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averagejoe
2011-04-04, 12:14 AM
For those who don't know, onomatopoeia are words that imitates the sound that it describes. A prominent category of onomatopoeia would be words for animal sounds (quack, meow, neigh, etc.) but there are a lot of other common ones (knock knock, ding dong, buzz, pitter patter, etc.)

So I was watching a TV program not in English, and was thinking about how neat it is to see onomatopoeia in other languages. They aren't words that will always be immediately understandable, but after you get what they mean there's always kind of a, "Yeah, I can see that," reaction. Different languages describing the same sound is completely fascinating to me.

Basically, what I'm asking is for any non-English onomatopoeia that you playgrounders might know. They don't need to be really exotic ones (a la Don Martin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Don_Martin_%28cartoonist%29)) and they don't need to be otherwise notable or weird (such as, they're the same in multiple languages, or other such coincidences); in fact, I'd most likely prefer that they aren't. Just post some common, everyday use onomatopoeia and an explaination of what the words describe.

English speakers feel free to post some of your favorites, of course, but that's obviously less neat to me!

Serpentine
2011-04-04, 12:31 AM
Well, there's this (http://www.cracked.com/article_18615_the-horse-goes-vrinsk21-6-noises-foreign-languages-suck-at.html). But also tangenitally relevant is the translation of Jabberwocky into other languages (http://www76.pair.com/keithlim/jabberwocky/translations/index.html).

Strawberries
2011-04-04, 12:34 AM
Off the top of my head, in Italian:

Pigolare: To chirp
Gracchiare: To croak
Squittire: To squeak
Ronfare: To snore
Muggire: To moo
Ticchettare: To tick
Cinguettare: To tweet

Kumori
2011-04-04, 12:35 AM
Japanese has tons of these... I personally have difficulty remembering them though, so I'm gonna go see if I can dig up a list.

Edit: nope, can't find an adequate list right now.

Innis Cabal
2011-04-04, 12:38 AM
Mouse goes Chu Chu in Japanese. As well as the frog going Koro Koro.

The NL has Blaf for dog barking.

Sarco_Phage
2011-04-04, 12:39 AM
Here's some Tagalog ones.

Quack - kwak kwak
Bark - Ow Ow
Rat Squeak - tsik tsik
Rooster Crow - tiktilaok
Meow - meow meow
Sneeze - Atsing/Haching

And so on...

Katana_Geldar
2011-04-04, 12:40 AM
I love reading Tintin comics in French, as the onomatapoeia is rather funny.

Knocking on a door: Tok tok
Bullets: Pan! Pan!

Serpentine
2011-04-04, 12:42 AM
Squittire: To squeakThat one sounds so... dapper.

Strawberries
2011-04-04, 12:46 AM
Here's some Tagalog ones.
Rooster Crow - tiktilaok

Oooh, we say "Chicchirichė!" for the sound the rooster makes.

Also, other sounds the animals make:

Cat: Miao
Dog: Bau
Mouse: Squit Squit
Donkey: ih oh, ih oh, ih ho!
Chick: pio pio.

And a lot of others!

araveugnitsuga
2011-04-04, 12:54 AM
Oooh, we say "Chicchirichė!" for the sound the rooster makes.

Also, other sounds the animals make:

Cat: Miao
Dog: Bau
Mouse: Squit Squit
Donkey: ih oh, ih oh, ih ho!
Chick: pio pio.

And a lot of others!

Italian onomatopoeias are also extremely similar to Spanish ones.
Cat: Miau
Dog: Guau
Mouse: Squeak
Donkey: Ih oh ih oh
Chick: Pio Pio
Sheep: Beh or Meh

Coughing: Cof Cof
Hitting: Pum pum
Train: Chu Chu
The sound made by the drum and the cymbal after a bad joke: Barum Cha

Katana_Geldar
2011-04-04, 12:56 AM
In Japan, cats go nya nya

SilentNight
2011-04-04, 01:03 AM
If my memory serves me, koro koro is also the sound an acorn rolling down a hill makes in Japanese.

Other ones I remember:
Dog: Wan wan
Frog: Gero gero
Hm, a year off from studying the language has been worse than I thought, oh dear.

Amiel
2011-04-04, 02:37 AM
In Mandarin (especially in Taiwanese Mandarin):
Dogs are gou gou
Cats are mao mao
Mums are ma ma
Dads are ba ba

Mathis
2011-04-04, 04:30 AM
In Norwegian:
For dogs barking: Voff Voff
Cats meowing: Mjau (usually drawn out vocals)

To snore: Snorke
To be in pain(Ow): Au

There are tons others, I just don't have time this close to my classes. Will edit in more later!

LCR
2011-04-04, 05:00 AM
German:

plantschen - to splash
summen - to hum


and lots more I can't think of right now.

Haruki-kun
2011-04-04, 10:41 AM
In Spanish, bullets are "pum". The U is pronounced like "oo" in English.

For some reason, a frog's croaking is a bit pokemonish... it sounds like the name of the animal "Rana" :smalltongue:. If you say it in a croaky voice itmakes sense, I guess.

averagejoe
2011-04-04, 11:08 AM
If my memory serves me, koro koro is also the sound an acorn rolling down a hill makes in Japanese.

That's... very specific.

Haruki-kun
2011-04-04, 11:14 AM
That's... very specific.

:smalltongue:

Also, in Japanese "Pika Pika" is the sound of thunder.

And as has been already mentioned, Chu is the sound a mouse makes, so....

Strawberries
2011-04-04, 11:19 AM
In Mandarin (especially in Taiwanese Mandarin):
Mums are ma ma
Dads are ba ba

Ehi, in Italian mums are mamma and dads are papā (or babbo)...who'd have thought?

Also, a bell (expecially a church bell) is Din Don Dan
a train is ciuff! ciuff!
a bullet is bam! bam!
a trumpet (expecially an annoying one) is perepereperč! :smallwink:

averagejoe
2011-04-04, 11:22 AM
Ehi, in Italian mums are mamma and dads are papā (or babbo)...who'd have thought?

Actually, this is really common. (http://www.qwantz.com/index.php?comic=1581) (Also they're not onomatopoeia, but it's all good, learning foreign words is still cool!)

Mary Leathert
2011-04-04, 03:14 PM
Yay, a change to spread the joys of Finnish.

Animals are the easiest.
Dog:hau or vuh (verb: haukkua)
Cat:miau (Verb: maukua)
Cow:ammuu or just muu (Verb: ammua)
Horse: ihahaa (Verb: hirnua)
Sheep:Bää (Verb: määkiä)
Pig:Röh (Verb:röhkiä)
Owl: huhuu (Verb: huhuilla)
****: kukkokiekuu (Verb:kiekua)

Others.
Growl: mur (Verb:murista)
Knock: kop (Verb:koputtaa)
Rustle: rapi (Verb:rapista)

Train: tsuu-tsuu

And the list goes on, but these came to my mind easily.

Mauve Shirt
2011-04-04, 03:28 PM
I think bullets go "Peng!" in German.

Yora
2011-04-04, 03:38 PM
They do.
Except automatics, those go ratta-ratta-ratta-ratta. As do trains.
Also, a toddler-term for dogs is "Wau-Wau".
"Miez" for cat is quite common.

"Knacks" is a small fracture.
"Watschen" means to slap in some regional dialects, with the -en sufix designating it as a verb.
"Klötern" is the sound of small hard things in a metal can, with the -ern suffix designating a verb used as a noun.
"Platsch" means splash, but can be used as a noun in the same way.
And a gong makes gong, but I think that's the same in english.

a trumpet (expecially an annoying one) is perepereperč! :smallwink:In german is Träteräterä, but that's a rather uncommon word.
Something entirely else is a Tröte. Remember the last football world cup? South Afrikans love Tröten.
Though I have recently learned that a Tröte is actually an historical musical instrument. If we're feeling a little bit mean, we use it for all small brass instruments.

Glass Mouse
2011-04-04, 04:47 PM
Well, there's this (http://www.cracked.com/article_18615_the-horse-goes-vrinsk21-6-noises-foreign-languages-suck-at.html).

It makes me happy that there are two Danish words on that list :smallbiggrin:

Ideas for the list below are shamefully stolen from the rest of you.

Animals
Dog: Vuf
Cat: Miav
Frog: Kvæk kvæk
Cow: Muh
Sheep: Mæh
Pig: Øf
Horse: Vrinsk
Hen: Gok gok
Rooster: Kykeliky
Critter: Piv piv

Other:
Growl: Knur
Sneeze: Atju
Cough: host
Bullet: Bang
Train: Tøf tøf
To tick: tik tak
Creaking: knirk
Shattering glas: klir
Knocking on door: bank bank
Splash: plask
Pain: Av

unosarta
2011-04-04, 04:55 PM
:smalltongue:

Also, in Japanese "Pika Pika" is the sound of thunder.

And as has been already mentioned, Chu is the sound a mouse makes, so....

Kira Kira means to sparkle or shine.

In a linguistical sense, Japanese has some truly fascinating onomatopoeia. They actually consider onomatopoeia to be its own language (I cannot remember the exact word, but it ends in "go" 語, which means language). In addition, there is a form of onomatopoeia for actions that do not make noise. Don't ask me how that works (although the above Kira Kira is sort of an example).

As for koro koro; it is well known because it is used in a children's song that goes something like "a long time ago there was an acorn rolling down a hill..." In addition, I think it covers most every rolling thing, not just acorns going down a hill, although I could be wrong on that.

Herpestidae
2011-04-04, 04:59 PM
Japanese onomatopoeia is simply ridiculous in its extent. For the curious:

a = (whoah)
ba = (arrows shooting)
ba = (whoosh)
ba = (fling)
ba = (fwoosh)
ba = (shake)
ba = (tearing off clothes)
ba = (clench)
ba = (pushing curtains)
ba = (grabbing)
ba = (whipping)
bababa = (arrows flying)
baki = (crush)
baki = (bam)
baku baku baku baku = (chomp chomp chomp chomp)
bali bali bali = (crackle crackle crackle)
ban = (striking rock)
basa = (clothes dropping)
basa = (whish)
basa = (opening)
basa basa = (flap flap)
basha, bashan = (splash)
bashi = (smack)
bashi = (force field repelling)
bashi = (crackling)
bata = (footsteps)
bataan = (slam)
bi = (rip)
biku = (jolt)
biku = (shock)
bikun = (sudden twitch)
bo = (vwoosh)
boki = (cracking)
boko boko = (ground breaking)
boso = (mumble)
bosu = (boff)
bota bota = (thud thud)
bu = (ptooey)
buho = (splurt)
bun bun = (shake shake)
byu = (vwoosh)
byu = (flying blade)
byoooooo = (wind blowing)
byuuuu = (wind blowing)
chichi = (chirping)
chuiin = (spinning, cutting into clothes)
da = (dashing)
dan = (push)
dan = (bam)
do = (burst)
do = (piercing)
doooon = (da-boooom)
dogimagi = (flustered)
doka = (thud)
doka = (strike)
doka doka = (kick kick)
doki doki doki doki = (ba-dump ba-dump ba-dump ba-dump)
dokkun = (heavy heartbeat)
dokun = (ba-dump)
dokun = (heartbeat)
don = (burst of flame)
don don don don = (bam bam bam bam)
dosa, dosha = (thud)
dosa dosa = (falling objects)
dosu = (punch)
dota = (thud)
fu = (pressure letting up)
fu = (disappearing)
fu = (relief)
fu = (sudden movement)
fu = (heh)
fugo fugo = (hm hm)
fulu fulu = (tremble tremble)
fura = (falling)
fuwa = (float)
gaaaan = (goooong)
gaba = (rising)
ga ga = (grab grab)
gaaa = (a mystic sound)
gachan = (locking)
gachi gachi = (shiver shiver)
gaku gaku gaku = (tremble tremble tremble)
gala = (crumble)
gali = (biting lip)
gali gali gali = (scratch scratch scratch)
gan gan = (throbbing)
gara = (rocks falling)
gara = (door opening)
gasa = (rustle)
gasa = (someone shifting their weight)
gasa gasa = (flipping pages)
gashan = (crash)
gashi = (grab)
gatan = (chair clunking)
geho = (cough)
golon = (roll)
goo = (blast)
goooo = (roaring flames)
goshi goshi = (rub rub)
gi gi = (tightening)
gi gi = (pulling)
gii, giii = (creak)
giku = (alarm)
giri = (sliding)
giri giri = (tightening)
gishi = (bed movement)
gu = (stopping midstep)
gu = (clench)
gugu = (squash)
gugu = (grip)
gugu = (groan)
gugu = (choking)
gu gu = (tugging)
gui = (grab)
gui = (yank)
gui = (push)
gula = (faint)
gulu = (grrr)
gululu = (grrrowl)
guo = (blast)
gura, gurari = (swaying)
guri guri = (noogies)
gusa = (stab)
gushi gushi = (rub rub)
gusu gusu = (whimper)
gyaaaaa = (a loud scream)
gyu = (grasp)
gyu = (tremble)
gyu = (clenching)
gyu = (squeeze)
gyu = (hugging)
gyuuuu = (spinning, squeezing)
ha = (gasp)
ha = (surprise)
ha = (realization)
ha ha ha = (rapid breathing)
hahahaha = (hahahaha)
heta = (slump)
hihiiin = (neigh of a horse)
hiku hiku = (twitch twitch)
hiso hiso = (whisper whisper)
hyoi = (rising)
hyoko = (stumble)
hyooooo = (wind blowing)
hyu = (flash)
hyu = (flashing by)
jala = (chink)
jiiin = (overflowing emotion)
jiro jiro = (staring)
jitabata = (struggling)
ju = (sizzle)
jyu = (water sizzling and evaporating)
ka = (light flashing)
ka = (scorching heat)
kaaa = (energy blast charging up)
kaaaa = (glow)
kachan = (clank)
kachi kachi kachi = (ice forming)
kachi kochi = (body tensing up)
kala = (stumble)
karan = (dropping chopsticks)
karan = (klak)
kapo kapo = (clop clop)
kasha = (klink)
kashan = (clank)
kashan = (shutters closing)
katan = (clack)
katsuuun katsuuun = (clomp clomp)
ke = (ha)
ki = (glare)
kii = (door creaking)
kiiin = (“kreeee”)
kiiin = (piercing noise)
kira = (shining)
kolo kolo = (roll roll)
kopopopo = (glug glug glug)
koro = (turning)
koron = (clattering)
koso = (whisper)
kotsu kotsu = (clomp clomp)
kotsun = (kick)
kotsun = (konk)
ku = (straining)
kukaaa = (zzzz)
kuru = (a sudden turn)
kuwaaa = (burning)
kyaaaaa = (a scream)
kyu = (crunch)
kyu = (tightening)
kyu = (tying)
mosha mosha = (munch munch)
mu = (grr)
mugyu = (squeeze)
mushi = (ignoring someone)
musuu = (mrggh)
niha = (sneer)
niko = (smile)
nikkori = (smile)
niya = (sneer)
nya = (smirk)
pa = (light changing)
paa = (glow)
paaaaan = (burst)
pacchiri = (blink)
pachi pachi = (crackle crackle)
pachi pachi = (clap clap)
paka = (shell opening)
paki = (ice breaking)
paki paki paki = (ice cracking)
pan = (slap)
pan = (whack)
pan = (explosion)
pan = (breaking)
pasa = (light falling object)
pasha = (splash)
pata = (ka-tunk)
pata pata = (pitter patter)
patan = (door closing)
piiiii = (a musical note)
piki piki piki = (icing over)
piki piki piki = (shake shake shake)
piku = (jolt)
piku = (ping)
piku = (twitch)
piku = (surprise)
pishaaaa = (pshiiiiing)
pishan = (gleeming)
pishi = (crack)
pishi pishi = (ice breaking off)
pishi pishi pishi = (crumbling)
pita = (stop)
pita = (freezing)
poko poko = (pouring)
pora pora pora = (crying)
pota = (drip)
potsun = (whisper)
pou = (glow)
puchi puchi = (unbuttoning)
sa = (quick movement)
sawa sawa = (crowd sounds)
sha = (moving curtains)
shaka shaka shaka shaka = (shuffle shuffle shuffle shuffle)
shan = (ching)
shiiin = (silence)
shu = (flash)
shulu = (clench)
shuru = (feather movement)
shuru = (loosening)
shururu = (whirling)
shuuu = (attack energy disippating)
shuuu = (sizzle)
solooo = (tiptoe)
sou = (sneak)
su = (taking out arrows)
su = (raising hand)
su = (slipping off mask)
su = (disappearing)
su = (extending hand)
su = (standing up quickly)
su = (step)
su = (swoosh)
su = (motioning silently)
su = (rushing air)
su = (moving curtains)
su = (sudden appearance)
sulu = (slipping off clothes)
supo = (slipping on)
suta suta = (stomp stomp)
suto = (person ducking under an attack)
suto = (landing lightly)
suu = (fluid, circular motion)
suuu = (stroke)
suuu = (zzz)
ta ta ta ta = (pitter patter pitter patter)
ton = (thump)
ton ton = (footsteps)
toro = (slow movement)
tsu = (trickle)
tsuu = (drip)
waaa = (yaaagh)
waaan = (waaah)
wai wai wai = (crowd noise)
yoro = (wobbling)
yusa yusa = (shake shake)
za = (crunch)
za = (stopping suddenly)
za = (shovel)
za = (zoom)
za = (footstep)
zaaa = (whipping through)
zaaaa = (swirling)
zaku = (dig)
zaku = (crunch)
zaku = (hack)
zaku zaku = (dig dig)
zaku zaku = (footsteps)
zan = (a hard hit)
zawa = (leaves rustling)
zawa zawa = (chatter chatter)
zaza = (rustle)
zazaaaaa = (scarfing down food)
zee haa zee = (huff puff puff)
zekun = (tensing up)
zoku = (shudder)
zulu = (slump)
zulu = (slip)
zuki, zukin = (ouch, pain)
zukin = (zing)
zuru = (going to one knee)
zu = (removing)
zuzaza = (slide)
zuzazazaa = (sliding)


Not included: MUNYU the sound of a mammary being groped.

Haruki-kun
2011-04-04, 05:04 PM
There's onomatopoeia for smiles and stares and stuff like that.

"niko" is actually a smiley in Japanese because it's spelled as ニコ, which looks like a smile (or it would if the computer font didn't mess it up).

EDIT: Also not included: CHII, the sound of staring.

unosarta
2011-04-04, 05:06 PM
Not included: MUNYU the sound of a mammary being groped.

From Mune, which means chest or breast.
I love word origins.

Yora
2011-04-04, 05:10 PM
Japanese is one of the funniest languages I've ever known with the sole exception of dutch.
However with Japanese it's not the sound of the language, but the logic behind words and sentences. And with script based on sylables instead of vowls and consonants, it just begs for puns. :smallbiggrin:

And even if you don't want to learn Japanese but read translated mangas, learn katakana. Mangas have the best written sound effects I've ever seen in comics. In german and american comics the sounds are mostly not very much like they are supposed to be. But in a manga a train coming into the station and the doors opening, that's hilariously spot on.

As for koro koro; it is well known because it is used in a children's song that goes something like "a long time ago there was an acorn rolling down a hill..." In addition, I think it covers most every rolling thing, not just acorns going down a hill, although I could be wrong on that.
There's on episode in the Simpson where Bart is scared of something and asks if he can sit on the roof with a baseball bat at night. Then the next scene is in Homers and Marges bedroom and you only hear first the bat rolling down the roof and speeding by the window, followed by Bart. That one totaly reminded me of that scene. :smallbiggrin:



Pig: Øf
Hen: Gok
Train: Tøf tøf
Shattering glas: klir

We have Töftöf for cars.
Klir is really the same.

However our pig sound is "oink".:smallbiggrin:

But speaking of chicken, there are actual onomatopeia in german:
Rooster: Gockel
Hen: Glucke

Teddy
2011-04-04, 05:14 PM
In Norwegian:
For dogs barking: Voff Voff
Cats meowing: Mjau (usually drawn out vocals)

These two are identical in Swedish.


To snore: Snorke
To be in pain(Ow): Au

...and these two are pretty like as well, with snarka as snore and Aj! (or Ao(e)! for being in pain.

And...
trains: tuff tuff (I've got a book since my childhood about trains featuring this onomatopoeia in several other languages as well)
guns: pang
sheep: bä
cow: mu
horse: gnägg
crow: kra
owl: ho ho
mouse: pip
horn: tut
yuck: blä
bee: surr
bird flapping wings: flax
stone dropping into water: plums
creak: knarr
engine: brum
I think that will do for tonight.

Herpestidae
2011-04-04, 05:18 PM
From Mune, which means chest or breast.
I love word origins.

Wait... so the Pokemon Munna...

http://www.legendarypokemon.net/thumbnail/bw/pokemon_munna.png

I thought that thing was a Jewel. :smalleek:

unosarta
2011-04-04, 05:19 PM
And even if you don't want to learn Japanese but read translated mangas, learn katakana. Mangas have the best written sound effects I've ever seen in comics. In german and american comics the sounds are mostly not very much like they are supposed to be. But in a manga a train coming into the station and the doors opening, that's hilariously spot on.
So, so, so true.


There's on episode in the Simpson where Bart is scared of something and asks if he can sit on the roof with a baseball bat at night. Then the next scene is in Homers and Marges bedroom and you only hear first the bat rolling down the roof and speeding by the window, followed by Bart. That one totaly reminded me of that scene. :smallbiggrin:

That is pretty awesome. I love how every language has its own onomatopoeia, and even though they are different, they still manage to describe the action perfectly.



Wait... so the Pokemon Munna...

I thought that thing was a Jewel. :smalleek:
I dunno about Munna, but I do know Mune means chest, or breast. Of course, it isn't like the breast that you are probably thinking of...

Also, that makes me slightly disturbed that they added a pokemon like that. :smalleek:

RebelRogue
2011-04-04, 06:55 PM
It makes me happy that there are two Danish words on that list :smallbiggrin:
Also, the balloon one cracks me up:

Denmark - "We're going to KNALD your bubble."

...

No, Danes. Just... just no. You're not.
Mostly because the word 'knald' when used as a verb is also common slang for having sex.

Good summary of danish animal noises, BTW :smallsmile:

AtlanteanTroll
2011-04-04, 08:42 PM
:smalltongue:

Also, in Japanese "Pika Pika" is the sound of thunder.

And as has been already mentioned, Chu is the sound a mouse makes, so....

Pokemon now makes sense.

Glass Mouse
2011-04-04, 10:21 PM
Also, the balloon one cracks me up:

Mostly because the word 'knald' when used as a verb is also common slang for having sex.

Yeah. I can't help but think that the writer of that article has been using a dictionary rather than a Dane consultant.
I don't think I know anyone who'd use "knald" in a non-sexual context. Little kids might, though.

Sarco_Phage
2011-04-04, 10:25 PM
I dunno, I can think of a Filipino onomatopoeia that works pretty much the same way.

Sapak: to hit (punch)
Sibak: to "hit" (in the sense of "I'd hit that").

Both technically mean "strike", and are based on the slapping sound that comes from those "strikes" but the connotations of either word are remarkably different.

True story: a friend of mine, none too proficient in the native tongue, was telling a story to our boss in Filipino, the story involving him getting into a fight with another guy at a bar. He meant to say, "I got really pissed, so I put down my drink and hit him!"

He ended up saying "I got really pissed, so I put down my drink and <bleep>ed him!"

It was hilarious.

Innis Cabal
2011-04-04, 10:26 PM
:smalltongue:

Also, in Japanese "Pika Pika" is the sound of thunder.

And as has been already mentioned, Chu is the sound a mouse makes, so....

Actually, pikapika is the sound of sparkling. Not thunder.

Haruki-kun
2011-04-04, 10:31 PM
Actually, pikapika is the sound of sparkling. Not thunder.

Electric Sparkling (http://pokemon.wikia.com/wiki/Pikachu#Name), to be precise.

arkol
2011-04-04, 10:36 PM
averagejoe if you wanna know any in portuguese feel free to ask.

Kneenibble
2011-04-04, 10:39 PM
In French, "tabernac!" is the sound of being slapped by your grandmother.

Amiel
2011-04-05, 02:55 AM
EDIT: Also not included: CHII, the sound of staring.
My mind is blown.

lobablob
2011-04-05, 03:44 AM
In Japan, cats go nya nya

Who makes them?

Serpentine
2011-04-05, 04:29 AM
:smalltongue:

Also, in Japanese "Pika Pika" is the sound of thunder.

And as has been already mentioned, Chu is the sound a mouse makes, so....Huh. Figured it was from the pika (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pika). Not mutually exclusive, I guess...
In French, "tabernac!" is the sound of being slapped by your grandmother.Soooo, a tabernacle...

Totally Guy
2011-04-05, 04:34 AM
In French, "tabernac!" is the sound of being slapped by your grandmother.

My nan used to say "snicker-snack" to describe that sound.

Serpentine
2011-04-05, 04:36 AM
<3 your nan.

Amiel
2011-04-05, 05:15 AM
:smalltongue:

Also, in Japanese "Pika Pika" is the sound of thunder.

And as has been already mentioned, Chu is the sound a mouse makes, so....

So, Pikachu is the sound a mouse makes when it is struck by lightning :P

Xiander
2011-04-05, 05:22 AM
Yeah. I can't help but think that the writer of that article has been using a dictionary rather than a Dane consultant.
I don't think I know anyone who'd use "knald" in a non-sexual context. Little kids might, though.

I thought this as well, there are at least three other danish words for the sound popping a balloon makes, and on top of that in the phrase "we are going to pop your bubble." pop is not really an Onomatopoeia.

That little rant aside, danish does have some onomatopaia that must sound crazy to English speakers.

Roar is brøl
Pop could be translated to brag
Whistle is fløjte
Wail is vræl

We aren't really sporting about it ;)

Combat Reflexes
2011-04-05, 05:25 AM
Mouse goes Chu Chu in Japanese. As well as the frog going Koro Koro.

The NL has Blaf for dog barking.

Actually, NL'ers say waf or woef.

And this is how 'Onomatopeën' (Onomatopoeia) sound in the Netherlands:

the cat goes mi-auw or miauw
pain: au
knocking: klop klop
breaking: krak

sheep: bčh
cow: boe
owl: oehoe
mouse: piep
horn: toet
yuck: bah
bee: bzz(zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz)
bird flapping wings: flap
stone dropping into water: splots(j)
creak: knars
engine: broem

and the horse goes, ... ,
HINNIK!
I know:smalltongue:

oh, and guns say 'pieuw pieuw' or 'pang'

Feel free to ask if you want to know more Dutch-ish things :smallsmile:

edit: hey, just saw that NL is a bit like Danish :)

Serpentine
2011-04-05, 05:32 AM
Pop is not really an Onomatopoeia.Uh... Maybe I'm just not understanding your context, but "pop" is pretty much a definitive onomatopoeia.

Innis Cabal
2011-04-05, 05:35 AM
I thought this as well, there are at least three other danish words for the sound popping a balloon makes, and on top of that in the phrase "we are going to pop your bubble." pop is not really an Onomatopoeia.

I'd say that it's probably one of the best, next to Buzz to show what the word means. Though I've never heard -ANYONE- say they're going to "pop" my bubble. Burst? Ya, I've heard that.


Actually, NL'ers say waf or woef.

I live with two from NL that disagree. They both say Blaf and we're natives until they moved to the states.

Serpentine
2011-04-05, 05:37 AM
Gum bubbles pop. I don't know why, but I'd never say it bursts.
Actually, "burst" would be an onomatopoeia, and I'd say it's about as weird as these other ones...

Innis Cabal
2011-04-05, 05:40 AM
Shock of shocks here, but I'd disagree that Burst is an onomatopoeia. I can't think of anything that makes the sound Burst. The action, certainly. The noise when it does the action? No. Boom, pop, psssssh as if air is leaking out of it...plenty of times when something Bursts.

Serpentine
2011-04-05, 05:43 AM
Water balloon.

Innis Cabal
2011-04-05, 05:47 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6JWvnhG9cIg

That still sounds like a pop and then a splash.


Another one, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rnrw-Ga58hw&feature=related at the end. Still a loud Pop.

Serpentine
2011-04-05, 05:48 AM
...that pretty much describes "burst" to me.

smellie_hippie
2011-04-05, 05:55 AM
Ironically the word for dog in ASL (American Sign Language) is to actually snap your fingers and then pat the side of your leg. Like you would be getting a dog's attention and then calling them to your side.

I always thought it was funny that in hinged on actually making a sound...

Xiander
2011-04-05, 06:06 AM
Uh... Maybe I'm just not understanding your context, but "pop" is pretty much a definitive onomatopoeia.

Pop Is an onomatopoeia, when it refers to the sound a balloon makes when it bursts.

Pop is not an Onomatopoeia when it refers to the act of poking a balloon with a needle.

Or maybe i have misunderstood the meaning of Onomatopoeia. Feel free to enlighten me.

Serpentine
2011-04-05, 06:13 AM
It comes from the sound something makes when you pop it. I think that counts. Zip, for example, is named for the sound it makes, as is the cuckoo. They're both listed on Wikipedia's entry for onomatopoia.

Innis Cabal
2011-04-05, 06:14 AM
...that pretty much describes "burst" to me.

Well, you're just weird then I suppose.


Pop Is an onomatopoeia, when it refers to the sound a balloon makes when it bursts.

Pop is not an Onomatopoeia when it refers to the act of poking a balloon with a needle.

Or maybe i have misunderstood the meaning of Onomatopoeia. Feel free to enlighten me.

the formation of a word, as cuckoo or boom, by imitation of a sound made by or associated with its referent is how it's defined.


Edit: You're gun is faster then my sword partner.

RebelRogue
2011-04-05, 06:15 AM
Pop Is an onomatopoeia, when it refers to the sound a balloon makes when it bursts.

Pop is not an Onomatopoeia when it refers to the act of poking a balloon with a needle.

Or maybe i have misunderstood the meaning of Onomatopoeia. Feel free to enlighten me.
Either way it's an onomatopoeia. Using the word as a noun or verb should not change that fact.

Serpentine
2011-04-05, 06:19 AM
That still sounds like a pop"Bu"

and then a splash."st"
Also! Fireworks.

Innis Cabal
2011-04-05, 06:21 AM
Those are two separate sounds! And I've never hears ST as water falling. How about Splish or Splash?

Totally Guy
2011-04-05, 06:53 AM
There was once a guy who tried to tell me that the word helterskelter was an onomatopoeia. He said it was the sound of going down it on the mat when you slide over the grooves, helterskelter-helterskelter-helterskelter. So we both went up so he could prove it.

When he got to the bottom he was waiting for me.

But I had stayed at the top as I had realised something...

"Where are you?" he called up.

So, sitting down, I shouted "I'm on a mat up here!":smalltongue:

Xiander
2011-04-05, 06:56 AM
Either way it's an onomatopoeia. Using the word as a noun or verb should not change that fact.

I stand corrected, several times.

How about using it to describe a genre of music? :smallwink:

Innis Cabal
2011-04-05, 06:58 AM
Pop in Pop Music is a shorting of Popular. Though I suppose it can be used to explain how long their moments of fame are on the grand scheme of things.

Xiander
2011-04-05, 07:00 AM
Pop in Pop Music is a shorting of Popular. Though I suppose it can be used to explain how long their moments of fame are on the grand scheme of things.

I know, i was making a joke.

I did make it with a small pinch of seriousness though, could the definition be stretched that far?

Serpentine
2011-04-05, 07:01 AM
Grunge seems like it very well could be. Maybe hip-hop? It's about the origins, though. If grunge is a reference to "nasty grossness" or something like that, then probably not, because the name doesn't refer to the sound.

unosarta
2011-04-05, 07:42 AM
Huh. Figured it was from the pika (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pika). Not mutually exclusive, I guess...

If it were that Pika, it would mean something like "Rodent mouse," which doesn't really make any sense. *shrug*

I love hearing all of these examples of English words that I never realized were onomatopoeia. :smallbiggrin:

Serpentine
2011-04-05, 07:45 AM
Wouldn't it be more "rodent squeak"?

unosarta
2011-04-05, 07:48 AM
Wouldn't it be more "rodent squeak"?

It would be similar to that. But honestly, "sparkling squeak" makes a little more sense considering the context and the creature itself, and also given the next evolution (raichu means thunder/lightning squeak). *shrug*

Serpentine
2011-04-05, 08:01 AM
But it looks like a pika!

Maralais
2011-04-05, 08:15 AM
In Turkish we have "reflection" words, as they reflect what we hear from the nature. Examples would be:
Hav hav(the bark sound dogs make)
Miyav(which probably comes from the French verb Miauler)
Vak vak(quacking of the ducks, yeah)
and so on.

Asta Kask
2011-04-05, 08:52 AM
Wouldn't it be more "rodent squeak"?


It would be similar to that. But honestly, "sparkling squeak" makes a little more sense considering the context and the creature itself, and also given the next evolution (raichu means thunder/lightning squeak). *shrug*


But it looks like a pika!

Could it be a pun?

unosarta
2011-04-05, 09:03 AM
Could it be a pun?

This is the most likely answer. :smallwink:

Serpentine
2011-04-05, 09:05 AM
I did say "they're not mutually exclusive"...

Haruki-kun
2011-04-05, 09:29 AM
So, Pikachu is the sound a mouse makes when it is struck by lightning :P

*pictures that*

Lightning: "Pika PIKA"
Mouse: "Chu... chu.... CHUUUUUUUUU!!!!!"


Could it be a pun?

Pretty much all pokemon names are puns. IIRC, in the original Japanese as well.

LaZodiac
2011-04-05, 10:16 AM
It might not be all that unique, but French uses "Paff" for gun shots, if I recall.

Combat Reflexes
2011-04-05, 10:35 AM
I live with two from NL that disagree. They both say Blaf and we're natives until they moved to the states.

'blaffen' is what dogs do if they bark - it's a real word, as in to bark, barking, barked. But the onomatopoeia itself is 'woef'. I yet have to see a Dutch comic where the dog's text balloon says 'blaf blaf blaf' - that doesn't exist. It says 'waf waf waf'.

So either you didn't understand what an onomatopoeia exactly is (very understandable) or you come from an area with a strange dialect :smallwink:

Serpentine
2011-04-05, 11:50 AM
I think "bark" is still an onomatopoeia, too.

Kneenibble
2011-04-05, 01:35 PM
Soooo, a tabernacle...

"Whoosh" is an onomatopoeia in French too. :smalltongue:
It's a joke, dear. Tabernac is a vulgar swear.

Lots of words seem to be coming up as onomatopoeic that are not so a priori. The artificial words that are are supposed to phonetically represent a sound. But do the words that are not a priori onomatopoeia almost shift our perception of the sound to match?

Haruki-kun
2011-04-05, 01:46 PM
I think "bark" is still an onomatopoeia, too.

As much as *chuckle* is, though.

Innis Cabal
2011-04-05, 02:29 PM
'blaffen' is what dogs do if they bark - it's a real word, as in to bark, barking, barked. But the onomatopoeia itself is 'woef'. I yet have to see a Dutch comic where the dog's text balloon says 'blaf blaf blaf' - that doesn't exist. It says 'waf waf waf'.

So either you didn't understand what an onomatopoeia exactly is (very understandable) or you come from an area with a strange dialect :smallwink:

:smallconfused:

I'm quite well aware of what it is, I actually defined it for someone. Bark, as in "To Bark" is still an onomatopoeia firstly. Secondly, I've yet to see -any- NL until now use Waf or any of the one's you posted. :smallwink:

I actually passed this to my roommates who are from the NL's, one of which is the son of the Ambassador to Hungary. He says Blaf as does his father. He'd never heard Waf until today.

SaintRidley
2011-04-05, 02:53 PM
Those are two separate sounds! And I've never hears ST as water falling. How about Splish or Splash?

Compound sound. Pop is a word made of three sounds. Want to disqualify that as a candidate since it is only used to describe a sound rather than a compound sound?

Also, tabernac as a French one has completely changed my perception of the word tabernacle.

Combat Reflexes
2011-04-05, 04:03 PM
:smallconfused:

I'm quite well aware of what it is, I actually defined it for someone. Bark, as in "To Bark" is still an onomatopoeia firstly. Secondly, I've yet to see -any- NL until now use Waf or any of the one's you posted. :smallwink:

I actually passed this to my roommates who are from the NL's, one of which is the son of the Ambassador to Hungary. He says Blaf as does his father. He'd never heard Waf until today.

Wait - I thought an onomatopoeia was a word that is also a sound and not just a word that describes a sound (as in: ka-boom is an onomatopoeia, but 'scream' isn't)

In kindergarten, I learnt that dogs said waf. They had always done so.
While I don't have the authority as a ambassador and whatnot to back it up, I am still 100% certain that dogs do say 'waf' - I asked several people what they thought was the sound of a barking dog, and all answers were 'woef' or 'waf' and they were all like 'duh, what else could it say?'. :smallamused:

I seriously have never, ever heard of people that think of 'blaf blaf blaf' when they see a dog.

The way I see it, there are two possible options:

1. your NL friends have some obscure dialect (or I have some obscure dialect - I live in Friesland after all :smallconfused:) or they might be wrong.

2. this is all a big misunderstanding and we mean entirely different things.

for good measure, these are correct Dutch sentences:

De hond blaft (The dog barks)
De hond zegt waf (The dog says bark)

I think they mixed it up a bit and created

De hond zegt blaf
:smallsmile:

I can assure you that, on my authority of having lived in the NL my whole life (about seventeen years now), dogs don't go blaf.

And now I'll get some well-earned sleep, after defending my country's grammar and other epic stuff :smallbiggrin:

Lady Tialait
2011-04-05, 04:06 PM
THIS (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mbtp9bG8Q4I) seems reliant.

Innis Cabal
2011-04-05, 04:14 PM
Wait - I thought an onomatopoeia was a word that is also a sound and not just a word that describes a sound (as in: ka-boom is an onomatopoeia, but 'scream' isn't)

In kindergarten, I learnt that dogs said waf. They had always done so.
While I don't have the authority as a ambassador and whatnot to back it up, I am still 100% certain that dogs do say 'waf' - I asked several people what they thought was the sound of a barking dog, and all answers were 'woef' or 'waf' and they were all like 'duh, what else could it say?'. :smallamused:

I seriously have never, ever heard of people that think of 'blaf blaf blaf' when they see a dog.

The way I see it, there are two possible options:

1. your NL friends have some obscure dialect (or I have some obscure dialect - I live in Friesland after all :smallconfused:) or they might be wrong.

2. this is all a big misunderstanding and we mean entirely different things.

for good measure, these are correct Dutch sentences:

De hond blaft
De hond zegt waf

I think they mixed it up a bit and created

De hond zegt blaf
:smallsmile:

I can assure you that, on my authority of having lived in the NL my whole life (about seventeen years now), dogs don't go blaf.

the formation of a word, as cuckoo or boom, by imitation of a sound made by or associated with its referent.

That's the definition. Just like Burst isn't an Onomatopoeia because it's not a word formed in imitation of a sound like Bark or Woof or Pop.

They speak with what they call a "posh" accent but they've lived in the country for about as long as you so I don't think age is really a way to cut it either :smalltongue:

It's clear at least, that even in the same country onomatopoeia are not the same. :smallsmile:

http://poodlematic.blogspot.com/2010/07/mia-goes-climbing.html

There's a blog that uses it, just to prove I'm not talking out my rear here. Though this one in particular is a dutch person in SAfrica so they may well be speaking Afrikaans.

GolemsVoice
2011-04-05, 08:13 PM
In German, the rooster goes: Kikerikiii!, while the hen goas Boaaaak. At least that's how I'd transcribe the sound I'd make. Horses "wieher", which is, in my mind, vastly superior to the English neigh. Snakes "zisch". Elephants go "törööö!" Jelly might "schwabbel" around, another nice word. Creaking floorboards "knarz", and a (camp)fire "knistert".

AtlanteanTroll
2011-04-05, 08:23 PM
I don't remember where I got this, but Eiichiro Oda, creator of One Piece, was (or is, I guess) very stern with the translating of sound-effects.

Japan has saaa and zaaa as onomatopoeia for both light and hard rain respectively. Anyway, he was apparently a little artistically upset when they were both translated as fshhh in English.

*shrugs*

Haruki-kun
2011-04-05, 10:11 PM
I don't remember where I got this, but Eiichiro Oda, creator of One Piece, was (or is, I guess) very stern with the translating of sound-effects.

Japan has saaa and zaaa as onomatopoeia for both light and hard rain respectively. Anyway, he was apparently a little artistically upset when they were both translated as fshhh in English.

*shrugs*

CLAMP's art is untouchable. Del Rey leaves all Onomatopoeias untouched and just adds a little subtitle for what it would be in English.

LaZodiac
2011-04-06, 08:47 AM
As it always should be, incidently.

Yora
2011-04-06, 09:35 AM
Elephants go "törööö!"
How can non-germanic languages even exist without umlauts? They are essential for so many funny and cute words. They wouldn't be half as funny with regular vowls. :smallbiggrin:

SaintRidley
2011-04-06, 03:45 PM
How can non-germanic languages even exist without umlauts? They are essential for so many funny and cute words. They wouldn't be half as funny with regular vowls. :smallbiggrin:

In nominally still Germanic languages like English we don't know what sounds those vowels are supposed to make, so we don't really do anything different when we say them (at least without training in the language that uses them). Probably the source of much confusion and amusement, however, when you run up on an English-speaker who doesn't know how to say them and says something funny.

GolemsVoice
2011-04-06, 06:06 PM
I've thought about this actually, and I haven't found a good way to reproduce the sound of ü and ö in the English language. Ä is easier, it's much like the a in bad.

SaintRidley
2011-04-06, 06:16 PM
I've thought about this actually, and I haven't found a good way to reproduce the sound of ü and ö in the English language. Ä is easier, it's much like the a in bad.

We used to have a letter specifically for that sound in English. It's sad that it doesn't get used for that anymore.

Teddy
2011-04-07, 05:44 AM
I've thought about this actually, and I haven't found a good way to reproduce the sound of ü and ö in the English language. Ä is easier, it's much like the a in bad.

Short ö is hard to find, but long ö exist in some places in English. The word burn, for example, has its u pronounciated as a long ö. Add a j-sound (like the j at the start of Jay!) before the u in burn, and you have the (almost)correct pronounciation of my name (Björn).

Asta Kask
2011-04-07, 06:16 AM
And there's the long 'å' in laaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaw. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ycmH1tMp_0s)

Eldan
2011-04-07, 06:18 AM
In nominally still Germanic languages like English we don't know what sounds those vowels are supposed to make, so we don't really do anything different when we say them (at least without training in the language that uses them). Probably the source of much confusion and amusement, however, when you run up on an English-speaker who doesn't know how to say them and says something funny.

That goes both ways, though. Just ask a German how to pronounce "Mötörhead".

RebelRogue
2011-04-07, 06:46 AM
That goes both ways, though. Just ask a German how to pronounce "Mötörhead".
I always pronounce that with ö's when I read it aloud in my head :smallbiggrin:

Now, the one that really gets me is the ˙ in Queensr˙che...

Eldan
2011-04-07, 06:54 AM
Huh. That's a pretty strange idea, really. I didn't even know ˙ existed.

And yeah, pronouncing Mötörhead is fun. All metal umlauts, really.

RebelRogue
2011-04-07, 07:20 AM
Huh. That's a pretty strange idea, really. I didn't even know ˙ existed.
I'm pretty sure it's just added 'for teh metulz'! It's probably half ironic, as Queensr˙che aren't all that heavy after all.

Eldan
2011-04-07, 07:42 AM
Well, yeah. But the fact that it's even on the keyboard seems to indicate it's at least used somewhere.

GolemsVoice
2011-04-07, 07:53 AM
Maybe there is a keyboard that is so metal that it can umlaut ANYTHING. Yes, even THAT.

And I always pronounce them Mötörhead, with added ös, in my head at least. That's what you get for messing with the Umlaut.

Teddy
2011-04-07, 07:57 AM
That goes both ways, though. Just ask a German how to pronounce "Mötörhead".

Tröyan was apparently a band when my parents were young, and a good example of failed umlauts. What the name alludes to is pretty obvious, but the way it's pronounciated is identical to another Swedish word, "tröjan", which means "the shirt". Distinctly un-cool. :smallwink:

Eldan
2011-04-07, 08:00 AM
You could, however, make pretty funny band T-shirts. :smalltongue:

By the way: was it Mötörhead or Mötley Crüe that had their name (mis)pronounced by a German concert crowd?

RebelRogue
2011-04-07, 08:35 AM
Related: I remember a guitar mag I bought some years ago tried to be hip by writing some 'o's as 'ø' instead (which is the danish version of ö). Me and my brother thought it was pretty hilaroius to read their 'prøfile' section.

Edit: Checked up on the ˙ thing:

Ẅ and ˙: Ÿ is generally a vowel, but it's used as the (semi-vowel) consonant [ɰ] (a [w] without the use of the lips) in Tlingit. This sound is also found in Coast Tsimshian, where it's written ẅ.

Ÿ is also a consonant in Luganda, where a diaeresis separates y from n: anya [aɲa], an˙a [aɲja].

Eldan
2011-04-07, 09:07 AM
:smallbiggrin:

Seriously. Umlaut-misuse is one of the funniest things ever.

On that subject: Rappy is reviewing the Ravenloft bestiary over in the RGP section. All German speakers should be delighted at two monsters titled "Lebentod" and "Ermordenung". (Though "Mangled German words in English" probably deserves a thread on it's own. Or, as I call it, "Warhammer Syndrome".)

Kneenibble
2011-04-07, 09:14 AM
We used to have a letter specifically for that sound in English. It's sad that it doesn't get used for that anymore.

Wait, which letter is that?

Eldan
2011-04-07, 09:17 AM
Æ, probably, but that's only used in Latin words, from what I know. Has the same origin as Ä, though. From what I heard, the two dots were originally a small "e".

Yora
2011-04-07, 10:21 AM
In nominally still Germanic languages like English we don't know what sounds those vowels are supposed to make, so we don't really do anything different when we say them (at least without training in the language that uses them). Probably the source of much confusion and amusement, however, when you run up on an English-speaker who doesn't know how to say them and says something funny.

Actually, at least americans pronounce lots of their As like Äs.
In Car, it's like A.
In action and man, that's a very nice Ä.

Speaking of Omnomnompoeia: "to nom" (verb) :smallbiggrin:

RebelRogue
2011-04-07, 01:39 PM
In action and man, that's a very nice Ä.
:smallconfused: I'd have to disagree there!

Eldan
2011-04-07, 01:44 PM
Swiss German has, depending on dialect, actually two or three slightly different pronunciations of the letter Ä. It's fun because foreign people, even Germans, just don't get it :smalltongue:

Yora
2011-04-07, 02:33 PM
:smallconfused: I'd have to disagree there!

Well, I'm speaking of the North German Standard German Ä. :smallbiggrin:

Glass Mouse
2011-04-07, 05:27 PM
Æ, probably, but that's only used in Latin words, from what I know. Has the same origin as Ä, though. From what I heard, the two dots were originally a small "e".

We have that letter in Danish - as well as Ø and Å. I always thought it came from a rune and not Latin.

Also, here, Æ is pronounced like the e in "bed". We probably just aren't Latin enough up north :smalltongue:

Kneenibble
2011-04-07, 05:47 PM
Æsc in Old English had a rune forebearer, didn't it? But I thought its pronunciation was a front unrounded A, what you'd call a standard short A in modern English.

*rereads the thread*
Oh, that's exactly the sound SaintRidley was referring to. :smallredface:

I gots to lay off the weeknight hooch.

Teddy
2011-04-08, 02:19 AM
We have that letter in Danish - as well as Ø and Å. I always thought it came from a rune and not Latin.

Also, here, Æ is pronounced like the e in "bed". We probably just aren't Latin enough up north :smalltongue:

Wait, you have Å? I thought you only wrote AA for that one. :smallconfused:

Eldan
2011-04-08, 02:56 AM
I've just seen Æ used for Ä before. Because writing AE for Ä is viable.

Maralais
2011-04-08, 09:01 AM
So wait, ö is called Umlaut? In Turkish we read it something like the "e" of French, is it similar in other languages?

RebelRogue
2011-04-08, 09:31 AM
Wait, you have Å? I thought you only wrote AA for that one. :smallconfused:
We changed it recently... a little over sixty years ago :smallwink:

SaintRidley
2011-04-08, 10:24 AM
So wait, ö is called Umlaut? In Turkish we read it something like the "e" of French, is it similar in other languages?

The dots over the o are the umlaut.


And yes, kneenibble, you got everything there right.

Partysan
2011-04-09, 03:18 PM
Ah, the joys of people who don't know a language you know and try to use it...

A while ago I was reading an English translation of a manga that was set in an european medieval fantasy setting but written by a Japanese. What I loved very much in this was that he had the main character actually use real medieval longsword techniques... complete with german names.
EISEN PFORTE! MORD SCHLAG!
It was hilarious.

Glass Mouse
2011-04-11, 05:04 PM
We changed it recently... a little over sixty years ago :smallwink:

*snicker*

Some cities (I think both Aalborg and Aarhus) changed it back to Aa, though, because they want to be able to appear on international maps :smalltongue:

Combat Reflexes
2011-04-11, 05:18 PM
hah! In my province, there are regions named Aa (de Vledder Aa)or Ee (de Dokkumer Ee)
Sometime, somewhere, someone was very lazy.

Yora
2011-04-11, 05:18 PM
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/42/%C3%85_i_Lofoten.jpg
Also: Learn one japanese character today:
http://ceo-bcn.upc.es/pase/azumanga/imagenes/OsakaNekoKoneko.jpg



So wait, ö is called Umlaut? In Turkish we read it something like the "e" of French, is it similar in other languages?
I think for some mysterious reason, Turkish does have an Ö and an Ü that are exatly like ours. Or we're all pronouncing the names of all the turkish immigrants wrong and they never tell us. :smallbiggrin:
(Fun fact, Germany has more turkish imigrants than anyone else.)

There's a joke about "Turkish Wheel of Fortune":
- "I take an Ü, please."
- *ding*, *ding*, *ding*, *ding*, *ding*, *ding*, *ding*, *ding*, *ding*, *ding*
:smallbiggrin:

Maralais
2011-04-15, 10:22 AM
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/42/%C3%85_i_Lofoten.jpg
Also: Learn one japanese character today:
http://ceo-bcn.upc.es/pase/azumanga/imagenes/OsakaNekoKoneko.jpg



I think for some mysterious reason, Turkish does have an Ö and an Ü that are exatly like ours. Or we're all pronouncing the names of all the turkish immigrants wrong and they never tell us. :smallbiggrin:
(Fun fact, Germany has more turkish imigrants than anyone else.)

There's a joke about "Turkish Wheel of Fortune":
- "I take an Ü, please."
- *ding*, *ding*, *ding*, *ding*, *ding*, *ding*, *ding*, *ding*, *ding*, *ding*
:smallbiggrin:
Ah, the 60s' immigration which is the reason why even my two aunts are living in Germany...

I kinda didn't get the joke. Do you mean that Turkish has lots of words with Ü? :smallbiggrin:

monomer
2011-04-15, 01:51 PM
Also, tabernac as a French one has completely changed my perception of the word tabernacle.

As Kneebibble pointed out, the original poster was probably making a joke. Tabernac is a swear in French, somewhere along the lines of the unexpurgated versions of "Holy Crap" or "Gosh Darnit". Using the church or religion as part of the swear is considered more offensive than saying something like "Merde" which is fairly tame and is translated closer to "Crap".

Back on topic, French roosters say Cocorico (interestingly, the profanity filter censors out the English translation :smallbiggrin:)

RebelRogue
2011-04-15, 02:03 PM
Back on topic, French roosters say Cocorico (interestingly, the profanity filter censors out the English translation :smallbiggrin:)
That's fairly close to the danish sound (mentioned above somewhere) 'kykkelikyh'.

Combat Reflexes
2011-04-18, 05:12 AM
That's fairly close to the danish sound (mentioned above somewhere) 'kykkelikyh'.

Kykkelikyh? serious? Then we have the same roosters in Holland:
Kukeleku!

Eldan
2011-04-18, 05:25 AM
Ah, the 60s' immigration which is the reason why even my two aunts are living in Germany...

I kinda didn't get the joke. Do you mean that Turkish has lots of words with Ü? :smallbiggrin:

That's the joke, yes. A standard stereotype about Turks in German speaking countries is that half their vowels are "ü"s. There's also tons of jokes where you "translate" things to Turkish by replacing all vowels of a German sentence with "ü".

Yora
2011-04-18, 06:30 AM
My favorite is the arab DJ: "Machlala" :smallbiggrin:

(mach is "make", and lala is is the musical version of blabla.)

Eldan
2011-04-18, 07:21 AM
Ah, yes. The Arabic version is of course to replace all vowels with "a" (rarely "e") and use as many "ch" sounds as possible.

Dihan
2011-04-18, 10:49 AM
In Welsh we have "popty ping" which is the word for a microwave oven. "Popty" is the word for oven, the "ping" is the sound it makes. :smallbiggrin:

Asta Kask
2011-04-18, 11:15 AM
That's fairly close to the danish sound (mentioned above somewhere) 'kykkelikyh'.


Kykkelikyh? serious? Then we have the same roosters in Holland:
Kukeleku!

And Swedish... kuckeliku! (Swedish 'ck' = Danish 'kk')

Dogs: Voff or Vov
Cats: Mjau
Pigs: Nöff (pronounced exactly like french 'neuf')
Horses: Ihahahaaa
Laughter: Hahahahaha

Teddy
2011-04-18, 11:24 AM
Horses: Ihahahaaa

I disagree with this one. The word for the sound horses make is "gnägg". Everything else is just people trying to make things overly complicated.

Asta Kask
2011-04-18, 02:17 PM
No, 'gnägga' is the verb. Saying it's the sound is like saying cats say 'jam'. They don't, they say mjau.

Teddy
2011-04-18, 05:13 PM
No, 'gnägga' is the verb. Saying it's the sound is like saying cats say 'jam'. They don't, they say mjau.

Hmm... Well, I suppose you're correct. However, I'd still claim that "gnägga" "jama" are onomatopoeias. Also, "gnägg" can and has been used as a sound effect.

grimbold
2011-04-22, 10:20 AM
in french they use "Thok" "Crock" and a lot of things with O's instead of A's

Yora
2011-04-22, 10:23 AM
In German we say Knäcke (or knägge in northern dialects) for this ultra-dry bread that tastes and behaves a lot like plywood. (Yet strangely tasty.)

Teddy
2011-04-22, 01:07 PM
In German we say Knäcke (or knägge in northern dialects) for this ultra-dry bread that tastes and behaves a lot like plywood. (Yet strangely tasty.)

Ahh, knäckebröd. Yes, it can be pretty tasty indeed.

Glass Mouse
2011-04-22, 03:04 PM
Is knækbrød (or however you weirdoes spell it :smallwink:) a particularly North European phenonomen?

Xsesiv
2011-04-22, 03:37 PM
How about using it to describe a genre of music? :smallwink:

Djent. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Djent)

I know that's not what you meant, but still...

Teddy
2011-04-23, 01:55 AM
Is knækbrød (or however you weirdoes spell it :smallwink:) a particularly North European phenonomen?

I think so, but I'm not sure.

Asta Kask
2011-04-23, 03:26 AM
It's called Crisp bread (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crisp_bread) in English and we have apparently been making it for a long, long time.

Innis Cabal
2011-04-23, 03:44 AM
It's called Hardtack in America.

Fuzzie Fuzz
2011-04-24, 12:04 AM
My personal favorite is 'nuff, nuff, nuff,' which is apparently the noise Swedish pigs make.

Teddy
2011-04-24, 01:46 AM
My personal favorite is 'nuff, nuff, nuff,' which is apparently the noise Swedish pigs make.

Actually, it's "nöff nöff". The 'ö' is pronounciated as the 'u' in "burn".

Dvandemon
2011-04-27, 12:14 AM
This thread has inspired to make a comic where all the characters are intelligent animals (a la Animal Farm) from many foreign places that only talk in onomatopoeia. It'd involve simple storylines involving daily living and everthing has there own little onomatopoeia.

Teddy
2011-04-27, 02:29 AM
This thread has inspired to make a comic where all the characters are intelligent animals (a la Animal Farm) from many foreign places that only talk in onomatopoeia. It'd involve simple storylines involving daily living and everthing has there own little onomatopoeia.

This reminds me of Watership Down and the rabbit word for car (as well as train): "Hrududu" (IIRC).

Asta Kask
2011-04-27, 04:20 AM
Actually, it's "nöff nöff". The 'ö' is pronounciated as the 'u' in "burn".

It is, in fact, pronounced exactly as the French word neuf, which never ceases to amuse me. I am easily amused.