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View Full Version : Kill it! Kill it with fire! Or genetics!



AtomicKitKat
2011-03-01, 11:50 AM
Just had one of those evil dinosaur out-living SoBs crawl across my leg. Flicked ever so slightly, it went onto a cushion. Took the cushion to the kitchen, where it flew off under the table. Went to grab the can(had just killed a baby not 2 hours ago), and barely 2 minutes later, it decides to make a break for it by crawling towards the space between my feet. Sprayed it good and hard. Hope it dies.

My wish for every year is the same. For someone to unlock their genetic code, and modify it so that they can never breed without exposure to some super rare trigger(ala the terminator genes used in some crops). Then release these genetically modified ones(exposed so that they can breed) into the environment, have them breed with the locals, pass on the conditional sterility to the next generation, and do this until every last one of them is extinct!:smallfurious:

MoonCat
2011-03-01, 11:55 AM
Spiders, right? Those I hate too.

VeisuItaTyhjyys
2011-03-01, 11:58 AM
I'm pretty sure that I'd rather kill pretty much any person than whatever kind of creature creature you're talking about.

I mean, c'mon, they're just trying to live. Imagine somebody coming into the place you live, deciding it is now theirs and you can't live their, spraying poison on your child until it dies, and then hurling you everwhere before doing the same thing. No whatever-kind-of-bug has done that to anybody I know, but I know plenty of people who have no qualms about doing it to them without any reason beyond aesthetic distaste. If we have to pick one species to take out, I know where my vote's going, basically.

KuReshtin
2011-03-01, 12:03 PM
Spiders, right? Those I hate too.

From the description, I'd guess cockroach.

MoonCat
2011-03-01, 12:06 PM
From the description, I'd guess cockroach.

Cockroaches interest me, although I've never had an infestation of them, so I'm not traumatized. My mom's old cat used to drop dead ones in her shoes every morning.:smalleek:

Lord Loss
2011-03-01, 12:09 PM
I thought it was a fly...

Lioness
2011-03-01, 12:17 PM
(had just killed a baby not 2 hours ago)

:smalleek:

But I had an encounted with a spider today at work...I moved the bin lifting machine, and a massive grey scary spider came scuttling out from underneath.

Haruki-kun
2011-03-01, 12:27 PM
I thought it was a fly...

It was a dinosaur out-living abomination. Roach.

They're not so bad... if they remain 500 meters away from you and your property. When they start climbing on you, then we have a problem.

VeisuItaTyhjyys
2011-03-01, 12:37 PM
I still really don't see what's so awful about them. Think of the most horrible thing a person has every done to you or someone you care about. Think about a cockroach crawling around looking for some food or whatever.

drakir_nosslin
2011-03-01, 12:42 PM
I still really don't see what's so awful about them. Think of the most horrible thing a person has every done to you or someone you care about. Think about a cockroach crawling around looking for some food or whatever.

Yea, well. If I found my neighbor crawling up my leg, trying to eat my food, I'd probably toss him around quite a bit too before spraying him with mace and calling the police. So, I'd say that AtomicKitKat reacted quite normal.

Asta Kask
2011-03-01, 12:43 PM
I think my cat would love them. They're just the right size to swat.

Fortunately we have no cockroaches in Sweden. At least none that live in houses.

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1277/4691358428_73d3937c0d.jpg

Crow
2011-03-01, 12:55 PM
At least it wasn't a potato bug...

Lord Loss
2011-03-01, 01:09 PM
At least it wasn't a potato bug...

Ugh. Don't mention those things to me. My childhood friend's basement was infested with them. We'd often sprint through there to make it to the backyard... ick.

AtomicKitKat
2011-03-01, 01:12 PM
They are the most useless insects ever. I'd sooner deal with wasps(and I say this, having been stung on the side of the head when I was about 10). At least wasps have the decency to eat other insects. Those things which shall not be named do nothing but eat plant fibre and rubbish, while spreading filth all over. Termites and ants are smaller and get the job done better. With less of the filth.:smallmad:

MoonCat
2011-03-01, 01:15 PM
At least it wasn't a potato bug...

What? Potato bugs are adorable funny little buggies! What's wrong with them???

Crow
2011-03-01, 01:42 PM
What? Potato bugs are adorable funny little buggies! What's wrong with them???

Just in case there's some confusion, we're not talking rollie-pollies here.

MoonCat
2011-03-01, 01:50 PM
Just in case there's some confusion, we're not talking rollie-pollies here.

Oh. Those potato bugs.:smalleek:

Eldan
2011-03-01, 02:30 PM
Which kind? Wikipedia tells me there Woodlice and crickets which both go by that name.

Mystic Muse
2011-03-01, 02:42 PM
They are the most useless insects ever. I'd sooner deal with wasps(and I say this, having been stung on the side of the head when I was about 10). At least wasps have the decency to eat other insects. Those things which shall not be named do nothing but eat plant fibre and rubbish, while spreading filth all over. Termites and ants are smaller and get the job done better. With less of the filth.:smallmad:
It's really hard to sympathize with you when we don't know what you're talking about you know.

Dvandemon
2011-03-01, 02:54 PM
They are the most useless insects ever. I'd sooner deal with wasps(and I say this, having been stung on the side of the head when I was about 10). At least wasps have the decency to eat other insects. Those things which shall not be named do nothing but eat plant fibre and rubbish, while spreading filth all over. Termites and ants are smaller and get the job done better. With less of the filth.:smallmad:

Actually, cockroaches are only as dirty as the surfaces they're on. The more you know!

Mr. Snuggles
2011-03-01, 03:36 PM
I'm pretty sure that I'd rather kill pretty much any person than whatever kind of creature creature you're talking about.

I mean, c'mon, they're just trying to live.
Roaches are pests. We're trying to live, too. Roaches will contaminate every last morsel of food in your house if you let them. They will then use the energy they gain from eating to reproduce like crazy. Roaches are highly adaptable and difficult to kill. Nobody needs to shed any tears for them or murder humans to make way for more roaches.


If we have to pick one species to take out, I know where my vote's going, basically.
So, you live in a roach-infested house, then?

Rettu Skcollob
2011-03-01, 03:36 PM
Due to the environment and kind of house I live in, cockroaches are pretty much a constant annoyance. I just set up the things that kill them everywhere, usually find at least 2 dead a day.

smellie_hippie
2011-03-01, 03:39 PM
:roach:
Give filth a chance man...
:roach:

:smallamused:

Gorgondantess
2011-03-01, 04:02 PM
Actually, cockroaches are only as dirty as the surfaces they're on. The more you know!

This is true. In fact, cockroaches have near catlike grooming habits and are individually very clean creatures. The reason they're perceived as filthy is that the only place they can easily get food is the garbage.

CrimsonAngel
2011-03-01, 04:03 PM
EW I just looked up Potato Bugs! :smalleek:

LemonDrizzle
2011-03-01, 04:08 PM
There was this one time, long ago in far-off lands when my dad left a bag of sweets out, opened, overnight. Come morning, a four-inch one of 'em was wandering about inside it. I'm normally "oh, wow, insects and the like" but that was just freakish. Needless to say, for the rest of the holiday we never left anything out again.

CynicalAvocado
2011-03-01, 04:32 PM
It was a dinosaur out-living abomination. Roach.

They're not so bad... if they remain 500 meters away from you and your property. When they start climbing on you, then we have a problem.

i win at roach killing. there was one in my house that i named carlos. i swear he became immune to raid, so i shot him.

you read that right.

EDIT: potato bug? ha. at least it wasn't a grasshopper.
long legged demon bug

Mystic Muse
2011-03-01, 04:34 PM
i win at roach killing. there was one in my house that i named carlos. i swear he became immune to raid, so i shot him.


With what?

CynicalAvocado
2011-03-01, 04:35 PM
With what?

a colt .32 ACP

EDIT: it was my mom's i just happened to have it

EDIT EDIT. got the caliber wrong

CrimsonAngel
2011-03-01, 04:36 PM
a colt .35

I love you.

CynicalAvocado
2011-03-01, 04:38 PM
I love you.

you love me because i shot a roach?

Mystic Muse
2011-03-01, 04:39 PM
you love me because i shot a roach?

