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Eakin
2011-10-07, 07:50 PM
Hey playgroundians!

I have a sister who has some really gaping holes in her cinema knowledge ("Rocky? What's that about?" honest to god actual quote). She's asked me to compile a list of 100 movies that she should watch, from every time period and genre I can think of. However, it turns out I'm not quite up to it myself so I'm turning to you. What are the most essential movies that anyone who wants to talk intelligently about movie NEEDS to see?

Howler Dagger
2011-10-07, 07:52 PM
Citizen Kane, for one.

Mutant Sheep
2011-10-07, 07:56 PM
Wizard of Oz. Rocky... lets go with 4, its awesome. Titanic, LOTR movies, Star Wars 4-6... uhh... I don't know any others that arent just my complete personal opinion. :smallredface:

Axolotl
2011-10-07, 07:58 PM
From the top of my head I'd say Seven Samurai, Lawrence of Arabia, Godfather, The Good, The Bad and The Ugly, Apocalypse Now and The Shining. But there's alot more just sticking with absolute classic films.

Eakin
2011-10-07, 08:00 PM
I'm trying to keep this to one movie per franchise, I'm aiming for breadth rather than depth.

I did include LotR as an entire trilogy though.

Only one Star Wars, Back to the Future, and Rocky entry.

Personal opinions are totally encouraged! 100 movies is a lot.

So far:

100. Back to the Future
99. Indiana Jones: Raiders of the Lost Ark
98. Star Wars
97. The Maltese Falcon
96. Chinatown
95. Citizen Kane
94. Robocop
93. Rocky
92. Lord of the Rings trilogy
91. Casablanca
90. The Matrix
89. Momento
88. The Prestige
87. Clockwork Orange
86. Monty Python and the Holy Grail

I also want to put something Tarantino on there but am torn between Pulp Fiction and Reservoir Dogs

Traab
2011-10-07, 08:00 PM
The Princess Bride is a must.

Dumbledore lives
2011-10-07, 08:00 PM
This might be relevant (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AFI%27s_100_Years...100_Movies) as are the other categories, like the 100 laughs and the 10th anniversary edition of the list.

Mando Knight
2011-10-07, 08:04 PM
Indiana Jones: Raiders of the Lost Ark

Temple of Doom and The Last Crusade have their moments, as well...

Starscream
2011-10-07, 08:06 PM
As I post this, I'm watching The Exorcist. One of the best horror movies of all time, and a definite must for this season.

Traab
2011-10-07, 08:07 PM
The last crusade should be included, temple of doom I never really liked. Im also a big fan of goodfellas, scarface, and godfather part 1. I like to list movies that you are likely to both enjoy, and hear quoted alot.

Eakin
2011-10-07, 08:11 PM
Temple of Doom and The Last Crusade have their moments, as well...

I agree, but do you really think Indiana Jones deserves 3% of someone's classic film knowledge? I'm not limiting her to 100 movies for the rest of time, if she likes the first one she can watch the other two.

Since, you know, that franchise stopped after 3 movies

Mutant Sheep
2011-10-07, 08:15 PM
Well, Planet of the Apes is wonderful Sci Fi, and Charlton Heston's bestest work, ever.

Well DUH the franchise ended after 3 movies. Theres a REASON the Last Crusade is called...well... THE LAST. :smallwink:

Mr.Bookworm
2011-10-07, 08:20 PM
Citizen Kane, for one.

Eh. It's a masterpiece of cinematography, but it hasn't aged as well in terms of plot. It's not unwatchable or anything, and it's definitely a classic, but I would say it's more important for what it's influenced than it's own actual merits as a film.

Very important question: How old is your sister? I'm guessing old enough to see anything, but you never know. Unless you just want to mentally scar a younger sibling, "Reservoir Dogs or Pulp Fiction" answers that.

Letsee. Just off the top of my head, movies I would recommend to absolutely anyone:

Seven Samurai
Dr. Strangelove
Airplane!
The Naked Gun
Brazil
The Seventh Seal
Every single thing by Monty Python (Meaning of Life, Life of Brian, Holy Grail)
The Princess Bride
The Birds/Psycho (something by Hitchcock)
Apocalypse Now
The Godfather
On the Beach
To Kill a Mockingbird
Night of the Living Dead (if you like classic, if not, skip straight to the next one)
28 Days Later
Everything by Pixar (okay, almost everything, you can skip Cars)
Who Framed Roger Rabbit?
Shaun of the Dead/Hot Fuzz
The Usual Suspects
The Big Lebowski
The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp
2001
Lawrence of Arabia
Bullitt
Unbreakable
Pulp Fiction
The Pink Panther
This is Spinal Tap
Office Space
Taxi Driver
The Silence of the Lambs
A Clockwork Orange
Everything by Mel Brooks (Blazing Saddles, Spaceballs, the Producers, Young Frankenstein)
The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
True Grit (both the original and the remake are quite good)
No Country for Old Men
Indiana Jones (any but the newest one)
Star Wars (the original trilogy)
Alien
Aliens

I could go on (for a long while, I'm already seeing some stuff upthread I missed), but that seems like a decent start. Good cross-section of genres.

Eakin
2011-10-07, 08:28 PM
Eh. It's a masterpiece of cinematography, but it hasn't aged as well in terms of plot. It's not unwatchable or anything, and it's definitely a classic, but I would say it's more important for what it's influenced than it's own actual merits as a film.

Very important question: How old is your sister? I'm guessing old enough to see anything, but you never know. Unless you just want to mentally scar a younger sibling, "Reservoir Dogs or Pulp Fiction" answers that.

Letsee. Just off the top of my head, movies I would recommend to absolutely anyone:

Seven Samurai
Dr. Strangelove
Airplane!
The Naked Gun
Brazil
The Seventh Seal
Every single thing by Monty Python (Meaning of Life, Life of Brian, Holy Grail)
The Princess Bride
The Birds/Psycho (something by Hitchcock)
Apocalypse Now
The Godfather
On the Beach
To Kill a Mockingbird
Night of the Living Dead (if you like classic, if not, skip straight to the next one)
28 Days Later
Everything by Pixar (okay, almost everything, you can skip Cars)
Who Framed Roger Rabbit?
Shaun of the Dead/Hot Fuzz
The Usual Suspects
The Big Lebowski
The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp
2001
Lawrence of Arabia
Bullitt
Unbreakable
Pulp Fiction
The Pink Panther
This is Spinal Tap
Office Space
Taxi Driver
The Silence of the Lambs
A Clockwork Orange
Everything by Mel Brooks (Blazing Saddles, Spaceballs, the Producers, Young Frankenstein)
The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
True Grit (both the original and the remake are quite good)
No Country for Old Men
Indiana Jones (any but the newest one)
Star Wars (the original trilogy)
Alien
Aliens

I could go on (for a long while, I'm already seeing some stuff upthread I missed), but that seems like a decent start. Good cross-section of genres.

She's 24, age isn't really an issue. (I'm 26, for reference)
EDIT: Still, I'd be neglecting my big brotherly duties if I didn't try to mentally scar her a LITTLE bit

If she were younger the total ignorance of film history would be a lot more forgivable, actually...

Good suggestions, I'm trying to avoid parodies like Shaun/Fuzz though, as they're much better once you're familiar with the genre

EDIT 2: She's not big on book-to-film adaptations, I'm making an exception for LotR since IMHO the films are vastly superior to the books. But I wouldn't ask her to watch the Harry Potter octilogy (is that a word?)

Metahuman1
2011-10-07, 08:42 PM
Terminator.

The First Rambo.

The First each of,

Nightmare on Elmstreet, Friday the 13th, and Halloween.

Avatar.

Spider-man.

Iron-man.

Casablanca.

The big sleep.

Dawn of the dead.

The Thing.

