez
2011-02-28, 02:54 PM
Easiest way to learn to draw characters, is by copying existing characters. It teaches you all kinds of basic skills, but it will not teach you how to come up with things on your own. If you want to be able to, say, draw a picture with a generic human with (say, muscular hero-guy with a sword), it's good enough. I haven't actually tried to learn heavily stylized art style, but I assume it wouldn't take that long to be able to produce reasonable good characters.

The problem with that is the fact that you're limited to that specific style. You won't be able to, say, draw wanted posters with your face in it. Of course, it takes a long time to get to the point where you can draw a realistic face, regardless of what you're doing. I've been trying to learn to draw, on and off, for perhaps four years now. You'll have to practice stuff like silhouettes, perspective, composition, realistic shading, drawing nudes from life, etc. This is much harder than copying from an existing style, and your drawings will suck for a long time even when you can see yourself getting better all the time. Some resources I used to get started:

Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain, by Betty Edwards. The book has its faults, but it explained to me how to see things, how to differentiate between things that are and what we think they are, and how to copy the things you see to the paper as they really are, and other really basic stuff. If you can find it in a library, you should definitely give it a read. It shouldn't be your only source, but it was a good start for me.

Another great resource are the books by Andrew Loomis. There're any several different ones, all fantastic. Here's Successful Drawing (http://www.fineart.sk/?s=0&cat=15), Fun with the Pencil might be easier to pick up, specifically for humans there's Figure Drawing for All It's Worth.

Nikola´des has a book (Natural Way to Draw) that basically explains what the students in his course would go through. It's a great book that puts lots of emphasis on drawing and not just reading.


Put down this book and DRAW FOR THREE HOURS

Turn your chair so that your back is towards the model, so that turning to look at it becomes a minor chore. To avoid the chore, you'll automatically try to minimize the times you'll turn to face the object you are drawing. This teaches you to really look at your model and to commit your observations to memory. DRAW FOR THREE MORE HOURS

Fri
2011-02-28, 03:02 PM
Another advice is to read this (http://thepunchlineismachismo.com/archives/657). I stumbled across it the other day, and it has really good advice.

That was a very good link.

Anyway, sorry. For everyone who keep saying 'practice practice practice'

just 'draw draw and draw' can only get you so far. I know it from personal experience. I draw since childhood, since I'm a baby, in fact. But I never had any feedback, anyone telling me that my drawing is bad, or I should move on from drawing simplistic cartoon with dot eyes. I really regret it now. I only learned to draw for real starting from highschool, or even college. If only someone gave me feedback earlier, told me what to copy, and such, I'd have better foundation and I'd defintely draw better right now.

My little brother is also interested in drawing, and I gave him feedback, and I adviced him to join deviant art and introduced him to some of my better-artist friends. It's clear that he draw a lot better than me now, eventhough he's nine years younger than me.