No, they love you because you shot a roach with a colt .35

CynicalAvocado
2011-03-01, 04:40 PM
No, they love you because you shot a roach with a colt .35

.32

i got the calber wrong

VeisuItaTyhjyys
2011-03-01, 04:57 PM
Roaches are pests. We're trying to live, too. Roaches will contaminate every last morsel of food in your house if you let them. They will then use the energy they gain from eating to reproduce like crazy. Roaches are highly adaptable and difficult to kill. Nobody needs to shed any tears for them or murder humans to make way for more roaches.
I forgot about eating and reproduciton, those heinouss crime of roachdom that no other species would dare commit.
Anyhow, we're trying to live, sure, but roaches aren't really a huge threat to that. They're not the horsemen of pestilence they're made out to be, and it's pretty easy to keep them out of your food, in which case they just eat anything that gets dropped on the floor, which is more convenient than them not doing so.


So, you live in a roach-infested house, then?
Yeah, actually.

CrimsonAngel
2011-03-01, 05:01 PM
I forgot about eating and reproduciton, those heinouss crime of roachdom that no other species would dare commit.
Anyhow, we're trying to live, sure, but roaches aren't really a huge threat to that. They're not the horsemen of pestilence they're made out to be, and it's pretty easy to keep them out of your food, in which case they just eat anything that gets dropped on the floor, which is more convenient than them not doing so.


Yeah, actually.

Sounds like you made friends with them. :smalleek:

Ranger Mattos
2011-03-01, 05:32 PM
:smalleek:

But I had an encounted with a spider today at work...I moved the bin lifting machine, and a massive grey scary spider came scuttling out from underneath.

Well, you live in Australia. Everything is trying to kill you over there.


On roaches: I've never seen any roaches that weren't in pictures. Woohoo.

Dvandemon
2011-03-01, 05:40 PM
Sounds like you made friends with them. :smalleek:

Why not? You'd be spared when they take over the world (http://www.marvunapp.com/Appendix/cockrchc.htm).
EW I just looked up Potato Bugs! :smalleek:

Oh! I saw a corpse of one a couple days ago. The people that told me about it thought it was an ant

Coidzor
2011-03-01, 05:44 PM
Cockroaches interest me, although I've never had an infestation of them, so I'm not traumatized. My mom's old cat used to drop dead ones in her shoes every morning.:smalleek:

In Florida, they're so endemic to the environment that one encounters them without needing to be infested.

It's rather annoying because they're quite disgusting to step on, find the eviscerated/squished remains of, or to watch being killed/eaten by dogs/cats.


I forgot about eating and reproduciton, those heinouss crime of roachdom that no other species would dare commit.
Anyhow, we're trying to live, sure, but roaches aren't really a huge threat to that. They're not the horsemen of pestilence they're made out to be, and it's pretty easy to keep them out of your food, in which case they just eat anything that gets dropped on the floor, which is more convenient than them not doing so.

They're a nuisance animal. We're humans. We generally kill nuisance animals when they damage or destroy our property. It's what we do. And the worst thing roaches do is eat books.

Can't remember if they eat clothing too if one lets an infestation progress past book eating though.

Also, they'll eat still living humans so they have to be kept completely out of places where we keep helpless or incapacitated people like babies, people recovering from surgery, invalids, and the elderly-to-the-point-of-decrepitude.

TheThan
2011-03-01, 05:57 PM
I hear they can get pretty big (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F3_QDHabaNM)

The Glyphstone
2011-03-01, 05:59 PM
At least it wasn't a Giant Intelligent Friendly Talking Roach. Brrrrrrrrr.

Forum Explorer
2011-03-01, 05:59 PM
I don't have a problem with insects in general. But as soon as they enter my living space its open war and I will destroy them all! :smallfurious: They can live peacefully in a different enviroment, just not mine. I haven't had to deal with roaches before (the pluses of routine minus 30 weather and poor heating) but from what I've heard about their difficulty to kill I would soon hate them the most.

Mystic Muse
2011-03-01, 06:00 PM
At least it wasn't a Giant Intelligent Friendly Talking Roach. Brrrrrrrrr.

You're an eldritch horror and you're afraid of a giant talking Roach that's friendly?

CynicalAvocado
2011-03-01, 06:18 PM
than guthix we have praying mantises (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=by8Gl61Tumk&feature=related)

Orzel
2011-03-01, 06:23 PM
Cockroaches. Bah nothing.

Now ants. Those mindless fearless bugs come outta nowhere during summer months.

"Like I know you only dropped 2 crumbs of bread like 10 seconds ago, but me and my 1000 cousins are coming over to have snacks, k."

Coidzor
2011-03-01, 06:39 PM
You're an eldritch horror and you're afraid of a giant talking Roach that's friendly?

Yeah, pretty much. (http://www.giantitp.com/forums/showthread.php?t=149881)

VeisuItaTyhjyys
2011-03-01, 07:05 PM
They're a nuisance animal. We're humans. We generally kill nuisance animals when they damage or destroy our property. It's what we do. And the worst thing roaches do is eat books.
Yeah, but it's a terrible thing to do.


Also, they'll eat still living humans so they have to be kept completely out of places where we keep helpless or incapacitated people like babies, people recovering from surgery, invalids, and the elderly-to-the-point-of-decrepitude.
So you mean they'll do what we do to them but for survival instead of just because they think we look yucky? Those monsters!

The Glyphstone
2011-03-01, 07:08 PM
Yeah, pretty much. (http://www.giantitp.com/forums/showthread.php?t=149881)

I hoped someone would get the reference:smallbiggrin:. (Though Exile/Avernum 3 actually has a colony of GIFTR).

Herpestidae
2011-03-01, 07:12 PM
I think my cat would love them. They're just the right size to swat.

Fortunately we have no cockroaches in Sweden. At least none that live in houses.

snip

Thank you. I am now scared out of my mind.




EW I just looked up Potato Bugs! :smalleek:


And now I'm even more scared. WTF nature!?

Admiral Squish
2011-03-01, 07:20 PM
Yeah, but it's a terrible thing to do. Our arrogance is abhorrent, and if there is an afterlife, I hope I can see cockroaches outlive us from it.

So you mean they'll do what we do to them but for survival instead of just because they think we look yucky? Those monsters!

Whine all you like about the killing of pest species, but the laternative is them being everywhere. Do you like libraries? Cockroaches ate all the books. Do you like having clean water? Rats infest the sewer and poop in the water. Do you like having affordable food? the crops got eaten. Do you like babies? Rats eat them in their crib. Do you like not having the plague? Sorry, rats again.

The fact is that these species are opportunity breeders with rapid reproductive cycles. The modern human lifestyle, even a fully 'green' idealized one, provides too many opportunities for them. We would be up to our armpits in critters within a few short years.

Now, I'm not saying 'exterminate them all forever'. That would be the simplest solution, yes, but I'm not saying we should do it. But human beings as a whole need to apply constant pressure to these populations to keep their numbers manageable.

Dvandemon
2011-03-01, 07:22 PM
I remember I was once visiting my auntie and while I went to the bathroom I was siezed by a coughing fit (I thought it was another loogie in my throat), when it came up I found a roach corpse :smalleek:

Admiral Squish
2011-03-01, 07:24 PM
I remember I was once visiting my auntie and while I went to the bathroom I was siezed by a coughing fit (I thought it was another loogie in my throat), when it came up I found a roach corpse :smalleek:

...Aaaaaand now I'm going to start sleeping with a surgical mask on.

VeisuItaTyhjyys
2011-03-01, 07:35 PM
Whine all you like about the killing of pest species, but the laternative is them being everywhere.
I hear this really terrible one goes all over the world leaving tar and weird mineral waste all over the ground so nothing else can even live there.


Do you like having clean water? Rats infest the sewer and poop in the water.
Clean sewage would be nice, but I think that boat kinda sailed. :smalltongue:

Admiral Squish
2011-03-01, 08:22 PM
I hear this really terrible one goes all over the world leaving tar and weird mineral waste all over the ground so nothing else can even live there.


Wow, comparing humans to cockroaches/rats. Amazing. I've NEVER heard anyone make that comparison before... and it's so true! I mean, after all, humans have several hundred children at a time and show absolutely no regard for the fate of their offspring.

I'm really not sure where this humans = r-strategist thing started. Humans show all the typical traits of K-strategist reproduction. Large body size, long life expectancy, and EXTREMELY long nurturing period...