Sabrina.

Super-man (Christoper Reeves version. See 2 as well if you liked it.)

The Dark Knight.

One of the Conan the Barbarian Movies.

Red Sonya.

X-men.

The Maltese Falcon.

Schindler's List.

Braveheart.

The Patriot.

Lethal Weapon 1

The Passion of the Christ(I know, Mel Gibson. I don't care that he's not the nice guy he once seemed, the movies are still good movies. And in the case of Passion, look at it as a great and emotional telling of one of the greatest myths in history, one that influenced the course of world history for century's, if you don't happen to be of the Christian faith yourself.)

Saving Privet Ryan.

Pearl Harbor.

Shakespear in Love.

The Matrix.

Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone. (Or Chamber of Secrets.)

The Mummy (the old version with Boris Korloft. )

The Majestic.

Jurassic Park.

Citizen Kane.

V for Vendetta.

The Bourne Identity.

Gold Finger.

Watchmen.

Monty Python and the Search for the Holy Grail/Meaning of Life.

Young Frankenstein/Robin Hood: Men in Tights.

Gladiator.

Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl.

The Naked Gun.

Seven Years in Tibet.



Not posted in any kind of Order, just so where clear.

Eakin
2011-10-07, 09:04 PM
Kinda heavy on comic book movies Meta, are you really devote spots to X-men, Spider man, AND Iron Man when Superman is a classic and The Dark Knight is just that much better?

Also, is there another Pearl Harbor besides the Ben Affleck one? 'Cause I already have From Here to Eternity and don't want to repeat myself. Also the movie I'm thinking of is TERRIBLE

PhantomFox
2011-10-07, 09:16 PM
We can't neglect the animation category now, can we?

Toy Story, The Incredibles, and/or Finding Nemo
Bambi
Snow White
The Lion King
Shrek
Beauty and the Beast

Eakin
2011-10-07, 09:22 PM
Coming down the home stretch! The AMC list helped a ton. List as it stands now:

100. Back to the Future
99. Indiana Jones: Raiders of the Lost Ark
98. Star Wars
97. The Maltese Falcon
96. Chinatown
95. From Here to Eternity
94. Jaws
93. Rocky
92. Lord of the Rings trilogy
91. Casablanca
90. The Matrix
89. Momento
88. The Prestige
87. Jerry Maguire
86. Monty Python and the Holy Grail
85. Goldeneye
84. Titantic
83. Godfather
82. Lawrence of Arabia
81. Apocalypse Now
80. The Shining
79. Superman
78. The Exorcist
77. Princess Bride
76. Pretty Women
75. Psycho
74. The Producers
73. Schindler's List
72. The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
71. Usual Suspects
70. Taxi Driver
69. Office Space
68. The Big Lebowski
67. Annie Hall
66. Citizen Kane
65. Sleepless in Seattle
64. Double Indemnity
63. Clockwork Orange
62. Unforgiven
61. Gladiator
60. The Lion King
59. Pulp Fiction
58. Sixth Sense
57. Night of the Living Dead
56. Dr. Strangelove
55. Goldfinger
54. One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
53. Wizard of Oz
52. Gandhi
51. Die Hard
50. Bonnie and Clyde
49. Rear Window
48. Finding Nemo
47. Gone With the Wind
46. Caddyshack
45. Silence of the Lambs
44. 12 Angry Men
43. Blade Runner
42. The Graduate
41. Ghostbusters
40. Sound of Music
39. Finding Nemo
38. Airplane
37. It's a Wonderful Life
36. Field of Dreams
35. Schindler's List
34. Nightmare on Elm Street
33. Braveheart
32. The Dark Knight
31. Goodfellas
30. Shawshank Redemption
29. Mr Smith Goes to Washington
28. Rambo: First Blood
27. On the Waterfront
26. Ben-Hur
25. To Kill a Mockingbird
24. Chariots of Fire
23. Rashomon
22. Good Will Hunting
21. Naked Gun
20. There Will Be Blood
19. Driving Ms. Daisy
18. Alien

otakuryoga
2011-10-07, 09:26 PM
one of the greatest ever made and no one mentioned it yet?

The Bridge on the River Kwai


older and hard to find...and tough subject matter
----Birth of a Nation

Obscure foreign but very influental
---Battleship Potemkin(russian from...oh..late 20/early 30?)(director is Sergei Eisenstein if i remember name right)

Eakin
2011-10-07, 09:35 PM
one of the greatest ever made and no one mentioned it yet?

The Bridge on the River Kwai


older and hard to find...and tough subject matter
----Birth of a Nation

Obscure foreign but very influental
---Battleship Potemkin(russian from...oh..late 20/early 30?)(director is Sergei Eisenstein if i remember name right)

Added Bridge, but I don't think my sister is going to find Birth of a Nation on Netflix instant streaming, for SOME reason...

Potempkin is the film that pioneered non-linear cutting and lots of jumps in the editing, right? Very important technically, but if you didn't know that I don't think watching it would be all that impressive today

KillianHawkeye
2011-10-07, 09:48 PM
A lot of my suggestions have already been... suggested. But I should still mention The Rock with Nicolas Cage and Sean Connery.

Nepenthe
2011-10-07, 09:51 PM
Metropolis (Fritz Lang, not the Anime) is an absolute must.
The Kid (Charlie Chaplin, not the Bruce Willis one)
Grave of the Fireflies

And you need some musicals. Lets go with Guys and Dolls as a classic, and either Phantom of the Opera or Moulin Rouge for something more modern.

EDIT:
Forgot to mention Eraserhead. I don't even really like it, but it's something everyone should see.

Eakin
2011-10-07, 10:01 PM
Grave of the Fireflies


Well I HAVE been meaning to give her clinical depression...

Whiffet
2011-10-07, 10:08 PM
Your current list has almost everything I could think of covered. I'd add Who Framed Roger Rabbit and Ferris Bueller's Day Off. Not that I'm a huge fan of Ferris, but it's one of those movies people should see anyway. Not to the extent of some others on your list, but still.

I assume your sister is familiar with Toy Story?

Mando Knight
2011-10-07, 10:10 PM
Well I HAVE been meaning to give her clinical depression...

It is the best movie you will only ever want to watch once.

Though I'm afraid it won't be enough to give her clinical depression. For that, I'll have to connect you to my university's resident GIANT ROBOTS Game Master... who will give you the absolute worst (emotionally) order to watch good anime in. One mood swing into Downer Ending after another, it's all the fun of clinical depression* without necessarily needing to go on medication afterward.

*By "fun" I mean it's like someone sticks a knife in your heart, and then twists it about when you think you're used to the pain. It hurts.

Gwyn chan 'r Gwyll
2011-10-07, 10:15 PM
Lawrence of Arabia

I'm watching this one at this very moment! It's looooong.
I also watched Casablanca just two weeks ago.

I'd have to add Fiddler on the Roof to this. Because it is the only ANYTHING that I've actually cried watching. Single most powerful moment in ANY film EVER.

Geno9999
2011-10-07, 10:21 PM
*By "fun" I mean it's like someone sticks a knife in your heart, and then twists it about when you think you're used to the pain. It hurts.

Wait, how would you know?

On topic, I would suggest;
Star Wars (New Hope)
Toy Story
Princess Mononoke

Vorpalbob
2011-10-07, 10:28 PM
You've mentioned Rocky, but you haven't mentioned Rocky Horror?

Shame on you! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V0SqS2QJdj8)

Gaelbert
2011-10-07, 10:29 PM
I'd go with Vertigo over Birds for Hitchcock.
I'll also add another vote for Battleship Potempkin. It was certainly a technical feat, but it was also an excellent movie, and a movie that is often discussed.

McStabbington
2011-10-07, 11:22 PM
The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance
Evil Dead 2
High Noon
Seven Samurai
The Iron Giant
Ikiru
Seven
Hoop Dreams
Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
King Kong (1933)
Pan's Labyrinth
He Got Game

Serpentine
2011-10-07, 11:25 PM
Only one Star Wars, Back to the Future, and Rocky entry.You can't have only one Star Wars and Back to the Future :smallconfused: They're one continuous story broken into three parts, just as much as Lord of the Rings.

The Princess Bride has been mentioned.
Willow.
Edward Scissorhands.
Dark City.
Up is a must, although if you're really trying to avoid doubling up I'd say either Up or Toy Story 3 (which is a somewhat different beast to Toy Story 1, so I'd say you could have both 1 and 3 without doubling up).
Spaceballs (after Star Wars, obviously), Robin Hood Men in Tights and/or Blazing Saddles.
Psycho.

Eakin
2011-10-07, 11:30 PM
You can't have only one Star Wars and Back to the Future :smallconfused: They're one continuous story broken into three parts.

The Princess Bride has been mentioned.
Willow.
Edward Scissorhands.
Dark City.
Up is a must, although if you're really trying to avoid doubling up I'd say either Up or Toy Story 3 (which is a somewhat different beast to Toy Story 1, so I'd say you could have both 1 and 3 without doubling up).
Spaceballs (after Star Wars, obviously), Robin Hood Men in Tights and/or Blazing Saddles.
Psycho.

I went with The Producers as my Mel Brooks entry, since it's more of an original film rather than a parody

I disagree about BttF and Star Wars, the first episode of each of them work as standalone films, typical Two Part Triologies (http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/TwoPartTrilogy). LotR isn't, the first film doesn't work as a one off AT ALL.

I want to expose my sister to as many different films/genres as I can, I have no problem with her hunting down the rest of a series afterwards.

Serpentine
2011-10-07, 11:35 PM
Re. The Producers: Eeeeeh. I suggest having one of the others I listed as well - The Producers is a very different sort of comedy. I'd recommend Men In Tights, although I think Blazing Saddles is more critically acclaimed.

And I guess we have to disagree about Back to the Future and Star Wars, because I seriously can't imagine watching one and not watching the others. It just doesn't work.

Tirian
2011-10-08, 01:22 AM
If you feel driven to see only one Mel Brooks movie in your life, it should definitely be Young Frankenstein. On this point, there should be no dispute. (BTW, how were there no news stories when Kenneth Mars died in February??!)

Beyond that, I'd tell you to skip both Blazing Saddles and The Producers. BS has two good scenes you can watch on YouTube, and The Producers doesn't even have that much. Silent Movie is better than both of them, as is Men in Tights. I also have a soft spot in my heart for The Twelve Chairs, which is remarkable for actually having a plot and a theme.

Brewdude
2011-10-08, 01:32 AM
Ok, so this is NOT a list of favorite movies. It's a list of movies that everyone thinks you've seen, and get shocked when you haven't seen them. So here's my commentary:

100. Back to the Future
99. Indiana Jones: Raiders of the Lost Ark
98. Star Wars
97. The Maltese Falcon -- Not mandatory. add a spot
96. Chinatown
95. From Here to Eternity -- Not mandatory, add a spot
94. Jaws
93. Rocky
92. Lord of the Rings trilogy
91. Casablanca
90. The Matrix
89. Memento
88. The Prestige -- Not mandatory, add a spot
87. Jerry Maguire
86. Monty Python and the Holy Grail
85. Goldeneye -- NOT the Bond film everyone expects you to have seen. Everyone expects you to have played the video game. List later
84. Titantic
83. Godfather
82. Lawrence of Arabia
81. Apocalypse Now
80. The Shining
79. Superman -- but it's Superman 2 that everyone expects you to have seen
78. The Exorcist
77. Princess Bride
76. Pretty Women
75. Psycho
74. The Producers -- Not Mandatory, Add a spot
73. Schindler's List
72. The Good, the Bad and the Ugly -- must at least also know that the other two exist: A fist full of dollars, and A few Dollars More.
71. Usual Suspects
70. Taxi Driver
69. Office Space
68. The Big Lebowski
67. Annie Hall
66. Citizen Kane
65. Sleepless in Seattle
64. Double Indemnity -- Not Mandatory, Add a spot
63. Clockwork Orange
62. Unforgiven
61. Gladiator
60. The Lion King
59. Pulp Fiction
58. Sixth Sense
57. Night of the Living Dead
56. Dr. Strangelove
55. Goldfinger -- one of the mandatory bond films yes.
54. One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
53. Wizard of Oz
52. Gandhi
51. Die Hard -- The first instance where the Team of bad guys NEEDED THEIR NERD
50. Bonnie and Clyde -- Not mandatory, Add a spot
49. Rear Window
48. Finding Nemo
47. Gone With the Wind
46. Caddyshack
45. Silence of the Lambs
44. 12 Angry Men
43. Blade Runner
42. The Graduate
41. Ghostbusters
40. Sound of Music
39. Finding Nemo -- Duplicate, Add a spot
38. Airplane
37. It's a Wonderful Life
36. Field of Dreams
35. Schindler's List -- Duplicat, Add a spot
34. Nightmare on Elm Street
33. Braveheart
32. The Dark Knight
31. Goodfellas
30. Shawshank Redemption
29. Mr Smith Goes to Washington
28. Rambo: First Blood
27. On the Waterfront - Not mandatory, Add a spot
26. Ben-Hur
25. To Kill a Mockingbird - Not mandatory, but add to expected reading list
24. Chariots of Fire
23. Rashomon - Not mandatory, Add a spot
22. Good Will Hunting
21. Naked Gun -- Airplane covers this
20. There Will Be Blood
19. Driving Ms. Daisy
18. Alien
And now my list

17. Aliens- yes, both movies are mandatory. However, none of the rest are.
16. Better off dead -- any 80s John Cusak movie will do, but this one is best.
15. the Breakfast Club -- Any Molly Ringwold movie will do, but this is best
14. The Hangover
13 Evil Dead 2
12 Highlander
11 The Manchurian Candidate
10 Friday the 13th
9 Halloween
8 A Christmas Story -- she'll shoot her eye out
7 Lost Boys
6 The Road Warrior
5 Close Encounters of the 3rd kind
4 Escape from New York
3 2001 - I'm sorry dave, I just can't do that.
2 Big Trouble in Little China
1 Cannonball Run


Bonus 14 to replace the non mandatories
A funny thing happened on the way to the forum
Young Frankenstein, or History of the World Part 1, or Blazing Saddles
For guys: "Stand by me". For girls: "Casual Sex?" The other sex just doesn't get those movies.
The magnificent 7 OR 7 Samurai (or both, and know why they are related)
Hard Boiled or The Killer (must have an opinion about john woo)
The Great Race
The Rock
The Goonies
The Sting or The Natural
Fantasia
Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure
Beetlejuice
Jurassic Park
Fight Club


Personal taste:
Old boy -- scarring
Shanghai Shuffle
Shaun of the Dead
Blood of heroes
La Femme Nikita
Run Lola Run
The house of flying Daggers
Hero
Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon


No you cannot have Scott Pilgrim vs the Universe. That movie is for my generation. You youngn's just don't understand.

Serpentine
2011-10-08, 01:35 AM
For guys: "Stand by me". For girls: "Casual Sex?" The other sex just doesn't get those movies.I "got" Stand By Me, and I've never heard of Casual Sex? :smallconfused:

Brewdude
2011-10-08, 01:39 AM
Casual Sex? is the Stand by Me for girls. Or so they tell me. More that they tell me they'll never believe I understand it like they do, just like I'll never believe they understand Stand By Me like I do.

drakir_nosslin
2011-10-08, 01:45 AM
The Seventh Seal.

