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Archpaladin Zousha
2011-02-25, 11:19 PM
Yesterday, my youngest brother had my father install a web protection program on our family's computer to block certain websites. He claims that he is addicted to the internet, and thus he needs these controls in place to prevent him from staying up all night and to keep viruses from slipping onto the computer. Some of the sites that are blocked include YouTube and DeviantArt, sites that other people who use this computer, including myself, visit often. I would be fine with this, but the problem is the program restricts site access for all users, not just my brother.

I seriously don't think it's fair to let my brother dictate how and when our computer is used when he is not the only one who uses it. He has his own computer with the same restrictions in the basement, and yet he insisted on having the same restrictions installed on the upstairs computer, which my parents and I use as well, and will soon belong to me once I have my new computer desk cleaned off (it's one that we've had for a while that's accumulated a lot of junk on it). He claims its for my good as well as his, since he believes I have a similar addiction. I at least go to bed at a decent hour and get my exercise.

The problem is, I don't expect my parents to see things my way. My mother thinks I have an addiction problem as well, and my father isn't likely to delete a program he just installed. I'm not sure who to talk to or what to do. My brother sincerely believes that he needs these restrictions in place or else he'll fall right back off the wagon. I've quit computer use cold turkey before, and I'd really rather not need to use my iPod just so I can go on the Internet, because I hate typing on it.

Any advice?

Innis Cabal
2011-02-25, 11:24 PM
It's call deleting it yourself.

Archpaladin Zousha
2011-02-25, 11:25 PM
I need a password to do that, which only my dad has.

Cyrion
2011-02-25, 11:43 PM
Start by asking your father to take it off that computer, and give him your reasons. Are you using a PC with Windows? If so, ask if you can put a password on the user accounts, and don't give it to your brother. He can still use his own computer, but can't indulge his addiction on the computer everyone else uses.

Archpaladin Zousha
2011-02-25, 11:48 PM
The main part of the problem is the familial politics involved.

It's my word against my brother's, and if my dad asks my mother for her candor, she'll be all for the restrictions because she doesn't like me using the computer for entertainment at all. That's not very good odds.

Crow
2011-02-26, 12:02 AM
Buwahahaahahha! Feel my frustration!

My place of work uses websense, which actually blocks *portions* of these very forums. I can go to "Roleplaying Games", but not "Gaming", lol.

But anyways, I frickin' hate web-blockers. Just another case of a few idiots ruining things for everyone else.

Force
2011-02-26, 12:09 AM
The best solution to this involves talking to your dad and getting the restriction pulled, at least on your account.

However, if you're techy enough and don't mind Linux, dual-booting Windows and Linux (flavor of your choice) will neatly bypass any restrictive program.

Moonshadow
2011-02-26, 12:12 AM
Either that, or backup the important stuff, format the HD and reinstall your OS, make yourself the admin account and put a password on it that only you know.

Gaelbert
2011-02-26, 12:15 AM
The best solution to this involves talking to your dad and getting the restriction pulled, at least on your account.

However, if you're techy enough and don't mind Linux, dual-booting Windows and Linux (flavor of your choice) will neatly bypass any restrictive program.

Linux. Is there any problem it won't solve?

valadil
2011-02-26, 01:10 AM
However, if you're techy enough and don't mind Linux, dual-booting Windows and Linux (flavor of your choice) will neatly bypass any restrictive program.

You won't even need to dual boot. Grab an Ubuntu or Knoppix Live CD. If you boot up the computer with the CD in the drive, you can run Linux without even installing it. Use it for the web browser when you wanna go to your sites and then eject the CD for normal use when you wanna go back to Windows. The only caveat is that you may have to install flash each time you boot up if you want YouTube. Can't remember if that comes with the Live CD or not.

Dubious Pie
2011-02-26, 01:22 AM
Step 1:
Boot into safe mode.
Delete all the files for the program in C:\Program Files.

Step 2:
???

Step 3:
Profit!

dgnslyr
2011-02-26, 02:13 AM
I must try that, Dubious Pie.

MoonCat
2011-02-26, 02:39 AM
Are you a convincing debater? Point out to your dad all the reasons ("I don't need it blocked, and <your brother> has a different computer, and so forth), but keep pressing him. I'm sure your dad can have some sway with your mom, if you convince him, and then you and your dad can work on your mom.

Pentachoron
2011-02-26, 02:40 AM
Linux. Is there any problem it won't solve?

Nuclear War?


*Edit* Anyway, I'd probably just talk to your dad. Though I remember when I was in (I'm assuming you're still in) high school, my parents were also uninclined to have me on the computer much either, it sucks to say but you may just have to suffer through it for a little while.

Don Julio Anejo
2011-02-26, 04:59 AM
Is a technological solution (i.e. deleting the program yourself) feasible in your family political atmosphere? If so, easiest solution is to

1. Try to kill it in safe mode. Most are meant to keep away computer illiterate idiots (you know, the ones who use Internet Explorer and have like 20 different toolbars on it, to the point where they take up more of your screen than everything else put together), or to be used in conjunction with low-level admin software like Novell that removes admin rights and lots of Windows settings (like safe mode) for everyone. Therefore they may not be protected against deletion.

2. If the above doesn't work, temporarily install another OS (preferably also a Windows but not the same one, to make life easier). Then kill files for the blocker from there.

3. Worst case scenario, back up all your files and reformat your hard drive.

4. Temp solution: use a proxy. Many web blockers can't block this. Although they can block the proxy itself. Funny story related to this: a guy I knew opened up porn on every library computer at my old high school despite web blockers even blocking google searches for "porn." Took library staff forever to figure out how to block it :tongue:

Mystic Muse
2011-02-26, 05:20 AM
Guys it sounds like him deleting the program would just get both his parents mad at him.

My advice is changing the account on the computer so that there's a password to unlock it, and not give your brother the password. He has his own computer, so he has no reason to want to use the family one/yours.

krapez91
2011-02-26, 09:01 AM
You won't even need to dual boot. Grab an Ubuntu or Knoppix Live CD. If you boot up the computer with the CD in the drive, you can run Linux without even installing it. Use it for the web browser when you wanna go to your sites and then eject the CD for normal use when you wanna go back to Windows. The only caveat is that you may have to install flash each time you boot up if you want unblock YouTube (http://proxy-zone.net). Can't remember if that comes with the Live CD or not.

yeah flash every time :smallsigh:

araveugnitsuga
2011-02-26, 09:10 AM
If your parents will be using that computer regularly than the best possible advice would be negotiation with your father, try to tell him that he isn't going to use that computer any more and as such that the restriction will not be necessary, and offer yourself to remove it.

If they are not, go into safe mode, F11 at start up and delete the program. i would also suggest cleaning it up while you're at it.

Rettu Skcollob
2011-02-26, 10:04 AM
Sounds like a computer restriction conniption.

But seriously, there's some good advice in here, they already said what I was going to.

thubby
2011-02-26, 10:29 AM
just ask for the password, turn the thing off while you use the computer, turn it back on when you're done.
if it's only on the computer for your brother's sake, then it shouldnt be a problem. if it is, there's more to it.

Jack Squat
2011-02-26, 10:33 AM
What about using a proxy service like ToR? It was developed by the Navy to get around firewall in China, and much more importantly it allows access to Facebook for millions of schoolkids worldwide :smalltongue:

You can run it and a mobile version of Firefox on a jump drive.

Dubious Pie
2011-02-26, 12:23 PM
Is it a password for a account in Windows or something special to the program? If it is just a Windows account, just nab a Ophcrack LiveCD and follow the instructions.

Galileo
2011-02-26, 03:34 PM
I think Kyuubi got it in one, suggesting that you ask to set up a password that everyone but your brother knows to access the family computer. That way, he can't indulge his alleged addiction, and you don't have to put up with so many useful sites being blocked off.

If your parents refuse, then continue to state your argument calmly and reasonably, while finding a good proxy.

Keveak
2011-02-26, 04:24 PM
Of you are a high-school student or older then I would advice that you use the argument that, despite what your other seems to believe, you can actually take decisions yourself now. :smallsmile:

Alternatively, there's the fact that at least DeviantArt is not primarily made for entertainment reasons but for artists to share their work and advice.

Essentially she is denying you from pursuing any art, assuming you use it for that, just because she believes the bogus* idea of Internet addiction.

*To my knowledge, which may be flawed indeed, most people only assume that the Internet makes people asocial instead of asocial people having an easier time communicating through it. I apologise if I am wrong. :smallsmile:

Gnoman
2011-02-26, 04:30 PM
Wait a few weeks, then bring the subject up. If everyone else in the household regularly uses Youtube and other sites, then the annoyances of having to disable the program every time will quickly wear on them, and they'll realize it was an insanely stupid idea.

Icewalker
2011-02-26, 05:27 PM
Deleting it sounds like a terrible idea to me.

If there's no way to convince them of the issue, then my best advice would be a proxy server, although in this you're still circumventing your parents' decision (and it'd make your mom even more sure that you are addicted). Finding a proxy sever to use would probably let you access these sites without any messing with the filter.

Brother Oni
2011-02-27, 05:05 AM
Query: Is it possible to start up the computer like normal, then use Task manager to kill the webblocker's process, thus giving you access to the desired websites, but without deleting or uninstalling the program?

Alternately, use msconfig, disable it during startup and reboot. Just remember to renable and reboot before you hand over the computer

It also gets round the limited functionality of Safe Mode and provided your parents or brother don't spot you using the blocked sites, they'll be none the wiser.

I do recommend not going behind your family's back and talking to them about it first though. The multiple accounts method seems the best solution to me.

Archpaladin Zousha
2011-03-03, 06:19 PM
YES! I got my dad to unblock Open Image/Media Search sites, which are the most common sites I end up visiting. I can handle the other stuff being blocked and the timer set on it (it blocks internet access after 11:30 PM), but it was real annoying not being able to access YouTube. At least until the computer is officially mine and I can uninstall the program, I think I can tolerate it for the time being.

MoonCat
2011-03-03, 06:21 PM
YES! I got my dad to unblock Open Image/Media Search sites, which are the most common sites I end up visiting. I can handle the other stuff being blocked and the timer set on it (it blocks internet access after 11:30 PM), but it was real annoying not being able to access YouTube. At least until the computer is officially mine and I can uninstall the program, I think I can tolerate it for the time being.

Sweet! Congratulations!