The fact stands: You are human. And if it comes down to a human life or the lives of a cockroach colony that moved in, I guarantee you'll choose the human's.


Clean sewage would be nice, but I think that boat kinda sailed. :smalltongue:

Not everything gets filtered perfectly, you know. There's still a very real possibility of disease through the water supply. Plus, what about places without water processing? You're just gonna say 'screw you, most of africa'?

LOTRfan
2011-03-01, 08:56 PM
On of the buses that drive along the Q54 (a local public bus line) is infested with little roach nymphs. There's this one lady who keeps eating KFC in the back and puts the containers behind other people's seats. :smallfurious:

aart lover
2011-03-01, 09:01 PM
lol i know what this is like. in Georgia our house was crawling with them. cockroaches, right? anyways, I'D rather that their genes be modified so that they can't breed at all, lord knows i hate those things:smallmad: because not only are they annoying, they serve no purpose whatsoever! they just bug you and crawl around eating filth and spreading germs.:smallyuk:

CrimsonAngel
2011-03-01, 09:22 PM
Yeah, but it's a terrible thing to do.


So you mean they'll do what we do to them but for survival instead of just because they think we look yucky? Those monsters!

When do we eat them?

AtomicKitKat
2011-03-01, 09:50 PM
lol i know what this is like. in Georgia our house was crawling with them. cockroaches, right? anyways, I'D rather that their genes be modified so that they can't breed at all, lord knows i hate those things:smallmad: because not only are they annoying, they serve no purpose whatsoever! they just bug you and crawl around eating filth and spreading germs.:smallyuk:

No, see, the purpose of letting them reproduce conditionally is that we release those who can breed(with our permission) out into the environment, where they spread their "cannot breed" genes to the next generation. This thins down the breeding population of the next generation. We repeat this for a few generations, and eventually, either they go extinct, or at least, we keep their numbers really low.

Alternative to artificial breeding permission was keeping them in nymph form unless permitted, but I suspect that they'd go the axlotl route and develop the power to reproduce without ever getting to the adult stage. That does have the benefit of killing off their ability to fly though. And that's always a plus.

And it's very easy to act all "holier than thou because I do not kill even vermin" when you're living in temperate/arctic conditions. Come over to the tropics, where every time it rains(about once every 1.5 days, sometimes 3 days between rainfall), you dread the oncoming plague within the next week.:smallannoyed:

LOTRfan
2011-03-01, 10:01 PM
That does have the benefit of killing off their ability to fly though. And that's always a plus.

They can fly???

Geting to work is about to become a lot more fun :smallsigh::smallfrown::smallyuk:

rayne_dragon
2011-03-01, 10:07 PM
Cold climates aren't always better off in terms of infestations. Bedbugs are quite the problem even up here in Canada.

Personally, I find that most bugs are generally alright, just not if they decide to take up residence where I eat and sleep. If they do I evict or kill them depending on how much I like the particular kind of bug. Roaches and bedbugs send me into extermination mode though.

Spiders I like to keep around so they can eat anything crawling around that I don't want to know about.

CynicalAvocado
2011-03-01, 10:07 PM
Wow, comparing humans to cockroaches/rats. Amazing. I've NEVER heard anyone make that comparison before... and it's so true! I mean, after all, humans have several hundred children at a time and show absolutely no regard for the fate of their offspring.




no no, you got it wrong.

humans are like a virus

http://ecoharp.com/custom/evil-agent-smith.jpg

Trog
2011-03-01, 10:19 PM
>>
<<

...

This thread needs more Kafka.

CynicalAvocado
2011-03-01, 10:24 PM
>>
<<

...

This thread needs more Kafka.

that book.... i could understand it not

Coidzor
2011-03-01, 10:25 PM
When do we eat them?

Sometimes they're made into exotic candy, but other than that...


Cold climates aren't always better off in terms of infestations. Bedbugs are quite the problem even up here in Canada.

The vacuumn is the flea's true worst enemy, after all.

Crow
2011-03-01, 10:27 PM
Some creatures exist for no other reason than to provide a food source for other animals. Lots of creatures eat cockroaches....and mosquitos.

The Unborne
2011-03-01, 10:42 PM
Yeah, we should all preserve the lives of our fellow vermin. I personally refuse to kill rats since they are always defecating and urinating everywhere. How many of you would like to be murdered while in the WC? :smallmad:

Don't get me started on drinking beer! You do realize you're destroying the small grains that are just beginning to germinate!? (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brewing#Starch_source) Doesn't this sound familiar?

It's really not beneficial that we are alive in this world. We developed brains for technology, but all that does is hurt the surrounding life around us: wooden doors? Nooo!

druid91
2011-03-01, 11:05 PM
Hmmm. Someone protesting the mistreatment of one more pest race that I personally desire the absolute and utter extermination to the point of extinction of.

Let the games begin.

Why are Roaches valuable? What do they contribute to my goal that I should not exterminate them? What area of science or art was explored primarily by roaches? What unique qualities do they contribute to society?

Do roaches do anything useful? Do they have any genetic properties that would make it worthwhile to keep them around? If so why not contain some in a laboratory and exterminate the rest?

And finally because I know it will come up at some point, why is the life of that roach important when it is both detrimental to another, And easily replaced?

aart lover
2011-03-01, 11:42 PM
They can fly???

Geting to work is about to become a lot more fun :smallsigh::smallfrown::smallyuk:

yes, they can fly, and yes, they use this to become even more of a nuisance:smallannoyed:. although i've heard that some varieties can't:smallconfused:

Dvandemon
2011-03-02, 12:22 AM
I know the ones I've seen can't, even though they appear to have wings. Because of this, I was confused when I saw Joe's Apartment

Admiral Squish
2011-03-02, 12:38 AM
Apparently in japan the roaches are known to fly DIRECTLY INTO YOUR FACE when you try to grab them.

Amiel
2011-03-02, 12:45 AM
I, for one, welcome our new Insect Overlords.



Apparently, there is a species of tick that embeds itself within the flesh of a sentient being and feeds to the point of causing said being to*
Do not read if you are easily afraid, for beyond the spoiler lies horror
*become hollowed out, leaving only a reminder of the creature it once was, all that which remains is the epidermis.

AtomicKitKat
2011-03-02, 01:18 AM
They can fly???

Geting to work is about to become a lot more fun :smallsigh::smallfrown::smallyuk:

The kind we get here is the American, I think. About an inch and a half long, brown, flat, with a yellow band separating the head and torso. We also get the much smaller(about 1 cm) German variety. More often found on buses. I've seen both in the bathroom at the mall where I work. I usually drown them in soap when I find them. The American ones are strong enough to swim out of it(but hopefully with clogged breathing pores) though.

dish
2011-03-02, 01:27 AM
While meeting a cockroach in my kitchen, or finding one crawling up my leg, is a deeply traumatic and horrifying experience, I do not believe that introducing a terminator gene to the entire population is a good idea. You know, ecology, every animal has its evolutionary niche, all that kind of stuff, blah, blah, blah.


When do we eat them?
You probably don't. But they are eaten in Guangdong (that would be Canton in the south of China). Apparently some people consider them quite a delicacy.

While I shudder at the thought (I'm far too European to eat cockroaches), my husband has enjoyed them. He says that if prepared correctly they taste like dried beef.

(I know, I know. Lips that have eaten cockroaches have kissed me.)

EDIT: Sorry, husband says it was Inner Mongolia where he first ate cockroaches. Apparently the ones there taste better than the ones in Guangdong.


They can fly???

Yep. Walking down the street you notice something on your companion's back. "Hold on a sec, let me brush this moth off you...Oh...it's not a moth." :smallyuk:

Eldan
2011-03-02, 02:29 AM
No, see, the purpose of letting them reproduce conditionally is that we release those who can breed(with our permission) out into the environment, where they spread their "cannot breed" genes to the next generation. This thins down the breeding population of the next generation. We repeat this for a few generations, and eventually, either they go extinct, or at least, we keep their numbers really low.

That's not how evolution works, sorry...
A gene like that would survive for a handful of generations at best, even if it was recessive.

Lyndworm
2011-03-02, 03:48 AM
*A person called Druid advocating genocide*

You have the most ironic screen name of all time.

Killer Angel
2011-03-02, 04:31 AM
I hear this really terrible one goes all over the world leaving tar and weird mineral waste all over the ground so nothing else can even live there.


