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View Full Version : Delicious Food The USofA Fails At Importing



Deth Muncher
2011-07-28, 02:17 AM
So, I'm from the good ol' USA. I live my life on burgers and apple pie - two TOTALLY AMERICAN dishes, NOT IMPORTED FROM ANYWHERE, right? Yeah, pfft. See, it seems like back in the day, the US had no problem importing delicious food and just absorbing it into the culture. Yet unfortunately, it seems like nowadays we are incapable of having delicious things that many other places have.

My first two points: Variations on the Kit Kat bar, and hazlenut yogurt (or yoghurt, to those of you trying to fight eldritch horrors). In the US, I've seen the standard Kit Kat, as well as white and dark chocolate varieties. And that's super keen. But look (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kit_Kat#Varieties) at what they have in Japan! That's a veritable smorgasbord of flavors!

As to hazelnut yogurt - I had this when I briefly visited Ireland, and let me tell you, it is the most wonderful dairy-based food I have put in my face in all of my years on this planet. Which is only a couple of decades, but regardless.

So, you other people who know what the US is missing - what does the US fail at importing that is both delicious and food?

veven
2011-07-28, 02:29 AM
I've had a hard time finding legitimate Hungarian food. Which is so sad.

If you have money for a a plane ticket and some spare time just buy twenty pounds of tums and spend a couple weeks eating in Budapest, the food is so freaking delicious, most of it is very rich though.

Also, Slovokia has these weird Haribo candies with like....chewy stuff wrapped in different chewy stuff (so descriptive, I know) that I ate pretty much every day I was there and have never seen anywhere else.

Totally Guy
2011-07-28, 02:42 AM
My dad moved to the US a couple of years back.

He misses:
Baked Beans
Marmite
British tea brands

... Actually there's not much british cuisine that isn't inspired by some place else anyway.

Half of the things he couldn't get were just things that were available which he didn't know the name for.

Mikhailangelo
2011-07-28, 02:45 AM
Ye got nae haggis over there laddie! Whit's a Scot tae dae wi' nae haggis?

arguskos
2011-07-28, 02:45 AM
Deth, I'm preeeeeetty sure I've had hazelnut yogurt here in the States. Like, a few different times. Once it even had hazelnuts in it. Just look harder. :smalltongue:

veven, concerning Haribo candies... we have those literally EVERYWHERE in Ohio. I mean, I can go to Speedway and buy a bag of Haribo gummies. I assume you must be referencing something more exotic? :smallconfused:

So far, the only thing I haven't found in the States somewhere (many things are not widespread but can be found with some digging) is a reaaaaaaaaaaaaally fantastic Lebanese place. And yes, I tried Toledo (which is supposed to have a large Lebanese population). I was unimpressed. Still, the hunt continues. What I wouldn't give for a super fresh plate of kibbeh.

EDIT: Totally Guy... your dad missed baked beans? :smallconfused: There's racks of that sorta thing at the grocery. What is it supposed to be like, this food that he misses? I'm not familiar with British baked beans.

Kislath
2011-07-28, 02:55 AM
If you like Hungarian food,
They have a goulash which is very good.
Or if you wish,
a dish
that's Chinese,
Somewhere down in Column B there's lobster Cantonese.
HEY!
Enchiladas,
that's what people eat in Mexico.
Shish kebab is
skewered,
in Armenia you know.
Then there's blubber, the favorite... of the frigid Eskimo.
Such
delicious dishes,
no matter where you go.
Chicken cacciatore is Italian.
Kangaroo souffle must be Australian.
Mutton chops are definitely British.
Chicken soup undoubtedly is Yiddish.
Pum..per..nick..el
comes from Lithuania.
Has..sen..pfef..fer
comes from Pennsylvania.
Wiener schnitzel's Austrian or German.
Kindly pass the sauerbraten, Herman.
Borscht is what they're eating in the Soviet.
Wait, I think we've got some on the stove yet.
See.. the ..Mau.. Maus
underneath the jungle sky.
Jol..ly.. Mau Maus,
eating missionary pie.
Frenchmen eat a lot of bouillabaisse there.
Dutchmen eat a sauce called Hollandaise there.
Smorgasbord in Sweden is the winner.
In America it's TV dinner.
Sooooo....
there, you have
one food from each land.
Each one delicious,
each one simply grand.
Mix them all up,
in one big mish mosh,
And what have you got?
Hungarian goulash!
HEY!

Anuan
2011-07-28, 03:25 AM
...I got that partly to the tune of the Macarena in my head. Was that deliberate? Did you write that? It's amazing.

Also I'm starving now.

Totally Guy
2011-07-28, 03:31 AM
I was tripping over the can-can...

The Succubus
2011-07-28, 03:33 AM
Oh gee, thanks Anuan, thanks a bundle. :smallannoyed: Send the mind bleach over when you're done.


Also, that many varieties of Kit-kat is too awesome just to keep in Japan.

Anuan
2011-07-28, 03:55 AM
Oh gee, thanks Anuan, thanks a bundle. :smallannoyed: Send the mind bleach over when you're done.


Also, that many varieties of Kit-kat is too awesome just to keep in Japan.

...Says the guy whose avatar is a schoolgirl with a looming tentacle? :smalltongue:

And yes. Australia's got a little bit of variety (the 'Chunky' kitcats have caramel, chocolate and cookies-and-cream filling varieties) but...C'mon, Japan. Gimme.

Then again, the Japanese equivelant of fastfood chains seems to do -everything- better.

Burger King (called Hungry Jacks in Australia for no apparent reason):
http://www.akihabaranews.com/wp-content/uploads//images/1/01/76401/1.jpg

http://tokyo5.files.wordpress.com/2010/09/teriyaki.jpg

They also had a 'windows 7 burger' that came with seven patties.

Pizza Hut:
http://www.japanprobe.com/wp-content/uploads/pizza-hut-nightmare.jpg

Eldan
2011-07-28, 03:57 AM
veven, concerning Haribo candies... we have those literally EVERYWHERE in Ohio. I mean, I can go to Speedway and buy a bag of Haribo gummies. I assume you must be referencing something more exotic? :smallconfused:


Well, just "Haribo candies" is a bit unspecific. They make hundreds of different kinds of candies.

veven
2011-07-28, 08:04 AM
Well, just "Haribo candies" is a bit unspecific. They make hundreds of different kinds of candies.

Right. It's a specific one who's name I cannot remember. We've got Haribo gummy bears coming out of our ears in Oregon. There is just one specific kind of candy that they make that I've only ever seen in Eastern Europe.

Scylfing
2011-07-28, 09:50 AM
So far, the only thing I haven't found in the States somewhere (many things are not widespread but can be found with some digging) is a reaaaaaaaaaaaaally fantastic Lebanese place. And yes, I tried Toledo (which is supposed to have a large Lebanese population). I was unimpressed. Still, the hunt continues. What I wouldn't give for a super fresh plate of kibbeh.

That's the type of thing you probably just need to get homemade. A Lebanese friend of mine here in this small Montana town (I know, right?) introduced me to kibbeh, and a host of other awesome dishes that I wouldn't have ever known about otherwise.

One thing I never thought I'd see in the States was the chocolate mint version of those Swedish-style ginger thin cookies, I'd only ever seen them in Canadia, but last weekend I found some at this great little ethnic market I'd somehow never been to before, but will definitely be making return trips. Their beer imports alone will make it worthwhile.

Keld Denar
2011-07-28, 10:11 AM
I have to go to a specialty German market in Pike's Market downtown to get Kaiserschmarn. Thats one of the biggest things I miss from when I lived in Germany. Still not sure exactly how to describe it to other Americans, other than incredibly delicious!

Ravens_cry
2011-07-28, 06:13 PM
Never tried it, but that does (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kaiserschmarrn) sound pretty darn good.

Occasional Sage
2011-07-28, 06:21 PM
Ye got nae haggis over there laddie! Whit's a Scot tae dae wi' nae haggis?

There are several places here in Seattle to get haggis. I keep meaning to....



So far, the only thing I haven't found in the States somewhere (many things are not widespread but can be found with some digging) is a reaaaaaaaaaaaaally fantastic Lebanese place. And yes, I tried Toledo (which is supposed to have a large Lebanese population). I was unimpressed. Still, the hunt continues. What I wouldn't give for a super fresh plate of kibbeh.


With this too, there are a couple places here in Seattle. One I've been to and is great, but I don't have a point of comparison to judge their authenticity.

Ravens_cry
2011-07-28, 06:25 PM
I've always wanted to try black pudding, AKA, blood sausage. And no, that's not a euphemism. Unfortunately, none of the local butchers have it.

golentan
2011-07-28, 06:32 PM
...

fried caterpillars

What? A friend brought me a can as a joke while he was travelling, and they were in this spicy tomato sauce and tasted delicious and I don't even know what country they were from.

afroakuma
2011-07-28, 06:42 PM
Ye got nae haggis over there laddie! Whit's a Scot tae dae wi' nae haggis?

We have it in Canada, at least in my province. I've never tried it, but I hear it's pretty authentic.

Neo_Leviathan
2011-07-28, 08:12 PM
I've always wanted to try black pudding, AKA, blood sausage. And no, that's not a euphemism. Unfortunately, none of the local butchers have it.

