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View Full Version : 3.5 Paladin Revamp (A True Divine Champion!) (PEACH)



crusaderjim
2011-05-15, 08:02 PM
Paladin


http://img262.imageshack.us/img262/7572/paladin.gif

"Do you think you know evil? Know of its sting? Know of the pain and destruction it can cause? I know of evil, for I fight it each and every day and will likely fall trying to defend you and those like you from it, like so many of my kinsmen have before me." - Azrael Bellamont, Paladin of the Order of the White Rose

The knight in shining armor, the righteous crusader, the divine warrior, all of these and more come to mind with the world paladin is heard. Paladins possess he compassion to pursue good, the will to uphold law and order, and the power to defeat evil. Few mortals have the purity of heart and the devotion that is required by the paladinís path, but those who take the steps are rewarded with the power to protect and heal their loved ones and smite their enemies. In a land of unholy cults, diabolical sorcerers, and hellish fiends, the paladin is the final light of hope that cannot be extinguished.

Adventures: Paladins take up arms and go on adventures in order to rid the world of evil. Most of them are serious individuals and refer to their adventures as quests. While they may take on many different types of quest, paladins are at home when leading or fighting in campaigns against evil, not merely looting ruins.

Characteristics: Divine power protects the paladin and gives him special powers. This mysterious power wards off harm, protects him from disease, lets him heal himself, and guards his heart against fear. A paladin can also use these powers to help others, healing wounds and curing diseases. Another power that each paladin possesses is the ability to destroy evil through smites and his ability to bind a portion of his righteousness into his weapon. Many paladins are also capable of calling forth a mighty steed from the celestial realms to serve as a companion and mount.

Alignment: Paladins must dedicate themselves to the defense of all goodly folk and the upholding of just and fair laws. A paladin that strays from the path risks losing his divine powers if he deviates from the lawful good alignment or breaks his oath to follow the paladinís code of conduct.

Religion: Paladins need not devote themselves to a single deity- devotion to righteousness is enough. Many paladins do choose to follow a god or goddess, and those that do must follow a deity that is either good or lawful, and a paladin can never knowingly serve an evil god. Paladins devoted to a god or faith are scrupulous in observing religious duties and are welcome in every associated temple.

Background: Becoming a paladin is akin to answering a call and accepting oneís destiny, no one ever chooses it. No one, no matter how diligent, can become a paladin through practice. Those that are called generally begin practice at a young age, often as a squire or page to an older, more experienced paladin. All paladins, regardless of background, recognize in each other an eternal bond that transcends culture, race, and even religion. Any two true paladins, even from opposite corners of the world, consider themselves to be comrades.

Races: Humans, with their ambitious souls and ability to dedicate themselves fully to a cause, make mighty and noble paladins. Half-elves, many of whom live amongst humans, may also find themselves called into service as a noble and knightly paladin. Dwarves are occasionally paladins, although the duties to family and clan sometimes come into conflict with the calling of the paladin. Elves rarely become paladins, as their natural inclination towards personal liberty and freedom generally clashes with the hierarchical way of the paladin order. Aasimar almost always become paladins, as many of them feel that it is their personal duty as children of the heavens to banish the infernal and wicked from the mortal world.

Other Classes: Even though paladins are in some ways set apart from others, they eagerly and willingly team up with those whose skills and capabilities complement their own. They work well with good and lawful clerics, and they appreciate working beside those who are brave, honest, and committed to good. While they cannot abide evil acts by their companions, they are otherwise willing to work with a variety of people quite different from themselves. Charismatic, trustworthy, and well respected, paladins make fine leaders for their adventuring groups.

Role: The paladinís chief role in most groups is that of a melee combatant and secondary healer. Thanks to his high Charisma, a paladin can also become a capable leader.

Game Rule Information

Abilities: Charisma enhances a paladinís healing, self-protective capabilities, spellcasting, and undead turning ability. Strength is important for a paladin because of its role in combat. A good Constitution score gives paladins extra hit points, which are beneficial due to their roles on the front lines.

Alignment: Lawful Good

Hit Die: d12

Class Skills: The paladinís class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Climb (Str) Concentration (Con), Craft (Int), Diplomacy (Cha), Handle Animal (Cha), Heal (Wis), Jump (Str), Knowledge (nobility and royalty) (Int), Knowledge (religion) (Int), Profession (Wis), Ride (Dex), Sense Motive (Wis) and Swim (Str).

Skill Points at 1st Level: (4 + Int Modifier) x 4

Skill Points at Each Additional Level: 4 + Int Modifier

{table=head]Level|Base Attack Bonus|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Special|0|1st|2nd|3rd|4th|5th

1st|
+1|
+2|
+0|
+2|Aura of Good, Detect Evil, Smite Evil (+2d6) +1/day|3|2|-|-|-|-

2nd|
+2|
+3|
+0|
+3|Lay on Hands, Shield Block +1|4|3|-|-|-|-

3rd|
+3|
+3|
+1|
+3|Aura of Courage, Bulwark of Defense, Divine Health|5|3|-|-|-|-

4th|
+4|
+4|
+1|
+4|Bonus Feat, Divine Grace, Mettle, Turn Undead|6|3|-|-|-|-

5th|
+5|
+4|
+1|
+4|Armor Mastery (Medium), Smite Evil (+4d6, shaken), Special Mount|6|4|2|-|-|-

6th|
+6/+1|
+5|
+2|
+5|Vigilant Defender, Righteous Surge 1/day, Shield Ally|6|4|3|-|-|-

7th|
+7/+2|
+5|
+2|
+5|Damage Reduction 1/-, Diehard|6|5|3|-|-|-

8th|
+8/+3|
+6|
+2|
+6|Aura of Resolve, Bonus Feat|6|5|4|-|-|-

9th|
+9/+4|
+6|
+3|
+6|Armor Mastery (Heavy), Sacred Weapon|6|6|4|2|-|-

10th|
+10/+5|
+7|
+3|
+7|Damage Reduction 2/-, Smite Evil (+6d8, frightened) +3/day |6|6|4|3|-|-

11th|
+11/+6/+1|
+7|
+3|
+7|Charging Smite, Shield Block +2|6|6|5|3|-|-

12th|
+12/+7/+2|
+8|
+4|
+8| Bonus Feat, Righteous Surge 2/day |6|6|5|4|-|-

13th|
+13/+8/+3|
+8|
+4|
+8|Aura of Warding, Damage Reduction 3/-|6|6|6|4|2|-

14th|
+14/+9/+4|
+9|
+4|
+9|Improved Shield Ally|6|6|6|5|3|-

15th|
+15/+10/+5|
+9|
+5|
+9|Smite Evil (+8d8, panicked) +4/day|6|6|6|6|3|-

16th|
+16/+11/+6/+1|
+10|
+5|
+10|Bonus Feat, Damage Reduction 4/-|6|6|6|6|4|-

17th|
+17/+12/+7/+2|
+10|
+5|
+10|Aura of Vitality, Impetuous Endurance|6|6|6|6|5|2

18th|
+18/+13/+8/+3|
+11|
+6|
+11|Righteous Surge 3/day|6|6|6|6|6|3

19th|
+19/+14/+9/+4|
+11|
+6|
+11|Damage Reduction 5/-, Shield Block +3|6|6|6|6|6|5

20th|
+20/+15/+10/+5|
+12|
+6|
+12|Avatar of Justice, Bonus Feat, Smite Evil (+10d10) +5/day|6|6|6|6|6|6 [/table]

Class Features: All of the following are class features of the paladin class.

Weapon and Armor Proficiency: Paladins are proficient with all simple and martial weapons, with all types of armor (heavy, medium, and light) and with shields.

Spells: A paladin casts divine spells, which are drawn from the cleric and paladin spell lists. He can cast any spell he knows without preparing it ahead of time. For spells that are available on both lists but at two different levels, the paladin can learn the spell at the lowest level available. He cannot, however, learn a spell twice.

To learn or cast a spell, a paladin must have a Charisma score equal to at least 10 + the spell level (Cha 10 for 0-level spells, Cha 11 for 1st-level spells, and so forth). The Difficulty Class for a saving throw against a paladinís spell is 10 + the spell level + his Cha modifier.

A paladin can cast only a certain number of spells of each spell level per day, as seen on the table above. In addition, he receives bonus spells per day if he has a high Charisma score (see page 8 of the Playerís Handbook).

Spells Known: A paladin begins play knowing two 0-level spells and two 1st-level spells, chosen from the cleric or paladin spell lists. He also knows one additional 0-level spell for each point of Charisma bonus.

Each time he gains a new class level, the paladin learns one additional spell of any level he can cast, chosen from the cleric or paladin spell lists.

Upon reaching 5th level, and at every subsequent odd-numbered level, a paladin can choose to learn a new spell in place of one he already knows. In effect, he loses access to the old spell in exchange for gaining the new one. The new spellís level must be the same as that of the spell being exchanged, and it must be at least two levels lower than the highest-level spell he can cast. For instance, upon reaching 9th level, the paladin could trade in a single 1st-level spell (two levels below the highest-level spell he can cast, which is 3rd) for a different 1st-level spell. He can swap only a single spell at any given level and must choose whether or not to swap the spell at the same time that he gains new spells known for the level.

A paladin needs not prepare spells in advance. He can cast any spell he knows at any time, assuming he has not yet used up his spells per day for that spell level.

Aura of Good (Ex): The power of a paladinís aura of good (see the detect good spell) is equal to his paladin level, just like the aura of a cleric of a good deity.

Detect Evil (Su): A will, a paladin can use detect evil, as the spell.

Smite Evil (Su): A number of times per day equal to his Charisma modifier +1, a paladin may attempt to smite evil with one normal melee attack. He adds his Charisma bonus (if any) to his attack roll and deals 2d6 extra points of damage. If the paladin accidentally smites a creature that is not evil, the smite has no effect, but the ability is still used up for that day. However, if a paladin misses with a smite evil attempt, the ability is not used up for that day.

As a paladin grows in power, his smites deal more damage and strike fear into the hearts of his foes. At 5th level a paladin's smite deals an extra 4d6 points of damage and the target is shaken. At 10th level the damage increases to 6d8 and the target becomes frightened. At 15th level the damage dealt by a paladin's smite increases to 8d8 and the target becomes panicked. At 20th level a paladin's smite deals 10d10 points of extra damage and the DCs of his smite's fear effects increase by 5.

The fear effects of a paladin's smite last for a number of rounds equal to the paladin's Charisma bonus (minimum 1 round) and have a DC equal to 10 + paladin's class level + his Charisma bonus (if any). The saves against fear are Will-based, and creatures normally immune to fear effects are still subject to the ones generated by a paladinís smite.

At 5th level and every five levels thereafter, the paladin may smite evil one additional time per day.

Lay on Hands (Su): Beginning at 2nd level, a paladin with a Charisma score of 12 or higher can heal wounds (his own or those of others) by touch. Each day he can heal a total number of hit points equal to his paladin level x his Charisma bonus. A paladin may choose to divide his healing among multiple recipients, and he doesnít have to use it all at once. At 6th level and higher, whenever a paladin uses his lay on hands, it removes any diseases or poisons the target may be suffering from. The paladin must spend 5 points of his daily healing in order to rid any disease or poison from the target, as if he had cast remove disease or neutralize poison as the spells. Using lay on hands is a standard action.

Alternatively, a paladin can use any or all of this healing power to deal damage to undead creatures. Using lay on hands in this way requires a successful melee touch attack and doesnít provoke an attack of opportunity. The paladin decides how many of his daily allotment of points to use as damage after successfully touching an undead creature.

Shield Block (Ex): Starting at 2nd level, a paladin excels in using his armor and shield to frustrate his enemyís attacks. During his action, a paladin carrying a shield can designate a single opponent as the target of this ability. His shield bonus to AC against that foe increases by 1, as he moves his shield to deflect an incoming blow, possibly providing just enough protection to turn a telling swing into a near miss. This shield bonus increases to +2 at 11th level and +3 at 19th level.

Aura of Courage (Su): Beginning at 3rd level, a paladin is immune to fear effects (magical or otherwise). Each ally within 10 feet of him gains a +4 morale bonus on saving throws against fear effects. This ability functions while the paladin is conscious, but not if he is unconscious or dead.

Bulwark of Defense (Ex): When a paladin reaches 3rd level, an opponent that begins its turn in his threatened area treats all the squares that the paladin threatens as difficult terrain. A paladinís strict vigilance and active defensive maneuvers force his opponents to move with care.

Divine Health (Ex): At 3rd level, a paladin gains immunity to all diseases, including supernatural and magical diseases (such as mummy rot and lycanthropy).

Bonus Feat: At 4th level and every four levels after that (4th, 8th, 12th, 16th, and 20th), a paladin gains a bonus exalted or fighter feat. He must still meet any prerequisites for the feats, and is treated as a fighter with levels equal to his paladin class levels for the purposes of qualifying for these bonus feats. These bonus feats are in addition to the feats that a character of any class gets every three levels (as given on page 22 of the Playerís Handbook).

Divine Grace (Su): At 4th level, a paladin gains a bonus equal to his Charisma bonus (if any) on all saving throws.

Mettle (Ex): At 4th level and higher, a paladin can resist magical and unusual attacks with great willpower or fortitude. If he makes a successful Will or Fortitude save against an attack that normally would have a lesser effect on a successful on a successful save (such as any spell with a saving throw entry of Will half or Fortitude partial), he instead completely negates the effect. An unconscious or sleeping paladin does not gain the benefit of mettle.

Turn Undead (Su): When a paladin reaches 4th level, he gains the supernatural ability to turn undead. He may use this ability a number of times per day equal to 3 + his Charisma modifier. He turns undead as a cleric of three levels lower would.

Armor Mastery (Ex): Starting at 5th level, a paladin is able to wear his armor like a second skin and ignore the standard speed reduction for wearing medium armor. Starting at 9th level, he ignores the speed reduction imposed by heavy armor as well.

Special Mount (Sp): Upon reaching 5th level, a paladin gains the service of an unusually intelligent, strong, and loyal steed to serve him in his crusade against evil. This mount is usually a heavy warhorse (for a Medium paladin) or a war pony (for a Small paladin). See page 45 of the Playerís Handbook for more information regarding a paladinís mount.

Once per day, as a full-round action, a paladin may magically call his mount from the celestial realms in which it resides. The mount immediately appears adjacent to the paladin and remains for 2 hours per paladin level; it may be dismissed at any time as a free action. The mount is the same creature each it is summoned, though the paladin may release a particular mount from service (if it has grown too old to join his crusade, for instance). Each time the mount is called, it appears in full health, regardless of any damage it may have taken previously. The mount also appears wearing or carrying any gear it had when it was last dismissed (including barding, saddle, saddlebags, and the like). Calling a mount is a conjuration (calling) effect.

Should the paladinís mount die, it immediately disappears, leaving behind any equipment it was carrying. The paladin may not summon another mount for thirty days or until he gains a paladin level, whichever comes first, even if the mount is somehow returned from the dead. During this thirty-day period, the paladin takes a -1 penalty on attack and weapon damage rolls.

Vigilant Defender (Ex): Starting at 5th level, a paladin stands his ground against all enemies, warding the spot where he makes his stand to prevent foes from slipping past and attacking those he protects. If an opponent attempts to use the Tumble skill to move through his threatened area or his space without provoking attacks of opportunity, the Tumble check DC to avoid the paladinís attacks of opportunity increases by an amount equal to his class level.

Righteous Surge (Ex): At 6th level and higher, a paladinís dedication to upholding the law and defending the good allows him to throw off the effect of a special attack that would otherwise hinder or harm him. Once per day, from 6th level on, he can opt to reroll a single saving throw. He must abide by the result of the new, second saving throw, even if it is lower than the first. This ability does not require an action, the paladin simple decides to use it after seeing the result of his saving throw roll but before he is informed as to its success or failure. At 12th level a paladin can use this ability twice a day, and at 18th level he may use it three times per day. He may only use righteous surge once for a single saving throw.

Shield Ally (Ex): Starting at 6th level, as an immediate action a paladin can opt to absorb part of the damage dealt to an adjacent ally. Each time this ally takes damage from a physical attack before her next turn, the paladin can take half this damage upon himself. The paladin can only absorb damage from physical melee attacks and ranged attacks, such as an incoming arrow or blow from a sword, not from spells and other effects.

Damage Reduction (Ex): At 7th level, a paladin gains damage reduction. Subtract 1 from the damage the paladin takes each time he is dealt damage from a weapon or a natural attack. At 10th level, and every three paladin levels thereafter (13th, 16th, and 19th), this damage reduction rises by 1 point. Damage reduction can reduce damage to 0, but not below 0.

Die Hard: A paladin gains Diehard as a bonus feat at 7th level, even if he does not normally qualify.

Aura of Resolve (Ex): Beginning at 8th level, the paladin gains immunity to all charm and compulsion effects. His mind is his own and no other creature can control his thoughts or actions. Each ally within 10 feet of him gains a +4 morale bonus on saving throws against charm or compulsion effects. This ability functions while the paladin is conscious, but not while he is unconscious or dead.

Sacred Weapon (Su): At 9th level, a paladin is able to channel his righteous might into a weapon, making it the bane of all things evil. The paladin must choose a particular weapon of at least masterwork quality as the focus of his power. Against chaotic and evil creatures, the paladinís sacred weapon gains a +2 bonus to attack and weapon damage rolls, inflicts an additional 2d6 points of damage, and becomes lawful and good-aligned and bypasses the corresponding damage reductions.

If a paladinís chosen weapon is lost or destroyed, he loses the ability to deal the extra damage until he acquires and bonds with another weapon of the same kind of at least masterwork quality. The paladin must spend one day per character level practicing with the replacement weapon (and doing very little else- no adventuring) to create a new weapon bond.

Charging Smite (Su): At 11th level and above, if a paladin uses smite evil on a charge attack, he deals double his smite evil damage to an evil creature he hits.

Aura of Warding (Su): Starting at 13th level, a paladin and all allies within 10 feet of him gain a +2 morale bonus on all Will saving throws and a +2 sacred bonus to their Armor Class. This ability functions while the paladin is conscious, but not while he is unconscious or dead.

Improved Shield Ally (Ex): At 14th level, a paladinís ability to absorb damage increases. Once per round he can absorb all the damage from a single attack directed against an adjacent ally. In addition, he continues to absorb half the damage from other physical attacks on an adjacent ally, if the paladin so chooses. He must decide whether to use this ability after the attacker determines that an attack has succeeded, but before the attacker rolls damage.

Aura of Vitality (Su): Starting at 17th level, a paladin is protected by a constant deathward effect that cannot be dispelled. Each ally within 10 feet of him gains a +4 morale bonus on saving throws against negative energy and death effects. This ability functions while the paladin is conscious, but not while he is unconscious or dead.

Impetuous Endurance (Ex): Starting at 17th level, a paladinís fighting spirit enables him to push his body beyond the normal limits of endurance. He no longer automatically fails a saving throw on a roll of 1. He might still fail the save if his result fails to equal or beat the DC.

Avatar of Justice (Su): At 20th level a paladin transcends the mortal coil and becomes something otherworldly and divine. His type changes to outsider (native). As a native outsider, the paladin can still be raised, reincarnated, or resurrected just as other living creatures can be, and remains native to the mortal world. However, he is not affected by spells that specifically target humanoids, such as hold person. Additionally, the paladin gains fast healing 5 and his damage reduction changes to DR 10/-. The powers of a paladin's aura also increase in potency, granting their bonuses to all allies within 20 feet and doubling their bonuses to saves and AC.

Code of Conduct: A paladin must be of lawful good alignment and looses all class abilities if he ever willingly commits an evil act. Additionally, each paladin must follow the paladinís code of conduct, which is in many ways similar to a noble knightís chivalric code.

A paladin must:


Always uphold just laws and strive for the greater good of the world.
Never act falsely unless it is for the greater good.
Always seek out and destroy the wicked and vile and those who threaten innocent folk.
Never harm the weak or helpless.
Always help those in need, provided they are not working towards evil or chaotic ends.
Never use poison to kill or harm a living creature.
Always respect legitimate authority, and actively work to overthrow unjust and cruel rulers.


If a paladin breaks one of these codes, he loses his ability to cast spells and access to all of his supernatural, spell-like, and extraordinary class abilities for the remainder of the day, unless he atones (see the atonement spell description, page 201 of the Playerís Handbook). If a paladin continues to break the code, he risks permanently losing access to his paladin abilities.


Associates: While he may adventure with characters of any good or neutral alignment, a paladin will never knowingly associate with evil characters, nor will he continue an association with someone who consistently offends his moral code. A paladin may accept only henchmen, followers, or cohorts or are lawful good.

Ex-Paladins: A paladin who ceases to be lawful good, who willfully commits an evil act, or who grossly violates the code of conduct loses all paladin spells and abilities (including the service of the paladinís mount, but not weapon, armor, and shield proficiencies). He may not progress any farther in levels as a paladin. He regains his abilities and advancement potential if he atones for his violations (see the atonement spell description, page 201 of the Playerís Handbook), as appropriate.

Like members of any other class, a paladin may be a multiclass character, but multiclass paladins face a special restriction. A paladin who gains a level in any class other than paladin may never again raise his paladin level, though he retains all his paladin abilities. The path of the paladin requires a constant heart. If a character adopts this class, he must pursue it to the exclusion of all other careers. Once he has turned off the path, he may never return.

Alternative Class Features:

Parry and Riposte (Ex)

Level: 2nd

Replaces: If a paladin selects this alternative class feature, he does not gain the shield block ability.

Benefit: Starting at 2nd level, a paladin begins training to defend himself without a shield. During his action, he may designate an opponent and receive a +1 dodge bonus to Armor Class against melee attacks against that opponent, however, he suffers a -1 penalty to AC against all other targets. He can select a new opponent at any action. In addition, if his designated target misses the paladin with a melee attack, the paladin may make a single attack of opportunity against that foe with a -4 penalty to attack, provided he has an attack of opportunity left to use for that round.

At 12th level the paladin's dodge bonus to AC increases to +2 and he no long suffers the -4 penalty with his attack of opportunity.

Divine Spirit (taken from Dungeonscape)
Most paladins form a special relationship with a celestial mount that aids them in battle. Some, however, spend most of their time fighting below the ground or in enclosed spaces, where a mount is of little use. Instead, these paladins have forged bonds with celestial spirits whose aid they call upon when needed.

Level:5th

Replaces: If a paladin selects this alternative class feature, he does not gain the special mount ability.

Benefit: Upon reaching 5th level, a paladin can call upon goodly celestials for aid in the form of a celestial spirit. Using this ability is a standard action that does not provoke attacks of opportunity. See below for detailed spirit descriptions and rules.

A paladin's paladin level determines which kinds of celestial spirits answer his summons. He can summon the spirit available at his current level as well as any that became available at lower levels.


{table=head]Paladin Level|Spirit Summoned

5th-10th|Spirit of Healing

11th-15th|Spirit of Combat

16th-19th|Spirit of Heroism

20th+|Spirit of the Fallen[/table]

The following entries describe how each of the different spirits function. Unless otherwise specified, all spirits share some characteristics, as set out below.


A spirit occupies a 5-foot square on the battle map.
When summoned, a spirit appears on the battlefield 30 feet in front of you. You can use a free action to have it move once per round. The spirit has a land speed of 30 feet.
All spirits are insubstantial and transparent. Any creature can move through them normally, and they do not block line of sight or line of effect.
A spirit cannot attack or be attacked. It is not undead and cannot be turned. It is subject to dispel magic, dismissal, or banishment as if it were a summoned creature, using your paladin level as the caster level.
If you lose line of sight to a spirit, it disappears immediately.
Each spirit available to you can be summoned once per day.
A spirit remains for a number of round equal to your paladin level, until it is dismissed, or until conditions in the spirit's description are met.


Spirit of Healing: This spirit increases your ability to heal damage dealt to you or your allies. When summoned, it can heal an amount of damage equal to twice the amount you can heal using your lay on hands ability. To use its healing ability, you or an ally must begin or end your turn in the same square as the spirit. That character can then use a standard action to transfer some or all of the hit points from the spirit to herself. Once the spirit uses all of its healing ability, it dissipates.

Spirit of Combat: This spirit enhances combat ability. Whenever an ally (including yourself) is adjacent to the spirit of combat or occupying its space, that character gains holy fervor. Holy fervor grants a +1 sacred bonus on attacks and damage rolls for every 4 paladin levels you possess (up to a maximum of +5 at 20th). In addition, affected characters' weapons are treated as good-aligned for the purpose of overcoming damage reduction.

Spirit of Heroism: This spirit automatically occupies your space and does not leave until dismissed, dispelled, or the duration of the summoning ends. You gain an additional DR 10/- and the effects of the Diehard feat, even if you don not meet the prerequisite. In addition, you can use your lay on hands as a free action once per round instead of as a standard action.

Spirit of the Fallen: While you or any of your allies are adjacent to this spirit, it grants fast healing 10 to those characters. If an affected character's hit points drop to 0 or fewer while within 30 feet of this spirit, it revives that character at the start of his next turn, allowing him to take his action as normal. The character heals an amount equal to twice your paladin level, though if his hit points are still at -10 or below, he still dies. The spirit can use its revive ability once per round.

A spirit of the fallen cannot revive creatures whose bodies have been destroyed, nor can it reverse the effects of bodily changes, or other effects that slay a character without dealing damage.

Author's Notes (open spoiler to view)

I felt obligated to make some changes to the paladin class due to its relative weakness, especially compared to the ďtrueĒ spellcasting classes (like cleric, wizard, or even bard). Anyone familiar with the Playerís Handbook II will notice that many of this paladinís abilities are taken from the knight class, which is thematically similar to the paladin in several ways, but it also ultimately lacking. The spell progression was taken from the duskblade and then altered slightly. The paladinís spell list was greatly expanded by allowing the paladin to learn spells from both the paladin and cleric spell lists, although when one spell is available from both lists at two different levels, the paladin must learn the spell at the later level.

I lessened the classís MAD (multiple attribute dependency) problems by making Strength and Charisma the primary stats for the class. Spell casting is entirely Charisma based, and by boosting the paladinís Will save progression, a low Wisdom will not impact a paladinís saves quite as much. Constitution is still an important stat, but thanks to the paladinís high Fortitude save and d12 hit die, it doesnít have to be the paladinís highest stat.

The survivability of the paladin class was further boosted by Mettle (evasion for Will and Fort-based saves if you will), Damage Reduction, three new auras (Resolve, Warding, and Vitality), and Righteous Surge (allowing the paladin a few ďoops rolls a dayĒ). The damage output against evil creatures was also increased by a major smite revision (more times per day and scaling dice damage rather than a straight number) and the paladinís ability to infuse a single weapon with his righteousness and desire to eradicate evil.

Lastly, I addressed the paladinís relatively feat-starved disposition by granting them access to bonus fighter or exalted feats. While not a perfect fix, it goes a long way without making the paladin too overpowered by letting them pick any old feat. Hopefully with these revisions, the paladin will climb out of its Tier 5 slot and hopefully up into Tier 3. All in all I'm proud of my revision, and I hope you all like it.

tempestman
2011-05-16, 09:44 AM
Looking at it, I must say that I like it. Definitely better than Tier 5 (where the paladin and knight classes are according to this site. (http://http://brilliantgameologists.com/boards/index.php?topic=1002.0) I'd say it's easily tier 4, perhaps tier 3? Removing the class's dependency on Wisdom and making Charisma that much more important was a stroke of genius if you ask me. Makes the class sort of a paladin/knight/favored soul hybrid in my opinion.

I liked the idea of the bonus feats being exalted feats, adds some more "heavenly flavor" to the class as a whole. Question though, why didn't you consider making it more like the crusader and give it access to some maneuvers and stances?

crusaderjim
2011-05-16, 12:00 PM
I want to stay away from the Tome of Battle because a lot of DMs don't like it (because they think for some odd reason that it's broken). That and I want the class to be playable with just the core books. The bonus feats are exalted, admittedly, and that requires the Book of Exalted Deeds, but it is easier to switch from one type of feat to another than change an entire combat system to something else.

Gideon Falcon
2011-05-16, 10:47 PM
First off, Paladin fixes would do well to keep in mind that a bonus equal to your level a few times a day is not worthy of being called a Smite. A Smite should, IMHO, either deal ludicrous amounts of damage or be usable much more often. The solution used most often is the second one, replacing per day uses with per encounter smites. Another possibility, however, is to replace or supplement the static bonus with extra damage dice, such as d6s or even d8s.

I really like the sacred weapon ability. I also agree with aura of resolve whole-heartedly, seeing as Paladins shouldn't be subject to some stupid thing like 'suggestion.'

All in all, aside from the Smite damage and such, this is actually a very good fix. A very good base for Soulborn fixes, as well, which I recently realized have their rightful place as an ACF for Paladins anyway.

crusaderjim
2011-05-17, 11:17 AM
Thanks for the feedback. Here's what I'm thinking for smites:

Smite Evil (Su): Once per encounter, a paladin may attempt to smite evil with one normal melee attack. He adds his Charisma bonus (if any) to his attack roll and deals 2d6 extra points of damage. If the paladin accidentally smites a creature that is not evil, the smite has no effect, but the ability is still used up for that day.

At 5th level and every five levels thereafter, the paladin may smite evil one additional time per encounter for an additional 2d6 points of damage, to a maximum of five times per encounter and +10d6 points of damage.

Thoughts?

I'm also making the bonus feats exalted or fighter bonus feats, and I'm thinking of making a full 20 Level Blackguard base class to counter the paladin.

Gideon Falcon
2011-05-17, 02:52 PM
Hmm... I think that 5d6 a limited number of times each encounter is a bit underwhelming when compared to even the Warlock's at-will 9d6, or 10d6 with most fixes. My favorite fix for it can even get off three blasts in one round. Now that I think about it, giving 1d6 per two or even one class levels would not be very OP for a paladin, considering that they have limited uses per encounter and can only affect one creature per use. Daily smites would do best with getting a d8 or d10 per class level, perhaps even d12, likely with a bonus per die.

crusaderjim
2011-05-17, 03:22 PM
Hmm... I think that 5d6 a limited number of times each encounter is a bit underwhelming when compared to even the Warlock's at-will 9d6, or 10d6 with most fixes. My favorite fix for it can even get off three blasts in one round. Now that I think about it, giving 1d6 per two or even one class levels would not be very OP for a paladin, considering that they have limited uses per encounter and can only affect one creature per use. Daily smites would do best with getting a d8 or d10 per class level, perhaps even d12, likely with a bonus per die.

I believe I fixed it up for you. Another alternative could be increasing the damage dice from d6s to d8s at 10th level and d8s to d10s at 20th so it would go 2d6 at 1st, 4d6 at 5th, 3d8 at 10th, 6d8 at 15th, and 10d10 at 20th.

Gideon Falcon
2011-05-17, 05:43 PM
Excellent. The dice increase is a good idea. I myself wouldn't even be that miffed if it was overpowered, since it's still not a Cleric or Druid, and Paladins are SUPPOSED to be impossibly awesome.

Another possibility for a high-level ability is a Death Ward effect, like LG Soulborns in my fix or in T.G. Oskar's fix. I also recommend coming up with a new ACF to replace Special Mounts, since Charging Smite is already incorporated.

NeoSeraphi
2011-05-17, 06:37 PM
Ah, a Paladin that actually has class features beyond 6th level. (Sometimes I really wonder what made Wizards want to give that class all those dead levels when they had to work twice as hard to stay in the class with that code of conduct)

I like the dice increase idea, although I'm confused, as your table and text conflict. You have your text saying it's 1d6 to 5d6 for Smite, while your table says 2d6 to 10d6, and your discussion says 10d10.

The Charging Smite AND Special Mount seem good, though now they can charge on their steed using a Smite Evil with their Sacred Lance and their Spirited Charge feat for...3d8+2 +4d6 (Unless charging Lance doubles the Holy damage, in which case 8d6) + 20d10. With a...masterwork lance. Not even magical at that point. Still, suddenly that makes a Paladin of Bahamut a serious threat against Tiamat's servants, so you've done the class some justice. I approve.

crusaderjim
2011-05-18, 08:55 AM
Ah, a Paladin that actually has class features beyond 6th level. (Sometimes I really wonder what made Wizards want to give that class all those dead levels when they had to work twice as hard to stay in the class with that code of conduct)

I like the dice increase idea, although I'm confused, as your table and text conflict. You have your text saying it's 1d6 to 5d6 for Smite, while your table says 2d6 to 10d6, and your discussion says 10d10.

The Charging Smite AND Special Mount seem good, though now they can charge on their steed using a Smite Evil with their Sacred Lance and their Spirited Charge feat for...3d8+2 +4d6 (Unless charging Lance doubles the Holy damage, in which case 8d6) + 20d10. With a...masterwork lance. Not even magical at that point. Still, suddenly that makes a Paladin of Bahamut a serious threat against Tiamat's servants, so you've done the class some justice. I approve.

The text generally gets overlooked whenever I do a quick patch update. Thanks for pointing it out, I'll update the text in a moment or two. And thanks for the feedback and criticisms, keep them coming!

EDIT: I've updated the original post to show the increase in damage dice on both the table and the text below that. I added a permanent deathward ability that the paladin gets at 17th level to go alongside Impetuous Endurance. Also added an ACF, found in a book co-designed by the Giant himself.

Ziegander
2011-05-18, 11:27 AM
1) Sacred Weapon is ludicrous as a 1st level class feature.

2) Also, once per encounter +2d6 damage is equally ludicrous for 1st level.

You have a set up that allows a 1st level Paladin guaranteed one-shot kills against creatures up to CR 3 or 4, and easily 50% or higher one-shot kills against creatures CR 5+.

There is no balance whatsoever between level breakpoints. Levels 1-6 are amazing to the point of being kind of dumb. Levels 7-9 are likewise dumb, but because they are so bad. This pattern continues as you progress through the class.

Dralnu
2011-05-18, 12:53 PM
I really like it. I especially like it because it carries so much from the original PHB Paladin that it's an easy transition between the two. You keep much of the same design philosophy and mechanics while granting the paladin the tank niche that WOTC tried to add with Crusader.

That said, my only dislike is the spells change. Not because it's under/overpowered, but because I feel it's an unnecessary move away from the original paladin and makes supplements less compatible. The paladin spells are pretty solid with the splatbooks, especially Complete Champion, which lets the buffs become swift actions. Maybe grant the spells learned a little earlier, like one or two levels, but otherwise I think that aspect is fine.

EDIT: Ooh yeah, Ziegander has a point there. I disagree that levels 7-9 are "dumb" (you're getting new spells along with the abilities), but the early levels are definitely OP.

My suggestion is to drop Sacred Weapon entirely. Way too much right off the bat. The paladin's spells should cover those things anyway IMO.

crusaderjim
2011-05-18, 01:13 PM
1) Sacred Weapon is ludicrous as a 1st level class feature.

2) Also, once per encounter +2d6 damage is equally ludicrous for 1st level.

You have a set up that allows a 1st level Paladin guaranteed one-shot kills against creatures up to CR 3 or 4, and easily 50% or higher one-shot kills against creatures CR 5+.

There is no balance whatsoever between level breakpoints. Levels 1-6 are amazing to the point of being kind of dumb. Levels 7-9 are likewise dumb, but because they are so bad. This pattern continues as you progress through the class.

Levels 7-9 might not be the greatest, but they still beat the 8 total empty levels the PHB paladin suffers.


I really like it. I especially like it because it carries so much from the original PHB Paladin that it's an easy transition between the two. You keep much of the same design philosophy and mechanics while granting the paladin the tank niche that WOTC tried to add with Crusader.

That said, my only dislike is the spells change. Not because it's under/overpowered, but because I feel it's an unnecessary move away from the original paladin and makes supplements less compatible. The paladin spells are pretty solid with the splatbooks, especially Complete Champion, which lets the buffs become swift actions. Maybe grant the spells learned a little earlier, like one or two levels, but otherwise I think that aspect is fine.

EDIT: Ooh yeah, Ziegander has a point there. I disagree that levels 7-9 are "dumb" (you're getting new spells along with the abilities), but the early levels are definitely OP.

My suggestion is to drop Sacred Weapon entirely. Way too much right off the bat. The paladin's spells should cover those things anyway IMO.

I revised Smite Evil to go back to its per day affair, which nerfs it but due to the scaling damage increase it isn't so bad. In hindsight more or less unlimited smites is somewhat unnecessary. I also cut back on Sacred Weapon, but didn't do away with it entirely. At first level you just get a +2 to attack and damage rolls vs evil and chaotic creatures, which while good isn't game breaking. 10th level remains the same, except the extra damage dice is only 2d6, not an additional 2d6.

At 1st level a paladin can deal an extra 4 to 14 damage with one attack against an evil opponent once per day, which is nice but not overpowering. At 10th level he can deal 28 to 60 damage to an evil opponent 3 times per day. Much more powerful, but still not gamebreaking. Wizards and Clerics haven't gotten their save or die spells yet, so the paladin is at the very least even, although he possibly has the edge in combat.

Gideon Falcon
2011-05-18, 01:41 PM
Perhaps if you make the damage start at +1d6 and scale a bit faster afterwards, such as every other level, but have the die size rate stay the same, you could keep the per-encounter mechanic. I suppose that 7th level, at least, might need something small to go with it, but DR 1/- is still nothing to sneeze at. I myself might go with an ability that boosts skills, such as +1/2 level to intimidate and sense motive. After all, the Paladin should strike fear into the hearts of evil, and they should be able to see through any deception.

Also, I propose the Death Ward ability be renamed Eternal Zeal, Deathless Might, or something suitably awesome, seeing as just 'Death Ward' may be a little bland.

Still, this is an excellent class.

Fable Wright
2011-05-18, 01:57 PM
I would take a page out of T.G. Oscar's (http://www.giantitp.com/forums/showthread.php?t=193554)book, and give the smite a rider effect. Honestly, just a holy smite is kinda dull, even if it is ridiculous damage, but if it also blind the impure, turns undead to dust, and banishes demons, then it is not only a more versatile tool, but also that much more badass.

Gideon Falcon
2011-05-18, 02:14 PM
True. I myself gave my Soulborn's smite heavy action-taking riders, as well as penalties to saves and ability checks, sort of representing the fact that the smiting packs the pain of all their evildoings. Thus, you're not going to get right back up after that.

I also gave the ability to smite without weaponry as a melee touch attack, for flavor reasons.

crusaderjim
2011-05-18, 03:36 PM
Here's what I did to Smite Evil (posted so you don't have to scroll through the original post):

Smite Evil (Su): Once per day, a paladin may attempt to smite evil with one normal melee attack. He adds his Charisma bonus (if any) to his attack roll and deals 2d6 extra points of damage. If the paladin accidentally smites a creature that is not evil, the smite has no effect, but the ability is still used up for that day. However, if a paladin misses with a smite evil attempt, the ability is not used up for that day.

As a paladin grows in power, his smites deal more damage and effect his opponents in multiple ways. At 5th level a paladin's smite deals an extra 4d6 points of damage and the target is shaken. At 10th level the damage increases to 6d8 and the target becomes frightened. At 15th level the damage dealt by a paladin's smite increases to 8d8 and the target becomes panicked. At 20th level a paladin's smite deals 10d10 points of extra damage and the DCs of his smite's fear effects increase by 5.

The fear effects of a paladin's smite last for a number of rounds equal to the paladin's Charisma bonus (minimum 1 round) and have a DC equal to 10 + paladin's class level + his Charisma bonus (if any). They are mind-affecting fear effects.

At 5th level and every five levels thereafter, the paladin may smite evil one additional time per day.

Thoughts? I'm also considering allowing paladins bonuses uses of their smites equal to their Charisma modifier.

Gideon Falcon
2011-05-18, 07:42 PM
Good. Might want to note that it isn't mind-affecting so that immunities to it won't be as common. After all, Paladins and undead go way back, so Undead shouldn't be unfazed by the smiting.

For versatility, have a second option that mimics sickening, nausea, dazing and then stunning at 20th without being useless on Undead.

Another idea for the Death Ward would be to make it an aura, like Resolve and Courage, granting +4 on allies' saves vs. death and negative energy effects.

Also, Diehard should probably be given as a bonus feat, seeing as it just fits.

NeoSeraphi
2011-05-19, 12:14 AM
Here's what I did to Smite Evil (posted so you don't have to scroll through the original post):

Smite Evil (Su): Once per day, a paladin may attempt to smite evil with one normal melee attack. He adds his Charisma bonus (if any) to his attack roll and deals 2d6 extra points of damage. If the paladin accidentally smites a creature that is not evil, the smite has no effect, but the ability is still used up for that day. However, if a paladin misses with a smite evil attempt, the ability is not used up for that day.

As a paladin grows in power, his smites deal more damage and effect his opponents in multiple ways. At 5th level a paladin's smite deals an extra 4d6 points of damage and the target is shaken. At 10th level the damage increases to 6d8 and the target becomes frightened. At 15th level the damage dealt by a paladin's smite increases to 8d8 and the target becomes panicked. At 20th level a paladin's smite deals 10d10 points of extra damage and the DCs of his smite's fear effects increase by 5.

The fear effects of a paladin's smite last for a number of rounds equal to the paladin's Charisma bonus (minimum 1 round) and have a DC equal to 10 + paladin's class level + his Charisma bonus (if any). They are mind-affecting fear effects.

At 5th level and every five levels thereafter, the paladin may smite evil one additional time per day.

Thoughts? I'm also considering allowing paladins bonuses uses of their smites equal to their Charisma modifier.

Sorry to nitpick again, but you didn't specify WHAT saving throw the target had to make, only the DC. (I assume it's Will but we all know what happens when we assume).

crusaderjim
2011-05-19, 09:03 AM
Good. Might want to note that it isn't mind-affecting so that immunities to it won't be as common. After all, Paladins and undead go way back, so Undead shouldn't be unfazed by the smiting.

For versatility, have a second option that mimics sickening, nausea, dazing and then stunning at 20th without being useless on Undead.

Another idea for the Death Ward would be to make it an aura, like Resolve and Courage, granting +4 on allies' saves vs. death and negative energy effects.

Also, Diehard should probably be given as a bonus feat, seeing as it just fits.

I like the idea of a Deathward aura. I'll also make it so the paladin can choose whether he wants to use the fear inspiring smite (put the fear o' God into the hearts of the wretched and all that) or the debilitating smite before he rolls for smiting and such.


Sorry to nitpick again, but you didn't specify WHAT saving throw the target had to make, only the DC. (I assume it's Will but we all know what happens when we assume).

Don't worry about it. It would have been Will, but now it'll be either Fortitude or Will-based, depending.

Gideon Falcon
2011-05-19, 02:40 PM
You'll also want to put in the duration of the effects. This presents the choice of whether they all end at once, or if the lesser effects last just a bit longer.

Going back with what I said earlier, this progression may be a way to get the smite mechanic back to being per encounter:
{table]Level|Damage
1-2|1d6
3-4|2d6
5-6|3d6
7-8|4d6
9-10|5d6
11-12|6d8
13-14|7d8
15-16|8d8
17-18|9d8
19-20|10d10[/table]

crusaderjim
2011-05-20, 10:09 AM
I'm planning on leaving smites as-is for now, since a paladin with a 20 in Charisma can smite upwards of 10 times a day (and a paladin with higher Charisma can smite more often).

One thing I did change was the paladin's spell list. Rather than draw his spells from the paladin spell list (which is rather limiting and is more or less the same as a cleric's spell list), I changed it so that paladin's use the cleric's spell list. This makes them similar to the favored soul class in that both use Charisma to spontaneously cast divine spells.

I think I'm done with the class now, unless there are some major faults that need fixing. Thanks for the help everyone.

Gideon Falcon
2011-05-20, 01:09 PM
Problem is, there are a sizable number Paladin spells that are ONLY for Paladins, and don't show up on any other class lists.

crusaderjim
2011-05-20, 02:31 PM
Problem is, there are a sizable number Paladin spells that are ONLY for Paladins, and don't show up on any other class lists.

True enough, but I'm fairly certain any DM willing to allow homebrew into a game is going to be lenient and let players use the paladin-only spells as well.

Deathanyl
2011-05-20, 05:12 PM
Thing i like the best about the revamp was the power is divined from righteousness not a specific deity, this opens them up to being more compatible with a greater scope of other players... The world I play in is very evil so not much call for the paladin but the smite and or variation to the mount should make him more flexible and useful.

T.G. Oskar
2011-05-21, 03:29 AM
First off, Paladin fixes would do well to keep in mind that a bonus equal to your level a few times a day is not worthy of being called a Smite.

Albeit a bit late, I'd like to point out something that's reasonable:
At-will, per encounter, daily and weekly abilities can be gauged roughly based on their relative power.

At-will abilities have to be something that's not very surprising, something you're expected to do at all times. Generally, at-will abilities are either part of an attack (trip, disarm), comparable to a 0-level spell at early levels, to a 1st-level spell at mid levels and up to a 3rd level spell at high levels. Something that's important for the character (such as a...say, dowser's ability to sense water) should be at-will, if the ability isn't VERY powerful.

Abilities that recharge at the start of each encounter should be abilities you're expected to do many times but that cannot be constantly repeated. Most smites fall in this way because they're very limited burst damage; maneuvers usually go all the way but you may notice that the 9th level maneuvers don't compare to 9th level spells in many cases. Encounter-recharging abilities usually are comparable to 1st level spells at early levels, 3rd level spells at later levels and probably 5th level spells at high levels.

Per day abilities should provide a continuous bonus or a continuous action in order to be effective. The best example of a good per-day ability is rage: it lasts for quite a while (pretty much for the entire encounter) and the ability increases with your level. Per day abilities should be comparable to 2nd level or even 3rd level spells at low levels, 4th-6th spells at later levels and up to 8th level spells and even the occasional 9th level spell at high levels.

Per week abilities should be above and beyond the norm. Only stuff like Limited Wish, Wish, Miracle, True Resurrection and such long-lasting effects should be per-week, because their effect goes off the scale. If the ability is mostly used outside of battle and has a very powerful (and long lasting, if not permanent), then it's reasonably good for a per-week ability. Offering wishes weekly may seem a bit too far, but a weekly ability to alter your spell list (even if only one spell per week) may suffice.

The reason I mention this is so that you consider the gauge upon which your abilities should lie. Smites, for example, are better considered per-day encounters; they're the paladin's main method of combat, and no amount of abilities will really justify a daily limitation unless they're last resort abilities. If you want your smite to work as a per day ability, grant it a lasting bonus (such as making any attacks dealt to that enemy deal 2d6 points of damage or something) or make it something that deals both ludicrous damage AND has a rider effect. Your smite, OP, is very close to what a per-day ability should be; it's too powerful for a per-encounter ability, but you offer enough uses per day to justify such limited actions. A Paladin with CHA 16-18 will have 3-4 uses per day, which allows you to take the strongest creature around.

On the other hand, Remove Disease is not a per-week ability. It's far too weak to do so. I've seen some abilities that work similarly, but they're far too weak as well; not even having Break Enchantment as a per-week ability makes it worthwhile. I'd recommend having at those levels a (3+Cha modifier) uses per day pool where you can spontaneously provide a healing effect based on the remove disease, remove fear, remove curse, remove blindness/deafness, neutralize poison or break enchantment spells. Tying it to lay on hands, and probably even spreading it out several uses might work. That, or give it a different ability; of all paladin abilities, only the weekly uses of Remove Disease simply suck beyond all belief. They're really pisspoor class abilities, something that can be easily replicated through spellcasting (which is really, in the end, what fully progresses alongside the mount). It doesn't have to be as I mentioned, but DO consider replacing Remove Disease with...something. If you're worried about backwards-compatibility, do recall that you can tie any ACF based on Remove Disease with this ability if you want.


Problem is, there are a sizable number Paladin spells that are ONLY for Paladins, and don't show up on any other class lists.

I wholeheartedly concur. The Paladin spell list is pretty decent, if you take the time to polish the hidden gems inside of it. I'd go for having the Cleric spell list alongside the Paladin exclusive spells, AND lower a few spells from their levels. It's a hard way to do so, but as an example: Dispel Magic at 1st level, but force Archivists to learn it at the highest level. That should make the spell more relevant at the levels it's really important (else, you'll have Dispel Magic at 9th level, just one level shy of its cap, while you won't have access to Greater Dispel Magic at all.

crusaderjim
2011-05-21, 08:57 AM
Hmmm.... remove disease is a very lackluster ability, especially for a per week ability. I'm actually surprised no one touched on that one yet.

I decided to roll remove disease into lay on hands:

Lay on Hands (Su): Beginning at 2nd level, a paladin with a Charisma score of 12 or higher can heal wounds (his own or those of others) by touch. Each day he can heal a total number of hit points equal to his paladin level x his Charisma bonus. A paladin may choose to divide his healing among multiple recipients, and he doesnít have to use it all at once. At 6th level and higher, whenever a paladin uses his lay on hands, it removes any diseases or poisons the target may be suffering from. The paladin must spend 5 points of his daily healing in order to rid any disease or poison from the target, as if he had cast remove disease or neutralize poison as the spells. Using lay on hands is a standard action.

Alternatively, a paladin can use any or all of this healing power to deal damage to undead creatures. Using lay on hands in this way requires a successful melee touch attack and doesnít provoke an attack of opportunity. The paladin decides how many of his daily allotment of points to use as damage after successfully touching an undead creature.

T.G. Oskar
2011-05-21, 04:33 PM
You might want to consider adding something to 18th level as well. As it currently stands, the loss of Remove Disease per week doesn't affect any other level where it once stood, but it does affect a bit the abilities at 18th level. In order for you to have it on perspective:

6th: You gain your first use of Righteous Smite, PLUS the ability to protect allies.
9th: You gain the Armor Mastery ability that allows you to ignore movement penalties in heavy armor, plus Diehard (though, IMO, it's gained a bit too late since you need something proper to extend the negative level range somewhere close to when you gain Diehard, or place Diehard at the first six levels where it still has some utility.
12th: You gain your second use of Righteous Smite, PLUS a bonus feat. Note: while it's excellent that you wish to consider exalted feats, Paladins still WILL have problems with their feat slots. I'd recommend a range between Fighter bonus feats (they ARE warriors, after all), Divine feats (they have Turn Undead, their TU is pretty weak, so why not make it useful by having something else as well?), Domain feats (though you might want to limit their access to 2 or 3 at most), Reserve feats (they're spellcasters, so they may have access to one or two feats) or Exalted feats (which is what you already have). That provides a myriad of options for Paladins, resolves their feat starvation, AND provides a stronger ability. If not, you risk having 12th level be pretty weak, since BAB/saves/spell progression is usually ignored when dealing about dead levels. You might wanna consider that. Not to mention that it allows people who aren't using the Book of Exalted Deeds to do something with those bonus feats.
15th: An extra use of Smite Evil. It may seem a bit off, but the fact that the Smite gains the ability to panic (remember most enemies up to this point are immune to fear, so you might want to allow the Paladin to bypass this immunity in a few evil creatures) and increased damage dice saves this a bit.
18th: An extra use of Righteous Surge. That's it.

So, if you look at it pretty closely, the first two levels are pretty decent, while the last three are saved only because the abilities progress in one way or another. Being generous with levels 12th and 15th (the closer examination indicates they don't get something that can balance the other levels in acquisition of abilities), that leaves level 18th as a quasi-dead level; you gain a new use of an ability, but nothing else that might motivate you to take the last two levels until level 20, where you get semi-redundant DR (10/evil is nothing to chafe at, but against evil enemies you get only your unbeatable DR 5/-) and other such abilities, which with the extra 5th level spell slots you might work around.

Another thing that worries me, just by looking at the table, is how...cluttered it looks. This is more of a pet peeve of mine, but whenever I organize a class table, I like to work with pretty close mathematical progressions where every level has something good. This doesn't usually happen (some classes of mine have horrible, horrible dead levels which need some fixing), but otherwise the remaining abilities have some sort of aesthetic to them. The reason why I mention this is because you should take your time to reconsider the abilities and spread them out. This is crucial, because I see many abilities that should be on other levels; Diehard at the moment is the biggest offender. Much like the original Paladin, it's heavily frontloaded within the first 6 levels, not to mention that you seem to have added the ACFs of the Paladin (except Divine Spirit) AND the Knight's abilities into the Paladin chassis. I can see how pretty much everything from the Knight except the Challenges might work out, but it seems cluttered. For example: Divine Grace, which is a VERY good ability, still remains at 2nd level, which makes you have a HUGE bonus to saves pretty much from the start. You could spread Divine Grace no further from 12th level, and it would still be amazing. If you were to replace Diehard with Divine Grace, you'd have a much more elegant progression. Also, Sacred Weapon right from the start, getting a low but still considerable bonus when you're pretty much starting seems a bit too powerful; against evil enemies, you get the rough equivalent of a +2 weapon, or worse, a bane weapon. You can extend that to, say, 7th level and you'd still have a surprisingly good ability, although by that level you might want to collapse all of the spread-out abilities into one. Now, I don't ask you to make it mathematically precise (for example, all aura abilities on a rigid "every 5 levels" progression starting from 3rd level or something), but a bit more aesthetic, so that when you gauge the abilities you gain each level, you gain something pretty similar every level (or at least, with a minimum variance in quality; not have 4th level be OMGWTFBBQ amazing and then 5th level suck beyond all belief).

crusaderjim
2011-05-21, 04:46 PM
By all means, goodsir, post a table as you see fit. I'll admit I'm not the greatest at balancing my homebrew, I'm more of an ideas man. Show me what you think it should look like with a table if you would (not so good at visualizing based purely off of text).

Gideon Falcon
2011-05-23, 05:18 PM
I disagree that his current smite, at least at higher levels, is too powerful for a per-encounter mechanic. with a progression that doesn't start at 2d6, it would be very comparable with Eldritch Blast; 5 times per encounter, dealing 10d10 damage and a rider effect to a single evil or chaotic target, or an at will 20' selective burst or 60' cone that deals 9d6 (10d6 with almost all fixes) damage no matter what alignment, no SR, that deals continuing damage for a few rounds afterward, given the right invocation choice. In addition, it has maximum damage equal to the extra damage from Strike of Perfect Clarity. With that in mind, per encounter would be a great idea.

As for Divine Grace, I originally opposed the idea of postponing it, but I realize now that it probably is a good idea. +4 on all saves is a rather big thing, and a two-level dip for it is a bit to much.

For some ideas on the higher level abilities, you might extend the range of the Shield Ally effects as a Supernatural ability, and increase the number of allies it can affect. A few Project Heretica style abilities may also do well.

I also think that Shield Block shouldn't really require a shield, as a lot of Paladins are likely going to be going two-handed.

Pechvarry
2011-05-23, 11:16 PM
As for Divine Grace, I originally opposed the idea of postponing it, but I realize now that it probably is a good idea. +4 on all saves is a rather big thing, and a two-level dip for it is a bit to much.

I don't get really get this. If you're making a class that's worth staying in for the long haul, then a 2-level dip simply makes for more possible character builds. Indeed, a true test as to whether you've succeeded in making it good for the full 20 levels could be if you're not threatened by builds dipping it.

Still, for my house rules, I've been looking at Paladins getting Cha to Will saves only (just like crusaders), with it upgrading to full saves a few levels later (like 'til 6 or so). I like this approach a lot more than simply delaying the whole thing for 10 levels. Glitterdust sucks so hard.


I also think that Shield Block shouldn't really require a shield, as a lot of Paladins are likely going to be going two-handed.

I disagree vehemently. In fact, I'm very happy to see "when carrying a shield," excluding (I think) animated shields of stupidness. My suggestion: leave it as-is and introduce an alternate class feature to replace it. However, said ACF should, under no circumstances, make 2-handing better than it already is. Simply making it something not tied to shield use is enough that it'll be appealing to 2-handers. E.g. trading in shield block for additional points of Lay on Hands, auras extend out to 15'/20'/25' at the indicated levels, etc.

crusaderjim
2011-05-24, 07:59 AM
Here's a revised table. If it gets positive feedback then I'll update the OP to reflect this. To save space I put it in a spoiler.

{table=head]Level|Base Attack Bonus|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Special|0|1st|2nd|3rd|4th|5th

1st|
+1|
+2|
+0|
+2|Aura of Good, Detect Evil, Smite Evil (+2d6) +1/day|3|2|-|-|-|-

2nd|
+2|
+3|
+0|
+3|Lay on Hands, Shield Block +1|4|3|-|-|-|-

3rd|
+3|
+3|
+1|
+3|Aura of Courage, Bulwark of Defense, Divine Health|5|3|-|-|-|-

4th|
+4|
+4|
+1|
+4|Bonus Feat, Divine Grace, Mettle, Turn Undead|6|3|-|-|-|-

5th|
+5|
+4|
+1|
+4|Armor Mastery (Medium), Smite Evil (+4d6, shaken), Special Mount|6|4|2|-|-|-

6th|
+6/+1|
+5|
+2|
+5|Vigilant Defender, Righteous Surge 1/day, Shield Ally|6|4|3|-|-|-

7th|
+7/+2|
+5|
+2|
+5|Damage Reduction 1/-, Diehard|6|5|3|-|-|-

8th|
+8/+3|
+6|
+2|
+6|Aura of Resolve, Bonus Feat|6|5|4|-|-|-

9th|
+9/+4|
+6|
+3|
+6|Armor Mastery (Heavy), Sacred Weapon|6|6|4|2|-|-

10th|
+10/+5|
+7|
+3|
+7|Damage Reduction 2/-, Smite Evil (+6d8, frightened) +3/day |6|6|4|3|-|-

11th|
+11/+6/+1|
+7|
+3|
+7|Charging Smite, Shield Block +2|6|6|5|3|-|-

12th|
+12/+7/+2|
+8|
+4|
+8| Bonus Feat, Righteous Surge 2/day |6|6|5|4|-|-

13th|
+13/+8/+3|
+8|
+4|
+8|Aura of Warding, Damage Reduction 3/-|6|6|6|4|2|-

14th|
+14/+9/+4|
+9|
+4|
+9|Improved Shield Ally|6|6|6|5|3|-

15th|
+15/+10/+5|
+9|
+5|
+9|Smite Evil (+8d8, panicked) +4/day|6|6|6|6|3|-

16th|
+16/+11/+6/+1|
+10|
+5|
+10|Bonus Feat, Damage Reduction 4/-|6|6|6|6|4|-

17th|
+17/+12/+7/+2|
+10|
+5|
+10|Aura of Vitality, Impetuous Endurance|6|6|6|6|5|2

18th|
+18/+13/+8/+3|
+11|
+6|
+11|Righteous Surge 3/day|6|6|6|6|6|3

19th|
+19/+14/+9/+4|
+11|
+6|
+11|Damage Reduction 5/-, Shield Block +3|6|6|6|6|6|5

20th|
+20/+15/+10/+5|
+12|
+6|
+12|Avatar of Justice, Bonus Feat, Smite Evil (+10d10) +5/day|6|6|6|6|6|6 [/table]


Aura of Warding (Su): Starting at 13th level, a paladin and all allies within 10 feet of him gain a +2 morale bonus on all Will saving throws and a +2 sacred bonus to their Armor Class.

Avatar of Justice (Su): At 20th level a paladin transcends the mortal coil and becomes something otherworldly and divine. His type changes to outsider (native). As a native outsider, the paladin can still be raised, reincarnated, or resurrected just as other living creatures can be, and remains native to the mortal world. However, he is not affected by spells that specifically target humanoids, such as hold person. Additionally, the paladin gains fast healing 5 and his damage reduction changes to DR 10/-. The powers of a paladin's aura also increase in potency, granting their bonuses to all allies within 20 feet and doubling their bonuses to saves and AC. (This will replace Perfect Self)

Alternative Class Feature: Not all paladins carry shields into combat, so not all paladins would benefit from the shield block ability. Paladins without shields can choose to replace Shield Block with the following ability:

Parry and Riposte (Ex): Starting at 2nd level, a paladin begins training to defend himself without a shield. During his action, he may designate an opponent and receive a +1 dodge bonus to Armor Class against melee attacks against that opponent, however, he suffers a -1 penalty to AC against all other targets. He can select a new opponent at any action. In addition, if his designated target misses the paladin with a melee attack, the paladin may make a single attack of opportunity against that foe with a -4 penalty to attack, provided he has an attack of opportunity left to use for that round.

At 12th level the paladin's dodge bonus to AC increases to +2 and he no long suffers the -4 penalty with his attack of opportunity.


As for a few other notes. I do intend on keeping Shield Ally as a purely shield-based ability. Maybe I'll come up with an ACF that makes dual-wielding or two-handed paladins get a smaller bonus to their AC, but the Shield Ally ability will remain as-is.

As for smites, I'm leaving them as per day. While a warlock might be able to inflict the same rough amount of damage at will, he also doesn't have as many options as the paladin unless built for it (ex. can't really melee, less HP, subject to Concentration, ASF, antimagic fields, and the like). Also, the ToB maneuvers are once per encounter, unless you specifically take time to refresh them (which with some feats doesn't take much, but still). I might come up with an ability that allows a paladin to meditate shortly to regain a few uses of his smite attempts, but that's about it. Also, the fear effects are going to ignore immunities to mind-affecting fear effects that many creatures have (I'll update that when I change the OP's post).

Comments or thoughts?

Hopefully this level progression is better. It spreads things out, adds a few things, and reduces the only relatively "dead" levels to Levels 14 and 18.

wyrmsbane2
2011-05-24, 09:28 AM
for your Aura of Warding ability, keep in mind that at 13th level all of (or at least most of) the party members will have a Ring of Protection, which doesn't stack with the Aura. you could call it Sacred Warding, and give the allies a + 1 or +2 sacred bonus to AC and Will saves, that way, everyone benefits, not just the poor shmuck without a ring.

for Paladins who fight two-handed or with two weapons you could make the shield block a dodge ability (just like the feat), and allow them to use it even if their armor normally wouldn't allow it.

Pechvarry
2011-05-24, 05:55 PM
Well, +3 shield bonus if wielding a shield vs +3 dodge bonus... this is the same benefit minus the shield dependence, so you're still in the same position.

crusaderjim
2011-05-25, 06:55 PM
Updated the Avatar of Justice and Aura of Warding abilities and added an Alternate Class feature for Shield Block.

wyrmsbane2
2011-05-25, 08:29 PM
nice addition to the capstone!

crusaderjim
2011-05-25, 08:43 PM
nice addition to the capstone!

Why thankya goodsir. I figured it'd be nice for the entire party to get a benefit from a Lv 20 paladin, not just the paladin himself.

tempestman
2011-05-26, 08:07 AM
Wow, a lot has changed since I last saw this. Alright, firstly I like that you made the Smites +1/day rather than go encounter based. I don't think a paladin should be able to smite things left and right all day. The reordering of some class abilities was also a good idea, glad you listened to some other people. Divine Grace is still low enough to make the class splashable, but no so low as to make it splashable only, if you catch my meaning.

The progressive smite damage was a boss idea, as was adding the fear-effect. If you didn't already make those fear effects bypass regular fear immunities, I suggest you do that. Avatar of Justice is way better than Perfect Self, so kudos for that.

I'm a little worried that the Parry and Riposte feature might be better than the Shield Block feature, rather than equal to it. Just letting you know.

Anyway, I'd play one just looking at it, but I might reconsider that depending on how well playtesting goes. Have you done any playtesting yet?

crusaderjim
2011-05-26, 02:52 PM
Thanks for the feedback everyone. I've updated the original post.

Gideon Falcon
2011-05-26, 03:44 PM
I also had a recent idea for an awesome ACF that takes after Unearthed Arcana: Instead of a smite, the Paladin gains a rage-like ability that gives extra bonuses against evil and chaotic creatures, like the smite, except over an extended period of time. It might gain a small increase to the bonuses if it is made in reaction to witnessing the committing or aftermath of a particularly heinous crime. At higher levels, it comes with a frightful presence as well.

Pechvarry
2011-05-26, 10:28 PM
I also had a recent idea for an awesome ACF that takes after Unearthed Arcana: Instead of a smite, the Paladin gains a rage-like ability that gives extra bonuses against evil and chaotic creatures, like the smite, except over an extended period of time. It might gain a small increase to the bonuses if it is made in reaction to witnessing the committing or aftermath of a particularly heinous crime. At higher levels, it comes with a frightful presence as well.

Check out Races of Destiny (I think). There's a half-orc paladin sub level that trades out smite for a mini-rage. I don't know that it's any good, but it's a good starting point for sure.

crusaderjim
2011-05-27, 09:43 AM
Alright, I updated the OP. Paladins can now learn spells from the cleric and paladin spell lists, but if a spell appears on both lists at 2 different levels, the paladin must learn the higher level spell. I believe I updated all text-based instances of that, so that should be good. I also updated the author's notes.

Unless there is something glaringly wrong with the update I'm not planning on touching the class again until after I playtest it (any of you fine folks can help me by playtesting it as well if you'd like). That's not to say that I'm done with this overall project, however. Next I'm planning on searching through some of my sourcebooks and locating feats that alter the paladin's smite ability, and rewriting them so that they work with this revision. Then I'm planning on making a blackguard class.

Questions for the blackguard, should I make it Lawful Evil, Chaotic Evil, or any type of evil? I'd prefer making it one or the other, but I'm considering both. Neutral Evil doesn't really strike me as "evil enough" for some reason, so I might stray away from that.

Gideon Falcon
2011-05-27, 10:30 AM
The problem is, spells that Paladins have can afford to be lower level since they have such limited spellcasting. Restricting access to a, say, 4th level Paladin spell that would normally be 6th level for clerics is not fair for Paladins. Instead of using the higher spell level, they should use the Paladin spell level. This makes much more sense, as they are actually Paladins.

crusaderjim
2011-05-27, 11:57 AM
The problem is, spells that Paladins have can afford to be lower level since they have such limited spellcasting. Restricting access to a, say, 4th level Paladin spell that would normally be 6th level for clerics is not fair for Paladins. Instead of using the higher spell level, they should use the Paladin spell level. This makes much more sense, as they are actually Paladins.

Fair enough, I'll change it asap

wyrmsbane2
2011-05-27, 02:16 PM
Questions for the blackguard, should I make it Lawful Evil, Chaotic Evil, or any type of evil? I'd prefer making it one or the other, but I'm considering both. Neutral Evil doesn't really strike me as "evil enough" for some reason, so I might stray away from that.

I would make it a specific evil, because if you want it to be the evil version of a paladin, then they should be just as restricted as the paladin is in alignment choice. I would choose the alignment that goes with what you want the class abilities to do. Is the blackguard meant to be a team player like the paladin, or a loner? Do his aura abilities help his allies or hurt his enemies? If they help I would say LE, if they harm, CE, and if they do a mix, NE.

Pechvarry
2011-05-27, 03:50 PM
Fair enough, I'll change it asap

Eeeh. That went quickly without counterpoint. I'm not saying I disagree with the decision, but it is worth noting that this paladin gets spell access faster than normal. Just food for thought.

crusaderjim
2011-05-27, 04:58 PM
Eeeh. That went quickly without counterpoint. I'm not saying I disagree with the decision, but it is worth noting that this paladin gets spell access faster than normal. Just food for thought.