There are lot of things you can do to save the nature. You can recycle, you can save electricity, you can donate money to WWF and Greenpeace, you can free a wasp closed in your house; when a raccoon pray on your chikens, you can capture the beast and free it in the woods.
But with a roaches' infestation, there are few things you can do, other then kill the pests.

Amiel
2011-03-02, 04:40 AM
But with a roaches' infestation, there are few things you can do, other then kill the pests.
Pests want to be loved too; see, the person who loves pests truly has a boundless love (for some pests are physically repugnant).

Asta Kask
2011-03-02, 05:23 AM
Then I do not have a boundless love.

Lyndworm
2011-03-02, 05:54 AM
Pests want to be loved too; see, the person who loves pests truly has a boundless love (for some pests are physically repugnant).

I have nothing against pests. They are organisms doing what organisms do: eating and breeding. I love animals that most consider pests just as much as I love all other animals. Certain species have a more personal fondness than others, (I like solifugids, hyaenids, and crocodylids in particular. I don't know why.) but I love them all.

It is important to note, however, that death is a natural part of life. When one form of life threatens another, only one prevails. It is an unavoidable fact that pests must be removed in order for humanity to flourish as we so desire, and the cheapest, easiest, most efficient, and most reliable methods of removal involve death.

I would prefer that the removal of pests not involve killing, but this is simply not the case. I love them, but that won't stop me from killing them when I have to. I love chickens, cows, and pigs, too; that doesn't stop me from enjoying an omelet, a cheeseburger, or a porkchop.

AtomicKitKat
2011-03-02, 06:10 AM
That's not how evolution works, sorry...
A gene like that would survive for a handful of generations at best, even if it was recessive.

You might want to re-read the quote. I said repeating this over several generations, as in "release conditionally-capable-of-breeding units into the wild to mix with the regular ones" every so often. Eventually, either they'll somehow mutate the gene so they can breed regardless of the condition, or they'll die out. At the very least, it should reduce the number of breeders available for the next generation.

I was wondering whether to point out the irony of "Druid" promoting species extermination, but decided to let someone else have a shot. :smallbiggrin:


I would prefer that the removal of pests not involve killing, but this is simply not the case. I love them, but that won't stop me from killing them when I have to. I love chickens, cows, and pigs, too; that doesn't stop me from enjoying an omelet, a cheeseburger, or a porkchop.

This.

Shyftir
2011-03-02, 06:18 AM
It obvious that they reproduce at such rates because everything else naturally wants to kill them. It's why Australians have lots of children!*

*The statement about Australians has no basis in fact but only in humor.

Also I will now not go to sleep for at least 4 more hours...

Eloel
2011-03-02, 08:05 AM
I hate pretty much all kinds of insects, with my instincts telling me to avoid it taking more and more control as they get bigger.

Ants/Butterflies? They can live as long as it's in the garden.
Spiders/Bees/Moths/Mosquito? Keep away from me
Roaches? Fire at will

Then there's the weird bird/mosquito hybrid that I've only ever seen on campus in college.
Think a black praying mantis with around 15 cm wingspan.

Those things, they're better at surviving than roaches. Half a can of fly-spray later, it was alive. Left it alone for a while, didn't die. Put a shoe on it, jumped on the shoe, and left it there (under the shoe) for 2 more days. 2 days later when I removed the shoe, the frigging thing was still alive.

I swear I'll buy a katana eventually just so I can strike those bastards down.

Sholos
2011-03-02, 08:53 AM
I think I'll just leave this (http://www.cracked.com/article_17481_5-most-hated-creatures-on-planet-dont-deserve-it.html) here. Roaches aren't that bad.

AtomicKitKat
2011-03-02, 09:33 AM
I think I'll just leave this (http://www.cracked.com/article_17481_5-most-hated-creatures-on-planet-dont-deserve-it.html) here. Roaches aren't that bad.

I'm doubtful about the claim that they eat other things, but I absolutely dispute the claim that they're necessary for decomposition. Ants can do it. So can lots of other smaller, less disgusting beings.

As an aside, the last time I got this freaked out(and posted a thread here), I looked up why they avoided sunlight in general, and it appears that ultraviolet light sterilises them. Now I gotta find a cheap source of UV radiation that I can shoot.:smallmad:

hamishspence
2011-03-02, 09:49 AM
Ants have trouble digesting cellulose though (they need to cultivate fungi to do it).

Why are cockroaches regarded as "more disgusting" than other creatures that fill a similar niche- dung beetles, sexton beetles, and so on?

Kris Strife
2011-03-02, 09:55 AM
a colt .32 ACP

I take it you've played Fallout? :smalltongue:

bladesyz
2011-03-02, 10:09 AM
My wish for every year is the same. For someone to unlock their genetic code, and modify it so that they can never breed without exposure to some super rare trigger(ala the terminator genes used in some crops). Then release these genetically modified ones(exposed so that they can breed) into the environment, have them breed with the locals, pass on the conditional sterility to the next generation, and do this until every last one of them is extinct!:smallfurious:

How would they spread their genes if they have such a huge reproductive handicap?

Dvandemon
2011-03-02, 10:13 AM
I don't mind them so much, I just hate finding them in my food (I don't need the protein :smallwink:). Apparently the ones in my house learned how to jump, I flicked one and it kept bouncing back from the wall
I, for one, welcome our new Insect Overlords.



Apparently, there is a species of tick that embeds itself within the flesh of a sentient being and feeds to the point of causing said being to*
Do not read if you are easily afraid, for beyond the spoiler lies horror
*become hollowed out, leaving only a reminder of the creature it once was, all that which remains is the epidermis.

Good thing The Foundation is working to contain it :smallwink: (was that the reference you were making?)

Astrella
2011-03-02, 10:15 AM
i win at roach killing. there was one in my house that i named carlos. i swear he became immune to raid, so i shot him.

you read that right.

EDIT: potato bug? ha. at least it wasn't a grasshopper.
long legged demon bug

Am I the only one who finds this slightly disturbing?

VeisuItaTyhjyys
2011-03-02, 10:24 AM
There are lot of things you can do to save the nature. You can recycle, you can save electricity, you can donate money to WWF and Greenpeace.

I literally lol'd.


But with a roaches' infestation, there are few things you can do, other then kill the pests.

You can just keep roaches away from the stuff you don't want them eating. It is easier than one might think to outwit insects.


It is important to note, however, that death is a natural part of life. When one form of life threatens another, only one prevails. It is an unavoidable fact that pests must be removed in order for humanity to flourish as we so desire, and the cheapest, easiest, most efficient, and most reliable methods of removal involve death.

I find it hard to feel threatened by non-venomous insects that have been in my various houses on and off since I was pretty young without causing me any real harm.
Humanity flourishing as it desires is exactly what I have been objecting to in this thread. Flourishing is one thing, but we might want to occasionally think about others' desires, both within and outside of our species before we decide if Asia should be a shopping mall or two shopping malls, and if Europe should be the parking lot or movie theatre. (Totally parking lot, beeteedubs, my national pride flares at the mere thought that Ukraine could be among the ideal parking spaces.)


I would prefer that the removal of pests not involve killing, but this is simply not the case. I love them, but that won't stop me from killing them when I have to. I love chickens, cows, and pigs, too; that doesn't stop me from enjoying an omelet, a cheeseburger, or a porkchop.

I never got the whole "I love X, but I will still kill and eat it." I mean, sure, if it was necessary, but if it's just convenient, and you still enjoy it. . . I wouldn't ever wanna date you, let's leave it at that. What if you're hungry and we're out of groceries? :smalltongue:

Druid91: What good, in every category you listed, are you? To claim existence needs justification, I think one must first justify one's own.

LaZodiac
2011-03-02, 10:27 AM
The opening of this thread is arguably a lot funnier if the only creature you know that outlived dinosaurs was crocodiles/aligators (I forget which).

Of course, I LIKE those so I wouldn't call them abominations.

Traab
2011-03-02, 10:29 AM
You know what? I am an equal opportunity killer. If it doesnt pay rent and wants to live in my house, it dies. I have killed mice, ants, bees, wasps, hornets, crickets, flies, roommates, and locusts that have dared to cross my threshold with the intent to stay and annoy me. This is MY territory dammit, and you weaker beings need to learn this fact.