Something by Studio Ghibli, My Neighbor Totoro is my favorite, Spirited Away and Howl's Moving Castle are also good.

Full Metal Jacket perhaps?

Nosferatu for something really old that people still discuss and with all the vampire hype it might be interesting to see where it all began.

Brewdude
2011-10-08, 01:48 AM
Dear lord yes
+1 on full metal jacket.

You have to know why the drill sergent keeps getting cast. It's this movie.

Noblesse
2011-10-08, 01:48 AM
One title that I haven't seen that that I think should be in there...

Requiem for a Dream... Just have a very happy movie to follow it up.

You said you wanted to scar her at one point... Human Centipede would do the trick, but you did say LITTLE... so maybe not.

McStabbington
2011-10-08, 02:07 AM
Do not put Requiem to a Dream on that list. To quote from the entry on the film from The Wiki That Shall Not Be Linked Too:



If you ever find yourself inexplicably contented with your lot, slip this into your DVD player and normal service will be resumed... this is a film you watch once, then repair to the pub to stare fixedly into your beer for the night, vowing never, ever to watch it again.
--Empire's Top 10 Most Depressing Movies, Entry #1


Which is in fact completely accurate. I've seen that movie exactly once in my life. It's well-crafted and well-made, but it is most certainly not a movie you need to see even once, nor is it a movie anyone will say "You haven't seen that!" when you announce it. Rather, when people hear that, they say "Good call, man. I saw that . . . once."

Beyond that, I'd say that there are a lot of things you can pull off your list if the "You've never seen X!" reaction is your metric for films that must be seen. Even beyond stuff that's vastly overrated (2001 *cough* *cough*), I've never heard anyone say "You've never seen Highlander!" or "You've never seen The Prestige!" Good films, for sure, but they're a world away in terms of cinematic effect from films like Seven Samurai or Nosferatu, neither of which is on your list. Seven Samurai and Raiders of the Lost Ark are basically the templates for every action film done subsequently; Seven Samurai also has the virtue of being the most seamlessly edited film I've ever seen. Nosferatu is not, by modern standards, a very good film, but it shows some of the earliest efforts at film special effects, editing and cutting to carry on the story, and what amounts to one of the earliest montages in film.

Hazzardevil
2011-10-08, 02:35 AM
Since, you know, that franchise stopped after 3 movies

Is the kingdom of the crystal skull that bad?
I liked it.

But I wouldn't ask her to watch the Harry Potter octilogy (is that a word?)

The correct term's cycle.


Ok, so this is NOT a list of favorite movies. It's a list of movies that everyone thinks you've seen, and get shocked when you haven't seen them. So here's my commentary:

86. Monty Python and the Holy Grail
85. Goldeneye -- NOT the Bond film Everyone expects you to have watched the bond film too.
84. Titantic Is this the Leonardo Di Caprio one?
55. Goldfinger -- one of the mandatory bond films yes. I think Goldeneye was better.
Fantasia Are you saying the disney one? Also you have several disney films on the list.

No you cannot have Scott Pilgrim vs the Universe. That movie is for my generation. You youngn's just don't understand.
Why isn't it? So what if it's based on a series of books/comic books?

Now for my list:
A bridge to far,
Saving Private Ryan, (Both WW2 films, but they teach you bit and are interesting.)
Serenity (The Firefly one)

Serpentine
2011-10-08, 02:37 AM
Casual Sex? is the Stand by Me for girls. Or so they tell me. More that they tell me they'll never believe I understand it like they do, just like I'll never believe they understand Stand By Me like I do.Well, I'll just say that I'm extremely skeptical of that claim.

Gadora
2011-10-08, 06:40 AM
You can't have only one Star Wars and Back to the Future :smallconfused: They're one continuous story broken into three parts, just as much as Lord of the Rings.


But the Back to the Future was originally conceived of as a standalone.:smallconfused: There weren't any plans for the sequels until after the movie was such a success.

KillianHawkeye
2011-10-08, 09:03 AM
But the Back to the Future was originally conceived of as a standalone.:smallconfused: There weren't any plans for the sequels until after the movie was such a success.

Is that why it ends with a "To Be Continued..." after Doc Brown comes to get Marty and Jennifer to take them to the future? :smallconfused:

Because that totally happened.

Serpentine
2011-10-08, 09:06 AM
There's a pretty strong link there... (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gvTTT-YX3iQ)

Mr.Silver
2011-10-08, 09:15 AM
If in doubt, browse the IMDb top 250 and pick 100 from that. It's not a definitive list but most 'must see' films are on it at some point.


23. Rashomon - Not mandatory, Add a spot
Fixed it for you :smalltongue:



Do not put Requiem to a Dream on that list. To quote from the entry on the film from The Wiki That Shall Not Be Linked Too:
Which is in fact completely accurate. I've seen that movie exactly once in my life. It's well-crafted and well-made, but it is most certainly not a movie you need to see even once, nor is it a movie anyone will say "You haven't seen that!" when you announce it. Rather, when people hear that, they say "Good call, man. I saw that . . . once."
:smallsigh:
Please ignore the 'sad is bad' brigade if you ever want to have a knowledge of film. Or any medium, for that matter.

Traab
2011-10-08, 09:19 AM
Dear lord yes
+1 on full metal jacket.

You have to know why the drill sergent keeps getting cast. It's this movie.

Just make sure you warn her that the drill sergeant might swear once in awhile. lol But yeah, qft. This movie is what created the entire cinematic version of the drill sergeant.

Speaking of military movies, watch Stripes! This movie has so many famous people in it that its beyond belief, it is fricking hilarious.

Gadora
2011-10-08, 10:23 AM
Is that why it ends with a "To Be Continued..." after Doc Brown comes to get Marty and Jennifer to take them to the future? :smallconfused:

Because that totally happened.

That was added in the VHS release. If you'd like, I could go double check the interviews on the DVD; it is possible I'm remembering incorrectly, but I'd be surprised.



There's a pretty strong link there... (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gvTTT-YX3iQ)
Hey now, I never said they didn't do a good job tying the rest of the trilogy into the first movie. I was just defending the first movie's ability to stand on its own.

EDIT: Ah-ha, here we go:

Originally Posted by Wikipedia article on Back to the Future Part II http://www.giantitp.com/forums/images/buttons/viewpost.gif (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Back_to_the_Future_Part_II#Development)

Zemeckis states that initially Back to the Future was not destined to have a sequel, but its huge box office success led to the conception of a second installment.

Trog
2011-10-08, 10:24 AM
Personal faves/enjoyable films off the top of my head:

Casablanca
Pulp Fiction
The Big Lebowski
Maltese Falcon
No Country for Old Men
Princess Mononoke
American Beauty
Lost In Translation
The Matrix
Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
Kill Bill
The Pirates of the Caribbean
Renaissance, Paris 2054
Fight Club
Silverado
Good Will Hunting
Die Hard
Aliens
The Silence of the Lambs
Blade Runner
The Usual Suspects
Toy Story
Avatar
The Sixth Sense
Star Wars films
Indiana Jones films
Tremors
2001: A Space Odyssey

Raistlin1040
2011-10-08, 10:39 AM
I realize this joke was made, but the Other Rocky (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bc80tFJpTuo). Preferable in a theater if your city does a weekly/monthy midnight showing. It's not TOTALLY about the movie, but I think the absurd cult following that is still going 36 years after the movie came out is worth mention.

Eakin
2011-10-08, 10:56 AM
Is the kingdom of the crystal skull that bad?
I liked it.


Honestly? I didn't think it was as awful as the internet claims. Not amazing but about average for a summer action flick.

As for Rocky Horror, I'll put it in if I have a spot, but she's seen the Glee tribute episode so that's basically the same thing.

*Flees enraged mob of Rocky Horror fans*

Serpentine
2011-10-08, 11:38 AM
Oh, Glee got Tim Curry in drag? That's impressive.

McStabbington
2011-10-08, 11:41 AM
If in doubt, browse the IMDb top 250 and pick 100 from that. It's not a definitive list but most 'must see' films are on it at some point.


Fixed it for you :smalltongue:



:smallsigh:
Please ignore the 'sad is bad' brigade if you ever want to have a knowledge of film. Or any medium, for that matter.

. . .Dude, I was the guy who recommended King Kong, Seven and Pan's Labyrinth. I don't make references based on the premise that sad is bad. I do ask, however, that the value of the film be proportionate to the level of misery inflicted, and Requiem does not make the cut. It's not going to tell you anything about film editing, scripting or cinematography that other pictures on the list can't, it's not something essential to the film canon of the late 90's/early 2000's, and if you're insisting on having a high-concept Aronofsky film on the list, The Fountain or Pi will serve perfectly without causing someone new to film geekery to jump out a window or swear off the rest of the list.

It's a solid, well-crafted film that packs an emotional punch. I'm pretty sure that if they used that film in schools as an anti-drug PSA, we would cut drug abuse among high-school age children in half. But as a movie, it's the emotional equivalent of knocking back a pitcher of Jagermeister: bad on the way down and guaranteed to ruin your night. There's nothing in the experience to mitigate that fact.

Tirian
2011-10-08, 12:38 PM
Is the kingdom of the crystal skull that bad?
I liked it.

Let's just say that it's in the bottom half of Indiana Jones movies. Most movies wish they could say that much, but it still diminished the franchise.

Raistlin1040
2011-10-08, 01:06 PM
Honestly? I didn't think it was as awful as the internet claims. Not amazing but about average for a summer action flick.

As for Rocky Horror, I'll put it in if I have a spot, but she's seen the Glee tribute episode so that's basically the same thing.

*Flees enraged mob of Rocky Horror fans*Haha no. And that's from someone who likes Glee. This 4 minute video explains the difference. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=22RWBe-1ix8)

Eakin
2011-10-08, 01:21 PM
Haha no. And that's from someone who likes Glee. This 4 minute video explains the difference. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=22RWBe-1ix8)

The last line was supposed to indicate that I meant that facetiously

Nepenthe
2011-10-09, 07:37 PM
I can't believe I forgot to list my personal favorite:
Empire of the Sun. Endlessly quotable, and an amazing performance by a young Christian Bale.

Also, I've seen Requiem for a Dream at least a dozen times. Depressing isn't the word for it. It's tradgedy in a very traditional sense. Really nothing that happens is that "bad" by greek or shakespearian standards. It's the power of the film making that brings out such an emotional response. That said, I wouldn't reccomend it to anyone who hadn't already expressed interest in the subject matter.

Maxios
2011-10-09, 07:42 PM
I'd recommend Watchmen. I've only seen the first half of it, but that half tops every other superhero movie I've seen in my life.

Kurgan
2011-10-09, 07:49 PM
Well, most of my recommendations were said already, but here are two that I don't think I saw:

-Stardust: fantasy/adventure
-Colour of Magic: a made for tv movie of Colour of Magic and Light Fantastic. I enjoyed it, and it has Tim Curry in it (though not in drag)!
-Event Horizon: sci fi/horror

On Star Wars: I really see the original trilogy too connected to not watch all three. Lord of the Rings is good, but if you need to cut some time out to watch through all of star wars, just cut all three of these movies and watch the Star Wars trilogy and Stardust in its place.

neoseph7
2011-10-09, 07:51 PM
Down Periscope. Navy Comedy is it's own genre worth mentioning. Top gun is also worth watching, though not a comedy.

Dienekes
2011-10-09, 10:01 PM
Alright some old great ones I don't think have been named yet:

Bringing Up Baby
Duck Soup
Night at the Opera
Day at the Races
Bud Abbot and Lou Costello Meet Frankenstein: Any Abbot and Costello movie will do, this one happens to be my favorite.
Arsenic and Old Lace
The Pink Panther
The Return of the Pink Panther
North by Northwest
Some Like it Hot
It's a Mad Mad Mad Mad World
Patton

Ursus the Grim
2011-10-09, 10:09 PM
I find it interesting that so many people have recommended Seven Samurai. It was good, but I found it a bit long. I would nominate Yojimbo as an alternate, especially if you put in near some classic westerns in the list. I personally found it more entertaining and more influential from the viewpoint of a casual observer. I also think its Mifune's most-known role.

Not to devalue Kurosawa's other major films, of course.

Bhu
2011-10-10, 12:13 AM
Hey playgroundians!

I have a sister who has some really gaping holes in her cinema knowledge ("Rocky? What's that about?" honest to god actual quote). She's asked me to compile a list of 100 movies that she should watch, from every time period and genre I can think of. However, it turns out I'm not quite up to it myself so I'm turning to you. What are the most essential movies that anyone who wants to talk intelligently about movie NEEDS to see?

How old is the aforementioned sister? (needs to know if should avoid r films)

Saintheart
2011-10-10, 12:29 AM
Top gun is also worth watching, though not a comedy.

That depends on how much alcohol you've ingested before watching it.

In terms of movies: why is there no Alfred Hitchcock on this list? Seriously, when I sat down to watch the original Psycho and The Birds I was expecting camp films that had not aged well at all. Nothing could be further from the truth. Psycho still packs one hell of a suspense wallop now, forty years past its release, and The Birds is surprisingly good. I'd recommend either of them for inclusion on the list, though in terms of "foundation film viewing" Psycho is probably the more iconic and more important to see. Goddammit, Psycho is on the list after all.

Also: Flight of the Navigator. This was a joyful little film.

Also recommend at least one or two John Hughes movies: Sixteen Candles, Pretty in Pink, or The Breakfast Club at a bare minimum. The last is probably the most essential viewing of the lot: watching it now, when I'm a lot older, you pick up a hell of a lot more than was there in the original show.

And Clerks. Just watch Clerks, and possibly Dogma if you're not Christian.

Moff Chumley
2011-10-10, 12:36 AM
BIG LEBOWSKI.

...gotta have some Coen Brothers. :smallsmile:

Also, I'm not sure if Silence of the Lambs has been mentioned. That's a damn fine film. Some Kubrik, also. Actually, speaking of Jonathan Demme, and since this is the internet and I'm Chumley, Stop Making Sense, Talking Head's concert film, is mindblowing. Not just musically, but in terms of camerawork and cinematography. Demme was a genius.

Kindablue
2011-10-10, 12:45 AM
I second Duck Soup. It's short and doesn't waste a second of your time. If she ends up liking it, Animal Crackers, Monkey Business, A Day at the Races, and A Night at the Opera are all also great.


possibly Dogma if you're not Christian.

I'd replace it with Chasing Amy.

Serpentine
2011-10-10, 01:24 AM
Just watch Clerks, and possibly Dogma if you're not Christian.My mum's Christian and she thought it was okay. She prefers Monty Python's Life of Brian for that subject, though.
That is, the reason she didn't especially like it was just because it's not her sort of film, rather than because of a clash between her beliefs and its themes.

Avilan the Grey
2011-10-10, 01:32 AM
There are several classics I either loath, or have never watched because they don't seem interesting to me (like A Clockwork Orange).

Here are some of my own, many is already on the list:

Godfather trilogy
Star Wars 4-6
Indy trilogy
Back to the future trilogy
Alien
The Man With No Name movies (Spaghetti Westerns)
Jaws (the first one only)
The guns of Navarone
Casablanca
The Maltese Falcon
Blazing Saddles
The quest for the holy grail
Patton
North By Northwest
The Birds

Dienekes
2011-10-10, 01:38 AM
My mum's Christian and she thought it was okay. She prefers Monty Python's Life of Brian for that subject, though.
That is, the reason she didn't especially like it was just because it's not her sort of film, rather than because of a clash between her beliefs and its themes.

Considering Kevin Smith is the writer, directer, actor, and a confirmed Christian and has called the movie his way of working through his religious identity that's hardly surprising. It's not offensive, while still getting in some good laughs.

Saintheart
2011-10-10, 01:47 AM
Considering Kevin Smith is the writer, directer, actor, and a confirmed Christian and has called the movie his way of working through his religious identity that's hardly surprising. It's not offensive, while still getting in some good laughs.

...George Carlin as a Catholic cardinal isn't offensive?? :smallbiggrin:

Yanagi
2011-10-10, 02:12 AM
The Third Man
Patton

Rashomon

Cyrano de Bergerac (the Depardieu one)

The first two contain some of the most referenced and parodies scenes and statements in English cinema.

The third is the trope-namer: you've seen it a hundred times.

The last isn't a trope-namer, but the play the film is based on is pretty much the launch point for half the content of romantic films, comedic or dramatic. And Depardieu absolutely rules the part.

Anderlith
2011-10-10, 02:51 AM
Ferris Bueller's Day Out. It is the best movie made by man.

& if it hasn't been said The Big Lebowski
Princess Bride
Jurassic Park

Oh & everyone needs to see The Postman it's the best post Apocalypse film out there

Feytalist
2011-10-10, 03:25 AM
...George Carlin as a Catholic cardinal isn't offensive?? :smallbiggrin:

Nope, not really. 'Course, it depends on your sense of humour.

As has been mentioned, this list isn't a list of everyone's favourites, but rather a list of movies that everyone expects everyone else to have seen. So I would recommend originals rather than remakes, and originals rather than spoofs, unless the latter version ends up being more famous than the original.

I did a quick search and I can't be sure, but has E.T. been mentioned yet?

Foreign language films are iffy; something like A Beautiful Life might be a brilliant film, but it's not something you expect everyone to have heard of. Same with Battleship Potemkin, really. Even so, I would recommend at least one wuxia-type movie, just for the exposure to the style. Crouching Tiger is probably the most well-known, but I'd go with Hero, maybe.

I really want to throw the Boondock Saints out there, but I'm not sure if the movie really made such an impact. Something to think about, anyway. Oh, and speaking of indie-type films, Desperado. Or El Mariachi if you're feeling purist.

Otherwise, the list looks good so far. Not that I pretend to know anything about cinema.

H Birchgrove
2011-10-10, 10:59 AM
Science Fiction:
Metropolis (the anime version from 2001/2002 complements the original silent film nicely)
20000 Leagues Under the Sea (1954)
2001: A Spacy Oddyssey
Solaris (1972)
Alien
Bladerunner
Terminator
Star Wars (maybe... the original trilogy without CGI shenenigans)
Star Trek (the ones based on TOS at least; she must hear The Shat's epic KHAAAAAAAAAAAN!!! :smallbiggrin: )

Sword and Sandal:
Spartacus
Ben Hur
The Fall of the Roman Empire (maybe, it has Alec Guiness and Sophia Loren and interesting themes)
Gladiator

Akira Kurosawa: (all right I love his films a lot :smallredface: )
Seven Samurai
Yojimbo
The Hidden Fortress
High and Low (it's based on Ed McBain after all)
Dersu Uzala

War
All Quiet on the Western Front (any version, the 1930 one especially; it was forbidden by the Nazis after all)
Tora! Tora! Tora! (to wash away the stench that is Pearl Harbour - the film, that is)
Apocalypse Now Redux
Full Metal Jacket
Deer Hunter
The Guns of Navarone
The Heroes of Telemark
Army of Shadows (French film from 1969 about the WWII resistance movement)

She has to have seen at least one James Bond and one Dirty Harry film.

I may post more later. :smallredface:

Raddish
2011-10-10, 12:04 PM
I haven't seen most of the movies that have been listed... I have massive holes in my movie knowlegde I guess. It's not like I don't watch movies either, I definately watched a movie a day for most of the last year and still managed to miss most of those in this thread.

GolemsVoice
2011-10-10, 12:19 PM
I think we've got many many good entries, and I won't repeat them here (though I MUST say that I usually defend Kingdom of the Crytal Skull, I liked it)

I'd just add "The Downfall", and probably either "Letters from Iwo Jima" or "Flags of Our Fathers" or both, since they fit together, but one is enough. THat should cover the war front somewhat.

Nepenthe
2011-10-10, 01:37 PM
I didn't think Crystal Skull was that bad either. When you consider that the first three movies were homages to the swashbuckling adventure films of the 40's, it makes sense that the fourth be based on the sci-fi movies of the 50's. Aliens were the natural progression of the series.

Also, most people's biggest complaint with the movie (other than the aliens) is completely moot: Indy survived that explosion because of the Grail, not the refrigerator.

It did lose me at the very end, however: Under no circumstances should reuniting an alien's bones bring it back to life.

On Topic:
The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy is pervasive in pop culture, to the point where I've heard people quoting it who had never even heard of the source material. I've enjoyed every adaptation I've come across, but the Martin Freeman/Sam Rockwell film is probably the most accessible to new audiences. I don't remember seeing it on the list (if it is, ignore me).

Gwyn chan 'r Gwyll
2011-10-10, 01:53 PM
All Quiet on the Western Front (any version, the 1930 one especially; it was forbidden by the Nazis after all)

I thought it was banned by the French, not the Nazis... wait, I'm thinking of a different movie, about the French army in WWI... Which was also a very good movie, now that I remember it... if only I could remember the title.

Mr.Silver
2011-10-10, 03:54 PM
. . .Dude, I was the guy who recommended King Kong, Seven and Pan's Labyrinth.
All of which are dark films. They aren't exactly tragedies though (ok, maybe you could make a case for Kong). While being darkness and sadness are often linked though, they aren't quite the same thing (Remains of the Day, for example, is a very sad film but probably isn't generally considered dark; you could well argue Seven is the opposite case).



I don't make references based on the premise that sad is bad.
That statement strikes me as being a little at odds with:


[...] it's the emotional equivalent of knocking back a pitcher of Jagermeister: bad on the way down and guaranteed to ruin your night. There's nothing in the experience to mitigate that fact.

and also this one:



I do ask, however, that the value of the film be proportionate to the level of misery inflicted, and Requiem does not make the cut.
This last one rather suggests that you don't consider effectively telling a tragic story to have any 'value' itself. If this is an incorrect reading then I appologise, that's just how it comes across to me. In part because there are people who do hold the view that tragedy is 'valueless', which is what the following paragraph addresses.


Evoking sadness is, after all, kind of the point of tragedy as a genre. Criticising a tragic film for being too sad is rather like telling people to avoid a horror film because it's 'too scary'. The only real difference is that in the latter case someone who did find such a film outside their personal comfort zone will typically not go on to warn strangers away from it because evoking fear is part and parcel of that genre. With tragedy however there seems to exist a sizeable minority who will slam a work for being sad or tragic. Whereas with a scary film you'd get advice like 'this film is very scary, so if you don't have a high tolerence for this then you may want to pass it' a sad film will often attract statements like, well:

[...]it's the emotional equivalent of knocking back a pitcher of Jagermeister: bad on the way down and guaranteed to ruin your night.
:smallfrown:

TheEmerged
2011-10-10, 04:07 PM
Also, is there another Pearl Harbor besides the Ben Affleck one? 'Cause I already have From Here to Eternity and don't want to repeat myself. Also the movie I'm thinking of is TERRIBLE

If someone answered this & I missed it,I apologize.

Go hunt down Tora! Tora! Tora! I wouldn't add it to the list your sister is watching unless she's a history buff. It's a pretty accurate portayal of the events as they were understood at the time* except for being apologistic about Admiral Kimball (the movie tries to make him a sympathetic character).

*There have been some revelations in the last few years that change some things portrayed here related to the ONI & FDR, and this is not the place for that discussion.

Dienekes
2011-10-10, 04:19 PM
...George Carlin as a Catholic cardinal isn't offensive?? :smallbiggrin:

Not particularly, actors, you know, act. Honestly I was more confused Carlin took the part due to his views and the movie portraying religious belief in a positive, and heroic light.

Eakin
2011-10-10, 11:40 PM
Thanks for all your input everyone. I've been busy with work and a CISSP exam the last couple days but I'll round out the list to 100 and put it up here some time tomorrow!



Cyrano de Bergerac (the Depardieu one)

The first two contain some of the most referenced and parodies scenes and statements in English cinema.

The third is the trope-namer: you've seen it a hundred times.

...I saw it on Wishbone when I was 8, but not since then.

I should probably read that at some point.

Kindablue
2011-10-11, 12:09 AM
This last one rather suggests that you don't consider effectively telling a tragic story to have any 'value' itself. If this is an incorrect reading then I appologise, that's just how it comes across to me. In part because there are people who do hold the view that tragedy is 'valueless', which is what the following paragraph addresses.


On the purpose of tragedy, I heard a Harold Pinter quote recently that I can't get out of my head. "How can you write a happy play? Drama is about conflict and degrees of perturbation, disarray. I've never been able to write a happy play, but I've been able to enjoy a happy life."

Ricky S
2011-10-11, 07:43 AM
Is it just me or does anyone else feel really sorry for future generations? They will have to spend their lives watching all the classic movies just to keep up with the references. :smalltongue:

Eakin
2011-10-11, 10:58 AM
Is it just me or does anyone else feel really sorry for future generations? They will have to spend their lives watching all the classic movies just to keep up with the references. :smalltongue:

Nah, most of these movies, awesome as they are, will just fade from the public consciousness over time. I'm sure if you made a list in 1800 of the books or pieces of literature people HAVE to know 95/100 of them wouldn't be recognized by 99% of people today

Klose_the_Sith
2011-10-11, 08:17 PM
I've gotta say, there are a lot of movies in here I've never seen that I don't want to (Citizen Kane, Casablanca etc.) and some that I really question the necessity of.

Seriously, why should Seven Samurai matter? If you're going to get into those sorts of movies then Throne of Blood is better and saves you from having to put up with watching Hamlet, anyway :smallamused:

Zeta Kai
2011-10-11, 08:20 PM
Spoilered for length, but these are all the movies that she should ever need to see (according to me):

1408
300
∆on Flux
Alien3
Aliens
All About Eve
American Beauty
Apocalypse Now
Apollo 13
Asoka
Avatar
Batman
Batman Begins
Batman Returns
Being John Malkovich
Best Little Whorehouse in Texas, The
Bicentennial Man
Blair Witch Project, The
Blazing Saddles
Boondock Saints, The
Boyz in the Hood
Braveheart
Bride of Frankenstein
Butch Cassidy & the Sundance Kid
Casablanca
Cell, The
Changeling, The
Children of Men
Citizen Kane
Close Encounters of the Third Kind
Contact
Cube
Dances with Wolves
Dark City
Dark Knight, The
Das Boot
Devilís Advocate, The
Dirty Harry
District 9
Donnie Darko
Dr. Strangelove or: How I learned to Stop Worrying & Love the Bomb
Dune
Enemy Mine
E.T.: The Extraterrestrial
Fallen
Fifth Element, The
Fire in the Sky
Forbidden Planet
Forrest Gump
French Connection, The
Gattaca
Ghost & the Darkness, The
Gladiator
Godfather, The
Godfather Part II, The
Goldfinger
Gone With the Wind
Goonies, The
Grave of the Fireflies
Grosse Pointe Blank
Hero
Hoodlum
Iron Giant, The
Jaws
Kurt Vonnegutís Harrison Bergeron
Labyrinth
Ladyhawke
Last Emperor, The
Lifepod
Lion King, The
Little Shop of Horrors
Lolita
Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, The
Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The
Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, The
Lost Boys, The
Lost Highway
Maltese Falcon, The
Matrix, The
Matrix Reloaded, The
Memento
Metropolis
Minority Report
Modern Times
My Neighbor Totoro
Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
Night of the Living Dead
On Her Majestyís Secret Service
Panís Labyrinth
Phantom of the Opera

Planet of the Apes
Predator
Prestige, The
Primer
Prophecy, The
Psycho
Pulp Fiction
Rebel Without a Cause
Ring, The
Rob Roy
Rocky Horror Picture Show, The
Romancing the Stone
Rules of Attraction
Saving Private Ryan
Scarface
Schindlerís List
Scrooged
Second Civil War, The
Seven
Shawshank Redemption, The
Silence of the Lambs
Silent Hill
Sin City
Sixth Sense, The
Sling Blade
Spiderman
Spiderman 2
Spirited Away
Stand, The
Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith
Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
Star Wars Episode IV: The Empire Strikes Back
Stir of Echoes
Storm Riders
Sunset Blvd.
Superman Returns
Terminator 2: Judgment Day
Thing, The
Truman Show, The
12 Monkeys
Usual Suspects, The
Vertigo
Wall, The
WALL-E
William Shakespeareís Romeo & Juliet
Willow
Wizard of Oz, The
X-Men
X-Men 2: X-Men United

Zeta Kai
2011-10-11, 08:23 PM
Nah, most of these movies, awesome as they are, will just fade from the public consciousness over time. I'm sure if you made a list in 1800 of the books or pieces of literature people HAVE to know 95/100 of them wouldn't be recognized by 99% of people today

Yeah, cinephiles will know the deep lore, & keep regurgitating the important tropes & great moments for the masses. Everyone will just pick up the salient bits via osmosis. It's worked for literature since Gilgamesh & Beowulf. We'll be just fine, barring a Mad Max scenario.

Tirian
2011-10-11, 08:26 PM
Seriously, why should Seven Samurai matter? If you're going to get into those sorts of movies then Throne of Blood is better and saves you from having to put up with watching Hamlet, anyway :smallamused:

Yeah, and why eat steak when you can eat meatloaf? It's easier to chew and has all the yummy spices blended through it.

AtlanteanTroll
2011-10-11, 09:07 PM
Don't know what country the OP is from, but I'm surprised Forest Gump hasn't been mentioned once. King of the Hill (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King_of_the_Hill_(film)) is another good one, though it could easily be substituted for The Grapes of Wrath. Those only really matter if you're American though.

Dienekes
2011-10-11, 09:31 PM
I've gotta say, there are a lot of movies in here I've never seen that I don't want to (Citizen Kane, Casablanca etc.) and some that I really question the necessity of.

Seriously, why should Seven Samurai matter? If you're going to get into those sorts of movies then Throne of Blood is better and saves you from having to put up with watching Hamlet, anyway :smallamused:

I find your implication that there is anything wrong with Hamlet one of terrible taste.

Honestly though, Citizen Kane is an interesting film that portrays one of the most complex characters in film history in an honest and uncompromising way. It is simply a pleasure to watch. Casablanca is just another romance movie, there are like 3 good scenes thrown in there where the acting and writing are fantastic, the rest, ehh, if you've seen one romance you've seen them all.

Kindablue
2011-10-11, 09:45 PM
Yeah, and why eat steak when you can eat meatloaf? It's easier to chew and has all the yummy spices blended through it.

Metaphor of the day.

Zea mays
2011-10-11, 09:53 PM
For the record, Throne of Blood was actually based on Macbeth. Not Hamlet.
And the Kurosawa film you really want to watch is Ran (still not Hamlet; King Lear).

