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KingOfLaughter
2011-03-16, 12:18 AM
So I decided it's time to fully and finally change my lifestyle.

This is how, any tips suggestions or support welcome. =]

Start jogging everyday, 2 hours. School days 5-7am, weekends 9-11am.

Workout everyday (except Sunday) 30 reps/set, however many sets I can do.
Be friendlier, less weird, louder, but not annoyingly so.

Get ready for military life.

Be happier (Might be hard to do =])

Focus better in school

STOP PROCRASTINATING!

That's it. My new life style. =]

golentan
2011-03-16, 12:21 AM
Might want to phase in on that. Taking on too much at once is a good way to do it for a couple days and then never again. Phase in one part until it's routine (about a month, but you can maybe go two weeks), before another. Start at half an hour jogging, say, and ratchet that up over a couple of weeks.

Lycan 01
2011-03-16, 12:40 AM
Also, don't work out every day. You need to give you muscles a day or two to recover, otherwise you'll hurt yourself quite badly.

Btw, IIRC, here are the ACSM Guidelines to Fitness, according to my Fitness for Life class:

Cardio
3-5 Times a Week
30-60 Minutes Each Time

Weight Training
2-3 Times a Week
8 Exercises


I can't remember the stats for stretching...

Keld Denar
2011-03-16, 01:45 AM
Is there such a thing as TOO much stretching? As long as you do it properly, that is...

Prospekt
2011-03-16, 01:57 AM
Working out every day can be bad for your body, in fact. I've been attempting to go to the gym only about 3 times a week, because rest is a very important factor in exercise. Also, don't worry about how many reps you can do, it's more important to get quality rather than quantity. It's better to do 5 reps of 150 pounds rather than 20 reps of 100 pounds, because if you can handle 150 pounds like so, 100 pounds won't really do anything for you.

The biggest thing I can agree with is the whole being happy thing. Being happy, keeping your chin up, and at the end of the day, not letting whatever bad happened rule you over- this is what will mostly factor into a successful future (well, that and being a hard worker. Believe it or not, being smart can be overrated, especially when compared to hard work). I know people who are too focused on expecting everything and everyone around them to make them happy... and to one of them, I ranted Xykon's famous "Power = Power" speech, though I used the word Happy instead of Power. It worked surprisingly well.

Doing better in school and stopping on the procrastination is good too. Good luck to you. :smallwink:

Don Julio Anejo
2011-03-16, 04:52 AM
Working out every day is fine. Provided you alternate what muscle groups you exercise. However, if you don't know what I'm talking about, or if you do but can't devise such an exercise routine on your own, then the answer is simple - don't work out every day. It requires some pretty advanced knowledge of kinesiology and most likely advice of a personal trainer. Or at the very least, alternate cardio and weights.

30 reps is NOT a good way to do weights (assuming, of course, you're doing lifting and not calisthenics like push-ups and sit-ups). 6-8 reps per set x3-5 sets per exercise to train strength, or 12-15 reps x3 sets to train endurance. Last rep (for whatever amount of reps you choose to do) should be very difficult to do, but not overly difficult that you can injure yourself without a spotter. If it feels quite easy, add weight. If you're collapsing midway, remove weight.

Sorry, went off on a tangent here...

Also, jogging at 5 AM is actually a bad idea, both in theory and from personal experience (did it for like 8 months while in high school, although I was training for a 10k). In the words of, I believe Crow, your body has been fasting for ~8 hours and has no energy to speak of. You want to eat first and then let it settle for a few hours so your body can metabolize the food. Running is NOT fun when your stomach is growling like an angry Russian bear who realized the liquor store is out of vodka. Okay, the angry bear is my own two pence, but point remains.

One thing you can do, for example, is eat a very full breakfast and then go for a long run during your school lunch and have a light snack (for example, a few carrots to fill you up and a protein/energy bar to restore glucose levels) right after. If Ontario schools are like BC ones your lunch is plenty long enough to do it.

You want to train for military, but I don't think you want to screw your body up in the process.

Amiel
2011-03-16, 04:58 AM
My only advice would be start small; you could find that you have too much on your plate and lose steam; you may find your attention and focus starting to drift onto other matters and lose interest.

This will mean jogging for 30 mins as opposed to 2 hours. Exercise at 10/reps, then build up weight and sets.

You could also combine one or two activities together, to maintain that focus. Smiling more would mean that you'll be happier. Working out releases endorphins and reduces stress and will also make you happier.

KingOfLaughter
2011-03-16, 11:18 AM
Thanks for the advice guys =]

I suppose I should say this isn't exactly new. This is just me finalizing it. =P

I've been working out for about two weeks now, and I've given myself sunday, and probably saturday off.

I do 30 reps at 30 pounds simply because thirty is comfortable, except I have moved to forty recently, still at 30, and I can do 30 at 50, just 50 is where I start to strain myself.

I'm doing this on a bowflex style machine, it allows me to do multiple different exercises and I do 'mix it up' everyday, once I get a weight room pass for my school I'll be doing free weights at lunch.

As for jogging, I'm actually extremely active when I wake up, and do have the energy to burn to jog for a few hours every morning (although I do still eat first).

I do situps, as they are army required, pushups... I can't really do them yet =P My arms can lift 140-150 max, and I weigh 193.

Keld Denar
2011-03-16, 12:42 PM
Talk to Crow or Haruki-Kun, both are pretty knowledgable on lifting. Really, though, if you want to build strength, you should be looking at 3-4 reps. 30-40 reps for just about any exercise falls completely in the cardio catagory, and won't really build any strength. You'll make the biggest improvements that way, both in strength and size.

Don't get me wrong, cardio is SUPER important (especially in the event of a zombie apocalypse, see rule #1), but strength is going to serve you well in at army training camp. When you lift, you should work for strength. When you do cardio, you should do cardio. Don't get the two confused.

Also, look up some information on High Impact Interval Training (HIIT). HIIT is awesome cardio. Basically, interval sprints with jogging instead of resting. Sprint hard for like, 30-40 seconds, then jog for about a minute tops, then sprint again, depending on your ability. The trick is to keep your rest periods short. Sprinting raises your heart rate up to ~170-190 BPM range. It takes about a minute for it to start to calm down from there. When it does, you are sprinting again, keeping your heart rate up high. The end result is your heart doing a sprint workout for the entire duration, while your body is only doing a sprint workout for 50-60% of the time. You'll see huge endurance benefits from this, trust me, and you'll probably also see a metabolism spike after a month as well, which will help you lose weight if thats part of your goal.

Lastly: Fuel fuel fuel fuel! When you are working out hard, your body needs fuel. Protein protein protein! You should be eating ~1 gram of protien per pound you weigh, give or take. Since you are 193, you should be eating ~193 grams of protein per day. Do yourself a favor and try to keep track for a couple day to see how much protein you are taking in. I highly recommend purchasing a powdered whey suppliment, as it is a cheap and easy way to get your protein. A 5 lb canister will cost you maybe $40-50, but will last you a LONG time, like, months. Have a shake after each workout, like, within 30 minutes of finishing, for best absorbtion.

KingOfLaughter
2011-03-16, 01:06 PM
Talk to Crow or Haruki-Kun, both are pretty knowledgable on lifting. Really, though, if you want to build strength, you should be looking at 3-4 reps. 30-40 reps for just about any exercise falls completely in the cardio catagory, and won't really build any strength. You'll make the biggest improvements that way, both in strength and size.

Don't get me wrong, cardio is SUPER important (especially in the event of a zombie apocalypse, see rule #1), but strength is going to serve you well in at army training camp. When you lift, you should work for strength. When you do cardio, you should do cardio. Don't get the two confused.

Also, look up some information on High Impact Interval Training (HIIT). HIIT is awesome cardio. Basically, interval sprints with jogging instead of resting. Sprint hard for like, 30-40 seconds, then jog for about a minute tops, then sprint again, depending on your ability. The trick is to keep your rest periods short. Sprinting raises your heart rate up to ~170-190 BPM range. It takes about a minute for it to start to calm down from there. When it does, you are sprinting again, keeping your heart rate up high. The end result is your heart doing a sprint workout for the entire duration, while your body is only doing a sprint workout for 50-60% of the time. You'll see huge endurance benefits from this, trust me, and you'll probably also see a metabolism spike after a month as well, which will help you lose weight if thats part of your goal.

Lastly: Fuel fuel fuel fuel! When you are working out hard, your body needs fuel. Protein protein protein! You should be eating ~1 gram of protien per pound you weigh, give or take. Since you are 193, you should be eating ~193 grams of protein per day. Do yourself a favor and try to keep track for a couple day to see how much protein you are taking in. I highly recommend purchasing a powdered whey suppliment, as it is a cheap and easy way to get your protein. A 5 lb canister will cost you maybe $40-50, but will last you a LONG time, like, months. Have a shake after each workout, like, within 30 minutes of finishing, for best absorbtion.

Protein powder is something I have yet to buy. =P

As for the weight lifting I'm not doing an easy lift, the 40 is actually pushing myself, and 50 (although doable) is my limit for now.

HIIT I'll have to try, I'm mostly trying to get ready for long distance marches and being able to complete the 2.5km (1 mile) run in 12 minutes.

Weight loss is only a helping side effect. I'm focusing on improving my upper body.

Keld Denar
2011-03-16, 01:28 PM
Again, even if you are "pushing" yourself at 40-50 reps, the amount of strength you gain from it is...not great. Strength is strength. It gives you endurance. It gives you power. Ask Crow, or Haruki-Kun. Or check out one of Deth Muncher's threads (both in Friendly Banter). They are both filled with workout discussions and even a bit of theorycraft.

Figure out how much weight you can load on and still do 3-4 reps. Thats about the ideal number of reps you want to do for the biggest gain. Do 3-4 sets of that, that'll give you the best results.

Anything else is cardio, and like I said, cardio is good, but its not going to give you strength. If you want to be able to do push ups, you need to build strength. Trust me.

Also, HIIT will give you endurance, more endurance than jogging alone. It will make you better at cross country treks. The only thing it won't give you is timing and pacing, but you'll get that from your cadance while running, assuming your military organization does cadance. If you do HIIT enough, it'll make long distance endurance running a joke.

KingOfLaughter
2011-03-16, 01:36 PM
Again, even if you are "pushing" yourself at 40-50 reps, the amount of strength you gain from it is...not great. Strength is strength. It gives you endurance. It gives you power. Ask Crow, or Haruki-Kun. Or check out one of Deth Muncher's threads (both in Friendly Banter). They are both filled with workout discussions and even a bit of theorycraft.

Figure out how much weight you can load on and still do 3-4 reps. Thats about the ideal number of reps you want to do for the biggest gain. Do 3-4 sets of that, that'll give you the best results.

Anything else is cardio, and like I said, cardio is good, but its not going to give you strength. If you want to be able to do push ups, you need to build strength. Trust me.

Also, HIIT will give you endurance, more endurance than jogging alone. It will make you better at cross country treks. The only thing it won't give you is timing and pacing, but you'll get that from your cadance while running, assuming your military organization does cadance. If you do HIIT enough, it'll make long distance endurance running a joke.

I understood your initial post differently. =P

I'll try 70 or 80 I think one of those should be my 5 rep max.

As for HIIT I'll try it tomorrow morning.
Thanks for the advice =]

ShadowHunter
2011-03-16, 09:10 PM
As for jogging, I'm actually extremely active when I wake up, and do have the energy to burn to jog for a few hours every morning (although I do still eat first).

Err, I don't think you appreciate what you're saying there. Even at a marginal jogging pace you're going to knock out nearly 10 miles in 2 hours. I just got done training for a marathon (which I crapped out of and ran a half-marathon instead!) and run pretty frequently, doing 5 and 10ks and the like, and I remember the first time I ran 10 miles in preparation for the marathon. It was brutal, and it was my once a week long run which I had gradually built up. You're suggesting a similar distance on consecutive days? You'd hurt yourself immediately. Or get sick, assuming a normal body weight, you'll burn somewhere around 1000-1200 calories. If you haven't gotten used to that, it'll be quite the shock to your system.

grimbold
2011-03-17, 11:47 AM
Might want to phase in on that. Taking on too much at once is a good way to do it for a couple days and then never again. Phase in one part until it's routine (about a month, but you can maybe go two weeks), before another. Start at half an hour jogging, say, and ratchet that up over a couple of weeks.

agreed if you start to fast you'll poop out fast

KingOfLaughter
2011-03-17, 12:07 PM
I'm not doing a fast paced jog, it's more of a very speedy walk (I have long legs). I tend to walk everywhere at a slightly slower pace, and usually walk for about an hour and a half a day, (30 minutes to school, 20 minutes throughout the day/between classes, 30 minutes home), my actual jog is akin to a lot of my friends running speed.

faceroll
2011-03-17, 12:22 PM
Also, don't work out every day. You need to give you muscles a day or two to recover, otherwise you'll hurt yourself quite badly.

I used to work out every day. Never hurt myself. Now I hurt myself by working out too infrequently and not easing into it like I should, thinking I'm as strong as I used to be, pre-slob.

His routine, with a lot of reps of a light weight, also will keep him from getting hurt.


Is there such a thing as TOO much stretching? As long as you do it properly, that is...

Yes. You can over stretch the attachment pieces at joints to the point that your knees or elbows flop around and don't properly lock up right when doing other exercises. Takes a lot of stretching to get to that point, though.


Talk to Crow or Haruki-Kun, both are pretty knowledgable on lifting. Really, though, if you want to build strength, you should be looking at 3-4 reps. 30-40 reps for just about any exercise falls completely in the cardio catagory, and won't really build any strength. You'll make the biggest improvements that way, both in strength and size.

Don't get me wrong, cardio is SUPER important (especially in the event of a zombie apocalypse, see rule #1), but strength is going to serve you well in at army training camp. When you lift, you should work for strength. When you do cardio, you should do cardio. Don't get the two confused.

While building strength is important, endurance is key to military life. There's a reason they make you do 1000s of push-ups in boot camp, instead of hitting the bench press for 3-4 reps a handful of times a day.

Lots of lifts with a light weight is a great way to build up endurance and focus on small, important muscles that are very easy to tear when you get to heavier stuff.

In my routines, I prefer stuff like pull-ups, dips, and push-ups, because I'm using my body as resistance, it works many incidental stabilizing muscles, the exercises give me useful strength as opposed to vanity presses, and it is a good blend of strength and endurance training. But then, my life style focuses on long days, bad brush, and big water. Big biceps don't help much with scree scrambles or paddling a boat.

Keld Denar
2011-03-17, 01:07 PM
Strength is strength. For the most part, those 3-4 rep "vanity presses" will help you do more push ups. You gain shear strength faster at the 3-4 rep level than you do at the 30-40 rep level.

Now, I'm not saying that you shouldn't do endurance exerices. Contrary, you should. Thats called cardio. Not all cardio is running. Cardio floor exercises such as push-ups, dips, sit-ups, lunges, and pull-ups are VERY important. They will increase your strength, and they will increase your endurance. They just won't increase your strength as much or as quickly as heavy lifting will. A person who can bench press 200 lbs can do a heck of a lot more push-ups than a person who simply does push-ups every day just like a person who does interval sprints (HIIT) can run a lot further and faster than a person who just jogs. Strength is strength, and translates across to other exercises.

Also, 1-2 reps is more in line with a "vanity" press. That'll just give you size. 3-4 is actually where most of your strength is built. I'm sure Crow will back me up on this one.

faceroll
2011-03-17, 01:26 PM
Strength is strength. For the most part, those 3-4 rep "vanity presses" will help you do more push ups. You gain shear strength faster at the 3-4 rep level than you do at the 30-40 rep level.

Now, I'm not saying that you shouldn't do endurance exerices. Contrary, you should. Thats called cardio. Not all cardio is running. Cardio floor exercises such as push-ups, dips, sit-ups, lunges, and pull-ups are VERY important. They will increase your strength, and they will increase your endurance. They just won't increase your strength as much or as quickly as heavy lifting will. A person who can bench press 200 lbs can do a heck of a lot more push-ups than a person who simply does push-ups every day just like a person who does interval sprints (HIIT) can run a lot further and faster than a person who just jogs. Strength is strength, and translates across to other exercises.

Also, 1-2 reps is more in line with a "vanity" press. That'll just give you size. 3-4 is actually where most of your strength is built. I'm sure Crow will back me up on this one.

I'm not arguing that lifting heavy things won't make you better at lifting heavy things. It will. But the OP sounds like he actually wants to be useful. I would steer him towards spending most of his regimen building endurance than burning out lifting heavy things. Not that he shouldn't include heavy things in his routine, just that a focus on push-ups and pull-ups and similar exercises will serve him much better when he's crawling through a shelled out town in 60lbs of kit while taking fire. Exercise every day will also prepare him, mentally and physically, for that sort of thing.

Keld Denar
2011-03-17, 01:41 PM
And what I'm saying, is that if you took 2 people and had them work out say, every day. One do 4 sets of as many pushups as he can do with a 2 minute rest in between, and one did that on even days, and 4 sets of 3-4 reps on bench on odd days (along with whatever other workouts), by the end of a month, the bench guy will be able to do more push-ups than just push-up guy, simply because he will simply be much stronger. Same thing with a person who just does lunges, vs a person who does lunges and squats. The squatter will have much stronger quads and be able to more lunges than someone who just does lunges.

A focus on strength gives you endurance as well. It takes less energy to do the same amount of work, so you have more energy to continue doing work. A focus on endurance doesn't give you as much strength. Thats one of the biggest misconceptions among lifters.

Again, don't neglect cardio. You need to train your muscles to take stress over time as well, but strength training combined with cardio will net you much more results than cardio or strength training alone could ever hope to.