Mice especially annoy me. Always scampering about in the walls at night when im trying to sleep. Last year alone I had to kill seven of them before the traps stopped getting triggered. Ants drive me nuts because they go everywhere and they WILL bite you if you let them. And those bites freaking HURT! The worst part is, they arent as easy to wipe out as its often hard to spot where they are coming in from, so you end up leaving the poison bait traps all over the place.

I fully support the rights of these beings to exist. However, they do NOT have the right to exist on my property.

Killer Angel
2011-03-02, 10:39 AM
You can just keep roaches away from the stuff you don't want them eating. It is easier than one might think to outwit insects.


I've said "few things", not "none". :smallwink:
Once, in a very small apartment, I treated a roaches infestation, with some killing, deep cleaning and intense use of household products.
This resolved the problem, and the insects didn't come back, but I can see other peoples, adopting more extreme measures.

Lillith
2011-03-02, 11:04 AM
While on a vacation my mom wanted to visit a real jungle bat cave. Now this cave was also used to gather guano (bat poo). Now imagine this big giant massive dark cave, with a wooden banister that has a railing and is covered in guano. Now imagine every single inch of that to be crammed with at least 5 cockroaches. Now imagine that everything is very slippery so you might trip and fall any second. Imagine the crunchy sound you have while walking.

Yeah, I hate them.

AtomicKitKat
2011-03-02, 11:30 AM
You know what? I am an equal opportunity killer. If it doesnt pay rent and wants to live in my house, it dies. I have killed mice, ants, bees, wasps, hornets, crickets, flies, roommates, and locusts that have dared to cross my threshold with the intent to stay and annoy me. This is MY territory dammit, and you weaker beings need to learn this fact.

Really?


The opening of this thread is arguably a lot funnier if the only creature you know that outlived dinosaurs was crocodiles/aligators (I forget which).

Of course, I LIKE those so I wouldn't call them abominations.

Turtles too. I'll eat all of those just fine. In fact, I've already eaten 2 of the 5 currently extant reptilian species. Just left Ophidia, Squamata, and Tuatara.


How would they spread their genes if they have such a huge reproductive handicap?

Once again, I'm proposing having them go out to breed with the current adult population, so that the next generation of kids are sterile. Next generation, send out more adults to breed with the G2 that are fertile. Now, we carry this on with G3, G4, and so on, until they're all sterile.

Dvandemon
2011-03-02, 11:50 AM
You can just keep roaches away from the stuff you don't want them eating. It is easier than one might think to outwit insects.
I never got the whole "I love X, but I will still kill and eat it." I mean, sure, if it was necessary, but if it's just convenient, and you still enjoy it. . . I wouldn't ever wanna date you, let's leave it at that. What if you're hungry and we're out of groceries? :smalltongue: You're missing intent (I think)Yeah, you just have to be more cautious with your stuff, they're not that much of a pest if you do something about it (instead of killing outright, solve the problem at the source)
The opening of this thread is arguably a lot funnier if the only creature you know that outlived dinosaurs was crocodiles/aligators (I forget which).

Of course, I LIKE those so I wouldn't call them abominations.

Imagine if they infested your house like cockroaches (including their size:smallwink:) That's what this makes me think

Killer Angel
2011-03-02, 12:02 PM
While on a vacation my mom wanted to visit a real jungle bat cave. Now this cave was also used to gather guano (bat poo). Now imagine this big giant massive dark cave, with a wooden banister that has a railing and is covered in guano. Now imagine every single inch of that to be crammed with at least 5 cockroaches. Now imagine that everything is very slippery so you might trip and fall any second. Imagine the crunchy sound you have while walking.


lol... even better than Indiana and the Temple of Doom. :smalltongue:

druid91
2011-03-02, 02:01 PM
You have the most ironic screen name of all time.

I know right? But I used to be a bit more sympathetic to nature than now.

Also I am not advocating genocide. Merely insecticide. Genocide is the deliberate slaughter of a race of people. Roaches are not people.

As for justifying my own existence... I said it right there. I am human, I may not know what I'm going to do with my life. But eventually I will be productive somewhere. It's either that or starve.

In other words if I don't manage to justify my own existence somehow then I starve. Simple as that.

bladesyz
2011-03-02, 02:12 PM
Once again, I'm proposing having them go out to breed with the current adult population, so that the next generation of kids are sterile. Next generation, send out more adults to breed with the G2 that are fertile. Now, we carry this on with G3, G4, and so on, until they're all sterile.

lol, I think you need to understand how evolution works first.

Dvandemon
2011-03-02, 02:57 PM
lol, then why don't you explain it? :smallannoyed:

Tiger Duck
2011-03-02, 03:09 PM
Is it really his job to explain it to you?

He just pointing it out that it won't work for the most basic evolutionary principles.

If you want to learn more about it I'm sure you could find some useful information on the internet

bluewind95
2011-03-02, 03:31 PM
But a similar thing is being done with mosquitos. Sterile males are being released to mate with the females. Populations go down.

Lyndworm
2011-03-02, 03:50 PM
I find it hard to feel threatened by non-venomous insects that have been in my various houses on and off since I was pretty young without causing me any real harm.

I actually agree with you. I don't, honestly, feel that I ever have been or ever will be personally threatened by a creature hundreds of times smaller than me with no real offensive or defensive capabilities.

However, when I find a "pest" (rat, roach, etc.) in or near my food supply I attempt to rid myself of the creature. As mentioned, death is unfortunately almost always part of this equation. In other cases, I actively go out of my way to spare the creatures. I never kill spiders or craneflies, for example, and always attempt to deter pests before resorting to execution.



Humanity flourishing as it desires is exactly what I have been objecting to in this thread. Flourishing is one thing, but we might want to occasionally think about others' desires, both within and outside of our species before we decide if Asia should be a shopping mall or two shopping malls, and if Europe should be the parking lot or movie theatre. (Totally parking lot, beeteedubs, my national pride flares at the mere thought that Ukraine could be among the ideal parking spaces.)
Actually, I agree with you here, too. I think that the way the majority of people treat other creatures, even other people at times, is deplorable. However, I feel that that's an issue for another thread.



I never got the whole "I love X, but I will still kill and eat it." I mean, sure, if it was necessary, but if it's just convenient, and you still enjoy it. . . I wouldn't ever wanna date you, let's leave it at that. What if you're hungry and we're out of groceries? :smalltongue:

Now that you mention it, I don't get a lot of dates...

Dvandemon
2011-03-02, 04:10 PM
Is it really his job to explain it to you?

He just pointing it out that it won't work for the most basic evolutionary principles.

If you want to learn more about it I'm sure you could find some useful information on the internet

Or he could stop being so condescending and make his point :smallannoyed: In that sense it is his job to explain

Admiral Squish
2011-03-02, 04:18 PM
lol, I think you need to understand how evolution works first.

I think it's YOU who doesn't understand how this works.

Non-breeder bugs are exposed to their chemical trigger so they can breed. Assuming non-breeder bugs are fit enough to earn themselves mates, the non-breeder bugs sire a significant portion of the upcoming generation. These children carry the non-breeder genes and are not exposed to their trigger, meaning they die without siring another generation. And since these non-breeder bugs are displacing at least a portion of the breeders, there are less resources for the breeders. We repeat the process and the population slowly decreases. It's unlikely this will ever exterminate cockroaches as a whole, but the population will be decreased, in a relatively humane fashion.

Essentially, we're manufacturing the results of natural selection.

bladesyz
2011-03-02, 04:53 PM
I think it's YOU who doesn't understand how this works.

Non-breeder bugs are exposed to their chemical trigger so they can breed. Assuming non-breeder bugs are fit enough to earn themselves mates, the non-breeder bugs sire a significant portion of the upcoming generation. These children carry the non-breeder genes and are not exposed to their trigger, meaning they die without siring another generation. And since these non-breeder bugs are displacing at least a portion of the breeders, there are less resources for the breeders. We repeat the process and the population slowly decreases. It's unlikely this will ever exterminate cockroaches as a whole, but the population will be decreased, in a relatively humane fashion.

Essentially, we're manufacturing the results of natural selection.

Yeah, except that you need to KEEP DOING THIS FOREVER! The moment you stop doing it, the remaining fertile roaches will experience a population explosion, as the amount of resources (garbage) remains the same while the sterile population dies off.

