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JediSoth
2011-03-29, 12:00 PM
I've seen a lot of good food threads here, so here's a bad food thread.

One of these is truly a bad food (it will be evident when I describe it). The other two, are bad in that, they are not to my personal tastes. Other people may think they're akin to ambrosia. For the most part, things I consider "Bad Eats" are things that are both bad tasting, and obviously not well-made, as I try to distinguish between bad food and food that just isn't to my taste.

But, there are some things I don't plan on trying again (Exhibits B & C, in this case).

Exhibit A
Caramel apples are a yummy autumn treat, right? I used to think so. I never got the ones encrusted with nuts or sprinkles, because, well, I just don't like it that way. So, I had a standard, caramel-covered apple. What could go wrong? I bite into it and the apple was rotten. My mouth was flooded with that sickly-sweet, fermented apple flavor mixed with sweet caramel. It was NOT good. The apple underneath the caramel was browner than the gooey stuff in which it was coated, and very mushy.

I haven't eaten a caramel apple since.

Exhibit B
Uni, i.e. raw sea urchin row served on top of sushi rice. It looked like a blend of standard yellow mustard and brown deli mustard. $10 for two pieces. It was the last of the truly exotic sushis I had yet to try (OK, technically, it was nigiri). It was a delicacy, and I'd seen the likes of Andrew Zimmern and Anthony Bourdain declare it to be delicious.

It tasted like fishy beach. Texture-wise, it was firm and a little gelatinous, with no grit. But it tasted like beach. Briny, sandy, fishy. Ever picked up a sea shell and you could smell that something used to live in it? Yeah, like that. Not good. By concentrating on the analysis, I managed to get the first piece down (the saki helped), but I just couldn't bring myself to eat that second piece.

Exhibit C
Chocolate Greek Yogurt. I like Greek yogurt. Chobani Dark Cherry being my current favorite. I like chocolate (understatement). Since the store was out of all my regular flavors, I picked up a four pack of a different brands chocolate Greek yogurt at the behest of my wife ("If you don't like it, we've only wasted $5."). Opening the container and stirring it did nothing to assuage my doubts. Tasting it...ugh. It tasted EXACTLY like I would have imagined chocolate sour cream tasting. It was like someone put chocolate syrup in sour milk. Not good. I had two bites and had to throw the rest away.

Ravens_cry
2011-03-29, 12:43 PM
Home made dill pickles. They were soft and not crisp and crunchy like a pickel should be but that wasn't the worst part, oh no. The worst part was they gave me food poisoning and I threw up and had to stay home from a feild trip. I wasn't able to even smell pickles without feeling nauseous for over a year after, let alone eat one.
Ancient spaghetti Sidekicks (http://www.knorr.ca/en/knorr_sidekicks.aspx), made with reconstituted dried milk. RANCID reconstituted dried milk. Oh god the smell, I can not even begin to describe it, foul, bitter and disgusting beyond all measure of words it is to tell, but it was the only thing to eat in the house and no stores were open.
So I ate it.
It tasted worse.
A fouler thing I have not put in my mouth, even the pickles aforementioned were better. The only description I could muster was, trying to swallow without tasting the foulness I was consuming, a mantra to distract my revolting stomach, "It smells like death, it smells like death, it smells like death . . . " It is said that hunger is the best sauce, but even that legendary spice was ill-used to make this rotten filth able to be forced down my throat, let alone palatable.
finally it was done, my fork fallen from my nerveless hands, all effort set to prevent my heaving belly from making me taste the carrion a second time, waiting with fevered desperation for day to break and stores to reopen.
So yeah, it was bad.

Orzel
2011-03-29, 12:44 PM
Birthday Cake- HATE. Few can make a decent one. I'll eat it. But I WILL COMPLAIN!!

Nonfresh Coconut- Why don't you just feed me wax paper and sugar?

Hot Guava Juice- How is this not a crime?

Raw sea urchin- It DOES taste like a beach.

Coffee Flavored Anything that isn't coffee- There's maybe a 5% chance of it not being considered tongue torture.

Keld Denar
2011-03-29, 12:47 PM
My motto with food is "there is nothing I won't try twice". I've tried EVERYTHING that my rather diverse group of friends have thrown at me. Every time I try to eat Kim Chi, I just can't. I've tried it, twice even, and then probably a couple more times, and I have yet to enjoy it. I dunno why, considering I LOVE sour kraut, and both are basically fermented cabbage. I just can't eat it. To this day, its about the only food I won't eat. Now, there are a lot of foods I like, and would eat preferentially to other foods, but there is no food I would turn down if offered to me other than Kim Chi.

ZombyWoof
2011-03-29, 12:50 PM
Ewww... that frosting stuff that comes on like every store-bought cake and or cupcake ever. It is so gross that the TEXTURE is enough to make me start wanting to vomit it back up. It's like my stomach is going, "So... I get that you want a heart attack, but no." It's weird because EVERY TIME I go to a family party everyone seems to make sure to pick out an end piece with tons of frosting despite the fact that I've hated the stuff since like first grade. Then they wonder why I scrape it all off. Uuuuugh :smallyuk:

TheThan
2011-03-29, 12:51 PM
I had some shellfish at a local sushi shop. Usually their stuff is pretty darn good. But this shellfish made me terribly sick. It wasn’t just me, my bro had some too and he was sick as well. He managed to sweat it out, I on the other hand, spend all day the next day in the bathroom.
That was the last time we went out for sushi.

[edit]


Ewww... that frosting stuff that comes on like every store-bought cake and or cupcake ever. It is so gross that the TEXTURE is enough to make me start wanting to vomit it back up. It's like my stomach is going, "So... I get that you want a heart attack, but no." It's weird because EVERY TIME I go to a family party everyone seems to make sure to pick out an end piece with tons of frosting despite the fact that I've hated the stuff since like first grade. Then they wonder why I scrape it all off. Uuuuugh :smallyuk:


That's because they're making it with lard (or some lard substitute), instead of butter cream. when it comes to cakes, butter cream frosting is where its at (unless its cheese cake).

Eldan
2011-03-29, 12:51 PM
Birthday Cake- HATE. Few can make a decent one. I'll eat it. But I WILL COMPLAIN!!
.

So, just to make sure: you Americans have a specific cake called "Birthday cake" that is not just "whatever cake I ate on my birthday"?

TheThan
2011-03-29, 12:58 PM
So, just to make sure: you Americans have a specific cake called "Birthday cake" that is not just "whatever cake I ate on my birthday"?

Birthday cakes are usually basic cakes with lots of frosting and the words “happy birthday” scrawled on them. Sometimes they’re basic chocolate cakes, sometimes their ice-cream cakes. You can get a elaborate as you want.
The primary defining characteristic is that it was made for someone’s birthday.

Orzel
2011-03-29, 12:59 PM
So, just to make sure: you Americans have a specific cake called "Birthday cake" that is not just "whatever cake I ate on my birthday"?

If I ask what kind of cake it is and you either:
Have to think about it
Read the side of a box
Read a reciept
Pause before answering
Say a color
Or
Say "Birthday Cake!"

I don't want any.
Especially if it has generic frosting on it.

Blisstake
2011-03-29, 01:00 PM
When I was a kid, a friend asked if I wanted to try papaya. I agreed, and it made me feel incredibly sick, and breathing became hard. I started gagging, and eventually spit the thing out, which caused me to immediately feel better.

A month or so later, my mom asked if I wanted to try some papaya, and I told her I didn't like it. She said something about me just not wanting to try new things, and then snuck some into the bowl of cantaloupe (I was a kid, and not very observant.) I started gagging after accidentally eating it, and spit it out on the ground. She never again doubted me when I said I didn't like something.

It tastes that foul.

Nix Nihila
2011-03-29, 01:00 PM
So, just to make sure: you Americans have a specific cake called "Birthday cake" that is not just "whatever cake I ate on my birthday"?

Yeah, I'm a little confused about that too. I mean, most people seem to have some sort of chocolate cake or yellow cake with lots of frosting on them, if that's what you mean. I always make my own birthday cake, since I'm quite picky when it comes to desserts. Sometime I'll opt for a birthday pie.

Dr.Epic
2011-03-29, 01:07 PM
A few days ago I had a chili dog I covered in whipped cream and dipped in Mountain Dew with broccoli on top, and I still found that enjoyable. Do you really want me to answer this question?

JediSoth
2011-03-29, 01:11 PM
A few days ago I had a chili dog I covered in whipped cream and dipped in Mountain Dew with broccoli on top, and I still found that enjoyable. Do you really want me to answer this question?

I've made duck & brussel sprout quesadillas. I've eaten lamb carpaccio (i.e. raw lamb), so yes, yes I do.

Eldan
2011-03-29, 01:12 PM
When I was a kid, a friend asked if I wanted to try papaya. I agreed, and it made me feel incredibly sick, and breathing became hard. I started gagging, and eventually spit the thing out, which caused me to immediately feel better.

A month or so later, my mom asked if I wanted to try some papaya, and I told her I didn't like it. She said something about me just not wanting to try new things, and then snuck some into the bowl of cantaloupe (I was a kid, and not very observant.) I started gagging after accidentally eating it, and spit it out on the ground. She never again doubted me when I said I didn't like something.

It tastes that foul.

That actually sounds more like an allergy.

Orzel
2011-03-29, 01:20 PM
When I was a kid, a friend asked if I wanted to try papaya. I agreed, and it made me feel incredibly sick, and breathing became hard. I started gagging, and eventually spit the thing out, which caused me to immediately feel better.

A month or so later, my mom asked if I wanted to try some papaya, and I told her I didn't like it. She said something about me just not wanting to try new things, and then snuck some into the bowl of cantaloupe (I was a kid, and not very observant.) I started gagging after accidentally eating it, and spit it out on the ground. She never again doubted me when I said I didn't like something.

It tastes that foul.

Papaya is a hard one. Its either awful or okay.

pffh
2011-03-29, 01:21 PM
A few days ago I had a chili dog I covered in whipped cream and dipped in Mountain Dew with broccoli on top, and I still found that enjoyable. Do you really want me to answer this question?

That sounds awesome!

I'll try anything at least once but the worst thing I've had was mushroom juice. We found it in a strange corner shop and I have no idea what was in it since the writing on the can was in Korean, all I know it was marked as mushroom soda on the shelf and it tasted weird.

Temotei
2011-03-29, 01:24 PM
Birthday Cake- HATE. Few can make a decent one. I'll eat it. But I WILL COMPLAIN!!

I don't like cake unless it's either made really, really well (rare indeed) or unless it's ice cream cake, and that hardly counts.

Blueberries are atrocious to me. I hate them. :smallannoyed:

EDIT: Oh, and bloody steak. I love steak, but if it's not at least medium-rare, I'm going to gag.

On the other hand, foods that are beyond brown and into the black region make me gag, too. Toast, steak, whatever. I call it bad preparation, but some people (including my stepdad) think that type of stuff is the bomb.

Syka
2011-03-29, 01:24 PM
My idea of a birthday cake, and yes...this will be specific and is non-negotiable*: Publix yellow sheet cake (vanilla or chocolate will do) with their butter cream frosting. It HAS to be Publix and it HAS to be butter cream frosting. Anything else is blasphemy.


Worst food I've tried...
-Bananas. I can't handle the texture and they, literally, make me want to vomit unless they are in that stage right before they are fully ripe and still a little bit green and firm. There is a reason I only buy one banana at a time.
-Canned peas. Once again, texture.
-Sweet Potato Chips. I love sweet potatoes, I love sweet potato fries. I had a bag of (Jet Blue) sweet potato chips and it was horrendous. Like card board.
-Cottage cheese. I can't handle the smell nor sight of it. I don't think I've ever tasted it, so that makes probably the first food I've been exposed to regularly and refuse to eat. Period.
-Tofu. Maybe it's just the stuff I have had, but it's the devil.
-Stale Peeps. Peeps on their own aren't fantastic, but I didn't think stale peeps existed. They do. It's terrifying.
-Fried pickle. Neither the texture nor the tastes mesh well.
-This list does not include food I've just had bad experiences with and have a hard time eating now. THAT list includes sushi (made a friend deathly ill for months), oatmeal (there were a bunch of little bugs crawling and making my breakfast move), and water (I can't drink this...obviously...but I once drank a large carpenter ant along with it...o.o)

I regularly enjoy odd foods, but those are ones that are disgusting to me.



*I will accept a birthday pie or cheese cake, however. But if it's cake, it's gotta be the above. Same standards apply to birthday cup cakes.

Bosaxon
2011-03-29, 01:25 PM
When I was thirteen, my family took the Amtrak auto train down to Orlando overnight. For dinner, we had chicken parmesan. It was probably the worst thing I've had on its own.

Cut to the next morning: we were driving from Gatorland to our hotel and I got the sickest I've ever been in my life. I pretty much covered the back seat in vomit. It turns out I had a really bad ear infection before I left which probably made me throw up, but still, If I see it on a menu somewhere, I get queasy.

Never eating Amtrak food again, either.

JediSoth
2011-03-29, 01:31 PM
Papaya is a hard one. Its either awful or okay.

Yes. I've had delicious papaya and I've had papaya that I wondered in what it grew. I think it's a fruit that very much picks up the terrior, like wine.

Blisstake's reaction definitely sounds like an allergy. I've unfortunately developed one to plantains. :(

Blisstake
2011-03-29, 03:41 PM
That actually sounds more like an allergy.

I'm pretty sure it isn't actually. The tase, the texture, the EVERYTHING of papaya is just so odious that I start gagging. Plus, after spitting it out, I felt a whole lot better.

Teddy
2011-03-29, 03:53 PM
Mushrooms. I can't eat mushrooms. They have this horrible alien consistency and I won't get into the taste. One day when I was to a summer camp, they served champignon soup for lunch. Despite my no-shroom policy, I decided to test it anyway, because it was the only thing that was served that day. One small sip nearly made me throw up. It was pure concentrated mushroom hell and I swore to never thouch a mushroom again. I can still eat food with mushrooms in it, but I will push them to the side, and I will grumble.

CynicalAvocado
2011-03-29, 04:15 PM
spicy food.

not "a little bit of burn but you can still taste the food" spicy food.

i hate the "so spicy that your tongue will bleed and you will cry fire and all your friends and loved ones will laugh at you because you cant talk because your mouth has gone numb and you are now drooling and crying and hiccuping" spicy food

arguskos
2011-03-29, 04:16 PM
Balut remains the worst thing I have ever consumed. I... it... ugh. There's just nothing to say. Go look it up, and you will understand why it's awful.

The fresh monkey brain I had once was actually honestly not bad in and of itself. However, the screaming monkey with a hole in its head across the room from where I was sitting turned me off of it forever.

I've had a few other pretty bad things, but nothing that approaches those two. Even the casu marzu I had was pretty good (gotta be DAMN CERTAIN there are no maggots still fermenting it, but otherwise it tastes great).

Gaelbert
2011-03-29, 04:28 PM
I had a salad with some sort of worms in it. That would have been enough to throw me off salads, except I'm a vegetarian which would make that difficult to say the least.

Orzel
2011-03-29, 04:32 PM
spicy food.

not "a little bit of burn but you can still taste the food" spicy food.

i hate the "so spicy that your tongue will bleed and you will cry fire and all your friends and loved ones will laugh at you because you cant talk because your mouth has gone numb and you are now drooling and crying and hiccuping" spicy food

You should never try my jerk chicken.

Eldan
2011-03-29, 05:39 PM
spicy food.

not "a little bit of burn but you can still taste the food" spicy food.

i hate the "so spicy that your tongue will bleed and you will cry fire and all your friends and loved ones will laugh at you because you cant talk because your mouth has gone numb and you are now drooling and crying and hiccuping" spicy food

I love it. I try to eat at least one meal per day that is hot enough I can't feel my mouth anymore afterwards.

Barbin
2011-03-29, 06:57 PM
Goat cheese. UGH! It's mainly the texture, but I can't really stand the taste much either.

Soilborn
2011-03-29, 07:19 PM
Nothing.

I'm dead serious. I've yet to meet a (unspoiled and properly prepared) food that I couldn't eat and enjoy.

Trog
2011-03-29, 08:22 PM
Soft shell crab sushi. A group of us ordered it at a shushi place and I had one piece and thought it tasted good, actually. And that piece did.

And it was the only good piece.

Everyone else thought it tasted rancid and... well like something dead on the beach, and refused to eat any more. My second piece tasted exactly like that too. It was, indeed, pretty gross. :smallyuk:

Has anyone else had this? Is this what it's supposed to taste like? Part of me wants to believe that we got a bad crab.

Marnath
2011-03-29, 09:08 PM
-Stale Peeps. Peeps on their own aren't fantastic, but I didn't think stale peeps existed. They do. It's terrifying.


Yeah, it's hard to make peeps go stale, even if you're actively trying to. I know, because I can't stomach them until they go, which can take months after you slash the package open. Fresh marshmallow fluff is gross.

Worst food? Gotta be meatloaf. Doesn't matter how it's prepared, that's just a crying waste of once-decent meat.

Winter_Wolf
2011-03-29, 11:16 PM
Soft shell crab sushi. A group of us ordered it at a shushi place and I had one piece and thought it tasted good, actually. And that piece did.

And it was the only good piece.

Everyone else thought it tasted rancid and... well like something dead on the beach, and refused to eat any more. My second piece tasted exactly like that too. It was, indeed, pretty gross. :smallyuk:

Has anyone else had this? Is this what it's supposed to taste like? Part of me wants to believe that we got a bad crab.

You got a bad crab. I don't know about softshell specifically, but I've had a number of crab meats both raw and cooked, and the raw meat should still be sweet and tasty. My experience is that the basic problem with sushi is whether the restaurant actually gets fresh stuff or if they try to lie about it. Basically, unless I'm currently in a city that is next to the ocean, fresh seafood is a lie, always.

I'm opposite of KD, I love me some rotten ol' kimchi, but the smell of saurkraut kind of makes me gag a little, and the actual taste isn't any better.

The worst thing I've ever tried to eat was gumchuks. Take fish heads, and bury them in the ground for a couple weeks. Then dig them up and eat 'em. And no, that's not a comparison of what it would taste like, that is the actual process for making them correctly.

ScottishDragon
2011-03-29, 11:29 PM
Mexican candy. Ugh. Can't stand the stuff. No matter how much I get into hispanic culture, hang out with my mexican friends or fluently speak spanish, no training can EVER make me like the stuff. Just nasty.

Trog
2011-03-29, 11:38 PM
You got a bad crab. I don't know about softshell specifically, but I've had a number of crab meats both raw and cooked, and the raw meat should still be sweet and tasty. My experience is that the basic problem with sushi is whether the restaurant actually gets fresh stuff or if they try to lie about it. Basically, unless I'm currently in a city that is next to the ocean, fresh seafood is a lie, always.
Well I'm in Wisconsin so there's no real surprise there I guess... but still for a sushi place you... sort of expect not to get bad seafood, you know? Still, this is good info to know. Thanks.


I'm opposite of KD, I love me some rotten ol' kimchi, but the smell of saurkraut kind of makes me gag a little, and the actual taste isn't any better.
Mmm... saurkraut... on brats... cooked in beer. P=

MonkeyBusiness
2011-03-29, 11:51 PM
I once had a big, traditional meal in Switzerland. It was wonderful, but caused me extreme pain in the tummy, simply because it was such heavy food, and so much of it.

The waitress very kindly brought me a digestif: a dark greenish-brown liquor. When I sipped it I almost gagged. It was like a fermented compost heap made of aromatic Alpine herbs; or possibly a Riccola Drop hanging around with The Wrong Crowd. Hoo, boy, it was vile! But the same stubborn politeness that made me eat a meal too large for me made me drink this weird green stuff.

I have to admit, it made my tummy feel much better. It was minty, and aggressively herbal, so it had some virtue besides being a thimbleful of alcohol. The person across from me seemed alarmed at the expression on my face and asked if I was going to cry.

I did not cry. I drank that weird stuff and smiled.

I asked the waitress to write down the name of the drink. She beamed, and wrote it on a doily, and asked if I liked it. I told her: "No, it was disgusting. I want to know the name so I never drink that by accident!" (As if one could.) But I also admitted it made me feel better, and thanked her.

And I have had it since. In fact, I've come to like it. It's weird, but it is good for what ails ya. But it is a powerful substance, taste-wise. Yowza.

It's called fernet branca. You have been warned.

.

Serpentine
2011-03-29, 11:52 PM
There isn't much food I really dislike. Normal stuff I'll keep trying in hopes I might like it some day, but squash, zucchini and (this I'm particularly disappointed about) eggplant I just can't like. Chicken feet and "duck chin" I don't regret trying although I wouldn't go out of my way to have it again. I'm picky about my bananas, hate anything banana flavoured, don't like coffee and coffee-flavoured things, and dislike mixing fruit (especially juices) and dairy (it goes all curdled and blech). But I don't really have any especially bad experiences. I do have some odd ones, though:

1. Banana-flavoured edible underpants. There is no way I can make this story sound good so I'll just make it sound extra-bad: I tried some banana-flavoured edible underpant offered to me by my mother. It was like those breath-freshening strip things (which are bad enough :smallyuk:), except horrible fake banana flavoured. It stuck to my mouth and BLECHK :yuk:

2. This weird taste that pops up every now and then that noone else seems to be able to detect. I don't know what it is, but it's sort of bitter and musky and musty and gets right in the back of my throat. It seems to be particularly connected with duck, as two of the times I remember coming across it were in duck: one was when I made home-made duck, I pulled off the tail to nibble on, and immediately god a face-full of this horrible taste. I had to go outside and try to spit it out but it just didn't go away. I gave some to my then-boyfriend, but he couldn't taste it at all and didn't know what I was going on about. The other one was at possibly the fanciest restaurant in town, French restaurant Jean Pierre's. I got a duck crepe, which was mostly delicious... except for this stupid musty flavour :smallsigh: It was mild enough, probably smothered in sauces and stuff, that I could get through the dish, but it sucked. Didn't want to ask the chef about it (it was quiet and all the staff were hanging around), because I'm pretty sure it wasn't his fault and I didn't want to offend him.
The last time it happened was in a half-full jar of marinated goat fetta. I'd already had some before and didn't detect this taste, but then next time it was there and I couldn't ignore it. Gave some to my housemate who, again, had no idea what I was talking about. I ended up throwing away the rest of the jar :smallfrown:
There's more times it's happened, but I can't remember them. Anyone know what it could be? I thought maybe, with the first duck, it was an oil gland or something, but that doesn't explain the fetta or why noone else can taste it.

Teutonic Knight
2011-03-30, 12:20 AM
Balut remains the worst thing I have ever consumed. I... it... ugh. There's just nothing to say. Go look it up, and you will understand why it's awful.

I guess it depends on you, because I remember trying balut eggs, just the yolk, as a kid and I was always and still am fine with it. I once tried to eat the duck that came with it, but I didn't like it not because of the duck, which tasted like normal duck, but the bones and beak remains.

Then I again, my family and I are Vietnamese, where the balut is most commonly found, i.e. Southeast Asia in general. So it could be I'm just naturally accustomed to eating it.

As for the worst food, I kinda dislike the feel of biting into mushrooms, feels like hardened butter. That's all I can think of at the moment.

Silviya
2011-03-30, 01:56 AM
I can't drink any sort of fizzy drink. It's not the taste that bothers me, it's the fizz. It feels like thousands of tiny, burning needles are repeatedly stabbing my tongue. I've accidentally taken a sip of something fizzy a few times, and I've been on the verge of tears from it many times because it hurts so much. Obviously it doesn't feel like that for everyone, because almost everyone I know sometimes drinks sodas of some sort.

I also don't like birthday cakes at any birthday other then my own, mainly because of the cake at one of my friend's birthday parties. They were vegan, wheat free cakes, because some people were vegan and one person was allergic to wheat. My friend's mother decided that it wouldn't be fair to bake multiple cakes, one vegan, one wheat free, and one normal, because that "wouldn't be fair, because not everyone could eat all the cakes." So everyone had to eat what I call "the empty cakes." And they did instead taste empty.


I've also had some bad experiences with food. I once drank a huge mouthful of some milk that I had ordered at a restaurant without smelling it or anything because I was really thirsty, and it turned out it was sour. I always smell milk before drinking it now.

Then there was the angel food cake I had at a camp I went to a while back, which wasn't so much bad . . . . it was just weird. It was on a college campus, so we had ate at the cafeteria. They had different cakes every day, which a few of us tried, and none of them were any good. Then, one day, they had angel food cake. I love angel food cake. One of the people sitting at my table got a slice, and I asked her to tell me if it was any good, because if it was then I would want to go get some.
She took a bite, and she made the 0.0 expression and just stared off into space a bit, chewing slowly. Then she said "This is the weirdest cake I've ever tasted." We asked her to describe it, but she said she just couldn't. So, of course, another person had a bite, and also made the same expression. Eventually we all tried a piece, except for one on person, who was too scared to try. It was truly the weirdest cake I had ever tasted.
It was both the taste and the texture. The texture was oddly rubbery, yet somewhat brick-like. Like a crumbly, rubbery brick, I guess. And the taste . . . . . it was sweet, but not like sugar or honey or fruit sweetness. It was a weird, almost sickly sweet taste. Then it almost had a hint of lemon, but not quite. One of the people described it as "imitation imitation lemon." It was like it saw the cake with the artificial lemon flavor and decided to try to imitate the artificial lemon flavor, so it had an almost-but-not-quiet-lemon taste to it. There were also other flavors, but I can't really describe them.


@Serpentine: I know the taste you're talking about! I've never had duck before, but I've had that weird taste in the back of my mouth that I can't get rid of, exactly how you described it. No one I know have ever tasted it, so I wasn't sure if it was just me or not. I don't remember the foods that caused me to taste it, though. I wonder what it is . . . .

Serpentine
2011-03-30, 02:09 AM
@Serpentine: I know the taste you're talking about! I've never had duck before, but I've had that weird taste in the back of my mouth that I can't get rid of, exactly how you described it. No one I know have ever tasted it, so I wasn't sure if it was just me or not. I don't remember the foods that caused me to taste it, though. I wonder what it is . . . .Yay! Someone else is weird! :D
I just remembered another descriptor for it, see how it lines up with your exprience of it: like rotting metal.

So, to summarise in case someone else gets this thing, it's a sort of musty, musky, bitter taste like rotting metal that gets right into the back of your throat and nose so you taste it every time you breathe. Has thus far been associated with duck and marinated goat fetta.

Silviya
2011-03-30, 02:39 AM
Yay! Someone else is weird! :D
I just remembered another descriptor for it, see how it lines up with your exprience of it: like rotting metal.

So, to summarise in case someone else gets this thing, it's a sort of musty, musky, bitter taste like rotting metal that gets right into the back of your throat and nose so you taste it every time you breathe. Has thus far been associated with duck and marinated goat fetta.


That's exactly how I'd describe it! I'm glad I'm not the only one who's experienced it. I guess only a few people get it . . . . .

Have you found some way to make it go away? I've found that if I put a little bit of some of my tea tree oil stuff that I have for acne under my nose while I have that taste in the back of my mouth, the strong smell of the tea tree oil seems to cancel it out. By the time the tea tree oil smell is gone, the weird taste will be gone too.

Serpentine
2011-03-30, 02:42 AM
Nah, hasn't happened often enough for me to experiment. I think with the first duck experience there was much spitting and water-drinking. I might've tried milk, too (which is saying a fair bit, cuz I don't like plain milk). I think other overpowering smells/tastes might do it, though.
I really wonder who else gets this, and what it's from...

Eldan
2011-03-30, 02:48 AM
Goat cheese. UGH! It's mainly the texture, but I can't really stand the taste much either.

Oh, come on. You can't generalize that much. There's hundreds of different goat cheeses.

Edit: And serpentine: Zucchini and Eggplant share one thing in common, often: if you grow them too big, or with too much water, they become huge, swollen and almost utterly tasteless. Sadly, most store bought ones are of that kind. A good egg plant actually shouldn't be much larger than a chicken egg.

Serpentine
2011-03-30, 02:53 AM
I've tried the multiple ways, and haven't found one I like yet - there's meals I've eaten despite the presence of eggplant, but none I've enjoyed because of it. That doesn't mean I'm all "eeeeeew eggplant is gross!" I actually really want to like it, so I'm gonna keep trying it.

Eldan
2011-03-30, 02:54 AM
Hmm. Strange. Have you tried Asian egg plants? You find them in thai food, I think they are delicious.

grimbold
2011-03-30, 04:58 AM
i once at a caramel ONION which somebody switched with my caramel apple

Lost Demiurge
2011-03-30, 10:14 AM
Jawbreakers. Especially those huge willy wonka ones that won't fit in your mouth.

I got one when I was a kid, and my dad broke it with a hammer for me, I ate the fragments.

It was like slightly flavored ceramic. Even after I sucked on it, it wouldn't soften up. I chewed and ate nonetheless, but it was what I imagined what eating a plate would be like. Got sick afterwards too.

Still don't like the damn things.

Telonius
2011-03-30, 10:22 AM
The absolute worst? That space is reserved for Tapioca Pudding. I can't smell, eat, or even think about it without feeling sick to my stomach. I tried it once in grade school, and my stomach promptly called in an emergency evacuation order. Never again.

Kiwifruit is a close second.




I also don't like birthday cakes at any birthday other then my own, mainly because of the cake at one of my friend's birthday parties. They were vegan, wheat free cakes, because some people were vegan and one person was allergic to wheat. My friend's mother decided that it wouldn't be fair to bake multiple cakes, one vegan, one wheat free, and one normal, because that "wouldn't be fair, because not everyone could eat all the cakes." So everyone had to eat what I call "the empty cakes." And they did instead taste empty.

Next time that happens, suggest having a garbanzo bean cake (http://allrecipes.com//Recipe/garbanzo-bean-chocolate-cake-gluten-free/Detail.aspx). You can use egg substitutes for the vegan portion. I've had them before (my wife is celiac), and they're really very close to regular chocolate cake.

Ravens_cry
2011-03-30, 10:29 AM
i once at a caramel ONION which somebody switched with my caramel apple
Well, I like caramelized onion, cooked long and slow until it is that nice golden colour and full of oniony goodness, perfect on burgers, perogies, or slurped up by itself, but a caramel onion? Wow, that sounds. . . odd. Waste of good onion and good caramel I say. My mouth is just wrinkling imagining what that would taste like.

Erloas
2011-03-30, 11:03 AM
Worst food? Gotta be meatloaf. Doesn't matter how it's prepared, that's just a crying waste of once-decent meat.
Considering that there probably isn't anything in meatloaf that you don't normally eat, I'm going to have to go with the fact that you just haven't had any good meatloaf. There is a lot, by far the majority, of meatloaf that is mediocre at best, which is probably what you've had. My step dad has made some absolutely amazing meatloafs, though thats not exactly something everyone can try.


As for really bad foods... I had something at a cafeteria at work that made me really sick very quickly and I associated that with the green beans (though it could have been another part but I don't remember what the rest of the meal was now) and there was a while where I couldn't even smell them without feeling a bit nauseous.

Overall though there isn't much I hate and nothing I won't try. While I don't hate it, I've found I don't really care for alfredo sauces. I don't like bananas, I think its mostly the texture because I have no problem with banana breads or banana cream pie.

@Serp. Have you tried zucchini bread? There isn't actually all that much most people do with zucchini, and most of the ways I've seen doesn't leave a lot of the taste left and the texture tends to get weird after its cooked and its kind of plain most of the ways its served uncooked. I think that goes with eggplant a lot too. Overall I'm not a big fan of zucchini but I love zucchini bread.

Keveak
2011-03-30, 11:18 AM
I oddly enough taste a similar taste to that duck-taste when applying too much ketchup on something, I can even smell it when my dad puts the horrendous amounts of the stuff on his spaghetti.

I suspect it related to the sugar and decay process but I have only my own taste-buds to go by. ^_^'

The worst I've had will have to be liquorice, though.

When you dislike a taste so much you can instantly recognise it at a tasting contest when you're five, you know you don't like it. :smalltongue:

A bad apple I had a few weeks ago probably comes a close second, but it was more intensity than truly liqourice-ly bad taste. ^_^

Marnath
2011-03-30, 12:14 PM
Considering that there probably isn't anything in meatloaf that you don't normally eat, I'm going to have to go with the fact that you just haven't had any good meatloaf. There is a lot, by far the majority, of meatloaf that is mediocre at best, which is probably what you've had.

Yeah, that's the part I don't get. I eat everything that goes into it on their own, but meatloaf = gross. It's a mystery. O.o

Maelstrom
2011-03-30, 01:01 PM
...There isn't much food I really dislike. Normal stuff I'll keep trying in hopes I might like it some day, but squash, zucchini and (this I'm particularly disappointed about) eggplant I just can't like...

I take it that ratatouille is right out? ;)

For me, it's caviar. Whether it's the orange Tobikko caviar on sushi, farm raised caviar, or $400/oz caviar straight from the Black Sea, I cannot handle it. yech...

Eldan
2011-03-30, 01:05 PM
I oddly enough taste a similar taste to that duck-taste when applying too much ketchup on something, I can even smell it when my dad puts the horrendous amounts of the stuff on his spaghetti.


People who put ketchup on spaghetti are the worst. The Worst. With capital letters.

Teddy
2011-03-30, 01:40 PM
People who put ketchup on spaghetti are the worst. The Worst. With capital letters.

Heh, I put ketchup on pretty much all my regular starch except spaghetti. I just don't find it to be worth it. The meat that comes with spaghetti, however... :smallwink:

Keveak
2011-03-30, 01:41 PM
People who put ketchup on spaghetti are the worst. The Worst. With capital letters.

It's the standard of the entirety of Denmark and probably several other nearby countries as well... ._.

Granted, we also eat liver pâté, blood sausage, Swedish meatballs, some squid things I haven't had in a while and stuff I only know contain something from three different animals and looks vaguely like reddish gel so you may indeed be right. :smalltongue:

I will say that I prefer it to Spaghetti Bolognese, though. But I'm planning on going vegetarian eventually so that's just me. ^_^

Gaius Marius
2011-03-30, 01:45 PM
My ex pinay girlfriend's family kinda peer-pressured me into having a Balut (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balut_(egg))during one of their party.

Cracked.com officially declared it the #1 most horrifying food alive. I had to chug down 2 beers in a row after that not to puke it out.

Winter_Wolf
2011-03-30, 01:58 PM
Well I'm in Wisconsin so there's no real surprise there I guess... but still for a sushi place you... sort of expect not to get bad seafood, you know? Still, this is good info to know. Thanks.


Mom's half of the family is from Wisconsin. I had sushi at a few places in Milwaukee and Sheboygan. "Fresh" is never an appropriate descriptor for the seafood. Usually it's edible though. Sounds suspiciously like your group got the ol' "it's going to spoil by tomorrow, so get rid of it today by any means necessry" ploy. The lake perch and pike are delicious, but I don't really see that in sushi places.


Mmm... saurkraut... on brats... cooked in beer. P=

Love me some brats n' beer action. There's a place in Cedarburg that somtimes does like jalepeno brats stuffed with bleu cheese, but it's seasonal or depends on the owner's mood or something whether you can get 'em. They also do strawberry brats for Strawberry festival. Still hate saurkraut though. (Then again, I eat akutuk like it's going out of style, and that's basically berries with lard and a little sugar.)

Teddy
2011-03-30, 02:00 PM
It's the standard of the entirety of Denmark and probably several other nearby countries as well... ._.

Precisely.


Granted, we also eat liver pâté, blood sausage, Swedish meatballs, some squid things I haven't had in a while and stuff I only know contain something from three different animals and looks vaguely like reddish gel so you may indeed be right. :smalltongue:

What!? Swedish meatballs are awesome. But it's not like boiling them makes them any good (quenelles, or Danish meatballs). :smalltongue:

Ravens_cry
2011-03-30, 02:00 PM
I've always wanted to try Blood Sausage, but all the butchers shops around town say they don't have it. SOme in fact said it's illegal in Canada. Does anyone know if this is true?

Eldan
2011-03-30, 02:05 PM
Illegal? Strange idea. I mean, I don't like it much, but butchering produces a lot of blood anyway, why not use it? Hygiene issues?

Telonius
2011-03-30, 02:16 PM
Illegal? Strange idea. I mean, I don't like it much, but butchering produces a lot of blood anyway, why not use it? Hygiene issues?

That's the most likely reason. I do know that some foods like unpasteurized milks and cheeses are illegal to sell (though not to consume, if you have a farm and make it yourself) in some US states. Hygiene issues are the most common reasons given.

Dire Moose
2011-03-30, 02:16 PM
I once ate a large amount of horseradish sauce as a child, operating under the mistaken assumption that it was whipped cream.

That has to be the worst food experience I've ever had.

RebelRogue
2011-03-30, 04:07 PM
It's the standard of the entirety of Denmark and probably several other nearby countries as well... ._.

Granted, we also eat liver pâté, blood sausage, Swedish meatballs, some squid things I haven't had in a while and stuff I only know contain something from three different animals and looks vaguely like reddish gel so you may indeed be right. :smalltongue:
What are you referring to? :smallconfused:

Kneenibble
2011-03-30, 04:19 PM
Why do so many people dislike black licorice flavour? :smallfrown:

Gaius Marius
2011-03-30, 04:23 PM
Anyone here knows what a Balut is?

Teddy
2011-03-30, 04:30 PM
Anyone here knows what a Balut is?

Given that it's already been mentioned... three times, I think, including one Wiki link, yes, I think so. :smallwink:

dehro
2011-03-30, 05:39 PM
ok, this needs to be put in the right context:

picture hong kong, on a business trip. meetings with plenty of suppliers and customers all week long. I love chinese food with a passion (unless it's too spicy, which I realise narrows the field quite a bit)...so what can go wrong?
well..the last meal.
it actually started really well too.
a customer invited my boss, my dad (a senior in the same company I used to work for) and myself for dinner.. took us to this wonderfully pictoresque harbour (I never found out if it was a touristy thing or if it was purely for the locals..at any rate we were the only westerners around that night).
sampans full of fish would trade through market stalls on the seaside of the road, and the restaurants on the other side of the road would cook the fish right away.
so here we go, into one of the stalls, our host helps us bartering and choosing the fish (which was still alive of course) we would eat that night, and we left with plastic bags full of fish and stuff.. walked to one of the restaurants right next door, and handed it all to the staff.
the dinner was one of the best I'd had in China up to that point.. right until the lobster was served.
it would have been a magnificent dish, except for a disgusting and indefinable white chees-y sauce that was poured all over the animal.
anyway, the three of us bravely attempt to swallow every bite under the eager stare of our host (and his ...underlings).
somehow, it just becomes too much, acidic, bitter, sour and syrupy all mixed together (at some stage I sincerely wondered if the cook had peed in our plates)..so all 3 of us "europeans" manage to sneak the uneaten half of our respective lobsters under the remains of what whe had managed to swallow.
our host didn't seem to notice.

the waiter did.

actually no..he only noticed MY plate being ... less than empty.
so he brought it back asking if I'd finished or if I didn't like it.

general embarassement, with my dad jumping at the chance to ridicule me and assuring both our host and our head waiter that it tasted great, I'd made a mistake and would gladly eat all of it..in fact, did they have a second lobster for me, as I liked it so much?


they did.

so I had to eat 2 of the damn beasts, with extra helpings of sauce.
smiling all the way too..

Trog
2011-03-30, 06:10 PM
Mom's half of the family is from Wisconsin. I had sushi at a few places in Milwaukee and Sheboygan. "Fresh" is never an appropriate descriptor for the seafood. Usually it's edible though. Sounds suspiciously like your group got the ol' "it's going to spoil by tomorrow, so get rid of it today by any means necessry" ploy. The lake perch and pike are delicious, but I don't really see that in sushi places.
I bet you're right. This was in Madison. I forget the name of the place. Speaking of Sushi I just had some for supper. Yummeh.

Love me some brats n' beer action. There's a place in Cedarburg that somtimes does like jalepeno brats stuffed with bleu cheese, but it's seasonal or depends on the owner's mood or something whether you can get 'em. They also do strawberry brats for Strawberry festival. Still hate saurkraut though. (Then again, I eat akutuk like it's going out of style, and that's basically berries with lard and a little sugar.)
Yeah I haven't had an opportunity to try any of the specialty-type brats yet. I've seen them in around but never jumped at the chance. And yeah I've only like saurkraut on brats... except for this one German place up in the Twin Cities that had excellent kraut. So much so that I was in a bit of disbelief that it was as good as it was. That stuff I ate on its own. Of course that same night I tried a snuffboard so the one too many glass boots of beer might be to blame. :smalltongue:

What!? Swedish meatballs are awesome. Swedish meatballs ARE awesome! P=

Derjuin
2011-03-30, 06:14 PM
Lutefisk (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lutefisk). It is the worst by a very large margin for me.

:smallyuk:

Brother Oni
2011-03-30, 06:38 PM
I've always wanted to try Blood Sausage, but all the butchers shops around town say they don't have it. SOme in fact said it's illegal in Canada. Does anyone know if this is true?

Have you tried looking for black pudding (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_pudding) instead? It may be sold as that.

I quite like it, especially as part of a full English breakfast (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Full_breakfast).

unosarta
2011-03-30, 09:40 PM
Yeah I haven't had an opportunity to try any of the specialty-type brats yet. I've seen them in around but never jumped at the chance. And yeah I've only like saurkraut on brats... except for this one German place up in the Twin Cities that had excellent kraut. So much so that I was in a bit of disbelief that it was as good as it was. That stuff I ate on its own. Of course that same night I tried a snuffboard so the one too many glass boots of beer might be to blame. :smalltongue:

Was that restaurant Kramarczuk's? I asked my dad, who is a serious lover of German cuisine, and he said they had some of the best kraut. Of course, he doesn't really know about it if it was in St. Paul.

Trog
2011-03-30, 11:02 PM
Was that restaurant Kramarczuk's? I asked my dad, who is a serious lover of German cuisine, and he said they had some of the best kraut. Of course, he doesn't really know about it if it was in St. Paul.
It was a place called Gasthof Zur Gemütlichkeit (http://www.gasthofzg.com/). Fun place when it's packed! :smallbiggrin:

Teddy
2011-03-31, 03:56 AM
Lutefisk (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lutefisk). It is the worst by a very large margin for me.

:smallyuk:

Uhh. Last Christmas (or was it the second to last?) we had lutfisk in school. I hadn't read the menu, so I thought it just was ordinary fish. I usually like fish, but this was hard to swallow. It's definitely nothing I'm going eat voluntarily again.

Keveak
2011-03-31, 06:04 AM
What!? Swedish meatballs are awesome. But it's not like boiling them makes them any good (quenelles, or Danish meatballs). :smalltongue:

I know, they're awesome.

I kind of assumed Swedish and Danish meatballs were the same considering both share name in Denmar-Wait, boil? You boil them?! O_o

You're supposed throw them on pans and fry them, the boiling thingy's for potatoes!


What are you referring to? :smallconfused:

What I just described? Both are pretty common around here, I just don't remember what either is called.

Though, I think the latter may be called Sky in Danish. :smallsmile:


Why do so many people dislike black licorice flavour? :smallfrown:

Personally I dislike the Ammonia taste but I haven't met anyone else who dislike it so I can't say much about the general dislike,.

But look on the bright side! More to you! :D

unosarta
2011-03-31, 06:25 AM
It was a place called Gasthof Zur Gemütlichkeit (http://www.gasthofzg.com/). Fun place when it's packed! :smallbiggrin:

Oh! He recommended that too, but he thought Kramarczuk's had better kraut.

Teddy
2011-03-31, 06:28 AM
I know, they're awesome.

I kind of assumed Swedish and Danish meatballs were the same considering both share name in Denmar-Wait, boil? You boil them?! O_o

You're supposed throw them on pans and fry them, the boiling thingy's for potatoes!

No, it's you who boil them. At least that's what I've heard: Swedes fry their meatballs ("köttbullar") and boil their quenelles ("frikadeller"), and the Danes do it the completely opposite way. Now, I'm certainly not especially well versed in the topic of Danish gastronomics, so I might be wrong. Just for the sake of clarity, I was accusing you for boiling your meatballs, which sounds gross. :smallyuk: Of course you're supposed to fry them, and then eat them with boiled potatoes, brown sauce and lingonberry jam.

Keveak
2011-03-31, 07:55 AM
No, it's you who boil them. At least that's what I've heard: Swedes fry their meatballs ("köttbullar") and boil their quenelles ("frikadeller"), and the Danes do it the completely opposite way. Now, I'm certainly not especially well versed in the topic of Danish gastronomics, so I might be wrong. Just for the sake of clarity, I was accusing you for boiling your meatballs, which sounds gross. :smallyuk: Of course you're supposed to fry them, and then eat them with boiled potatoes, brown sauce and lingonberry jam.

I had never heard of quenelles (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quenelle) until I looked it up right now and I obviously never had it. :smalltongue:

We do fry our frikaddeller (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frikadeller), but according to Wikipedia the Swedish frikadelle and the Danish are not related in the least. :smallsmile:

Ours seems more like your meatballs, which may be why I believed that Swedish meatballs was the English name for it.

Sorry for my poor knowledge of cuisine linguistics. ^_^'

Jack Squat
2011-03-31, 08:13 AM
Worst food I ever ate was a rack of baby back ribs. Now, I love ribs, don't get me wrong. But at this particular restaurant they were poorly seasoned, and I swear 80% of what wasn't bone was fat. And not the good melt-in-your-mouth type fat, but the might-as-well-be-chewing-on-an-eraser type fat.

Despite everyone I know despising the place, to my knowledge it's still open for some reason.

Teddy
2011-03-31, 09:02 AM
I had never heard of quenelles (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quenelle) until I looked it up right now and I obviously never had it. :smalltongue:

We do fry our frikaddeller (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frikadeller), but according to Wikipedia the Swedish frikadelle and the Danish are not related in the least. :smallsmile:

Ours seems more like your meatballs, which may be why I believed that Swedish meatballs was the English name for it.

Sorry for my poor knowledge of cuisine linguistics. ^_^'

So, in other words, I think we can safely say that no one of us (and then especially me) know what we're talking about as soon as we leave our own borders. And then we try to comunicate this in English... :smalltongue:

Also, the english name for "frikadeller" (the Swedish ones, i.e. "quenelles"). Is a bit too broad. I'm talking about boiled meatballs, which to me sounds gross.

Keveak
2011-03-31, 10:06 AM
So, in other words, I think we can safely say that no one of us (and then especially me) know what we're talking about as soon as we leave our own borders. And then we try to comunicate this in English... :smalltongue:

Also, the english name for "frikadeller" (the Swedish ones, i.e. "quenelles"). Is a bit too broad. I'm talking about boiled meatballs, which to me sounds gross.

Indeed, which is odd considering I have a larger English vocabulary than Danish. :smalltongue:

We do have meatballs for soup that I personally think taste horrible but I am not sure if that is the same as the Swedish kind.

RebelRogue
2011-03-31, 02:40 PM
The absolutely confusing thing about the swedish/danish terms here is, that the swedish word 'frikadell' means 'kødbolle' (meatball) in danish, and the swedish word 'kjötbulla' (meatball) means 'frikadelle' in danish. I wish I was making this up!

As for 'sky', it looks like this (the brown stuff on top):
http://www.jv.dk/modules/xphoto/cache/90/211490_600_391_0_0_0_0.jpg
It's a kind of savoury jelly that is traditionally served on some kinds of traditional 'smørrebrød' (open sandwiches). Not really my thing, I must say.

Still not sure about the squid thing - those things aren't all that common around here, in my experience :smallconfused:

Pokonic
2011-03-31, 03:17 PM
The worst food I ever had was homemade Pidan, or in english the millennium egg.
Honastly, I cant see why everyone in my house eats it. Balut is a freaken delicasy compared to pidan, and balut tastes horrid!:smallyuk:

Dire Moose
2011-03-31, 03:20 PM
Lutefisk (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lutefisk). It is the worst by a very large margin for me.

:smallyuk:

My mom and her brothers went hungry every Christmas due to my great-grandmother insisting on serving it every year.

Keveak
2011-03-31, 03:34 PM
The absolutely confusing thing about the swedish/danish terms here is, that the swedish word 'frikadell' means 'kødbolle' (meatball) in danish, and the swedish word 'kjötbulla' (meatball) means 'frikadelle' in danish. I wish I was making this up!

As for 'sky', it looks like this (the brown stuff on top):
http://www.jv.dk/modules/xphoto/cache/90/211490_600_391_0_0_0_0.jpg
It's a kind of savoury jelly that is traditionally served on some kinds of traditional 'smørrebrød' (open sandwiches). Not really my thing, I must say.

Still not sure about the squid thing - those things aren't all that common around here, in my experience :smallconfused:

I know how it looks, my dad loves it. :smallsmile:

I just remember several kinds of squid I have seen served at various people's homes that I have tasted one kind of, considering they seemed to be sold as usual toppings for bread or pre-made dinner I assumed that they must be somewhat popular. ^_^'

Was mainly included for the joke, though. :smalltongue:

There's apparently a difference in ingredients between the Swedish and Danish cuisine you mentioned, but I get that from Wikipedia so you probably know better. Would love to try the Swedish variant, though. :smallsmile:

Probably hard to get in Copenhagen, though.

RebelRogue
2011-03-31, 03:42 PM
Probably hard to get in Copenhagen, though.
You can usually find it in Ikea's cafeteria (but that's outside of Copenhagen, technically), and I doubt it's the best of quality.

Teddy
2011-04-01, 01:58 AM
Indeed, which is odd considering I have a larger English vocabulary than Danish. :smalltongue:

You can't guess how much I want to say something stereotypical about the unpronounciability and unintelligability of Danish. :smalltongue: However, I think I'll abstain. It isn't actually that hard for a Swede if you try, and my mum speaks pretty good Danish from her studies in Copenhagen.


The absolutely confusing thing about the swedish/danish terms here is, that the swedish word 'frikadell' means 'kødbolle' (meatball) in danish, and the swedish word 'kjötbulla' (meatball) means 'frikadelle' in danish. I wish I was making this up!

Ah, that's what I was talking about. Also, we spell it 'köttbulle'.


You can usually find it in Ikea's cafeteria (but that's outside of Copenhagen, technically), and I doubt it's the best of quality.

Ikea's meatballs aren't bad, but as always, nothing beats home-made.

Marnath
2011-04-01, 02:44 AM
Ikea's meatballs aren't bad, but as always, nothing beats home-made.

That depends greatly on whose home it is. :smallbiggrin::smallwink:

Teddy
2011-04-01, 02:49 AM
That depends greatly on whose home it is. :smallbiggrin::smallwink:

Well, it probably depends on which Ikea it is, but, yeah, you're right.

dehro
2011-04-01, 03:49 AM
Ikea's meatballs aren't bad, but as always, nothing beats home-made.

oh..those! if you could take a bite of nothing and it had an after-taste..that would be it.

also a few more inedibles:
from Italy: brus (actually I like it a lot, but it's not everybody's taste).. a very strong cheese made of milk and..cheese scraps, soaked in cognac to prefent further fermentation. basically it's what you get if you stuff all the remaining scraps of a few months of eating cheese in a pot, and leave it there to..blend together.
from...all over the place.. I know it as a jewish-east european sauce: Cren, basically a sauce made of primarily horseradish.. utterly inedible.
personal factoid: my Dutch (Polish born) grandad knew the sauce through his mum, and never learned to make it; my Italian grandad on the other hand, learned to make it during ww2, in former Jugoslavia..decades later it was their first personal "connection"..aside of course from their respective offspring living together.
again from Italy: Casu marzu, something so appalingly disgusting that its trade has been banned by the European Union...because of this (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casu_marzu)

Keveak
2011-04-01, 08:19 AM
You can't guess how much I want to say something stereotypical about the unpronounciability and unintelligability of Danish. :smalltongue: However, I think I'll abstain. It isn't actually that hard for a Swede if you try, and my mum speaks pretty good Danish from her studies in Copenhagen.

Please go ahead, it is seemingly unintelligible to anyone but ourselves and the pronunciation include several sounds not existing in a lot of other languages so I'd expect it to sound nonsensical to most non-Danes. :smallsmile:

In fact, it is apparently so unintelligible that ordering sausage with bread (Pölse med bröt) in Norway is impossible if done in Danish (pølse med brød) O_o


Ikea's meatballs aren't bad, but as always, nothing beats home-made.

They are in Copenhagen, even their cola had an awful aftertaste.

I am suspecting they ship the Swedish leftovers here when they get too old. :smalltongue:

Teddy
2011-04-01, 09:30 AM
Please go ahead, it is seemingly unintelligible to anyone but ourselves and the pronunciation include several sounds not existing in a lot of other languages so I'd expect it to sound nonsensical to most non-Danes. :smallsmile:

In fact, it is apparently so unintelligible that ordering sausage with bread (Pölse med bröt) in Norway is impossible if done in Danish (pølse med brød) O_o

Nah, as I said, it isn't actually that bad, but mostly, I'm too lazy to come up with something good. :smallwink:


They are in Copenhagen, even their cola had an awful aftertaste.

I am suspecting they ship the Swedish leftovers here when they get too old. :smalltongue:

What!? No! That would be terrible! :smalleek:

He's onto something. Quick, burn the evidence!

Shpadoinkle
2011-04-01, 09:51 AM
When I was 9 or 10, my mom forced me to eat some macaroni salad she made. Five seconds after swallowing the last bite, it all came back up. She never forced me to eat anything again.

I also have a problem with extremely rare steaks. Medium rare is fine, but if the majority of the meat isn't brown, then I consider it raw and won't eat it. About a year ago I tried an underdone steak. I barely managed to choke it down. Six hours later, at around 2 AM, I woke up and was nauseous for an hour before throwing up. I recall it was quite vividly red. I refuse to touch a steak that isn't at least medium rare now.

Maelstrom
2011-04-02, 02:13 AM
Man, all these playgrounders that insist on ruining perfectly good beef! ;) Give me blue all the way! And/or carpachhio...

RebelRogue
2011-04-02, 08:05 AM
You can't guess how much I want to say something stereotypical about the unpronounciability and unintelligability of Danish. :smalltongue: However, I think I'll abstain. It isn't actually that hard for a Swede if you try, and my mum speaks pretty good Danish from her studies in Copenhagen.
Nah, you're right: danish speakers has an unfortunate habit of 'eating' syllables, simply not pronuncing them. I can imagine it being a nightmare to understand if you're not used to it. And as much as I'm proud to speak and write the language (the latter in particular is a rare skill these days :smallmad:), I'm the first to admit that it must be pretty flat and ugly sounding compared to most other languages. Swedish - which is a no-brainer to compare the danish language to - in particular seems much more pretty and musical to me.


Ah, that's what I was talking about. Also, we spell it 'köttbulle'.
...but as you can see, I still can't speak/spell in swedish to save my life :smallredface:

Teddy
2011-04-02, 01:33 PM
Nah, you're right: danish speakers has an unfortunate habit of 'eating' syllables, simply not pronuncing them. I can imagine it being a nightmare to understand if you're not used to it. And as much as I'm proud to speak and write the language (the latter in particular is a rare skill these days :smallmad:), I'm the first to admit that it must be pretty flat and ugly sounding compared to most other languages. Swedish - which is a no-brainer to compare the danish language to - in particular seems much more pretty and musical to me.

I guess I'm pretty good at understanding what other says (I act as the mumble-translator in our family :smallwink:), but at least I've proven myself able of understanding Danish if the Dane speaks slow and clearly.


...but as you can see, I still can't speak/spell in swedish to save my life :smallredface:

Well, on the other hand, if I'm supposed to speak Danish, it will be just like the stereotypical Swedish idea of how Danish shounds, and that is going to be unintelligible. :smallwink:

Saposhiente
2011-04-02, 03:56 PM
If I answer this truthfully, I'm afraid I'll get lynched >.<

Keveak
2011-04-02, 04:05 PM
If I answer this truthfully, I'm afraid I'll get lynched >.<

Go ahead, go ahead. We don't lynch people.

We do force them to eat Lutefisk, though.

So maybe lynching would be more merciful. :smalltongue:

Eldan
2011-04-02, 04:07 PM
If I answer this truthfully, I'm afraid I'll get lynched >.<

Please tell me you're a cannibal. I've always wanted to meat one.

Saposhiente
2011-04-02, 04:08 PM
chocolate. I can't stand the stuff

unosarta
2011-04-02, 04:10 PM
chocolate. I can't stand the stuff

Same here. I really dislike most anything chocolate that I eat. Blegh.

Eldan
2011-04-02, 04:10 PM
Aww. That's bit disappointing.

If it's any consolation, I don't like most chocolate either.

Keveak
2011-04-02, 04:38 PM
I like dark chocolate, but milk chocolate is an abomination to all sweets. >_<

I don't think any of you are bad for not liking chocolate, that would be mean and hypocritical with my inability to eat liquorice and whipped cream due to their taste.

I do think we should all agree that chocolate bunnies are cute, though. :3

Mary Leathert
2011-04-02, 05:30 PM
For me the stuff I have actually eaten and started to dislike is a lot shorter list than the one including food I don't even wantto try based on the look/smell/other qualities discernible without putting it in my mouth. But there are couple of experiences. Both have to do with trying to eat something while feeling sick.

First I had bought some candy (http://www.finnairshop.fi/wcsstore/ePreOrder/images/catalog/small/fruitgarden280.jpg) for a flight because I get motion sickness somewhat and had discovered chewing on something helps. Well, this time it didn't, and I think I didn't finish that candy jar during my three week language course.

The second time I was staying at my friend's place with some other friends. We had some Japanese take-away during the first evening. During the night I was starting to feel ill. Come morning, I didn't feel like eating anything much but was pressured into it (mostly by myself) because we had a long day ahead away from the house. I remembered I had some leftover onigiri in the fridge. I managed to force some down, but after that I haven't been able to stand the smell and taste of nori-seaweed. Too bad this means that I won't be eating much sushi, because that Japanese restaurant has a wide selection even for a vegetarian like me. Sushi rice is still tasty for some reason, though

TheThan
2011-04-02, 06:22 PM
It's the standard of the entirety of Denmark and probably several other nearby countries as well... ._.

Granted, we also eat liver pâté, blood sausage, Swedish meatballs, some squid things I haven't had in a while and stuff I only know contain something from three different animals and looks vaguely like reddish gel so you may indeed be right. :smalltongue:

I will say that I prefer it to Spaghetti Bolognese, though. But I'm planning on going vegetarian eventually so that's just me. ^_^

Ahem G'Kar on Swedish meatballs.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bVLkxSSvegc

Teddy
2011-04-02, 07:11 PM
First I had bought some candy (http://www.finnairshop.fi/wcsstore/ePreOrder/images/catalog/small/fruitgarden280.jpg) for a flight because I get motion sickness somewhat and had discovered chewing on something helps. Well, this time it didn't, and I think I didn't finish that candy jar during my three week language course.

Are you sure that's not baking powder. It looks suspiciously like a can of baking powder with fruit stickers tacked on it. :smalltongue:


Ahem G'Kar on Swedish meatballs.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bVLkxSSvegc

And here's how you cook them. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C8Wu3Bps9ic)

TheThan
2011-04-02, 07:22 PM
Are you sure that's not baking powder. It looks suspiciously like a can of baking powder with fruit stickers tacked on it. :smalltongue:



And here's how you cook them. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C8Wu3Bps9ic)

I thought this (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sY_Yf4zz-yo) was the proper method of cooking Swedish meatballs.

Emperor Ing
2011-04-02, 07:31 PM
Macaroni & Cheese. Now hear me out people: I LOVE Mac & Cheese, but this one time visiting a college where I and others were offered free lunch, I decided to skrew health and get edibles of deliciousness. Needless to say, it was bad. Like really really bad. I know some people have some reservations on using the term "epic" but if the definition of "epic fail" is "leaves people wondering 'how the heck did you pull that off?!'" then that...vile...vile yellow sludge was epic fail.

Knaight
2011-04-03, 01:44 AM
Lets talk about Durian. For those that don't know it is a spiky hard shelled fruit that makes Pineapple look like it has harmless fuzz. Clearly anything that hard to get into had to be good for people to keep doing so. No. For one it stinks, this isn't just my subjective analysis, this is a reflection of every apartment complex, motel, and condominium in Thailaind which has banned the opening of these indoors. Blue cheese has nothing on this.

Then you taste it. It looks creamy, and at first it tastes creamy, then suddenly it turns into some sort of nasty slime that has no reason to exist. Worst of all, its got a calorie density somewhere around that of lard, so that one spoonful you just ate counts for a meal. Its also somewhat expensive, yet another downside. If I'm ever going back to Chaang Rai, and I hope to do so given that I've lived there for a year, I'm going with the other "exotic" food. Chaang Rai insects, an example of why bamboo worms and other larvae, as well as grass hoppers and some sort of beetle should always be fried.

Teddy
2011-04-03, 05:25 AM
I thought this (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sY_Yf4zz-yo) was the proper method of cooking Swedish meatballs.

Oh, no, that was just how you salt them into bounciness. A common but non-vital tradition in the Swedish kitchen. :smalltongue:

KjeldorMage
2011-04-03, 07:58 AM
Undercooked Meatloaf...

...Yep...

dehro
2011-04-04, 10:06 AM
I thought this (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sY_Yf4zz-yo) was the proper method of cooking Swedish meatballs.

I'm surprised it took this long for this video to be posted. I honestly pictured somebody would have remembered this a few pages back

Soilborn
2011-04-04, 01:12 PM
Not to bring up balut again, but having just looked it up this may just be the first thing I would hate eating.

Black_Pants_Guy
2011-04-04, 02:18 PM
Vegemite. - After having Vegemite toast Microwaved I have never eaten the stuff ever again... except for the next case...
Spaghetti made with Vegemite as a substitute for spices. - Mum ran out of spices, used Vegemite... this is the only time she has ever cooked anything bad.
Woolworth's home-brand peanut butter. - I swear they put chalk in this stuff.
My Sister's Boyfriend's cooking. His cooking is so bad that I want to punch him in the throat. He has me convinced that the English can't cook.
Corned Beef. *Nom-nom-no----* *vomit*
Shellfish... I can only describe this terrible sub-group of meat as umami with a distinctly overpowering bitter aftertaste.

Lady Tialait
2011-04-05, 10:02 AM
I have a few foods I dislike.

Chocolate - Never really liked it, except when I was pregnant...couldn't get enough.

Potatoes - I'm allergic, and for the most part I don't like the texture of them.

Strawberries and other berries - I hate having seeds in my mouth, it annoys me to the point of just wanting to rinse my mouth and brush my teeth and tongue. Berries are pretty much all seedy and I can't seem to bring myself to like them.

Nerocite
2011-04-09, 08:34 PM
Chicken Liver- To me it tasted like wood.
Boiled Cabbage- Slimy and nasty.
Yogurt-covered pretzels- Make me gag.

SaintRidley
2011-04-09, 09:09 PM
I thought this (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sY_Yf4zz-yo) was the proper method of cooking Swedish meatballs.

And here I thought this was how the Swedes did it. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C8Wu3Bps9ic)

zephyrkinetic
2011-04-09, 09:18 PM
My Mom's from NH, my Dad's from GA.

For anyone who's not familiar with American geography or regional culture: this essentially means that my parents grew up eating completely disparate foods.

Well, my mom tried to make sweet potato pie (pronounced "pataytuh pah") for Thanksgiving one year.

...

What? That's it. That's enough of that story. Let's not go back to that place.

Keveak
2011-04-10, 02:01 AM
And here I thought this was how the Swedes did it. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C8Wu3Bps9ic)

That's the same one as he was responding to...

Besides, it's obvious that real Scandinavians just eat it raw after fighting down a boar barehandedly. :smalltongue:

SaintRidley
2011-04-10, 02:06 AM
That's the same one as he was responding to...

Besides, it's obvious that real Scandinavians just eat it raw after fighting down a boar barehandedly. :smalltongue:

I didn't see the original posting of the Muppet Swedish chef, only the quotation.

Whoops.

lesser_minion
2011-04-10, 06:37 AM
I'm pretty sure 90s school dinners qualify for any list of horrible foodstuffs (in fact, there is evidence that British schoolchildren ate better during the rationing era).

Highlights included assorted 'novelty' meat products of unknown provenance, powdered mashed potato, watery green slime that was ostensibly mint custard, and chips that were probably first cooked six months previously.

I'm told that things did improve in the 21st century, although by that point, I'd started skipping lunch altogether.

Anuan
2011-04-10, 07:21 AM
Vegemite. - After having Vegemite toast Microwaved I have never eaten the stuff ever again... except for the next case...


Why would you do th-




Spaghetti made with Vegemite as a substitute for spices. - Mum ran out of spices, used Vegemite... this is the only time she has ever cooked anything bad.


WHY WOULD YOU DO THAAATTT D8




Woolworth's home-brand peanut butter. - I swear they put chalk in this stuff.
My Sister's Boyfriend's cooking. His cooking is so bad that I want to punch him in the throat. He has me convinced that the English can't cook.
Corned Beef. *Nom-nom-no----* *vomit*
Shellfish... I can only describe this terrible sub-group of meat as umami with a distinctly overpowering bitter aftertaste.



I havn't tried it.
So very few of them can, partly because English cuisine is mostly terrible (loveyouguyspleasedontkillme). Luckily, the few that played a major part in my life were pretty decent. One of them, in fact, was really good.
I'm with you on this. The only way I can handle Corned Meat is chopped up fairly small and cooked into fritters with other stuff, with lots of salt and tomato sauce.
Yeah, I'm not big on seafood in general, but the only acceptable form of shellfish is deepfried oysters with a litre of good tartare sauce and eaten quick enough to not taste anything past the grease, crumb and sauce.


Worst thing I've ever eaten? I had a pickled oyster once, was pretty terrible. I'll have to think about this...

I had some really off steak once that made me quite sick, but...Nothing's really sticking out in my memory.

Skeppio
2011-04-10, 07:29 AM
The worst food I ever ate? Corned Beef. I swear that stuff is so vile, it beats out the time I accidently drank detergent (someone had stored detergent in a cup identical to the one i always drank out of, so I grabbed it and drank without even looking :smallredface:).

Blech, corned beef..... I'm feeling ill just mentioning it. :smallyuk:

Oh, and chicken loaf. You could not pay me to eat that stuff. Or even inhale in the same room as it. It smells like death and tastes just as foul. :smallyuk:

Dreager_Ex
2011-04-10, 08:47 AM
I once ate a raw habanero on a dare. Yeah it sucked going down and was even worse an hour later.

I'm not an adventurous kind of person so I can't really say I've tried anything unique :P but at the same time I eat a lot of things most other people don't so idk.

Solaris
2011-04-10, 12:44 PM
EDIT: Oh, and bloody steak. I love steak, but if it's not at least medium-rare, I'm going to gag.

You are a communist, a heretic, and a blasphemer. Properly done, not only should a steak be bloody, it should still have a pulse. Alternatively, it should be allowed to ripen for a hot minute (I buy the steaks that are just about to expire for a reason), beaten by a violent person with anger management issues before being seasoned and marinaded, and finally dragged over the grill once or twice before being brought over to my plate.

There is only one food I know of that I can't stand. And before I go into this too far, I want to explain that I have a cast-iron stomach and the ability to consume things most people would gag at the mere scent of. This includes carrion - I boil it, season the hell out of it (I'm the only guy I know who brings a seasoning shaker out to the field) then I eat it as quickly as I can. It tastes like hatred for all life, by the way. But there's a food so disgusting, so vile, and so unnatural that the mere taste of it can cause me to vomit. I can swallow 'em whole, and have done so (when your only other option is 'go hungry'...), but if I break those little sinspawned vegetables open inside my mouth it's all comin' out.

Peas.
They are the incarnation of evil.

SaintRidley
2011-04-10, 03:55 PM
I don't think I could ever go anywhere near hákarl.

pffh
2011-04-10, 05:56 PM
I don't think I could ever go anywhere near hákarl.

But it´s so delicious.

Jack Squat
2011-04-10, 09:37 PM
Peas.
They are the incarnation of evil.

I thought you were going to say veggie omelet MREs.

dehro
2011-04-11, 02:37 AM
I am sometimes baffled at the levels of depravity one's national cuisine is treated with in other nations...

I remember having spaghetti in L.A. once... (don't ask me why, I don't remember).. and the cook put ketchup instead of half a decent tomato sauce on top of them... shudder..
also, in San Francisco we went for indonesian food and instead of Ketjap (essentially soy sauce) we got served stuff with ketchup by the "too well integrated" indonesian guy who ran the place.
yet another time: somewhere in the Yosemite National Park there's a pizza place that proudly boasts "we've been making pizza since *enter year really far away in the past" ..so we gave it a try, some 20 years ago. we got served... a loaf of half cooked bread dough, topped with some sort of milk derivate that I hesitate to call cheese and, you guessed it, Ketchup! (seriously, guys, what is it with you and ketchup?).. of course we had half a bite and left the place, considering whether we should write underneath their "boast" that they still hadn't learned how to make a decent pizza.
on a "bright" note, about a week after our passing through the park, most of it burned down in a summer fire..I can only hope the accursed place was taken out by the flames too.

in my 3 years in England I can't say I've ever had a pizza that tasted anything above mediocre or didn't give me stomach ache for being either undercooked or simply badly executed...admittedly, after a handful of experiments I stopped trying to find a good pizza.

Lady Tialait
2011-04-11, 02:42 AM
*snip*
in my 3 years in England I can't say I've ever had a pizza that tasted anything above mediocre or didn't give me stomach ache for being either undercooked or simply badly executed...admittedly, after a handful of experiments I stopped trying to find a good pizza.

Make your own Pizza, Pizza should be created by the comsumer, it is simply better that way.

As for the Ketchup thing....trust me....you have no idea how wrong that stuff gets. I have seen Ketchup Ice Cream, Ketchup flavored (Insert impossible thing here)....seriously.

copycatloki
2011-04-11, 04:25 AM
Huh, the first time in a running sushi bar, I saw this bamboo bowl with a white liquid in it which I assumed to be coconut milk. It was not. So I take a mouthful of it...which instantly made my brain scream "ABORT! SPIT IT OUT! SPIT IT OUT!" so I had to actually force myself to swallow it instead of spraying it all over the table and the person sitting opposite to me. After swallowing it and inspecting the inside of this...let's call it "soup"...I found...strange transparent tiny tasteless balls in it...looking back, I believe another person on the table claimed it to be coconut milk as I was pushing the bowl far away from me...I still doubt it, not that it matters, never tried it again.



Peas.
They are the incarnation of evil.

My sister would agree you there. XD

Eldan
2011-04-11, 04:56 AM
Make your own Pizza, Pizza should be created by the comsumer, it is simply better that way.

As for the Ketchup thing....trust me....you have no idea how wrong that stuff gets. I have seen Ketchup Ice Cream, Ketchup flavored (Insert impossible thing here)....seriously.

Blech. Ketchup has no business in serious food.

Serpentine
2011-04-11, 05:06 AM
Peas.
They are the incarnation of evil.My Boy agrees with you. I don't understand it :smallconfused:
But then, he thinks they're orange, so I think his opinion can safely be disregarded :smalltongue:

Teddy
2011-04-11, 05:24 AM
My Boy agrees with you. I don't understand it :smallconfused:
But then, he thinks they're orange, so I think his opinion can safely be disregarded :smalltongue:

He's color blind, right?

Serpentine
2011-04-11, 05:25 AM
Yep.
He thought that "eat your greens" was meant ironically.

dehro
2011-04-11, 05:52 AM
Yep.
He thought that "eat your greens" was meant ironically.

oooh, I would have so much fun with that..
and yeah..I love peas..so...:smallconfused:

Innis Cabal
2011-04-11, 06:02 AM
Beans Cake in a Can easily takes the....cake...Thank "It Came from a Can" for putting the idea in my head. It was a mix of salt and vomit that I will never dare try again.

Serpentine
2011-04-11, 06:56 AM
Goats milk! Goats milk and fricking duck! That weird musky musty taste of rotting metal, it's in goats milk (and goat fetta) and duck.
For funsies, I bought some goat milk to try. I made myself a Milo with it, and... bam. Icky musky musty taste. Not as strong as in the duck, but still very much present and too strong for me to finish my Milo. My housemate, on the other hand, can't taste anything at all out of the ordinary.
Whhhyyyyyyyyy :frown:

Other person who could taste it: you should go do an experiment, get some duck and something made out of goat milk.

Kain05
2011-04-11, 07:30 AM
Italian food ... yes, Italian food as a whole with very few exceptions, such as thin pizza, bread, salad and coffee. Things like lasagna and spaghetti and fetuccini make me vomit. Pretty much anything italian food with sauce.

Eldan
2011-04-11, 07:39 AM
My Boy agrees with you. I don't understand it :smallconfused:
But then, he thinks they're orange, so I think his opinion can safely be disregarded :smalltongue:

Well, orange peas do exist. You can make a pretty good soup from them.

Timberwolf
2011-04-11, 07:43 AM
My brother's Mushroom soup that he made in school cooking lessons, the only food I have ever thrown up from. Also his courgettes.

Running my brother a close second is the... thing my housemate made a couple of days ago. Despite larding it with all the spices he had and having several nice vegetables in it, he still managed to make it taste of precisely nothing.

Serpentine
2011-04-11, 08:02 AM
Well, orange peas do exist. You can make a pretty good soup from them.Not so much, you know, green peas.

Keveak
2011-04-11, 08:07 AM
I am sometimes baffled at the levels of depravity one's national cuisine is treated with in other nations...

I remember having spaghetti in L.A. once... (don't ask me why, I don't remember).. and the cook put ketchup instead of half a decent tomato sauce on top of them... shudder..
also, in San Francisco we went for indonesian food and instead of Ketjap (essentially soy sauce) we got served stuff with ketchup by the "too well integrated" indonesian guy who ran the place.
yet another time: somewhere in the Yosemite National Park there's a pizza place that proudly boasts "we've been making pizza since *enter year really far away in the past" ..so we gave it a try, some 20 years ago. we got served... a loaf of half cooked bread dough, topped with some sort of milk derivate that I hesitate to call cheese and, you guessed it, Ketchup! (seriously, guys, what is it with you and ketchup?).. of course we had half a bite and left the place, considering whether we should write underneath their "boast" that they still hadn't learned how to make a decent pizza.
on a "bright" note, about a week after our passing through the park, most of it burned down in a summer fire..I can only hope the accursed place was taken out by the flames too.

in my 3 years in England I can't say I've ever had a pizza that tasted anything above mediocre or didn't give me stomach ache for being either undercooked or simply badly executed...admittedly, after a handful of experiments I stopped trying to find a good pizza.

Never go to Denmark, then.

Spaghetti is always with ketchup here (unless it's with meat-sauce, but that's a lot fancier) and most homemade pizzas I've seen are made with it as well.

Tastes pretty good unless someone with as ruined a sense of smell as my dad make it, then it's just a metallic-tasting soup of ketchup with the occasional spaghetti piece in it. >_<

SaintRidley
2011-04-11, 08:08 AM
Italian food ... yes, Italian food as a whole with very few exceptions, such as thin pizza, bread, salad and coffee. Things like lasagna and spaghetti and fetuccini make me vomit. Pretty much anything italian food with sauce.

I find that very sad. If I could subsist on Italian alone, I would.



Vegetables on the whole (excepting corn and pumpkin pie if it counts) simply displease me at the best.

Keveak, is there a particular reason ketchup is used for pasta sauces over there?

Solaris
2011-04-11, 10:09 AM
I thought you were going to say veggie omelet MREs.

No, that one I can eat. I don't necessarily like it, but I can eat it.
Plus, y'know, it has the advantage of being fun to make the new kids eat. Peas don't make nearly so much a fun torture device unless you're feeding them to me, and that runs rather counter to the purpose of my tormenting someone for fun.


As for the Ketchup thing....trust me....you have no idea how wrong that stuff gets. I have seen Ketchup Ice Cream, Ketchup flavored (Insert impossible thing here)....seriously.

Ketchup-flavored potato chips seem to be big in Iraq. Not among the people (so far as I know, I didn't exactly live daily life with 'em), just among the folks the Army buys our chow from. It's bizarre, 'cause I've never seen them elsewhere.

Teddy
2011-04-11, 10:18 AM
Keveak, is there a particular reason ketchup is used for pasta sauces over there?

It's more or less the same thing over here in Sweden (except, perhaps, for the pizzas). I think it's just a tradition thing. Also, ketchup contains quite a lot of sugar, so it's easier feeding your children "strange" foodstuff if you pour ketchup on it. Afterwards, it just sticks.

I, myself, pour ketchup on more or less all starch except for pasta (I do pour it in the sauce for spaghetti bolognese, though) which makes me go quite against the norm.

Keveak
2011-04-11, 10:28 AM
Keveak, is there a particular reason ketchup is used for pasta sauces over there?

Cultural and historical factors, I presume. Best guess I have is that ketchup was easy and cheap to aquire during the poor times after the war and just became traditional afterwards. :smallsmile:

I honestly wonder more about why Americans put ham on theirs.

But it's probably just because it's easier than mixing a sauce yourself and Danish cuisine is more foccused on stuff like Danish meatballs and liver paté than on pasta. ^_^'

Still love pasta, though. Italian culture really did a good job with their cuisine, as opposed to Danish culture. We just ate everything and put gravy on it if it tasted bad. :smalltongue:

Kain05
2011-04-11, 10:35 AM
I find that very sad. If I could subsist on Italian alone, I would.



Vegetables on the whole (excepting corn and pumpkin pie if it counts) simply displease me at the best.

Keveak, is there a particular reason ketchup is used for pasta sauces over there?

I find it sad as well since Italian food does look good, but sadly even the smell makes me sick. On another point you would be suprised how many times I have heard "You never tried it they way I make it then" and I still didn't like it.

Hmm, I have never had pasta made with ketchup though ... too bad I'm not a big fan of ketchup either, or tomato soup (which is only watered down ketchup anyways) And before anyone mentions it, I love tomatoes, i will sit and eat a tomato sandwich, it's even better with a little mayo and some raw onions, mmmmm.

And I'm with you 100% on pumpkin pie, I hate that too.

Yora
2011-04-11, 10:38 AM
Now I really want to put some noodles into a pot and get some ketchup.
It's such a very sad sight, but sometimes so very tasty.

"danish cuisine" *snicker* :smallwink:

Goats milk! Goats milk and fricking duck! That weird musky musty taste of rotting metal, it's in goats milk (and goat fetta) and duck.
Goats are the wonderous animals that have the miraculous ability to make anything made from them smell bad. If it once smelled like goat, it will always smell like goat. :smallbiggrin:

SaintRidley
2011-04-11, 10:44 AM
And I'm with you 100% on pumpkin pie, I hate that too.


Actually, corn and pumpkin pie make up pretty much all of my vegetable intake. I love pumpkin pie.


Cultural and historical factors, I presume. Best guess I have is that ketchup was easy and cheap to aquire during the poor times after the war and just became traditional afterwards.

I honestly wonder more about why Americans put ham on theirs.

That makes sense.

We do what? I mean, I've thrown strips of bacon into a slowcooker full of sauce a couple times to infuse the sauce with bacony goodness, but I've never heard of anybody over here putting ham on spaghetti.

Yora
2011-04-11, 10:46 AM
I think the worst thing that I can remember having actually eaten is nori. It's sea weed cardbox. Pretty much tastes like that.

Serpentine
2011-04-11, 11:05 AM
Goats are the wonderous animals that have the miraculous ability to make anything made from them smell bad. If it once smelled like goat, it will always smell like goat. :smallbiggrin:It's not that. It's this weird taste thing I mentioned before that I find absolutely foul, but which noone else can taste. For instance, that Milo I mentioned? My housemate drank it, and thought it just tasted of normal milk.

Keveak
2011-04-11, 11:44 AM
We do what? I mean, I've thrown strips of bacon into a slowcooker full of sauce a couple times to infuse the sauce with bacony goodness, but I've never heard of anybody over here putting ham on spaghetti.

They do where Rae Artemi lives, but I guess I was a bit too general. Sorry. ^_^'

Eldan
2011-04-11, 11:49 AM
Sure you add bacon to spaghetti sauce. Carbonara (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbonara), as an example. I forgot what tomato and bacon was called.

SaintRidley
2011-04-11, 11:54 AM
Ah. I just use meat-heavy red sauce, often with whole chicken breasts or pork chops too.

I've put steaks in before, too.

Jack Squat
2011-04-11, 01:25 PM
No, that one I can eat. I don't necessarily like it, but I can eat it.
Plus, y'know, it has the advantage of being fun to make the new kids eat. Peas don't make nearly so much a fun torture device unless you're feeding them to me, and that runs rather counter to the purpose of my tormenting someone for fun.

Fair enough - I couldn't get past the aftertaste when I had one, but I also was 3 steps away from a pantry full of delicious snacks; so it was hardly something I was relying on for sustenance.

I now just keep them around for when people I camp with forget to pack meals. At the least, I've never had someone forget to pack food after that :smalltongue:



Ketchup-flavored potato chips seem to be big in Iraq. Not among the people (so far as I know, I didn't exactly live daily life with 'em), just among the folks the Army buys our chow from. It's bizarre, 'cause I've never seen them elsewhere.

My store carries them, Herr's (http://www.herrs.com/products/Chips/Ketchup.html) to be exact. Never had them, but if it's anywhere near the quality of their baby back ribs or horseradish cheddar ones, I can't imagine them being bad.

pffh
2011-04-11, 01:41 PM
I just took a bite of a hard boiled egg. Look down and see two black hard stone like things in the yolk. So was that a fetus or just some weird bad egg because those were recently bought.

Jack Squat
2011-04-11, 01:56 PM
They're blood spots. Could've been from a fertilized egg, could've just been from something causing the hen to bleed a bit during the formation of the egg. Either way, not going to kill you.

dehro
2011-04-11, 03:15 PM
I find that very sad. If I could subsist on Italian alone, I would.

newsflash, you actually can :smallwink: 60 million people manage to :smallbiggrin:


Eldan, you're thinking about Amatriciana sauce

kain05... you are weird:smallsmile: (but I like weird, lol)

and yes, I can't help but think that if you came to Italy for a week or two you'd find plenty of things to your taste.


bias against one or the other national cuisine aside, I find that very often not liking something derives from being exposed to a very bad rendition of it.
for instance, I had a friend in england who'd come around to have dinner and watch a movie (we'd alternate the place, once at my place and once at her's etc)..one day I made some simple pasta as a side dish to fish, (which isn't a very italian way to use pasta, but what the hell..when in Rome..).. meaning small pasta with basically nothing in it except a little butter and sage.
she was totally amazed by the taste, and asked me what I'd done to it..

as it turned out, when she makes pasta "in bianco" (literally meaning "in white", by which we understand it has no real sauce on it) she actually never put anything on it, barely salting the water during cooking.. I was equally gobsmacked that she'd been eating that sticky mess for her entire life.

Solaris
2011-04-11, 07:33 PM
Fair enough - I couldn't get past the aftertaste when I had one, but I also was 3 steps away from a pantry full of delicious snacks; so it was hardly something I was relying on for sustenance.

I'm pretty sure my taste buds committed mass suicide. My standards are pretty much, to the exclusion of peas, "If I don't have to fight somethin' bigger than me, I'm gonna eat it".


I now just keep them around for when people I camp with forget to pack meals. At the least, I've never had someone forget to pack food after that :smalltongue:

That's frikkin' awesome. I approve.


My store carries them, Herr's (http://www.herrs.com/products/Chips/Ketchup.html) to be exact. Never had them, but if it's anywhere near the quality of their baby back ribs or horseradish cheddar ones, I can't imagine them being bad.

They really weren't bad, just different. Took a little getting used to, but once you did they were certainly edible - and not just by my standards, either.


bias against one or the other national cuisine aside, I find that very often not liking something derives from being exposed to a very bad rendition of it.
for instance, I had a friend in england who'd come around to have dinner and watch a movie (we'd alternate the place, once at my place and once at her's etc)..one day I made some simple pasta as a side dish to fish, (which isn't a very italian way to use pasta, but what the hell..when in Rome..).. meaning small pasta with basically nothing in it except a little butter and sage.
she was totally amazed by the taste, and asked me what I'd done to it..

as it turned out, when she makes pasta "in bianco" (literally meaning "in white", by which we understand it has no real sauce on it) she actually never put anything on it, barely salting the water during cooking.. I was equally gobsmacked that she'd been eating that sticky mess for her entire life.

I remain convinced that English cuisine is secretly a national penance. For what, I don't know - but they must've done something awful to deserve their food.

RebelRogue
2011-04-11, 08:49 PM
Never go to Denmark, then.

Spaghetti is always with ketchup here (unless it's with meat-sauce, but that's a lot fancier) and most homemade pizzas I've seen are made with it as well.
Pasta and ketchup is a staple dish for poor students, but do other people really eat it like that? It's very much something you only eat because you cannot afford real food. That said, ketchup is often served along with spaghetti 'bolognese' (no italian would ever approve of labelling it as such). Also, a lot of people here eat their fries with ketchup. To me that's heresy: The one true condiment for fries is remoulade (piccalilly mixed with mayo)!

As for homemade pizza, I've never used ketchup for that. As a mimnimum, I use canned tomato puree, and if I'm not too busy, I cook up a tomato sauce myself.

Lemonus
2011-04-11, 09:31 PM
I really don't like rock candy. I had it once on a trip to Plymouth, Massachusets, and I had it on the way back. For about two weeks after the trip, I was (literally) throwing up all day every other day. I dunno if it's actually the candy's fault, (it still made me feel a bit queasy) but I still don't like rock candy for what happened after I ate it.

nixxieraindrop
2011-04-11, 09:36 PM
Mostly-rare steak is the only food I have ever had that has made me gag. I politely ate it, considering it was the first meal I had with my then future husband's parents, made by his father... But it tasted of platelets, and that's just not okay with me.

Keveak
2011-04-12, 12:10 AM
Pasta and ketchup is a staple dish for poor students, but do other people really eat it like that? It's very much something you only eat because you cannot afford real food. That said, ketchup is often served along with spaghetti 'bolognese' (no italian would ever approve of labelling it as such). Also, a lot of people here eat their fries with ketchup. To me that's heresy: The one true condiment for fries is remoulade (piccalilly mixed with mayo)!

As for homemade pizza, I've never used ketchup for that. As a mimnimum, I use canned tomato puree, and if I'm not too busy, I cook up a tomato sauce myself.

My family certainly does, and it's very tasty.

We do eat the meat-sauce variant quite often as well. ^_^'

Chips (Yay, British name!) with remoulade are quite hard to get at McDonbald's, which I presume is why most people eat them with ketchup. Ignoring personal preference, of course.

It's pretty good, the taste of metal completely disappears when the pizza is baked. :smallsmile:

Yora
2011-04-12, 07:32 AM
I really don't like rock candy. I had it once on a trip to Plymouth, Massachusets, and I had it on the way back. For about two weeks after the trip, I was (literally) throwing up all day every other day. I dunno if it's actually the candy's fault, (it still made me feel a bit queasy) but I still don't like rock candy for what happened after I ate it.
I once ate about 30 to 40 walnuts in two days. Because they are so tasty.

Now I know the symptoms of zinc overdose. :smallbiggrin:

Hadn't had any desire to eat walnuts since.

Black_Pants_Guy
2011-04-12, 11:29 AM
So very few of them can, partly because English cuisine is mostly terrible (loveyouguyspleasedontkillme).


Yes, probably explains why they seem to adopt the good foods from the rest of the UK and Ireland as their own.

Quirinus_Obsidian
2011-04-12, 01:08 PM
Any sort of soft cheese; like cottage, brie, etc. The texture is just abhorrent. Plus the smell just makes me violently ill. I can only stand firm cheeses; like swiss, super insane sharp cheddar, and monterey jack. This goes for sour cream too <shudder>.

Anything with a heavy sugar taste. Pure sugar frosting, heavy milk chocolate, etc. Don't get me wrong, I love chocolate; but it needs to be a low sugar / dark chocolate.

Speaking of violently ill, anchovy bits and pieces in marinara sauce. There is a place nearby my home that makes their sauce with it. Sooooo disgusting. Plus the fact that I am allergic to shellfish adds to the bleeech factor. That's probably *why* it makes me so sick. The smell of any kind of fish; whether it's cooked, uncooked, fresh or aged, makes me heave.

Lastly, anything remotely related to raw meat like carpaccio, sushi (see above: allergy) or sashimi just gives me dry heaves. Which is odd, because I LOVE red meat that is just cooked to being safe to eat; which usually means it's still mooing. Sausage of any kind also puts me off. It's not so much the texture, it's the melding of flavors and the statement: "natural casing". Makes me think of nothing but chitlins or haggis. <shudder x2>.