To be honest, it's nothing special. I recently returned from six weeks in the UK and apart from the one person who thought it tasted like fish, everyone in my tour agreed that black pudding tastes like roast chicken stuffing o.O

Tirian
2011-07-28, 09:27 PM
Ye got nae haggis over there laddie! Whit's a Scot tae dae wi' nae haggis?

Relax and have some scrapple. Or a hot dog. :smalleek:

Mando Knight
2011-07-28, 09:42 PM
Pizza Hut:
http://www.japanprobe.com/wp-content/uploads/pizza-hut-nightmare.jpg

Japanese Pizza Hut also had the best tie-in.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/5/59/CC_033_animestocks-com--2-.jpg

Serpentine
2011-07-28, 09:59 PM
I got an anime reference :O
Baked Beans
US doesn't have baked beans? :smallconfused:
My stepsiblings had a lot of trouble finding fresh fruit when they were in the US, but I've since been told it's not hard to find. So I dunno.

DeadManSleeping
2011-07-28, 10:14 PM
The United States has baked beans. It has a lot of baked beans. If you go to any place where the word "barbeque" is used more than once, it will have baked beans.

Fresh fruit's not easy to find in restaurants (though it's not too hard, just not easy), but in grocery stores, it's a cinch.

Stuff that is supposedly not imported can usually be found at special grocery stores (i.e. Japanese items at a Japanese grocery). There's at least one store in Cincinnati where many people claim you can find absolutely anything.

Dralnu
2011-07-28, 11:24 PM
I think it's unfair to generalize USA like that. It's a very big country. Multicultural areas (big cities, NYC and such) will have the appropriate representation of multicultural cuisine. Middleclass white suburbs will have mostly middleclass white suburb food. Areas in the south that have a strong Mexican influence will have that influence also in their cuisine. This is not just an American thing. When I visited Japan, Korea, and a handful of European countries, the variety also changed.

That said... I remember when I was little we never had Cherry Coke up here in Canada. My dad was often away on business to the States and would bring me back a couple cans. USA, such variety! :smalltongue:

Ravens_cry
2011-07-29, 12:51 AM
To be honest, it's nothing special. I recently returned from six weeks in the UK and apart from the one person who thought it tasted like fish, everyone in my tour agreed that black pudding tastes like roast chicken stuffing o.O

That's not a bad thing, I imagined it would taste like liver, all bloody and irony.

factotum
2011-07-29, 01:40 AM
That's not a bad thing, I imagined it would taste like liver, all bloody and irony.

It doesn't taste like that, but it shouldn't really taste like chicken stuffing either...not sure where Neo_Leviathan ate his, though; you really need to be in the North-East of England to get the proper stuff.

Ravens_cry
2011-07-29, 01:45 AM
It doesn't taste like that, but it shouldn't really taste like chicken stuffing either...not sure where Neo_Leviathan ate his, though; you really need to be in the North-East of England to get the proper stuff.
Interesting.
***
Damn it, I always hate these food topics. They always make me hungry and I am on a student budget.

Heliomance
2011-07-29, 04:15 AM
From what I hear, chocolate that actually tastes good is distinctly absent from America.

lesser_minion
2011-07-29, 05:27 AM
I hate to point this out, but the USA was formed in 1776, and apple pie is known to have existed well before the 14th century. So it's not exactly "purely American and not imported from anywhere" is it?

Otherwise, I find it hard to believe that it's not possible to find whatever food you want in the US.

Nix Nihila
2011-07-29, 06:41 AM
I think that was the point of the original post, lesser_minion.

And there is good chocolate, but it is vastly outweighed by horrible chocolate unfortunately. Although there are several wonderful chocolatiers near me, so I don't notice it very much.

Erloas
2011-07-29, 09:29 AM
The difference between the good chocolate and the normal chocolate has mostly to do with where you are trying to buy it from. Most places you're just going to get the packaged mass market chocolate, but there are probably thousands of small shops around that can make anything you can get anywhere else. The thing is a lot of its going to be dependent on the market.
Chocolate is also one of those things where you develop into what you like based on what is around. I've also heard going the other direction that there are a lot of people from the US that don't care for how treats in general are made in some other countries. One of the main differences with chocolates also seems to be that someone will compare a $25/lb hand made chocolate from Europe to some pre-packaged manufactured candy bar thats $3/lb in the US and say they don't really compare. Well, they don't, you aren't really comparing a like product though.

Same with the rest of the food though. Its not that they don't make X in the USA, but there is a good chance that X is a very specialized food and not one people are going to be eating all of the time, one thats very seasonal, or one thats expensive, and as such it takes a very big market to have enough people to keep a store going.
Go to some place like New York City or Los Angeles and there is probably almost nothing you can't find. Go some place like a city of 20k people in the middle of Wyoming and chances are you're going to be very limited in what you can find.


As for blood sausage, I was thinking that its one of those things that the FDA doesn't allow to be sold, at least when made traditionally.

Fresh fruit, well part of that depends on how fresh, where you are at, and what time of year it is. With a little looking its not hard to find fresh fruit some times of the year, but for most of the country thats not going to be bananas. But I can go into my back yard right now and get some blackberries that are all of 3 seconds old and you can't get any fresher then that. The oranges at the grocery store go from not very good to very good depending on the time of year and where they can be harvested from.

blackfox
2011-07-29, 09:57 AM
From what I hear, chocolate that actually tastes good is distinctly absent from America.Nonono, Amurika is pretty good at importing tasty chocolate. It's just expensive, and you have to know where to look for it. It's pretty easy to find, like, Ghiradelli and uh wosscalled in supermarkets. Fancy local-made chocolate is gonna cost twice as much again.

golentan
2011-07-29, 10:01 AM
Nonono, Amurika is pretty good at importing tasty chocolate. It's just expensive, and you have to know where to look for it. It's pretty easy to find, like, Ghiradelli and uh wosscalled in supermarkets. Fancy local-made chocolate is gonna cost twice as much again.

But can be so worth it. There's a place in san francisco that does the most amazing melty delicious champagne truffles for a price roughly on par with my weekly entertainment budget, and I've occasionally said "Okay, I'm in SF, I'm not going to buy myself anything else fun for a week because there's chocolate."

Telonius
2011-07-29, 10:12 AM
Local chocolate shops in the US are terrific. Personal favorite: Romolo's in Erie, PA, but then again I have a hometown bias. Pretty much any city is going to have a few real chocolatiers.

Mass-market stuff, not so hot. Hershey's has made a few attempts to duplicate some British candy bars, with not so terrific results. (Most recent attempt was to emulate an Aero with the "Air Delight." Fail.)

I think one of the bigger problems is that the general American market doesn't like things besides chocolate in its chocolate. They'll tolerate crisp rice, almonds, or maybe peanuts. But unless the filling is the main thing to the candy bar, and the chocolate's only there for coating (like Snickers), people generally don't like the texture. Putting raisins in chocolate? "Madness," [the market] says!

One big exception to the "no good imported chocolate" rule is during the run-up to Easter, when the Cadbury's Creme Eggs arrive.

Reverent-One
2011-07-29, 10:25 AM
Putting raisins in chocolate anything? "Madness,"

Fixed that for you. :smallwink:

Zherog
2011-07-29, 10:41 AM
Relax and have some scrapple. Or a hot dog. :smalleek:

Mmm... scrapple...

Heliomance
2011-07-29, 10:44 AM
The difference between the good chocolate and the normal chocolate has mostly to do with where you are trying to buy it from. Most places you're just going to get the packaged mass market chocolate, but there are probably thousands of small shops around that can make anything you can get anywhere else. The thing is a lot of its going to be dependent on the market.
Chocolate is also one of those things where you develop into what you like based on what is around. I've also heard going the other direction that there are a lot of people from the US that don't care for how treats in general are made in some other countries. One of the main differences with chocolates also seems to be that someone will compare a $25/lb hand made chocolate from Europe to some pre-packaged manufactured candy bar thats $3/lb in the US and say they don't really compare. Well, they don't, you aren't really comparing a like product though.


Mostly I'm comparing Cadbury's to Hershey's or Reese's. And Cadbury's is the LOW end of what we can get. Green and Blacks and Lindt are both better, and only somewhat more expensive.

Reverent-One
2011-07-29, 10:50 AM
Mostly I'm comparing Cadbury's to Hershey's or Reese's. And Cadbury's is the LOW end of what we can get. Green and Blacks and Lindt are both better, and only somewhat more expensive.

Well, given that Hershey's and Reese's are both tasty, Cadbury's would have to be amazing for those two to not even be considered good.

Occasional Sage
2011-07-29, 11:11 AM
Nonono, Amurika is pretty good at importing tasty chocolate. It's just expensive, and you have to know where to look for it. It's pretty easy to find, like, Ghiradelli and uh wosscalled in supermarkets. Fancy local-made chocolate is gonna cost twice as much again.

Ghirardelli is American. They're based in San Fran, CA.

Totally Guy
2011-07-29, 11:24 AM
From my experiences most of the US candies must have a pretty high nostalgia value because I haven't found anything too amazing.

Except Reece's peanut butter cups which are amazing.

Erloas
2011-07-29, 11:45 AM
Mostly I'm comparing Cadbury's to Hershey's or Reese's. And Cadbury's is the LOW end of what we can get. Green and Blacks and Lindt are both better, and only somewhat more expensive.

Well I don't know what all Cadbury carries, but I know we can get at least some things from them in a regular grocery store. And the same thing for Lindt, I know I've had some of their stuff but not sure exactly what right now.