Even worse, as long as you keep up this "therapy", the ROACH POPULATION WILL NOT DECREASE! Yes, a large portion of this population will be sterile, but that is a rather moot point as your average human isn't going to care about the difference.

The only way for this method to be effective is for somehow, the sterile roach population to out compete the fertile roach population, resulting in the entire local roach population to become sterile, and thus ending the need for the "intervention". However, unless the sterile roach population has some kind of definite reproductive advantage over the fertile roaches, that's never going to happen.

* A note on the Sterile Insect Technique: it is only capable of targeting particular species of an insect because it exploits the fact that the females are only able to mate once in their lifetime. Genetic manipulation is not needed either, as you only have to release sterile males (created through irradiation). Other drawbacks include the fact that you need to have a "campaign" for each species of that insect, and you need to ensure that population from other geographic areas don't migrate over.

** And seriously, why are we talking about humane methods of cockroach extermination?

VeisuItaTyhjyys
2011-03-02, 05:17 PM
However, when I find a "pest" (rat, roach, etc.) in or near my food supply I attempt to rid myself of the creature. As mentioned, death is unfortunately almost always part of this equation. In other cases, I actively go out of my way to spare the creatures. I never kill spiders or craneflies, for example, and always attempt to deter pests before resorting to execution.

Fair enough. I tend to go a little too far out of my way to preserve them, but I'm mostly horrified by the wanton, joyous slaying in this thread.


Now that you mention it, I don't get a lot of dates...

Maybe they're afraid you'll try and eat them. I know that's why I've been shot down sometimes.
Only for real though. :smallfrown:

Herpestidae
2011-03-02, 05:43 PM
When the roaches/rats/whatever start paying rent, they can start setting people traps.

Dvandemon
2011-03-02, 06:09 PM
Yeah, except that you need to KEEP DOING THIS FOREVER! The moment you stop doing it, the remaining fertile roaches will experience a population explosion, as the amount of resources (garbage) remains the same while the sterile population dies off.

Even worse, as long as you keep up this "therapy", the ROACH POPULATION WILL NOT DECREASE! Yes, a large portion of this population will be sterile, but that is a rather moot point as your average human isn't going to care about the difference.

The only way for this method to be effective is for somehow, the sterile roach population to out compete the fertile roach population, resulting in the entire local roach population to become sterile, and thus ending the need for the "intervention". However, unless the sterile roach population has some kind of definite reproductive advantage over the fertile roaches, that's never going to happen.

* A note on the Sterile Insect Technique: it is only capable of targeting particular species of an insect because it exploits the fact that the females are only able to mate once in their lifetime. Genetic manipulation is not needed either, as you only have to release sterile males (created through irradiation). Other drawbacks include the fact that you need to have a "campaign" for each species of that insect, and you need to ensure that population from other geographic areas don't migrate over.

** And seriously, why are we talking about humane methods of cockroach extermination?Now why in Nine Hells couldn't you say that instead of being a condescending {Scrubbed}

bladesyz
2011-03-02, 07:18 PM
Now why in Nine Hells couldn't you say that instead of being a condescending {Scrubbed the post, scrub the quote.}

ROFL... sure, whatever dude.

Dvandemon
2011-03-02, 07:32 PM
{Scrubbed}

Spacefarer
2011-03-02, 07:44 PM
So you mean they'll do what we do to them but for survival instead of just because they think we look yucky? Those monsters!

Um...I don't eat still-living cockroaches...do you?

VeisuItaTyhjyys
2011-03-02, 08:00 PM
Um...I don't eat still-living cockroaches...do you?

You're right, I hadn't thought of the fact that they're not even wasteful about their killing. That's just sick.

AtomicKitKat
2011-03-02, 08:38 PM
But a similar thing is being done with mosquitos. Sterile males are being released to mate with the females. Populations go down.

This is happening in Malaysia. Against the wishes of environmentalists and government agencies, I think it's a private company doing this. It's only for a specific species of mosquito(the one carrying Dengue), so in theory, there should be other varieties around for most of their predators to feed on. That's one advantage of being higher on the food chain. You have more than one option for your energy.

Admiral Squish got the gist of it.

blade: Yes, the problem is having the same absolute number of roaches around. I also pointed out that UV radiation seems to make them sterile(which is why they seldom leave the shade or come out in the day). I'm thinking potentially the best way to do this is some form of pheromone-producing genes, either to attract females(or males, if there's some form of bee misandry going on), or predators. Maybe both, so that those that don't get eaten attract mates who do.

Moff Chumley
2011-03-02, 11:58 PM
So much love in this thread... :smallbiggrin:

Anyhow, I still think a little cognitive dissonance and willful ignorance will get you the most bang for your buck when it comes to pests. :smalltongue:

THAC0
2011-03-03, 12:01 AM
I take steps to make my home unattractive to insects.

However, if insects show up, I have absolutely no problems with killing them. You can't just move a nest of roaches or flourbugs or whatever out into the backyard - they just come back.

Then again, I also hunt for my meat. But I won't eat roaches. Ick.

Amiel
2011-03-03, 12:15 AM
Good thing The Foundation is working to contain it :smallwink: (was that the reference you were making?)

Ah, but does the Foundation seek to contain it or work to replicate it? :smalltongue:
Indeed it was, good sir


Um...I don't eat still-living cockroaches...do you?

Indeed, you need to eat it with the right condiments; radioactive slurry and a nice goodberry sauce.

Killer Angel
2011-03-03, 04:59 AM
but I'm mostly horrified by the wanton, joyous slaying in this thread.


Nerds' repressed hostility? :smalltongue:
Y' know, there's no such thing as ENUFF DAKKA! :smallwink:

druid91
2011-03-03, 12:02 PM
Nerds' repressed hostility? :smalltongue:
Y' know, there's no such thing as ENUFF DAKKA! :smallwink:

Exactly. Which is why I will never be a politician.

Necro_EX
2011-03-03, 12:22 PM
At least it wasn't a potato bug...

Jerusalem crickets or pillbugs?

Either way, for bugs, they're both kind of cute.

Lyndworm
2011-03-03, 01:11 PM
Jerusalem crickets or pillbugs?

Either way, for bugs, they're both kind of cute.

Jerusalem crickets, and I agree. I actually think that there's a kind of other-worldly beauty to them, as there is with most arthropods.

Coidzor
2011-03-03, 02:05 PM
Ants have trouble digesting cellulose though (they need to cultivate fungi to do it).

And cockroaches have special intestinal parasites for the job as well, IIRC. Ahh, biology.


Why are cockroaches regarded as "more disgusting" than other creatures that fill a similar niche- dung beetles, sexton beetles, and so on?

Proximity, mainly. We generally don't have dung or sexton beetles infesting our houses. And if they do, there's bigger fish to fry about what's gone wrong with the management of that household than some mere detritivores. Specifically why there's enough carrion and **** to attract those in the first place.

Since they'll never commonly be a reason for people to never go barefoot in their own homes, whether it be in the day or the evening, they are afforded casual disgust when encountered. Cockroaches, on the other hand, are a constant, eternal enemy waiting to invade and requiring a heroic effort to dislodge once entrenched, and so the enemy close to and threatening the home is more reviled than the merely disgusting 'jackals' that live on the periphery of civilization.

Lyndworm
2011-03-03, 02:37 PM
And cockroaches have special intestinal parasites for the job as well, IIRC. Ahh, biology.

Don't we, as well?

Coidzor
2011-03-03, 03:03 PM
Don't we, as well?

Not really. We can't use cellulose for fuel, but we can break it down to a limited extent to aid in digestion. I recall it being put forward that opening up cellulose as a viable food source would greatly improve things in regards to the human food supply back in the 70s and 80s, though specifics escape me.

We do have intestinal flora for breaking down other things though, yes.

Lyndworm
2011-03-03, 03:07 PM
Not really. We can't use cellulose for fuel, but we can break it down to a limited extent to aid in digestion. I recall it being put forward that opening up cellulose as a viable food source would greatly improve things in regards to the human food supply back in the 70s and 80s, though specifics escape me.

We do have intestinal flora for breaking down other things though, yes.

Sorry, that's my fault for being too vague. i meant intestinal parasites that aid digestion in general. I'm aware that cellulose is indigestible to humans.

LOTRfan
2011-03-03, 08:06 PM
Sorry, that's my fault for being too vague. i meant intestinal parasites that aid digestion in general. I'm aware that cellulose is indigestible to humans.

Yes we do (including E. coli).

Amiel
2011-03-03, 08:33 PM
Tangentially, intestinal parasites may aid in weight-loss. It's certainly something to mull over.

Coidzor
2011-03-03, 08:50 PM
Tangentially, intestinal parasites may aid in weight-loss. It's certainly something to mull over.

They were once sold as dieting aides....

However, they can also have long-lasting/permanent ill effects if not treated in their early stages, especially as some migrate out of the intestines to wreak havock in other parts of the body that aren't quite so cavity-some. :smalleek:

I remember something about them having an immuno-suppressant effect and so being encouraged by a friend to willingly contract a case of some variety temporarily in order to help diminish the severity of my allergies...

aart lover
2011-03-03, 11:25 PM
ahh, the body. the most complicated machine on earth, and yet we take it for granted every day...

AtomicKitKat
2011-03-04, 06:50 AM
The problem with having a tapeworm infestation(for a brief period in my pre-teens) was that it gave me a huge appetite(prompting my superior pubertal size increase over my younger brother), which just didn't diminish after. That or I just had a big appetite to start with, but I remember when I was much younger, that I always had trouble finishing my meals, so maybe some of A, some of B?

That which must not be named are apparently descended from termites, sharing the same cellulose-digesting bacteria(and similar appetite for wood and paper).

Renegade Paladin
2011-03-04, 09:04 AM
Ugh. Don't mention those things to me. My childhood friend's basement was infested with them. We'd often sprint through there to make it to the backyard... ick.

Potato bugs are beetles that eat potato plants. Why would they infest a basement? :smallconfused:

For'Ninniach
2011-03-04, 10:24 AM
I'm pretty sure that box elder bugs are the worst bugs, EVER.
They crawl around and do nothing, consuming everything that contains sugar. Like,
No point.
I remember I had one crawling on my face while I was asleep. They, just, CRAWL, they dont even bite. They're just annoying.

CynicalAvocado
2011-03-05, 12:05 AM
i remember at scout camp we had these bugs that were about the size of your palm, had huge wings and big jaws. we didn't know what they really were so we just called them satan bugs. i woke up with one next to my head once:smalleek:

Mystic Muse
2011-03-05, 12:25 AM
A giant water bug maybe? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giant_water_bug

CynicalAvocado
2011-03-05, 01:18 AM
A giant water bug maybe? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giant_water_bug

def not one of those. needs bigger jaws

Lyndworm
2011-03-05, 02:18 AM
def not one of those. needs bigger jaws

I'm usually pretty good at this sort of thing (amateur entomologist); do you think you could describe it in greater detail? Color, pattern, wing texture, wing shape, body shape, head shape, eye shape, eye size, leg length, antennae length, antennae shape, and especially location could all be important factors. I probably won't need all of those things, but any one might wind up giving me the clue I need.

CynicalAvocado
2011-03-05, 02:26 AM
I'm usually pretty good at this sort of thing (amateur entomologist); do you think you could describe it in greater detail? Color, pattern, wing texture, wing shape, body shape, head shape, eye shape, eye size, leg length, antennae length, antennae shape, and especially location could all be important factors. I probably won't need all of those things, but any one might wind up giving me the clue I need.

it was black(flat black) big wings...sort of stands vertical as opposed to flat against the body, bigish jaws(like a stag beetle's), no antennae that i could see.

location was south west arkansas (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mena_Arkansas)

Eloel
2011-03-05, 02:47 AM
I'm usually pretty good at this sort of thing (amateur entomologist)

I respect you for not only being able to look at insects in a non-hating way, but actually being interested in them.

golentan
2011-03-05, 03:59 AM
I respect you for not only being able to look at insects in a non-hating way, but actually being interested in them.

Hey, way more attractive then humans. All oily flesh, either blood tinged or burnt looking in hue, pulsing and quivering in time... that mouth like a sore, filled with exposed yellow-white stinking teeth and a probing mucous-y tongue like some bizarre parasite... The knees which bend the wrong way, the grunting halting speech, the patchy hair like fungal blooms on the extremities...

*shudders* Yeah, people haunt my nightmares. I mean that literally. If I ever get off this forsaken lump of rock again I am going to need so many centuries of therapy.

On topic, I'm kind of neutral about roaches and most of the bugs mentioned here. I don't like them in my food, and will go to lengths to keep them out. And I certainly will kill any number to protect an infant. But I don't go out of my way to wish them ill, or even remove them from my house. Just regular old maintenance and precautionary measures.

Lyndworm
2011-03-05, 04:30 AM
it was black(flat black) big wings...sort of stands vertical as opposed to flat against the body, bigish jaws(like a stag beetle's), no antennae that i could see.

location was south west arkansas (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mena_Arkansas)

Is this your nightmare?
http://static-wtb.cheshirecat.net/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/dobsonfly_handful.jpg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corydalus_cornutus)It's called a Black Dobsonfly. (The picture is a link to Wikipedia.)



I respect you for not only being able to look at insects in a non-hating way, but actually being interested in them.

Thank you. I truly appreciate that sentiment.



Hey, way more attractive then humans. All oily flesh, either blood tinged or burnt looking in hue, pulsing and quivering in time... that mouth like a sore, filled with exposed yellow-white stinking teeth and a probing mucous-y tongue like some bizarre parasite... The knees which bend the wrong way, the grunting halting speech, the patchy hair like fungal blooms on the extremities...

Ditto. No "natural" creature scares me in the least. Many inspire caution, but not fear. It's humans that disgust me; to be fair, though, our knees work just fine. It's all in the ankles.

golentan
2011-03-05, 04:39 AM
I think you mistake me. "Natural" creatures can and do disturb the heck out of me. And I find humans uniquely fascinating and beautiful in their own way alongside other animals.

Just... So much not my default aesthetics.

Asta Kask
2011-03-05, 07:24 AM
Is this your nightmare?
http://static-wtb.cheshirecat.net/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/dobsonfly_handful.jpg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corydalus_cornutus)It's called a Black Dobsonfly. (The picture is a link to Wikipedia.)

Why thank you. I needed a monster for tomorrow's gaming session.

Ravens_cry
2011-03-05, 02:05 PM
Tailless Scorpions (http://www.google.ca/images?hl=en&q=tailless%20scorpion&um=1&ie=UTF-8&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi)are pretty freaky. I have never met one for real though. They aren't actually scorpions though. I feel a cold clammy feeling in my gut just looking at them.

CynicalAvocado
2011-03-05, 02:28 PM
Is this your nightmare?
http://static-wtb.cheshirecat.net/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/dobsonfly_handful.jpg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corydalus_cornutus)It's called a Black Dobsonfly. (The picture is a link to Wikipedia.)




yes. that's the one

*shivers*

Mystic Muse
2011-03-05, 03:22 PM
Tailless Scorpions (http://www.google.ca/images?hl=en&q=tailless%20scorpion&um=1&ie=UTF-8&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi)are pretty freaky. I have never met one for real though. They aren't actually scorpions though. I feel a cold clammy feeling in my gut just looking at them.

Oh those things. Wish my zoo or something had one of those. Those things look awesome.

Ravens_cry
2011-03-05, 04:00 PM
Oh those things. Wish my zoo or something had one of those. Those things look awesome.

The funny thing is, I don't have a problem with actual scorpions. In fact, they are quite beautiful, all black and glistening. Those things though, they just give me the willies.

Lhurgyof
2011-03-06, 11:28 PM
I quite enjoy insects myself. I don't know much about roaches (we have none here), but the ones at the Discovery Museum are cute and tickle your hand when they walk on you. :smallbiggrin:

But then again, I am a quite odd person.


Is this your nightmare?
http://static-wtb.cheshirecat.net/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/dobsonfly_handful.jpg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corydalus_cornutus)It's called a Black Dobsonfly. (The picture is a link to Wikipedia.)

Aww, I like it. :)

aart lover
2011-03-08, 11:31 PM
wow:eek:. i saw the potato bug thing and was FREAKED. but also started wondering about how i was going to homebrew a giant version and use it in a campaign:smallamused:

Tyndmyr
2011-03-16, 06:39 AM
a colt .32 ACP

EDIT: it was my mom's i just happened to have it

EDIT EDIT. got the caliber wrong

Finally, someone else who knows how to deal with insects. I used a 12 ga on a bumblebee once. lil' bugger just wouldn't leave me alone. Problem solved.

Soilborn
2011-03-16, 11:28 AM
The main problem I see with cockroaches are not themselves but what they often represent: filthy living conditions. If you leave food out on a few occasions you probably won't encourage an infestation, but if your stove is covered with crumbs over a month old and there are ancient puddles of some food on your countertop, you're just begging for them to move in.

I don't really consider them disgusting in and of themselves so much as indications of the filth I may be living in of my own design.

This isn't always the case though. There's always the chance that they may be visiting from a nearby filthy environment, or they're left over from a previous resident who didn't keep the environment clean. Or they might just be incredibly rampant in the area.

Hell, I respect these critters. They're quite possible the only insect smart enough to actually train. Nothing like the ants that seem to infest my basement for no reason, crawling over my keyboard and across my desk in search of food they'll never find.

If you want a bug to truly fear give the Solifugae/Camel Spider a shot.

Lyndworm
2011-03-16, 02:39 PM
If you want a bug to truly fear give the Solifugae/Camel Spider a shot.


I like solifugids, hyaenids, and crocodylids in particular. I don't know why.

I loves them. So much, you guys.

Marillion
2011-03-17, 02:01 AM
Is this your nightmare?
http://static-wtb.cheshirecat.net/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/dobsonfly_handful.jpg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corydalus_cornutus)It's called a Black Dobsonfly. (The picture is a link to Wikipedia.)

Looking at it now, just fine. See it live, probably mildly squicked but not a big deal.

Wake up with one next to my head, though, and I think I'd still be screaming:smalleek:.

faceroll
2011-03-17, 02:58 AM
Potato bugs are beetles that eat potato plants. Why would they infest a basement? :smallconfused:

It's a common name, which means it can also refer to the terrestrial isopod Armadillo vulgaris (also known as a rolly-polly bug, pill bug, or woodlouse), as well as Orthopterans of the genus Stenopelmatus, or more commonly known as Jerusalem crickets.

Judging by being creeped out and the location, I suspect the poster had a basement full of Jerusalem crickets, as pill bugs are quite innocuous and the crickets burrow as part of their life cycle.

Eldan
2011-03-17, 05:13 AM
I loves [solifugids]. So much, you guys.

Dang. Never heard much of those before, and I work in an athropod collection. Lovely.


In the Middle East, it is widely rumored among American and coalition military forces stationed there that Solifugae will feed on living human flesh. The story goes that the creature will inject some anaesthetising venom into the exposed skin of its sleeping victim, then feed voraciously, leaving the victim to awaken with a gaping wound. Solifugae, however, do not produce such an anaesthetic, and they do not attack prey larger than themselves unless threatened. Other stories include tales of them leaping into the air, disemboweling camels, screaming, and running alongside moving humvees; all of these tales are false.

Doughnut Master
2011-03-17, 05:37 PM
Poor guy:

http://www.quickmeme.com/meme/n5j/

Toofey
2011-03-18, 10:05 PM
wouldn't they then fail to breed said trait into the indigenous population?

grimbold
2011-03-19, 01:13 PM
Looking at it now, just fine. See it live, probably mildly squicked but not a big deal.

Wake up with one next to my head, though, and I think I'd still be screaming:smalleek:.

i saw one once in New Hampshire in the summer
me and a couple guys were looking at it
i was 12 w/ 3 other 12 year olds and 2 20 year olds
at first it was cool
then it started to move and we ran off screaming

Traab
2011-03-19, 02:15 PM
i saw one once in New Hampshire in the summer
me and a couple guys were looking at it
i was 12 w/ 3 other 12 year olds and 2 20 year olds
at first it was cool
then it started to move and we ran off screaming

As long as it kept its distance id be ok. If it came towards me id run away fast, unless I had a baseball bat in my hands or something.

Lhurgyof
2011-03-19, 09:15 PM
I love insects, unless they get the jump on me or land on me when I don't know it, then I instinctively panic, flail, and scream.

And then feel bad and appologize, poor little guys.

bluewind95
2011-03-19, 10:10 PM
I can think of one good thing about cockroaches. And that is that they are enemies of these (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/87/Bed_bug%2C_Cimex_lectularius.jpg) guys.

Groundhog
2011-03-19, 11:05 PM
It's a common name, which means it can also refer to the terrestrial isopod Armadillo vulgaris (also known as a rolly-polly bug, pill bug, or woodlouse), as well as Orthopterans of the genus Stenopelmatus, or more commonly known as Jerusalem crickets.

Judging by being creeped out and the location, I suspect the poster had a basement full of Jerusalem crickets, as pill bugs are quite innocuous and the crickets burrow as part of their life cycle.

Jerusalem crickets--neither crickets, nor from Jerusalem. :smallbiggrin:


I can think of one good thing about cockroaches. And that is that they are enemies of these (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/87/Bed_bug%2C_Cimex_lectularius.jpg) guys.

That is a very good point. I only wish that roaches would be a viable way of getting rid of bedbugs.

AtomicKitKat
2011-03-20, 12:38 PM
I can think of one good thing about cockroaches. And that is that they are enemies of these (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/87/Bed_bug%2C_Cimex_lectularius.jpg) guys.

Meh. I'd rather have those than roaches. At least bed bugs are more or less "invisible".


wouldn't they then fail to breed said trait into the indigenous population?

Hence some form of "triggered" fertility. But again, still need to find some way to collapse the entire population.

Lyndworm
2011-03-20, 09:26 PM
Meh. I'd rather have those than roaches. At least bed bugs are more or less "invisible".

Yep. Invisible.
http://bed-bug-treatment-bed-bugs-control-ma.com/Bed-Bug-Bites.jpg
http://www.badbedbugs.com/wp-content/uploads/arm-bed-bug-bites.jpghttp://www.bedbugsnewarknj.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/infant-baby-bed-bug-bites1.jpg

AtomicKitKat
2011-03-21, 10:33 AM
Yep. Invisible.

I'm sure I've had some, but never anywhere near what you posted. Maybe I'm thinking of dust mites. I usually flip my mattress every other month, and I don't let anyone else drop their filthy outside clothes on my bed(ie, sitting about in their jeans), so maybe that's why.

Lyndworm
2011-03-21, 11:43 AM
You're almost certainly thinking of dust mites, then. They're virtually invisible to the naked eye and actually beneficial since they eat stuff that would make you sick if they didn't.

Bed bugs are actually very easy to see and are horrendously uncomfortable parasites.

Vonriel
2011-03-22, 02:17 AM
You know, most bugs don't bother me, they really don't. I'm not in denial or anything, I swear. :smallwink:

To be honest, the deal with cockroaches for me is the same as with any other household pest: by allowing it to live in my house, I'm allowing it to affect my way of life. Whether or not I choose to exterminate the infestation, I'm still required to go out of my way to deal with them. The problem isn't simply one of expedience, even though it's much simpler to deal with the infestation now, before it becomes larger and spills over to my neighbors who won't be as accepting of it as I might. The alternative is letting the infestation grow, in which case I am now required to purchase containers to keep any food I wish to keep pest-free in, which is money spent, and time spent as I have to continually ensure that the food is kept in them. I also have to make sure to keep anything that they might damage in a state where they can't get to it, which includes pretty much any sensitive cable. All in all, I'm ok with driving them out of my domain, because it's normal animal behavior: Anything that threatens the domain of a lion gets killed, for instance. And yes, I view these pests as a threat, because eventually it will come down to me or them, either because my food protection methods weren't as safe as I had hoped, or because someone else can't live with them as well as I can and called someone about it, or any number of other reasons including actual structural instability, and I intend to ensure that I am the one who survives, thank you.

Honestly, the only insects I really have a problem with are the ones that fly, sting, and buzz. For some reason, I have a mild phobia of them, likely due to being stung in a rather sensitive area (and having the stinger dug out with a key, mutter grumble) as a child, combined with a few horror movies my mother loved that I ended up watching for some reason.

I do agree with the sentiment that entomology and entomologists in general are cool, if only because if it exists, someone must study it, and I have to admire anyone willing to study something so reviled by so much of the population. The same goes for psychologists. :smallwink: