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Pika...
2011-03-31, 12:01 AM
I have wondered this for years. Do you technically have a birthday only once every four years? For example are you four years old when you have the body of a sixteen year old?

Must be awful getting gifts only once every four years. :smalleek:

Strawberries
2011-03-31, 12:04 AM
I have wondered this for years. Do you technically have a birthday only once every four years? For example are you four years old when you have the body of a sixteen year old?

Must be awful getting gifts only once every four years. :smalleek:

You just celebrate on the first of March. That's what a friend of mine does,anyway.

Blisstake
2011-03-31, 12:04 AM
This is why I celebrate my birthday on March 1st...

Lady Moreta
2011-03-31, 12:05 AM
Yeah, I'd either celebrate the 28th Feb or the 1st March - and then try to wrangle an extra-big celebration every four years :smallbiggrin:

Worira
2011-03-31, 12:05 AM
You actually age four times slower than a regular person. This is the secret to becoming a true Kung Fu Master, as the maximum proficiency requires a quarter-century of training.

Amiel
2011-03-31, 12:09 AM
You get older quickly; by the time everyone else is 25, you'll be 100; because each leap year adds x4 extra years to your age. You would've also discovered the secret to longevity.

Coidzor
2011-03-31, 12:10 AM
You become a year older from the date of your birth on march first when it's not a leap year unless my figuring is wrong. But, really, it's up to the parents whether they want it in February or March or to stiff the kid of having a birthday for three years out of four.

Nothing legal cares about you making it to your birthday in order to age up. Just that your date of birth is known and your general age, which is not dependent upon hitting your birthday anyway, it's dependent upon years lived post-birth, since very few people care about the duration of one's gestation period.

Thufir
2011-03-31, 12:12 AM
Pirates of Penzance is what happens.

Serpentine
2011-03-31, 12:24 AM
Pirates of Penzance is what happens.Curses, beat me to it. I'm doing it anyway.


Well, if I've learnt anything from Pirates of Penzance...

rakkoon
2011-03-31, 08:12 AM
Let's third that
A paradox,
A most ingenious paradox!
We’ve quips and quibbles heard in flocks,
But none to beat this paradox!

Death, your friend the Reaper
2011-03-31, 09:01 AM
You also develop a affinity for hurdles

Orzel
2011-03-31, 09:57 AM
"I can't date you anyway. You are only 6, leap year girl."

The Rose Dragon
2011-03-31, 10:00 AM
Legally? Nothing different than if you were born on the 1st of March on a leap year.

Socially? Whatever you want to happen. You can joke you age slower than other people, have your birthday parties on the 1st of March or 28th of April on non-leap years, or anything you like.

Biologically? Your day of birth doesn't matter as much as how your cells divide (in number of division, kind of division and place of division).

Telonius
2011-03-31, 10:21 AM
If that happens, you should try to meet up with people who were born a few seconds before Daylight Savings Time ends. (For an hour, they were actually born before they were alive!)

SlyGuyMcFly
2011-03-31, 10:47 AM
What happens is that you have an always-available conversation topic.

Blisstake
2011-03-31, 11:51 AM
Biologically? Your day of birth doesn't matter as much as how your cells divide (in number of division, kind of division and place of division).

Now that's just what they want you to think.

MoonCat
2011-03-31, 11:59 AM
Your birth-day technically doesn't exist except once every four years. But you always age a year, just the day after. And I don't think people would not celebrate your birthday, it's like having a party on a different day.

Muz
2011-03-31, 04:33 PM
Aht moins yar fooked!

(Don't mind me, I'm ill.)

onthetown
2011-03-31, 05:59 PM
Actually... your birth day does happen... It's just not labeled in the same human terms for three years out of four. So either March 1st or February 28th really is your birthday, since it's the year after your last aging-up.

Gwyn chan 'r Gwyll
2011-03-31, 09:14 PM
You become immortal.

That is all. No big deal.

Dr.Epic
2011-03-31, 09:38 PM
You become immortal.

That is all. No big deal.

Unless someone cuts your head off. But why would you want to live to see the Quickening? That sequel was awful!:smallmad:

pffh
2011-04-03, 07:25 PM
Unless someone cuts your head off. But why would you want to live to see the Quickening? That sequel was awful!:smallmad:

What are you talking about? A sequel? There was never a sequel you must be thinking of some other movie.

Amiel
2011-04-03, 09:13 PM
Unless someone cuts your head off. But why would you want to live to see the Quickening? That sequel was awful!:smallmad:

Sans head is no detriment to existence; chickens can thrive without their heads.

Kobold-Bard
2011-04-04, 07:40 AM
Yeah, I'd either celebrate the 28th Feb or the 1st March - and then try to wrangle an extra-big celebration every four years :smallbiggrin:

This sounds about right. Claim the sympathy vote because you only get a "real" birthday every four years.

KuReshtin
2011-04-04, 07:55 AM
In Sweden, the leap day in a leap year used to be the 24th of February, and not the 29th.
That meant that the 29th of February was actually the 28th, only a day later, so the celebrations should have been on the 28th of February on non-leap years.

They changed that in 2000, though, so now, the leap day is on the 29th of February.

I kind of liked the old way, cause it confused the heck out of people, and it was a commonly used quiz question, since a lot of people figured that the leap day was on the 29th. :smallbiggrin::smallwink:

Yora
2011-04-04, 03:50 PM
What happens if you are born on a leap-day?
People will makes jokes about your birthday for all your life.

:smallwink: