PDA

View Full Version : More language fun



pinballchico
2011-04-08, 02:45 AM
After seeing all the great responses to the onomonopea thread I figured this would be a great place to expand on a favorite lingual knowledge. I've been collecting how to say "word to your mother" in many languages. I'd list some of the more fun ones here, but seeing some of the sources I've gotten them from and how awkward the statement is in general I'm not sure I've always been given correct answers and I don't want to insult anybodies mom.

The one I'm pretty sure of is spanish :palabra a su madre'

So help me make sure I've been given accurate info and expand the knowledge of this generaly useless phrase.

thanks in advance............and......
Word to your mother

ForzaFiori
2011-04-08, 07:08 AM
Italian (i believe) would be: Parola a tua madre, but I'm not entirely sure.

Adumbration
2011-04-08, 07:12 AM
Literal translation to Finnish would be: "Sananen äitisi kanssa." Not sure if it carries the same connotation the phrase apparently carries according to Urban Dictionary.

pinballchico
2011-04-08, 07:28 AM
as far as urban dictionary is concerned the definition I'm looking at is this....



Dumb-a** catch phrase that Vanilla Ice used at the end of Ice Ice Baby.

So yeah....its meant to be asinine.

Literal translation is the goal.

so thank you.

smellie_hippie
2011-04-08, 07:37 AM
Word to your mother in ASL (American Sign Language) would look like this.

1. Make a pointing gesture with your left hand, and tap your index and thumb from your right hand against the extended finger (will look something like a "P"). Word

2. Point at the person you are speaking to. Your

3. Extend all five fingers on your right hand (as if you were showing that your wanted 5 of something) and while fingers are extended tap your thumb against your chin. Mother

:smallamused:

shiram
2011-04-08, 08:16 AM
Mot à ta mère.

Is the french equivalent.

Eldan
2011-04-08, 02:23 PM
Hmm.

Not sure how to translate that to German, really. Even just translating "Word" would probably be "Ein Wort", "a Word".

"Ein Wort für deine Mutter", perhaps. "A word for your mother".

or

"Ein Word an deine Mutter". Now I'm not sure how to translate that back. "an" here would mean something between "intended for", "directed towards" and "sent to".

Eldariel
2011-04-08, 02:28 PM
"Ein Word an deine Mutter". Now I'm not sure how to translate that back. "an" here would mean something between "intended for", "directed towards" and "sent to".

I'd say this is what we're looking for; I think you can directly translate it into "A word to your mother." or "A word at your mother." Far as I know my German (of course, I'm not a native unlike you), the same expression would be used for the German equivalent of both.


Literal translation to Finnish would be: "Sananen äitisi kanssa." Not sure if it carries the same connotation the phrase apparently carries according to Urban Dictionary.

I'd say it's "Sananen äidillesi." - "kanssa" would be "A word with your mother."

Morty
2011-04-08, 02:36 PM
The Polish equivalent would be "Słowo dla twojej matki". I think it bears roughly the same connotations.

Castaras
2011-04-08, 02:43 PM
I've always wanted to learn how to say "Help, my head is on fire!" in as many languages as possible. I dunno why. :smallbiggrin:


Attention, ma tete est sur la feu! :smalltongue:

Eldan
2011-04-08, 02:45 PM
"Hilfe, mein Kopf brennt!"

Though, that's "my head is burning". I don't think there's an equivalent to "on fire".

Or, in my garbled tripple-bastard Swiss dialect*: "Hilfe, min chopf brönnt."


*I've lived in two cantons and my parents are from a third, my accent is a mixture of them all. No one can place it, it's fun.


Attention, ma tete est sur la feu!

I'm reasonably sure that translates approximately to "Attention, my head is above the fire". Help is "Au secour", not sure about "on fire". It's been years since I've last had French, and I was never good at it.

Castaras
2011-04-08, 02:59 PM
"Hilfe, mein Kopf brennt!"

Though, that's "my head is burning". I don't think there's an equivalent to "on fire".

Or, in my garbled tripple-bastard Swiss dialect*: "Hilfe, min chopf brönnt."


*I've lived in two cantons and my parents are from a third, my accent is a mixture of them all. No one can place it, it's fun.



I'm reasonably sure that translates approximately to "Attention, my head is above the fire". Help is "Au secour", not sure about "on fire". It's been years since I've last had French, and I was never good at it.

No clue, I was never any good at french either. :smallamused:

shiram
2011-04-08, 03:04 PM
I've always wanted to learn how to say "Help, my head is on fire!" in as many languages as possible. I dunno why. :smallbiggrin:


Attention, ma tete est sur la feu! :smalltongue:

Bad google translate, bad!

À l'aide, ma tête est en feu!

Eldan
2011-04-08, 03:05 PM
Ah. "En". Right. Man, I should have remembered that. 9 years of French and I forgot the word "en".

Mainlander
2011-04-08, 03:07 PM
In Irish Gaelic, I think 'Focal ag do mháthair' would be most appropriate. I'm not fluent or anything, but I've had two semesters of classes and that's my best guess. Directly translated as 'word at your mother'.

EDIT: Note, this can also mean 'your mother has a word'. Hmm.

Castaras
2011-04-08, 03:10 PM
Bad google translate, bad!

À l'aide, ma tête est en feu!

Wasn't google translate, was my memory of my french lessons from a few years ago. :smalltongue:

Morty
2011-04-08, 03:13 PM
In Irish Gaelic, I think 'Focal ag do mháthair' would be most appropriate. I'm not fluent or anything, but I've had two semesters of classes and that's my best guess. Directly translated as 'word at your mother'.

EDIT: Note, this can also mean 'your mother has a word'. Hmm.

I also know a bit of Irish Gaelic, but I've never been really fluent in it, so I can't really comment. However, this sentence can indeed mean "your mother has a word" as well. Irish Gaelic has a funny way of indicating possession.
As for Castaras' sentence: it'd be "Pomocy, moja głowa się pali" in Polish. I don't feel confident enough to translate it to Irish Gaelic.

shiram
2011-04-08, 03:15 PM
Wasn't google translate, was my memory of my french lessons from a few years ago. :smalltongue:

Well it looked like an online translation tool, my bad:smallbiggrin:

Castaras
2011-04-08, 03:21 PM
Well it looked like an online translation tool, my bad:smallbiggrin:

Online translation tools are probably better than my french skills...:smallamused:

Abemad
2011-04-08, 03:24 PM
The danish translation would be "et ord til din mor"... It really loses any meaning translated this way...

Keveak
2011-04-08, 03:34 PM
The danish translation would be "et ord til din mor"... It really loses any meaning translated this way...

I'd remove the "et" but otherwise I agree. ^_^

What is it supposed to convey, by the band?

Mainlander
2011-04-08, 03:38 PM
I also know a bit of Irish Gaelic, but I've never been really fluent in it, so I can't really comment. However, this sentence can indeed mean "your mother has a word" as well. Irish Gaelic has a funny way of indicating possession.
I don't feel confident enough to translate it to Irish Gaelic.

Irish has a funny way of indicating everything :P

Mary Leathert
2011-04-08, 03:42 PM
Help, my head is on fire! = Apua, pääni on tulessa! (in Finnish).

Morty
2011-04-08, 03:49 PM
Irish has a funny way of indicating everything :P

Hoo boy, that's true. I was pretty shocked to find out it has no words for "yes" and "no". :smalltongue:

Haruki-kun
2011-04-08, 04:58 PM
I've always wanted to learn how to say "Help, my head is on fire!" in as many languages as possible. I dunno why. :smallbiggrin:


Attention, ma tete est sur la feu! :smalltongue:

"¡Auxilio! ¡Mi cabeza se incendia!"


Online translation tools are probably better than my french skills...:smallamused:

You greatly overestimate Online Translation Tools.

ForzaFiori
2011-04-08, 05:31 PM
Aiuto! Mio capo e in fiami!
or
Aiuto! Mio capo e sta bruciando!

I believe that's "help me, my head is on fire!" or "help me, my head is burning" in Italian. The "e" should have an accent on it though. Never can remember how to type an accent.

Edit: forgot that "help" can be used as a interjection. Replaced "mi aiuti" with "aiuto"

GolemsVoice
2011-04-08, 06:21 PM
slova materi tvoja would be Russian for your mother's word. Unfortunately, we haven't yet learned how to say that soemthing is intended for somebody.

"Wollt ihr den Kopf in Flammen sehn?"

Agamid
2011-04-08, 09:02 PM
"Tok long mama bilong yu" Tok Pisin.

it'd be something like that anyway.

they'd actually probably say "Word long mana bilong yu" though, as 'tok' while meaning 'word' also means 'talk' so really you're just saying "Talk to your mother."

Flickerdart
2011-04-08, 09:12 PM
slova materi tvoja would be Russian for your mother's word.
Not quite, no. "Slovo tvojej materi" is the order you want.

The head on fire thing would be "Pomogite! U menya gorit golova!"

unosarta
2011-04-08, 10:16 PM
Japanese:
あなたのおかさんに言葉よ!(Anata no okasan ni kotoba yo!)

Literally: Your mother at word. It doesn't have close to the same meaning, and there isn't really a verb, so I have no idea what to with that sentence, but yeah. I am completely unable to do that in Chinese...

助けて!私の頭は(on fire? 火事がありますよ Literally: has fire (uncontrolled fire, to be precise))!

I don't know the word for on fire, and light googling/my Japanese dictionary are not helping, so :smallfrown:.

Spoken: Tasukete! Watashi no atama wa (kaji ga arimasu yo)!

Probably want to get a native speaker/someone who knows more than me to corroborate that, though.

GolemsVoice
2011-04-09, 02:14 AM
Not quite, no. "Slovo tvojej materi" is the order you want.

Right, I forgot. It's been a while since I last looked at a Russian textbook. But does "u menja" not mean "I have...?"

Cicciograna
2011-04-09, 04:09 AM
I've always wanted to learn how to say "Help, my head is on fire!" in as many languages as possible. I dunno why. :smallbiggrin:


Attention, ma tete est sur la feu! :smalltongue:

In Italian it would be "Aiuto, la mia testa è in fiamme!" :smallsmile:

Flickerdart
2011-04-09, 10:36 AM
Right, I forgot. It's been a while since I last looked at a Russian textbook. But does "u menja" not mean "I have...?"
Not quite. It does indicate possession, however - it's your head that's burning, after all. A more direct translation would be "moya golova gorit" (literally - my head burning) but it's less grammatically correct.

Maralais
2011-04-09, 01:54 PM
Bad google translate, bad!

À l'aide, ma tête est en feu!

or au secours.

Also the Turkish equivalent would be "İmdat! Kafam alev aldı!"

Groundhog
2011-04-09, 11:48 PM
Word to your mother in Hebrew:
Milah l'eemecha. Note: the "ch" is the guttural, "phlegm" type.

Help, my head is on fire! in Hebrew:
Hatzilu, roshi dalohk!

Transliteration FTW!

shiram
2011-04-11, 11:40 AM
or au secours.

Also the Turkish equivalent would be "İmdat! Kafam alev aldı!"

That is correct, but I put "À l'aide" because that's what most people around here would say. Rarely hear "au secours".

I'm da Rogue!
2011-04-11, 02:56 PM
πες το στη μητέρα σου.

(greek)

dehro
2011-04-11, 03:02 PM
Italian (i believe) would be: Parola a tua madre, but I'm not entirely sure.
right

Aiuto! Mio capo e in fiami!
or
Aiuto! Mio capo e sta bruciando!

I believe that's "help me, my head is on fire!" or "help me, my head is burning" in Italian. The "e" should have an accent on it though. Never can remember how to type an accent.

Edit: forgot that "help" can be used as a interjection. Replaced "mi aiuti" with "aiuto"
wrong

"aiuto, ho la testa in fiamme" would be better.

edit: the second bit was already done by cicciograna (great nick, lol).. I should have noticed.

Castaras
2011-04-12, 02:06 AM
πες το στη μητέρα σου.

(greek)

Roguey! Haven't seen you in ages! :smallbiggrin: *hugs!*

pinballchico
2011-04-12, 03:49 AM
I love you all.....thank you