That may be true, but then there is the fact that DCs for the paladin's lower level spells will be lower than if he picks the higher level versions. I did make a note to say that a paladin cannot learn a spell twice in order to prevent someone from doubling up on a handy spell and getting to cast it more often (like Virtue or a Cure spell).

Solaris
2011-05-29, 06:30 AM
I want to stay away from the Tome of Battle because a lot of DMs don't like it (because they think for some odd reason that it's broken).

I don't like it for the same reason I don't like PC primary spellcasters or monks: It doesn't fit right with my game. I don't think I've ever encountered someone who said "ToB is bad because it's overpowered." I've run into plenty of people who've said that people didn't like it because they thought it was overpowered, but nobody who said that they, themselves, thought it was overpowered. Complicated, sure, it's another magic system to learn, but not overpowered.

I do like what you've done with this class, though I'm afraid I really don't have much to contribute beyond that. It seems a fairly solid Tier 3 to me.

crusaderjim
2011-05-29, 08:08 AM
I don't like it for the same reason I don't like PC primary spellcasters or monks: It doesn't fit right with my game. I don't think I've ever encountered someone who said "ToB is bad because it's overpowered." I've run into plenty of people who've said that people didn't like it because they thought it was overpowered, but nobody who said that they, themselves, thought it was overpowered. Complicated, sure, it's another magic system to learn, but not overpowered.

I do like what you've done with this class, though I'm afraid I really don't have much to contribute beyond that. It seems a fairly solid Tier 3 to me.

Thank you very much for the kind words goodsir. I also strayed away from the ToB in this instance so that I could preserve the feel of the 3.5 Core Paladin, which I hope I did.

Solaris
2011-05-29, 10:55 AM
Thank you very much for the kind words goodsir. I also strayed away from the ToB in this instance so that I could preserve the feel of the 3.5 Core Paladin, which I hope I did.

You did, and I'm rather glad you stayed away from ToB. It tends to really turn me off of a class when it's an initiator. I particularly like your idea about the shields.

Pechvarry
2011-05-29, 11:14 PM
I hate ToB paladins for a very simple reason: that class already exists. It's called the Crusader and it doesn't need fixing.

I had more to say but it was a dumb question about semantics so um...

Good work, dude!

crusaderjim
2011-05-30, 08:10 AM
Thanks for all the feedback guys (and gals). I'll actually be having one of my players test it soon, so I'll be able to update you guys on any issues I come across during that fun time. If any of you folk happen to play with this class as well, please post how it works out and any problems with it so I can update it accordingly.

wyrmsbane2
2011-06-01, 09:50 PM
so last night I had the opportunity to do a little play-testing. started off at 5th level, it was a one-time campaign to kill time, but nevertheless:
heres the paladin I rolled up using the point buy with 30 points.

Half-elf level 5
Hp: 49
AC: 21 (+2 breastplate +7, +2 heavy steel shield +4)
str 14, dex 10, con 14, int 10, wis 14, chr 16
skills: climb +10, heal +10, k. religion +8, sense motive +10
feats: improved initiative, extra smite, power attack
gear: +1 longsword, +2 breastplate, +2 heavy shield, 2 ptns. haste, 2 ptns. barkskin

overall: very good performance. shield block came in quite handy, especially with the dodge bonus from a haste potion. I took the extra smite since I was told we were fighting vampires, so having 2 more was pretty nice (thats 8d6 more!), but otherwise I probably wouldn't have taken it, since we only played long enough to actually use 4 smites. armory mastery medium was huge, I ended up needing all 30' frequently. bulwark of defense and vigilant defender didn't see any use at all, so sorry there. otherwise, definitely better than the PHB. he was a tank, which is impressive to me because he had a con 14, but that huge armor class was really nice. shield block was the deciding factor for hit/miss more than once. I would definitely rather play this than a shield oriented fighter.

Great job!

crusaderjim
2011-06-02, 08:21 AM
Glad to hear someone's used and liked it. The extra smite feat reminds me that I need to search through my sourcebooks and rewrite some of the smite feats that may not work so well with the updated smite ability.

So far one of my players plans on running a 9th level human paladin using a flamberge (2d8 damage, 18-20/x2; exotic weapon) and serve as the party's healer and secondary frontliner. The rest of the party is a changeling rogue, half-elf sorcerer, and jahseri warblade (jahseri is a homebrewed race of mine). And I'm sending them through a 3.5 version of the Tomb of Horrors.

Hopefully he'll shine and survive the tomb. I'll fill you guys in on the results once we play in a week or two.

Anyway, the current question is, what are all of the paladin smite feats in 3.5?

tempestman
2011-06-02, 08:55 AM
The only feats I found that pertained to damage were Great Smiting and a few that were from some random campaign settings. Great Smiting is an epic feat, and I don't know if you play epics, so it might not pertain to you. Always good to keep your options open though I suppose.

Most of the other ones are extra uses per day or allowing you to overcome DR, which you already have thanks to sacred bond.

wyrmsbane2
2011-06-02, 03:19 PM
as I was making the character and looking at smite feats I didn't find any that didn't work with the way you have it set up. actually, a lot of them are just less powerful because the smite is better, or the paladin basically gains the feat through a class feature like Sacred Bond.

crusaderjim
2011-06-04, 09:54 AM
Thanks for the information. I won't worry too much about updating those feats then, although I might make a few homebrew feats to make the smite better or more versatile.

Hemnon
2011-06-04, 08:31 PM
this makes a paladin worth playing, im sold!
*starts stealing the blueprints:smallbiggrin:

Gideon Falcon
2011-06-06, 02:45 PM
First off, the update for Sapphire Smite (Magic of Incarnum)

Sapphire Smite [Incarnum]
Prerequisites: Smite class feature, Con 13
Benefit: Once per day, you may invest essentia into this feat. For each point of essentia invested, you gain an additional smite attempt per day and your smites deal an additional die of damage.

Next, the Righteous Fury ACF (Rough Draft)

Righteous Fury
Class: Paladin
Level: 1st
Replaces: Smite
Benefit: Once per day, plus an additional time per day at each level divisible by 5 (5th, 10th, 15th, etc.), as an immediate action, you may enter a state superficially similar to a Barbarian's rage. This may not be used more than once each encounter, however, no matter how many daily uses you gain. You gain a bonus on attack and damage rolls against evil opponents equal to your charisma modifier, and an additional bonus on damage rolls in general equal to your paladin level. You also gain a +4 bonus on Intimidate checks, a +2 morale bonus on will saves, and a +2 morale bonus to Constitution. You take a -2 penalty to AC, however. This Fury lasts a number of rounds equal to your charisma modifier, after which you are fatigued for the rest of the encounter. During your Fury, you may not use any intelligence, charisma, or dexterity based skill check except for intimidate and ride, and you cannot take actions that require concentration. The exception is that you may still cast spells, as long as they affect either you, an opponent, or an area. You must make a concentration check (DC 15 + Spell level) or lose the spell in such a case, however. You may not otherwise use the concentration skill.

At 5th level, you gain DR 1/- during your Righteous Fury, or your existing damage reduction increases by 1. This improves by an additional 1 at 10th level, 15th level, and so on.

At 10th level, the Constitution bonus increases to +4, and the Will save bonus increases to +3. You also gain a frightful presence out to 20 feet. All enemies within this aura must make a will save (DC 10 + 1/2 paladin level + Cha modifier) or become shaken for 1d4 rounds. Regardless of the save result, the enemy needs not save again against that use of your Righteous Fury.

At 20th level, the Constitution bonus and Will save bonus increase to +6 and +4, respectively. In addition, your Frightful Presence extends out to 40 feet and causes enemies to become frightened on a failed save rather than shaken.

So, what do you think? Does it fit with crusaderjim's fix?

crusaderjim
2011-06-07, 07:59 AM
I'm glad you fixed the Sapphire Smite to work with this revamp. Forgot to check the Magic of Incarnum book.

Righteous Fury looks good, especially if someone was playing a savage paladin. I'd write in a note for it that makes it count as Smite for the purpose of qualifying for prestige classes, and/or make feats that affect rage and frenzy to affect Righteous Fury as well.

Gideon Falcon
2011-06-07, 02:05 PM
I'm not the one who wrote the revamp, I'm just helping because I'm interested.

The point behind the Righteous Fury is less a savage Paladin, in my mind, and more the kind who, when confronted with a truly heinous act, causes bad guys to 'disappear.' Because you don't want to know what actually happened to them.

crusaderjim
2011-06-10, 08:45 AM
I was unaware of that. Either way, it's a pretty sweet ACF.

crusaderjim
2011-06-24, 03:48 PM
Alright, so my play testing player played his paladin today. It was a 4-man group of Lv 9 characters: Changeling Rogue, Half-Elf Sorcerer, Jahseri (homebrew race) Warblade, and Human Paladin (wielding a flamberge [2d8, 18-20/x2]). The monsters were various undead and/or evil creatures, resulting in the paladin being able to smite several things.

Sadly I don't have the player's sheet on-hand, but when I do I'll update this post to something a little more informative. Without the smites, he was dealing an average of 24~30 damage with his power attack and sacred weapon ability, and with smites he was able to knock enemies down to half-hp. He was using the Parry and Riposte ACF, but forgot to use it so I'll have to get back to you after they finish the dungeon for information about that.

As for spells, the party as a whole was surprisingly capable, and took very little damage (sorcerer took 0 damage the first day in the dungeon). The warblade and rogue both took a fair amount of damage from a fall and skirr respectively, and the paladin was able to heal them quite nicely with his spells.

I'll take better notes next time my group gets together and plays so that you guys have a better clue as to what it does, but I was pleasantly surprised by the paladin's capabilities. The warblade (a munchkin) complained that the smite was too powerful until I pointed out some of his per encounter abilities, which shut him up. The paladin player liked the class, minus the who "honor" thing, which got in the way of his kill and loot barbarian-mind philosophy.