And of course comparing to Hersey's... you mean the plain milk chocolate bar? They make a huge number of things after all, that just being the most iconic, but far from the best.

And of course preference plays a bit part. While I like Reece's peanut butter cups, if they are someone's idea of amazing then I'm not too going to be all that inclined to believe their other choices are really all that impressive.

Preference plays a big role too in a lot of fillers. I agree with someone else that raisins for deserts. I love coconut but I know a lot of people don't... and now that I think about it, I haven't seen but would like to find some pineapple chocolate at some point.

Thes Hunter
2011-07-29, 12:02 PM
Coffee Crisp. I see them in the US occasionally, but really they're a Canadian thing.

I see Canada from my apartment window, you'd think I'd pop over the border and grab a few now and then. No, I like to keep my rectum un-violated thank you very much.

Because I am sure my car would be searched if I said this to the Border Patrol: "I was in Canada for about 20 minutes to pick up some candy bars."

That thing would have flown pre 9-11 but I ain't trying it now.

Though a few of my classmates commute into school every day. There at least they can say I'm going to work, and I'm going home. Sounds much more reasonable than, "I came over all peckish, so I sallieforth and infiltrated place of purveyance to negotiate the vending of some coffee-y chocolate-y things.

Elder Tsofu
2011-07-29, 12:43 PM
The US miserably fail at importing my dad's pancakes and my mom's minced-meat sauce!

I had some problem finding something close to breakfast sausages, falu-sausage (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Falukorv), some decent smoked bacon and pepper-cookies when I visited the US - but that might be because I didn't have the opportunity to turn every rock in town to find them. Nor the will (I was abroad after all).

Liriel
2011-07-29, 04:04 PM
I've always wanted to try black pudding, AKA, blood sausage. And no, that's not a euphemism. Unfortunately, none of the local butchers have it.

I got it at a local grocery store. To be honest, it was a bit too salty for my taste, but otherwise, not bad.

Kuma Da
2011-07-29, 04:11 PM
Oh, man. Those of you who've been to Japan will know what I'm talking about here: plum soda. Sweet non-denominational Jesus, it is saintly. And yet, none of the local asian groceries have ever stocked so much as a case of it. Sadness.

Renegade Paladin
2011-07-29, 05:24 PM
There's at least one store in Cincinnati where many people claim you can find absolutely anything.
Jungle Jim's? Yes. Yes you can. :smallbiggrin:

Innis Cabal
2011-07-29, 05:31 PM
Mostly I'm comparing Cadbury's to Hershey's or Reese's. And Cadbury's is the LOW end of what we can get. Green and Blacks and Lindt are both better, and only somewhat more expensive.

You must not be aware that Hershey's owns Cadburry. Have for some time in fact.

Heliomance
2011-07-29, 07:43 PM
So? Doesn't mean that the Hershey's brand uses the same recipe as the Cadbury brand. The fact that one owns the other is entirely irrelevant.

ric0
2011-07-29, 07:47 PM
two things i miss since moving to texas, UK bread and bacon, US bacon just isnt the same at all :(

Worlok
2011-07-29, 08:09 PM
Word up about Kaiserschmarrn. If you can get some good one, you'll be satisfied for quite some time. Austria's cuisine in general is one of their most understandably lauded commodities - you ever tried eating composer balls (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mozartkugel)? :smalltongue:

Also, I don't know whether the USofA have those little döner stores that Germany is full of, but unless you've had a decent döner-kebab at least once, you haven't really explored the heights of fast food. Oh, and adana kebab. And lahmacun. And while we're it, galaktoboureko, at least partly for the badass name.

Speaking of, cakes. From what I've heard, America is rather short on most of the more elaborate ones in some places. Then, of course, there's the related stuff. Russisch Brot, anyone?

Damn, you were right. This stuff does make you hungry. :smalleek:

Innis Cabal
2011-07-29, 08:12 PM
So? Doesn't mean that the Hershey's brand uses the same recipe as the Cadbury brand. The fact that one owns the other is entirely irrelevant.

No...no it isn't...they standardized the recipe.

Occasional Sage
2011-07-29, 08:18 PM
Oh, man. Those of you who've been to Japan will know what I'm talking about here: plum soda. Sweet non-denominational Jesus, it is saintly. And yet, none of the local asian groceries have ever stocked so much as a case of it. Sadness.

That sounds magical.


two things i miss since moving to texas, UK bread and bacon, US bacon just isnt the same at all :(

Really? Howzzat?

EDIT: Jones Soda makes a plum soda; anything similar?

Heliomance
2011-07-29, 10:10 PM
No...no it isn't...they standardized the recipe.

Really? They didn't change our end, that mean they changed the Hershey's stuff? If that's the case, I retract the relevant parts of my comments.

Zigg'rrauglurr
2011-07-30, 12:14 AM
What USA is missing big time is Dulce de Leche, altough the word in english "should" be caramel, dulce de leche is not caramel alone, it's cooked with milk, sometimes vanilla is added. It's sort of "caramel cream".

http://media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lnsacgOKat1qhkske.jpghttp://www.pordinero.org/http://www.pordinero.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/dulce.jpg

Imagine if you will the pure essence of sweetness, ready to be applied to anything:

Cookies:
http://www.absolut-argentina.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/09/alfajores-choco-dulce.jpg

Cakes:
http://www.hayrecetas.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/01/tarta-dulce-de-leche-300x225.jpg

Toasts:
http://www.tequedasacenar.com/wp-content/uploads/TostadaDulceLeche.jpg

Your Significant Other
What you tought I was crazy?

Anything at all. It makes maple syrup taste bitter in comparison. It gives the perfect soft texture against cookie or chocolate, to make the parfect candy.

And you can make it in your own home, you just need milk, sugar and water, maybe some vanilla essence One recipe (http://gosouthamerica.about.com/od/dessertsandsweets/r/dulcedeleche.htm).

Serpentine
2011-07-30, 12:31 AM
No...no it isn't...they standardized the recipe.Dunno if it's different in the US, but that Hershey's chocolate bar I tried that one time tastes pretty awful compared with our Cadbury chocolate (which itself is pretty damn ordinary compared with... almost every other chocolate brand out there).

Esprit15
2011-07-30, 12:44 AM
As an American, I really enjoy French food. A lot of it is actually pretty easy to cook.

factotum
2011-07-30, 01:39 AM
You must not be aware that Hershey's owns Cadburry. Have for some time in fact.

He's not aware of that because it's not true. Hershey's have had the rights to manufacture and distribute Cadbury's products in the States for a while (such as Cadbury's Creme Eggs), but Cadbury's were an entirely independent company until they were purchased by Kraft Foods a couple of years ago.

Coidzor
2011-07-30, 01:41 AM
Baked Beans

That's because we do have Baked Beans.


What USA is missing big time is Dulce de Leche, altough the word in english "should" be caramel, dulce de leche is not caramel alone, it's cooked with milk, sometimes vanilla is added. It's sort of "caramel cream".

http://media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lnsacgOKat1qhkske.jpghttp://www.pordinero.org/http://www.pordinero.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/dulce.jpg

Available in every supermarket I've been in from Florida to Oregon. :smallconfused:

Ravens_cry
2011-07-30, 05:02 AM
That's because we do have Baked Beans.

British baked beans (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baked_beans#United_States) are a little different. Less sweet and mushy for one thing.

Brother Oni
2011-07-30, 06:32 AM
Otherwise, I find it hard to believe that it's not possible to find whatever food you want in the US.

Depends on the foodstuff. For example, Smarties are banned in America because the yellow ones (I think, it was one of the colours) have a prohibited food colouring dye, so you can't import or sell the product entirely, which is a shame as the image of US custom officers picking out all the yellow ones out of incoming Smarties consignments amuses greatly. :smallbiggrin:


Dunno if it's different in the US, but that Hershey's chocolate bar I tried that one time tastes pretty awful compared with our Cadbury chocolate (which itself is pretty damn ordinary compared with... almost every other chocolate brand out there).

Yeah I agree that American chocolate tastes bad compared to British chocolate. Mind you Australian chocolate tastes a bit weird as well since you have this waxy material in it to stop it melting at your higher ambient temperatures, although Cadburys in Australia does this nice cherry chocolate thing.

Orzel
2011-07-30, 07:25 AM
This is why I may NEVER move out of New York City.

I can get almost any food... via various methods.

Eldan
2011-07-30, 07:30 AM
Interestingly, from what I've heard from various friends who went to the US as exchange students is that it's almost impossible to get some good, fresh bread over there. I'm willing to believe it, given that I've heard the same story a dozen times.

Zherog
2011-07-30, 07:32 AM
Depends on the foodstuff. For example, Smarties are banned in America because the yellow ones (I think, it was one of the colours) have a prohibited food colouring dye, so you can't import or sell the product entirely, which is a shame as the image of US custom officers picking out all the yellow ones out of incoming Smarties consignments amuses greatly. :smallbiggrin:

You mean these:

http://staticb.wisegeek.com/images/calories/calories-in-smarties-candy-s.jpg

We have them. My wife eats them like, er, candy.

Heliomance
2011-07-30, 08:07 AM
No, those aren't Smarties. These are Smarties:
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_ZO8PEi5Qwrw/TJZYvMG_VqI/AAAAAAAAAXc/zbO9ks3LYIw/s1600/smarties+1.jpg

Mando Knight
2011-07-30, 08:14 AM
Yeah I agree that American chocolate tastes bad compared to British chocolate. Mind you Australian chocolate tastes a bit weird as well since you have this waxy material in it to stop it melting at your higher ambient temperatures, although Cadburys in Australia does this nice cherry chocolate thing.
That's why you start to develop a taste for the more expensive chocolates, like imported chocolate or 60%+ cacao brands. (Someone mentioned Lindt... I can find their dark chocolate rather easily in places like Wal-Mart or Walgreen)

Eldan
2011-07-30, 08:17 AM
Heh. I gave my father this piece (about the size of a sheet of paper, and a few milimeters thin) of what they called Aztec chocolate. Something like over 90% cacao, no milk. And not ground fine powder either. Chunky chunks of cacao. Absolutely delicious.

KnightDisciple
2011-07-30, 08:34 AM
Interestingly, from what I've heard from various friends who went to the US as exchange students is that it's almost impossible to get some good, fresh bread over there. I'm willing to believe it, given that I've heard the same story a dozen times.I dunno. I'm sure there are plenty of smaller bakeries around, and the stuff from grocery store bakeries is pretty good. I guess it depends on how picky you are, though.

EDIT: "Worst Case" you go to Panera Bread. Which serves, among other things, fresh-made bread that's quite good. Though, again, maybe it's an expected taste thing or something.

Zherog
2011-07-30, 08:36 AM
No, those aren't Smarties. These are Smarties:
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_ZO8PEi5Qwrw/TJZYvMG_VqI/AAAAAAAAAXc/zbO9ks3LYIw/s1600/smarties+1.jpg

Those look like M&Ms...

The ones I posted are what we call smarties. They come wrapped in clear cellophane. They're basically sugar pills; I don't know how anybody can eat them...

Ravens_cry
2011-07-30, 09:16 AM
They are what we Canucks call them "Rockets" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smarties_%28wafer_candy%29) I always hated getting them in Halloween candy. I would rather have those little boxes of Smarties (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smarties), so chuggable.

Heliomance
2011-07-30, 09:41 AM
Those look like M&Ms...

They're similar to M&Ms, chocolate coated in a sugar shell. IMO, smarties are nicer, though. Also the orange ones have orange flavoured chocolate inside.

Trog
2011-07-30, 09:42 AM
Mock Turtle from Wonderland. Yum! P=

Erloas
2011-07-30, 10:01 AM
Interestingly, from what I've heard from various friends who went to the US as exchange students is that it's almost impossible to get some good, fresh bread over there. I'm willing to believe it, given that I've heard the same story a dozen times.

You just have to go to a bakery. The main issue with that is that most people do their shopping at a normal grocery store and don't often go to specialty stores. Of course many grocery stores do have fresh french bread, and many have started to carry "specialty" breads, that while being pre-made dough, is baked in the store and put out. Some of it is better then others.
But if you just go into the bread isle its all going to be prepackaged.

And exchange students, like normal students, probably don't actually spend much time looking for specialty stores like that. And of course its a lot more expensive then the ubiquitous loaf of white bread commonly found (of which I've given up eating years ago)

Brother Oni
2011-07-30, 10:15 AM
Those look like M&Ms...

Further to Heliomance's post, a Smartie is a bit bigger than a M&M and the shell isn't as thick.

I also agree they taste nicer than M&Ms. :smallbiggrin:


Mock Turtle from Wonderland. Yum! P=

You may joke, but I remember reading a period guide somewhere extolling the taste and edibility of giant turtles. The phrase 'nearly every part of this animal is delicious' stuck in my mind.

Dogmantra
2011-07-30, 10:22 AM
Further to Heliomance's post, a Smartie is a bit bigger than a M&M and the shell isn't as thick.

I also agree they taste nicer than M&Ms. :smallbiggrin:

They also don't have little Ms printed on them and M&Ms are more round, Smarties are more disco.

(Disco in this sentence being the adjectival form of disc. It's too good a word to not use like that.)

Let's turn this thread into "facts about Smarties from Britons!"
(let's not)

zeratul
2011-07-30, 10:27 AM
Interestingly, from what I've heard from various friends who went to the US as exchange students is that it's almost impossible to get some good, fresh bread over there. I'm willing to believe it, given that I've heard the same story a dozen times.

Strange, I'd say fresh bread is pretty easy to get here actually. Almost every grocery store has a bakery where among other things they bake various types of fresh bread every day, plus you have assorted local bakeries sprinkled about that do the same thing. Plus when it comes to bread you can always just, ya know, bake some.

With regards to chocolate, while our cheapo check out counter chocolate is generally not that great, you can (As others have said ) get some really awesome imported stuff and good quality american brands if you're willing to pay a little more. Lindt, Dove, Gertrude Hawk, ghirardelli, and pretty much any imported South American brand are really quite good.

factotum
2011-07-30, 11:18 AM
They're similar to M&Ms

It would be truer to say that M&Ms are similar to Smarties, given that Smarties came first... :smallwink:

Kris Strife
2011-07-30, 11:20 AM
Calpis Water (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calpis), Pocari Sweat (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pocari_Sweat) and this awesome protein gel/drink in a pouch that got me over leg cramps about 30 minutes after drinking it.

Coidzor
2011-07-30, 11:46 AM
British baked beans (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baked_beans#United_States) are a little different. Less sweet and mushy for one thing.

Well, yes, most of our brands actually use spices to make baked beans, but the unflavored British derivative is still available anyway, one just has to go to a slightly larger store.


Depends on the foodstuff. For example, Smarties are banned in America because the yellow ones (I think, it was one of the colours) have a prohibited food colouring dye, so you can't import or sell the product entirely, which is a shame as the image of US custom officers picking out all the yellow ones out of incoming Smarties consignments amuses greatly. :smallbiggrin:

Which Smarties are we talking about here? There are, after all, at least 4 different types of candies known as Smarties.

Ravens_cry
2011-07-30, 11:49 AM
Well, yes, most of our brands actually use spices to make baked beans, but the unflavored British derivative is still available anyway, one just has to go to a slightly larger store.

Well, I've never seen them, but then they were practically banned (http://archive.aweber.com/blightys01/1Hrko/h/A_Crazy_Case_of_Beans.htm) in Canada.

Coidzor
2011-07-30, 12:12 PM
Well, I've never seen them, but then they were practically banned (http://archive.aweber.com/blightys01/1Hrko/h/A_Crazy_Case_of_Beans.htm) in Canada.

Well I've seen them in backwater Kentucky, so any place with a decent level of cosmopolitanism or population density should have them available for purchase.

Zherog
2011-07-30, 12:16 PM
They also don't have little Ms printed on them and M&Ms are more round, Smarties are more disco.

Duh. Everybody knows those are Ws printed on them, not Ms. ;)

Dogmantra
2011-07-30, 12:42 PM
Duh. Everybody knows those are Ws printed on them, not Ms. ;)

I find it hard to believe they're Ws. I understand I'm wrong about them being Ms, but I've found my answer.

I'm pretty sure that they're little Σs.

Elder Tsofu
2011-07-30, 02:53 PM
Which Smarties are we talking about here? There are, after all, at least 4 different types of candies known as Smarties.

Smarties of course, the one and only. Don't accept any substitutes. :smallsmile:
---

I had to wiki the dove chocolate-bars since I associate the name to the company making soap-bars.

Greenish
2011-07-30, 05:24 PM
I hear getting proper rye bread is impossible pretty much everywhere outside Finland. (In Scandinavia, they put honey in the dough, those scoundrels!)


Salmiakki (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salmiakki) is also a popular gift for Finns living abroad, since it's not found in most of the world. I guess ammonium chloride is an acquired taste.

Eldan
2011-07-30, 05:28 PM
People actually eat Salmiac? :smalltongue:
I only knew that people use it to induce coughing.

Perenelle
2011-07-30, 06:06 PM
Lindt, Dove, Gertrude Hawk, ghirardelli, and pretty much any imported South American brand are really quite good.

I never liked Dove chocolate for some reason, I've always thought it tasted weird and had a funny aftertaste.

Greenish
2011-07-30, 06:50 PM
People actually eat Salmiac? :smalltongue:Like candy. Exactly like candy. :smallamused:

Brother Oni
2011-07-31, 07:56 PM
Which Smarties are we talking about here? There are, after all, at least 4 different types of candies known as Smarties.

The one linked to earlier on in the thread (basically an M&M analogue).

Wikipedia's page on Smarties (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smarties).

zeratul
2011-07-31, 08:26 PM
I never liked Dove chocolate for some reason, I've always thought it tasted weird and had a funny aftertaste.

It does have a slightly different flavour from normal chocolate, I think they might do something to the formula that most companies don't? I still generally like it though, particularly the caramel filled ones.

On another note American butcher shops need to start carrying brittish style bacon. I think it's the fat to meat ratio or something, but Brittish bacon just tastes way better and is textually much nicer than American bacon.

unosarta
2011-07-31, 11:37 PM
Calpis Water (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calpis), Pocari Sweat (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pocari_Sweat) and this awesome protein gel/drink in a pouch that got me over leg cramps about 30 minutes after drinking it.

I love that I knew both of those without even clicking the links.

Also; C.C. Lemon, which is like Sprite but more sour and DELICIOUS.
Any soft drink that has been turned into a version of ice cream. They are everywhere in Japan.

Anuan
2011-08-01, 03:45 AM
On the subject of bacon: british (and Australian) bacon is cut from a different part of the pig, instead of from the belly, and is also preserved in a different way.

Avilan the Grey
2011-08-01, 04:03 AM
USA is a dangerous country to visit if you want to stay in shape. Not because of McDonalds etc, but because of all the WONDERFUL food available. I could spend my whole vacations there eating and nothing but.

Serpentine
2011-08-01, 06:02 AM
Depends on the foodstuff. For example, Smarties are banned in America because the yellow ones (I think, it was one of the colours) have a prohibited food colouring dye, so you can't import or sell the product entirely, which is a shame as the image of US custom officers picking out all the yellow ones out of incoming Smarties consignments amuses greatly. :smallbiggrin:For a while, Pop Tarts were banned in Australia cuz they wouldn't tell our Customs what one of the ingredients was...

Yeah I agree that American chocolate tastes bad compared to British chocolate. Mind you Australian chocolate tastes a bit weird as well since you have this waxy material in it to stop it melting at your higher ambient temperatures, although Cadburys in Australia does this nice cherry chocolate thing.Cherry Ripe or something like that? Dunno about that "waxy material" thing, though, never heard anything like it.
I dunno. I'm sure there are plenty of smaller bakeries around, and the stuff from grocery store bakeries is pretty good. I guess it depends on how picky you are, though.I've heard that US bread tends to have much more sugar in it than most brands sold in Australia. Don't know how true that is, though.
You may joke, but I remember reading a period guide somewhere extolling the taste and edibility of giant turtles. The phrase 'nearly every part of this animal is delicious' stuck in my mind.See also: Stellar's sea cow. Described as delicious in the very first scientific identification of them. Extinct within something like 70 years.
Otherwise, I find it hard to believe that it's not possible to find whatever food you want in the US.Kinder Surprise (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kinder_surprise#Prohibition_on_sale_or_import_into _the_United_States), for one (and presumably Yowies (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cadbury_Yowie) for the same reason). Also, although I'm sure it's possible, it's my understanding that TimTams and Milo are hard to find there. Dunno how much kangaroo meat you guys have over there, either.

Pika...
2011-08-01, 06:55 AM
...

fried caterpillars

What? A friend brought me a can as a joke while he was travelling, and they were in this spicy tomato sauce and tasted delicious and I don't even know what country they were from.

I have always wanted to try chocolate covered grasshoppers/ants.

Also, I have seen documentaries where the Irish fry candy bars. I drool every time I think about it. Please, is there a place in Florida to get it? @_@

Kris Strife
2011-08-01, 06:59 AM
I have always wanted to try chocolate covered grasshoppers/ants.

Also, I have seen documentaries where the Irish fry candy bars. I drool every time I think about it. Please, is there a place in Florida to get it? @_@

State fairs have a wide variety of foods that you wouldn't normally fry. :smalltongue:

Pickles, candy bars, Twinkies, Coca-Cola...

Pika...
2011-08-01, 07:05 AM
State fairs have a wide variety of foods that you wouldn't normally fry. :smalltongue:

Pickles, candy bars, Twinkies, ......

Really? At state fairs? Are they like the Irish style?



Coca-Cola...

Um...uhhh....is that physically possible?????

Serpentine
2011-08-01, 07:31 AM
I have always wanted to try chocolate covered grasshoppers/ants.I fully intend to eat chocolate-covered honeypot ants before I die. Supposedly you can buy boxes of them under the David Jones in Sydney, but I couldn't find them when I looked :smallfrown:

Heliomance
2011-08-01, 08:27 AM
I thought deep fried chocolate - especially Mars bars - was more a northern thing than an irish thing. Certainly, the one time I've had deep fried Mars bar (if memory serves, it was delicious) was oop north.

The Succubus
2011-08-01, 08:59 AM
I thought deep fried chocolate - especially Mars bars - was more a northern thing than an irish thing. Certainly, the one time I've had deep fried Mars bar (if memory serves, it was delicious) was oop north.

Not exclusively. It's definitely a UK thing though - my local chip shop will batter most chocolate bars on request and have even managed the difficult feat of Deep Fried Maltesers. If you think Pringles are more-ish, you've never had a pack of these....

factotum
2011-08-01, 09:00 AM
I thought deep fried chocolate - especially Mars bars - was more a northern thing than an irish thing. Certainly, the one time I've had deep fried Mars bar (if memory serves, it was delicious) was oop north.

More a Scottish thing than Northern England, I thought. Scotland seems to be most famous as the home of the deep fried Mars bar...a Scottish lass on a TV programme last night was bemoaning that fact!

Eldan
2011-08-01, 09:04 AM
How do you prevent the chocolate from just melting away into the oil?

Kislath
2011-08-01, 09:08 AM
We do a terrible job of importing things here into the USA, but we don't do much better sometimes in distributing things within the country, either. Each region has a few items which are unknown in the others.
Cheerwine & Moxie are two soft drinks which are devilishly hard to find except in a few small isolated areas, and if you live anywhere north of Miami, you've probably never experienced the sublime, orgasmically-delicious flavor of a conch fritter. The New England area, especially around Vermont, is home to numerous wonderful candies simply unheard of anywhere else, and woe be unto you if you aren't from Louisiana, for you'll never know the joy of etouffe' melisza on your Tripletail or Mahi planks.

Really. What's UP with that? I can get Bimbo Cakes here in south Alabama now, but Big Red & Naya are still virtually impossible to find?

The Succubus
2011-08-01, 09:08 AM
Its the batter mixture you place around the outside of the bar. You make it thick enough to completely encase the chocolate and then what happens is when you fry it (quickly) the batter forms around it (as it would with say, a sausage or fish). The chocolate melts slightly as well to give the batter a really interesting flavour. :smallbiggrin:

@Kisalth: One of my favourite foods comes out of Florida - the Key Lime Pie. I've tried making it a couple of times at home and it gives a really zesty alternative to lemon merguine.

Pika...
2011-08-01, 09:38 AM
Its the batter mixture you place around the outside of the bar. You make it thick enough to completely encase the chocolate and then what happens is when you fry it (quickly) the batter forms around it (as it would with say, a sausage or fish). The chocolate melts slightly as well to give the batter a really interesting flavour. :smallbiggrin:

Drool...drool...drool....

The Succubus
2011-08-01, 10:12 AM
It works especially well with Mars bars, Pika. As I mentioned, the slightly melted chocolate seeps into the batter, giving it a slightly softer texture than usual, while still having a strong savory fried flavour. Sometimes, if you manage to eat it at just the right temperature, the caramel oozes out from the first bite, the oil from the batter making it not as thick as a traditional Mars. Then in the centre, you have that sort of soft chocolatey nougat which stays unaffected during the battering process, leaving you with the crispy batter offseting the soft squishy centre.

Erloas
2011-08-01, 11:54 AM
How do you prevent the chocolate from just melting away into the oil?

They've been deep frying ice cream for decades, chocolate is easy compared to that. The trick is making sure its not warm to start out with (very cold in the case of ice cream), then fry it very quickly, just long enough to get the outside dough, not like a fry or piece of chicken where its fried for a minute or more. All you are really frying is the dough coating, not much of the item itself, though something like a twinkies could probably be fried straight like it is.

As for where its from, I always thought deep fried candy bars where an American thing, at least it fits our general stereotype well enough. As for if the American version is like the Irish version, once you deep fry something it all ends up about the same, so while there might be minor differences in the dough used I would imagine there isn't too much variation when you're using the same base item.

And yes Pika, just about every fair will have them.

Kris Strife
2011-08-01, 11:56 AM
Um...uhhh....is that physically possible?????

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fried_Coke

HalfTangible
2011-08-01, 11:57 AM
I hate to point this out, but the USA was formed in 1776, and apple pie is known to have existed well before the 14th century. So it's not exactly "purely American and not imported from anywhere" is it?

Otherwise, I find it hard to believe that it's not possible to find whatever food you want in the US.

Technically it wasn't formed at that exact date, but i'm not sure we can discuss history of a country on the forum... can we?

Pika...
2011-08-01, 12:19 PM
It works especially well with Mars bars, Pika. As I mentioned, the slightly melted chocolate seeps into the batter, giving it a slightly softer texture than usual, while still having a strong savory fried flavour. Sometimes, if you manage to eat it at just the right temperature, the caramel oozes out from the first bite, the oil from the batter making it not as thick as a traditional Mars. Then in the centre, you have that sort of soft chocolatey nougat which stays unaffected during the battering process, leaving you with the crispy batter offseting the soft squishy centre.

I...I need a plain ticket to Scottland now...or marry a Scottish lass... @_@

Erloas
2011-08-01, 02:18 PM
I...I need a plain ticket to Scottland now...or marry a Scottish lass... @_@
Or just any of your average American carnies. The county fair here is this week and I would check for them but I'm going to be out of town so I can't. Not that I'm any where near you, but if we have them here I'm sure you could find them where you are. According to wikipedia the deep fried snickers bar is more common in the US, but its all essentially the same to deep fry any of them.


Technically it wasn't formed at that exact date, but i'm not sure we can discuss history of a country on the forum... can we?Well considering that the apple has been available for so long in Europe, its still hard to call it a trademark American item. Especially when there are so many food items that are simply taken for granted now days that was not available until people make it to the Americas. Such as pumpkin pie. Or corn, which everyone knows. And you know that Irish Potato Famine? seems like potatoes must have been a staple there forever, but potatoes are from the Americas and they didn't even have them in Ireland until something like the 16th century.

Eldan
2011-08-01, 02:24 PM
They've been deep frying ice cream for decades, chocolate is easy compared to that. The trick is making sure its not warm to start out with (very cold in the case of ice cream), then fry it very quickly, just long enough to get the outside dough, not like a fry or piece of chicken where its fried for a minute or more. All you are really frying is the dough coating, not much of the item itself, though something like a twinkies could probably be fried straight like it is.

As for where its from, I always thought deep fried candy bars where an American thing, at least it fits our general stereotype well enough. As for if the American version is like the Irish version, once you deep fry something it all ends up about the same, so while there might be minor differences in the dough used I would imagine there isn't too much variation when you're using the same base item.

And yes Pika, just about every fair will have them.

Ah, that makes a lot more sense. See, I didn't know dough was involved. I was thinking of someone just throwing chocolate into hot oil, then fishing it out again.

Avilan the Grey
2011-08-02, 02:58 AM
Well considering that the apple has been available for so long in Europe, its still hard to call it a trademark American item. Especially when there are so many food items that are simply taken for granted now days that was not available until people make it to the Americas. Such as pumpkin pie. Or corn, which everyone knows. And you know that Irish Potato Famine? seems like potatoes must have been a staple there forever, but potatoes are from the Americas and they didn't even have them in Ireland until something like the 16th century.

There are very few trademark North American dishes. The modern Hamburgers*, the hot dog in a bun and the Pan Pizza (and Chicago Deep Dish) are the few I can think of right now.

All others are just food that came with immigrants. That, however, does not make them any less tasty!!

*The Romans invented them, but they never spread outside the Roman Empire and were forgotten together with concrete and some other stuff for centuries.

lesser_minion
2011-08-02, 08:27 AM
Kinder Surprise (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kinder_surprise#Prohibition_on_sale_or_import_into _the_United_States), for one (and presumably Yowies (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cadbury_Yowie) for the same reason). Also, although I'm sure it's possible, it's my understanding that TimTams and Milo are hard to find there. Dunno how much kangaroo meat you guys have over there, either.

Yeah, I somehow forgot about Kinder eggs. Although I wouldn't really say the Americans are missing out there.

As for kangaroo meat... well, I don't think anyone in the UK sees kangaroos as a food source, and Americans are even pickier than we are, so I imagine not.

Heliomance
2011-08-02, 08:50 AM
Nothing wrong with kangaroo meat, don't see why you wouldn't see it as a food source. Tastes rather like liver, IMO.

DeadManSleeping
2011-08-02, 09:05 AM
As for kangaroo meat... well, I don't think anyone in the UK sees kangaroos as a food source, and Americans are even pickier than we are, so I imagine not.

Excuse me? I'm pretty sure our country is the origin of both the donut burger and the "double down", among other things. I wouldn't call Americans "picky". :smallwink:

Go to any metropolitan area, and you'll probably be able to find somebody who's eaten kangaroo. Or crocodile. Or bug. Being American doesn't make you averse to foods not of your land. Being the kind of person who lives away from urban centers and sports both neckbeard and weapon is what does that. Most countries have those people. Your average metropolitan American is, honestly, exactly as urbane as your average metropolitan Englishman, or Frenchman, or German, or whathaveyou.

Zherog
2011-08-02, 09:11 AM
Go to any metropolitan area, and you'll probably be able to find somebody who's eaten kangaroo. Or crocodile. Or bug.

Well, I've not had those. But I've had rattlesnake and alligator.

Gwyn chan 'r Gwyll
2011-08-02, 09:20 AM
You guys don't have back-bacon-onna-bun! It is one of the best things ever, and apparently a Toronto specialty. You take your back bacon, put it on a bun, and put on some mustard. Done.

All but Vermont and area lack real maple syrup. I weep for you.

Tourtiere is the best pie ever. It comes from Quebec, only ever had it within the family.

I'm sure I'll come up with more Canadian foods...

Zea mays
2011-08-02, 09:26 AM
There are very few trademark North American dishes. The modern Hamburgers*, the hot dog in a bun and the Pan Pizza (and Chicago Deep Dish) are the few I can think of right now.


The waffle cone thing for ice-cream. That's all American.
(personally I consider it an all American mistake).

But I wonder, are there any delicious* foods that America fails at exporting?


*(as opposed to the other kind)

Zherog
2011-08-02, 09:29 AM
I'm sure I'll come up with more Canadian foods...

Poutine .

lesser_minion
2011-08-02, 10:05 AM
Excuse me? I'm pretty sure our country is the origin of both the donut burger and the "double down", among other things. I wouldn't call Americans "picky". :smallwink:

You shouldn't really take that more seriously than a French person declaring that the British overcook their steak (although we are guilty as charged there. Ask for a rare steak and you'll get something not unlike charcoal in most restaurants). However, being willing to eat things that everyone else finds completely disgusting is -- rightly or wrongly -- a British stereotype, not an American one.

You can find people willing to consider -- or avoid -- seemingly weird foods basically anywhere. But what's weird in one country isn't even a blip on the radar elsewhere.

As far as the 'donut burger' is concerned... well, Americans like doughnuts, like misspelling the word, and like burgers. Combining the three isn't that surprising, is it?

Gwyn chan 'r Gwyll
2011-08-02, 10:15 AM
Poutine .

Oh, of course! How could I forget.

I wonder if the new trend of hip alt-poutine places popping up is a Toronto thing or not. We have places like Smokie's Poutinerie, or Poutini's House of Poutine that serve special poutines, with like, mushrooms, onions, steakstrips, pulled pork, other cool stuff on it. I was talking with one of the guys from Smokie's just a little while ago, actually, and planning a new dish with him, the Vladimir Poutine.

DeadManSleeping
2011-08-02, 10:44 AM
As far as the 'donut burger' is concerned... well, Americans like doughnuts, like misspelling the word, and like burgers. Combining the three isn't that surprising, is it?

Other people don't spell it 'donut'? Man, you guys are missing out on a really fast way to write a really fun word. I mean, really, that's cutting out 3 letters. But I will spell it the long way so as not to offend your delicate British sensibilities on spelling things. I know how much you guys hate picking up all the stray 'u's we drop.

Don't other people like doughnuts, though? I mean, I know burgers are mostly American (and Japan!American), but I thought doughnuts had hit Europe?

Man, the world is missing out. I am getting doughnuts today and thinking of all the people who could have doughnuts but don't because their culture gave them blood sausage or somesuch instead.

lesser_minion
2011-08-02, 11:49 AM
Don't other people like doughnuts, though? I mean, I know burgers are mostly American (and Japan!American), but I thought doughnuts had hit Europe?

Yes, we have doughnuts. And the comment on misspelling was also meant to be taken non-seriously.

goat cart
2011-08-02, 11:54 AM
Food I wish I could get in the US:

Thuringer bratwursts – especially the ones from the ladies outside of the baumarkt in Arnstadt

Cadbury Wunderbars – best candy bar EVAR!

Nasi Goring – it’s around but it’s not as good

Food I wish I could get outside of the US:

Grain Belt Premium Beer

Hamburgers - they're around but they're not as good

Gwyn chan 'r Gwyll
2011-08-02, 01:26 PM
Food I wish I could get in the US:

Thuringer bratwursts – especially the ones from the ladies outside of the baumarkt in Arnstadt

Cadbury Wunderbars – best candy bar EVAR!

Nasi Goring – it’s around but it’s not as good

Food I wish I could get outside of the US:

Grain Belt Premium Beer

Hamburgers - they're around but they're not as good

You can get the Cadbury Wunderbars north of the border. Cadbury sells a good amount of their items in Canada, but not all.

NikitaDarkstar
2011-08-02, 01:53 PM
I moved to the US a few months ago (from Sweden) and somethings I'm about ready to kill for is a very specific bran of falu-sausage (to make matters worse they had to stop making it cause they used no chemicals in it, it was all natural, all traditionally made, which violated some silly EU rule! >.<), a specific brand of meatballs, fresh fish (I'm 4-5 hour from the ocean now, and as someone who grew up at the coast I'll kill myself before considering salt water fish this fr from the ocean "fresh") and decent cheese! Come on America, what's with these tasteless cheeses? I go out and buy something that's supposed to be really sharp and really strong, and it's barely mild? >.<

And I've given up on my favorite bread, I'll just bake that on my own. ^^;

Erloas
2011-08-02, 02:42 PM
fresh fish (I'm 4-5 hour from the ocean now, and as someone who grew up at the coast I'll kill myself before considering salt water fish this fr from the ocean "fresh")
You consider 4-5 hours to be a huge distance or time for something to "no longer be fresh?" Thats nothing in time, even if you are catching them yourself. When I go out to the lake and go fishing its about 30 minutes away, but since I generally go in the morning and don't have fish for breakfast, its usually evening before I get around to cooking them, which is at least 4-5 hours.

And if you go to expensive restaurants you can get some types of fish fresh no matter where you are in the country, as they have them shipped in live in tanks. Of course those are high end restaurants.

tyckspoon
2011-08-02, 03:19 PM
and decent cheese! Come on America, what's with these tasteless cheeses? I go out and buy something that's supposed to be really sharp and really strong, and it's barely mild? >.<

And I've given up on my favorite bread, I'll just bake that on my own. ^^;

Look into farmer's markets in your area; that's probably your best chance for finding breads, cheeses, and maybe meats that are not to mass-market tastes. And since the people doing the selling usually either are or are very close to the producers, if they don't have what you want and you can explain it accurately they might be able to make it for you next time (well, more with the bread- meat products and dairy are a much more time and resource-intensive job.)

Suicidal Charge
2011-08-02, 03:38 PM
*snip* decent cheese! Come on America, what's with these tasteless cheeses? I go out and buy something that's supposed to be really sharp and really strong, and it's barely mild? >.< *snip*

Did you try going to a specialty cheese store, or buying directly from the farm? If you've got one locally, Trader Joe's has a pretty good selection, and fairly cheap. Raw milk cheese is delicious, and stronger than pasteurized. You can't get most types of soft cheese raw, though; they have to be aged for 60 days.

Edit: The farmer's markets in my area have some very nice people manning the stalls, too.

goat cart
2011-08-02, 03:55 PM
You can get the Cadbury Wunderbars north of the border. Cadbury sells a good amount of their items in Canada, but not all.

Do you think Canada would be willing to trade Quebec for Minnesota, straight up?

unosarta
2011-08-02, 04:11 PM
Do you think Canada would be willing to trade Quebec for Minnesota, straight up?

Hey, hey, hey! Wait a minute right there, mister.

Actually, no, free healthcare and less stupidity in general. Can we secede straight away?

Gwyn chan 'r Gwyll
2011-08-02, 04:50 PM
Do you think Canada would be willing to trade Quebec for Minnesota, straight up?

Hah, you could have all the secessionists! 'fraid I love QC too much to give it up for Minnesota. Hell, what does Minnesota have? I'd trade Alberta for Alaska, or for everything Vermont and north in New England.

THAC0
2011-08-02, 05:32 PM
Hah, you could have all the secessionists! 'fraid I love QC too much to give it up for Minnesota. Hell, what does Minnesota have? I'd trade Alberta for Alaska, or for everything Vermont and north in New England.

Alaska become part of Canada? Them's fightin' words!

unosarta
2011-08-02, 08:49 PM
Hah, you could have all the secessionists! 'fraid I love QC too much to give it up for Minnesota. Hell, what does Minnesota have? I'd trade Alberta for Alaska, or for everything Vermont and north in New England.

I wasn't saying we should switch, but Minnesota should join Canada. I mean, they are the same place to half of America anyway... >_>

Heliomance
2011-08-03, 05:01 AM
You guys don't have back-bacon-onna-bun! It is one of the best things ever, and apparently a Toronto specialty. You take your back bacon, put it on a bun, and put on some mustard. Done.

All but Vermont and area lack real maple syrup. I weep for you.

Tourtiere is the best pie ever. It comes from Quebec, only ever had it within the family.

I'm sure I'll come up with more Canadian foods...

How do you define "real" maple syrup? Because I'm fairly sure I've had syrup made from real maple sap, it's not that hard to get in England.

factotum
2011-08-03, 06:28 AM
(although we are guilty as charged there. Ask for a rare steak and you'll get something not unlike charcoal in most restaurants).

You need to start visiting higher quality restaurants...I always ask for my steak well done, and even then it doesn't come back like charcoal! I've been in restaurants where people have asked for a rare steak and it's practically been mooing on the plate when it arrived... :smallwink:

goat cart
2011-08-03, 07:08 AM
Hah, you could have all the secessionists! 'fraid I love QC too much to give it up for Minnesota. Hell, what does Minnesota have? I'd trade Alberta for Alaska, or for everything Vermont and north in New England.

We offer a diverse economy including agriculture, mining, medical devices, and big box chains (headquarters to Worst Buy and Target). We’re also headquarters to 3M. Most of our population lives farther north than most of Canada’s population so it’s a natural geographical fit. We are also home to the NCAA ice hockey champs and considering the impending NHL realignment making Minnesota the 14th province/territory would allow for a sensible all Canadian Northwest Division (Vancouver, Edmonton, Calgary, Winnipeg, and Minnesota).

NikitaDarkstar
2011-08-05, 03:58 PM
You consider 4-5 hours to be a huge distance or time for something to "no longer be fresh?" Thats nothing in time, even if you are catching them yourself. When I go out to the lake and go fishing its about 30 minutes away, but since I generally go in the morning and don't have fish for breakfast, its usually evening before I get around to cooking them, which is at least 4-5 hours.

And if you go to expensive restaurants you can get some types of fish fresh no matter where you are in the country, as they have them shipped in live in tanks. Of course those are high end restaurants.
Considering 4-5 hours is enough to get from west to east coast in sweden and adds a day to shipping straight up? Yhea I consider it a huge distance and yes it's enough to notice a very distinct difference in taste on some types of fish. Perhaps not fish you caught yourself but between coming off a fishing boat, going on the auction, getting transported and then finally sold to me? It's easier to just avoid the saltwater fish for me than just get disappointed, but freshwater fish? not an issue. (And yes I suppose I am picky with my favorite fish. ^^; )

As for farmers markets, I know there's a few around here but I've never visited one, but I certainly will! As for not being able to get raw milk cheeses soft, that's not really an issue I prefer hard cheeses anyway. :) Thanks for the tips guys I'll look into all of them, anything for cheese. :D

Coidzor
2011-08-06, 02:53 AM
Considering 4-5 hours is enough to get from west to east coast in sweden and adds a day to shipping straight up?

Wait. A 4 hour transit time adds an entire day to your shipping services? :smalleek:

...So if you have something to be delivered within the same city, then the best way to do it is yourself rather than using any kind of service then at that kind of speed? :smallconfused:

NikitaDarkstar
2011-08-06, 04:50 AM
Wait. A 4 hour transit time adds an entire day to your shipping services? :smalleek:

...So if you have something to be delivered within the same city, then the best way to do it is yourself rather than using any kind of service then at that kind of speed? :smallconfused:

You got it. Sorry to say. But it also means something like fish can't just be kept cool (like on the boat), it has to be properly frozen and that will kill flavor. :smallmad:

Kislath
2011-08-06, 08:12 AM
The big malls usually have cheese shops offering much more variety than you'd find at the grocer or farmer's markets. In Raleigh there is a section of town called "Old Town" which is a tourist type place, and it is good for finding fresh sourdough bread and various locally made cheeses. You might find something there you'd like. Overall though, to find the really strong cheeses you have to shop in the hugest cities.
As for fresh fish, well, you might have to take a trip to the Outer Banks for that. It's possible that someone is running a livewell truck to Charlotte or some other very large city where it might be practical to do so, but still rather iffy.

Akiosama
2011-08-10, 11:46 AM
Well, for those who posted it before - Calpis Water (called Calpico Water in the US, probably because it sounds like 'Cow-Piss', which is ironic since it's a milk-based soft drink), Pocari Sweat, and CC Lemon are all pretty easy to find here in CA. Most Asian markets have them, here, both in the packaged versions for direct consumption (drink boxes, cans, etc.) and the make-it-yourself versions (concentrates/powders).

What really sucks from an import view for Japanese snacks is that there's a great chip snack line there called "Kaaru" (Curl), that are everywhere in the stores, but they can't import their best flavor (Curry). I've tasted those and they're freakin' awesome, but I recently found out from my cousin who's in the Japanese food import business that they're not allowed to be imported anymore because one of the ingredients is called 'meat extract' and that doesn't pass food import laws for some reason. :smallfrown:

As for food types, I want to find a restaurant out here that is an actual Okonomiyaki restaurant. It's my favorite food, and there are places out here that make it and do well, but having had the experience in Japan, it's not the same.

Basically, in a nutshell, okonomiyaki is taking your favorite meat and vegetables (I like beef and cabbage, myself), mixing it up into a buckwheat batter (often flavored - usually shrimp or light fish flavored) and frying it like a pancake on a grill. It's topped with a tangy sauce, Japanese style mayonaisse (which is sweet, unlike US versions), Bonito Flakes (shaved, dried tuna), and nori (seaweed). It's pretty awesome.

But in Japan, it's also a social experience - something you go to with your friends. You all sit around a teppan (flat grill), with your bowl of batter, and ingredients, and you mix it up and fry it up yourself. It often comes with a side of vegetables, as well, to be fried on the grill, to complement the dish. It's about having fun, and being social while the food cooks, and is quite a great experience. Yakisoba also has a similar experience in Japan, too.

I really wish that the US would look at bringing more foods to the US, but also bringing experiences based on food to the US as well. I know there are some, like teppanyaki (i.e. Benihana) but I still haven't seen my favorite one, yet.

Oh, and to the OP, the hamburger is derived from that which was the 'Hamburg Steak' which was a product of Hamburg, Germany... and the original dish was thought to have originated in 15th century Europe. However, the US has pretty much taken it, made it their own, and spread it over the world once more. Not sure if that makes the dish originally American or not, though.

My 2 yen,

Akiosama

DeadManSleeping
2011-08-10, 02:30 PM
But in Japan, it's also a social experience - something you go to with your friends. You all sit around a teppan (flat grill), with your bowl of batter, and ingredients, and you mix it up and fry it up yourself. It often comes with a side of vegetables, as well, to be fried on the grill, to complement the dish. It's about having fun, and being social while the food cooks, and is quite a great experience.

You can do that in America! Some markets sell all the ingredients you need, and after that, all it takes is a few friends, a bowl, and a pan. When I was in college, the Japanese students did that for our second-year bounenkai (cheap sake was also included).

Akiosama
2011-08-10, 03:38 PM
Heh, I've done that at home before, but there's something about sitting around a real teppan, with those cute little spatulas that got me to dress up like a girl dressed up as a guy for my first real anime convention - seriously, grew my hair out and everything... And is it cross-dressing if you're dressed up as a girl who's dressed up and trying to pass for a guy? - cooking food, drinking beer, and having a great time talking it up.

In any case, the stuff's oishii, easy to make, and been generally popular. I just want an authentic experience on this side of the Pacific. :smallbiggrin:

My 2 yen,

Akiosama

unosarta
2011-08-10, 09:23 PM
Basically, in a nutshell, okonomiyaki is taking your favorite meat and vegetables (I like beef and cabbage, myself), mixing it up into a buckwheat batter (often flavored - usually shrimp or light fish flavored) and frying it like a pancake on a grill. It's topped with a tangy sauce, Japanese style mayonaisse (which is sweet, unlike US versions), Bonito Flakes (shaved, dried tuna), and nori (seaweed). It's pretty awesome.

First of all; bonito is actually its own fish, and is different than tuna. According to Wikipedia, it is commonly used outside of Japan in Japanese cuisine for the Skipjack Tuna, but they are quite different, and bonito flakes don't really taste anything like tuna. Its really funny because the bonito fish is called Katsuo in Japan, and the bonito flakes are called katsuobushi, which makes you really wonder where the word bonito came from. The Portuguese? Bonito in Portuguese translates into beautiful, so I guess that makes some sense. Oh dang, this gets even better. The genus of the Skipjack Tuna is Katuwonus, which is very similar to Katsuo, the word for bonito. Its like everyone has switched the words entirely.

But in any case; I know/have heard that Okonomiyaki is really good from restaurants, but the Okonomiyaki I had during the tanabata in Japan was really terrible. Really, really terrible.

Akiosama
2011-08-11, 10:40 AM
Yah, I know katsuobushi/bonito flakes are slightly different than tuna, but how do you convey what that is if someone doesn't know what bonito is? It's an easy way to explain it.

As for bad okonomiyaki, fortunately, I've never had that before. Actually, seems kind of odd - it's a pretty simple food, really. Though, I'll admit that I only had it once in Japan, and it was at a pretty decent place in Shinjuku.

As for over here, there was a decent restaurant in San Francisco Japantown (Izumi-ya) that I used to get it every chance I could, and I'm pretty sure there was a place down here in either Gardena or Torrance that had it, too.

But it's easy to get the ingredients down here, so it's no worries - I just have to get around to making it again.

And for what it's worth, Japanese mayonnaise (Kewpie) is a pretty good topping, despite what it may sound like.

Oh, and a thought - Bonito might be Portuguese - I'm not sure, but I wouldn't be surprised. After all, the name "Japan" came from Portuguese, as I understand it. "Japan" itself doesn't mean anything intrinsically to the Nihon-jin/Nippon-jin.


My 2 yen,

Akiosama

DeadManSleeping
2011-08-11, 01:04 PM
Oh, and a thought - Bonito might be Portuguese - I'm not sure, but I wouldn't be surprised. After all, the name "Japan" came from Portuguese, as I understand it. "Japan" itself doesn't mean anything intrinsically to the Nihon-jin/Nippon-jin.

Weeeelll...

Basically, the name Nippon got carried through other languages and rendered into different characters, giving it different pronunciations. THEN the Portugese ran into one of those names (most likely "Jepang" in Malaysia) and brought it over to Europe. Additionally, a misreading (or, perhaps, simply an archaic reading) of the characters that make up the word "Nippon" gets you "Jippon", which was listed as one of the Japanese names for Japan in the Portugese dictionary of the Japanese language (the other was "Nifon", since the old Japanese 'h' used to have the sound which now only remains in the 'hu' phoneme).

(I admit, I had to check Wikipedia for this. I had mistakenly believed they went through China, where it's "Zeppen". The rest I remembered from my classes).

I should really get a facsimile of that dictionary. Maybe I could find 'bonito' in there somewhere.

unosarta
2011-08-11, 08:32 PM
(I admit, I had to check Wikipedia for this. I had mistakenly believed they went through China, where it's "Zeppen". The rest I remembered from my classes).

Actually, Japan in Mandarin is "Riben". It doesn't sound very much like that at all.

But I digress; I have yet to find any of the following in America; Shichimi, katsuobushi, or especially good sushi. I also have never seen people eat fish with the bones in America, and I never ate deboned fish in Japan. I suppose you could find shichimi or katsuobushi in an Asian market, but I have yet to find it (although my friend's mom, who is a chef, has ichimi, so shichimi should be in America as well, so who knows).

DeadManSleeping
2011-08-11, 08:56 PM
Actually, Japan in Mandarin is "Riben". It doesn't sound very much like that at all.

Wrong Chinese (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shanghainese_dialect), apparently. And now I know twice as much Mandarin as I did five minutes ago!

turkishproverb
2011-08-11, 09:05 PM
My first two points: Variations on the Kit Kat bar, and hazlenut yogurt (or yoghurt, to those of you trying to fight eldritch horrors). In the US, I've seen the standard Kit Kat, as well as white and dark chocolate varieties. And that's super keen. But look (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kit_Kat#Varieties) at what they have in Japan! That's a veritable smorgasbord of flavors!

Wizzywig.com carries those, I think.


For my part? Jelly Babies. And Caramilk bars.

Akiosama
2011-08-12, 12:17 AM
Actually, Japan in Mandarin is "Riben". It doesn't sound very much like that at all.

But I digress; I have yet to find any of the following in America; Shichimi, katsuobushi, or especially good sushi. I also have never seen people eat fish with the bones in America, and I never ate deboned fish in Japan. I suppose you could find shichimi or katsuobushi in an Asian market, but I have yet to find it (although my friend's mom, who is a chef, has ichimi, so shichimi should be in America as well, so who knows).


Actually, in California, Shichimi togarashi (Seven flavored chili pepper - never heard it called just "Shichimi", either the full name or "togarashi") is pretty easy to find, as is Katsuobushi. Saba Shioyaki (Grilled Mackerel) is served in many Japanese restaurants here, too, and is never deboned.

In fact, more rare stuff like Takoyaki (Octopus balls/dumplings), dango (dumplings), real ramen, and the likes are pretty easy to find.

I'm glad to be living in California.

My 2 yen,

Akiosama

arguskos
2011-08-12, 01:02 AM
But I digress; I have yet to find any of the following in America; Shichimi, katsuobushi, or especially good sushi. I also have never seen people eat fish with the bones in America, and I never ate deboned fish in Japan. I suppose you could find shichimi or katsuobushi in an Asian market, but I have yet to find it (although my friend's mom, who is a chef, has ichimi, so shichimi should be in America as well, so who knows).
I know a place here in town to acquire most, if not all, of that. You have to speak Japanese to order it though, since it's on the Japanese Only portion of the menu (that's how you know it's a good place, there's a special menu for native speakers). I don't, so I can't guarantee you can find that jazz, but I wouldn't be surprised.

They make FANTASTIC sushi though. God love Akai Hana.

Serpentine
2011-08-12, 01:47 AM
For my part? Jelly Babies.To expand on this: English jelly babies are very different, and far superior, to Australian jelly babies.

unosarta
2011-08-12, 02:03 AM
Actually, in California, Shichimi togarashi (Seven flavored chili pepper - never heard it called just "Shichimi", either the full name or "togarashi") is pretty easy to find, as is Katsuobushi. Saba Shioyaki (Grilled Mackerel) is served in many Japanese restaurants here, too, and is never deboned.
That's weird that you know of it as shichimi togarashi, since I literally never heard it called that way while I was in Japan (my host family called it shichimi, market vendors in Asakusa in Tokyo had shichimi flavored snacks, etc), and I gave it as an omiyage to my tutor, who is Japanese, and she called it shichimi.

Oh man, saba shiyoyaki is the best! Now you are making me feel all nostalgic.


In fact, more rare stuff like Takoyaki (Octopus balls/dumplings), dango (dumplings), real ramen, and the likes are pretty easy to find.

I'm glad to be living in California.

My 2 yen,

Akiosama
That reminds me, my area doesn't have very many good (actually none, as far as I know) ramen shops, nor takoyaki or dango. :smallfrown:


I know a place here in town to acquire most, if not all, of that. You have to speak Japanese to order it though, since it's on the Japanese Only portion of the menu (that's how you know it's a good place, there's a special menu for native speakers). I don't, so I can't guarantee you can find that jazz, but I wouldn't be surprised.

They make FANTASTIC sushi though. God love Akai Hana.
Man, where are these restaurants? Everywhere but Minnesota?

turkishproverb
2011-08-12, 02:20 AM
To expand on this: English jelly babies are very different, and far superior, to Australian jelly babies.

Really? Good to know. I won't be buying any of them now.

Serpentine
2011-08-12, 02:25 AM
Which, Australian or English?

turkishproverb
2011-08-12, 02:51 AM
Australian.