This list needs a few more non-English speaking films. How about Cinema Paradiso? Anyone for Delicatessen? Now I'm drawing a blank. Can't think of more.

Serpentine
2011-10-11, 10:36 PM
Amelie seems like one of the more famous non-English films.

More as a general recommendation than "I'd be surprised if you didn't know it": Angel-A is pretty great.

Gwyn chan 'r Gwyll
2011-10-11, 10:58 PM
Amelie seems like one of the more famous non-English films.

love love love love love love LOVE this film!
... y'know, if anyone was wondering as to my opinion on this film...

Serpentine
2011-10-11, 11:40 PM
I also <3 it. So hard :3

JohnFoutz
2011-10-12, 01:14 AM
Science Fiction:
Metropolis (the anime version from 2001/2002 complements the original silent film nicely)
20000 Leagues Under the Sea (1954)
2001: A Spacy Oddyssey
Solaris (1972)
Alien
Bladerunner
Terminator
Star Wars (maybe... the original trilogy without CGI shenenigans)
Star Trek (the ones based on TOS at least; she must hear The Shat's epic KHAAAAAAAAAAAN!!! :smallbiggrin: )

Sword and Sandal:
Spartacus
Ben Hur
The Fall of the Roman Empire (maybe, it has Alec Guiness and Sophia Loren and interesting themes)
Gladiator

Akira Kurosawa: (all right I love his films a lot :smallredface: )
Seven Samurai
Yojimbo
The Hidden Fortress
High and Low (it's based on Ed McBain after all)
Dersu Uzala

War
All Quiet on the Western Front (any version, the 1930 one especially; it was forbidden by the Nazis after all)
Tora! Tora! Tora! (to wash away the stench that is Pearl Harbour - the film, that is)
Apocalypse Now Redux
Full Metal Jacket
Deer Hunter
The Guns of Navarone
The Heroes of Telemark
Army of Shadows (French film from 1969 about the WWII resistance movement)

She has to have seen at least one James Bond and one Dirty Harry film.

I may post more later. :smallredface:


hey H Birchgrove, you are the real lover of movies and you know in your collection some movies which is my hot favourite....

Feytalist
2011-10-12, 02:31 AM
Something like Casablanca is famous simply because of those three scenes. And it's worth watching just because of those scenes, and so you know what all the other movies that came after are all on about.

Citizen Kane, again, is a movie everyone is always talking about. Sure, I found it boring. It's still worth watching.

Oh! Has anyone mentioned a James Dean movie yet? I'm regularly surprised, given his place in the public mind, that so few people have seen his stuff. In fact, I saw Rebel Without a Cause only recently. I was underwhelmed :/ But his name is still associated with cinematic greatness. Probably worth it to put one of his movies on the list, regardless.

Klose_the_Sith
2011-10-12, 04:48 AM
Yeah, and why eat steak when you can eat meatloaf? It's easier to chew and has all the yummy spices blended through it.

A flawed metaphor, seeing as any steak that resembled Hamlet would be ludicrously oversized, burnt to a crisp and greasy.


I find your implication that there is anything wrong with Hamlet one of terrible taste.

And I find the reverse true. What of it? My point was really just a poorly thought out dig at the idea of universal taste that this thread espouses.


Honestly though, Citizen Kane is an interesting film that portrays one of the most complex characters in film history in an honest and uncompromising way. It is simply a pleasure to watch. Casablanca is just another romance movie, there are like 3 good scenes thrown in there where the acting and writing are fantastic, the rest, ehh, if you've seen one romance you've seen them all.

I've tried to watch a lot of classics, seeing as my mother went through a phase where she needed support and was addicted to the TCM channel (it was just after my dad left) but I didn't get anything positive out of those two movies.

That probably would have applied to anything that I was forced to watch, though.

steveburns
2011-10-12, 04:55 AM
Pulp Fiction for me the best movie ever made a must watch...

Dienekes
2011-10-12, 11:19 PM
And I find the reverse true. What of it? My point was really just a poorly thought out dig at the idea of universal taste that this thread espouses.

I don't think this thread is about universal taste, but universal awareness. Personally, for example, I thought Buffy was rather bland teenager angst with "sexy" vampires thrown in, because people like vampires for some reason. But I still developed a sense of what Buffy was about and I can generally understand most references and parodies and such, because Buffy is that big.


That probably would have applied to anything that I was forced to watch, though.

Well, nothing quite kills entertainment like being forced to watch/read/listen to it. There are exceptions here and there, but let's just say I am so glad I read the Iliad before my teacher told me to, or I might have hated one of the few poems I've actually developed a liking for. Same is true for Shakespeare most likely, and it might be why I detest Romeo and Juliet so much, because it was one of the few I was forced to read before I wanted to. Or it could be that the main characters are lust filled fourteen year olds who think they are in love and get everyone killed because of their aggravating and senseless stupidity, or that the play itself has only 2 bloody interesting characters who die in the first act, and the entire second act is the two morons moping about and saying how they want to die until they finally give the audience the respite they so desperately desire and off themselves.

Uhh sorry, I really, really hate that play.

Trog
2011-10-12, 11:41 PM
Something like Casablanca is famous simply because of those three scenes. And it's worth watching just because of those scenes, and so you know what all the other movies that came after are all on about.
Casablanca won Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Writing, Screenplay and was nominated for five other Oscars, you know - also something likely to make it famous. :smallwink:

There are many good scenes in it that are iconic but the cast and dialogue make the entire picture worth watching. It's my all-time favorite film. It has a passionate and heart-wrenching love triangle, witty dialogue, memorable characters, a powerful nazi bad guy, difficult moral choices, character growth, it's got more packed in it than many films do even nowadays in terms of a good film. If any of you haven't seen it yet, you should.

Comrade
2011-10-12, 11:55 PM
Has Taxi Driver been said?

If not...seriously. Taxi Driver. Must see.

PhantomFox
2011-10-13, 12:16 AM
From what I remember, the groundbreaking things about Citizen Kane was mainly the camerawork. A lot of those inventive shots hadn't been done before.

Anderlith
2011-10-13, 11:13 AM
Die Hard. It remade the action genre

Mathis
2011-10-13, 11:24 AM
Lawrence of Arabia.

LAWRENCE OF ARABIA!

This movie needs more attention then it is currently getting. This movie really changed the way I view quality movies, so I'm going to add my voice to the choir of those who have already mentioned it. The scenery and landscapes depicted in this movie is alone worth giving it a watch, though I'll admit it isn't for anyone. It's a long movie, so if your attention span simply isn't cut out for watching anything the length of the Lord of the Rings movies then this movie isn't for you.

Venom3053000
2011-10-13, 12:16 PM
I don't think i saw anyone say secondhand lions

Illieas
2011-10-13, 12:53 PM
missing a bit of the chop socky genre.

Bruce Lee:
Enter the dragon

Jackie chan:
Drunken Master

Jet Li:
Fist of legends or Hero

Traditional old ones:
36th chamber of shaolin


new age thai fighters:

Tony Ja:
The protector or oong bak


Chinese shoot em movies:

John Woo:
the Killer

Klose_the_Sith
2011-10-13, 07:50 PM
Lawrence of Arabia.

LAWRENCE OF ARABIA!

This movie needs more attention then it is currently getting. This movie really changed the way I view quality movies, so I'm going to add my voice to the choir of those who have already mentioned it. The scenery and landscapes depicted in this movie is alone worth giving it a watch, though I'll admit it isn't for anyone. It's a long movie, so if your attention span simply isn't cut out for watching anything the length of the Lord of the Rings movies then this movie isn't for you.

I'm quite capable with long, historical dramas (Barry Lyndon comes to mind) but for some strange reason every time I've tried to watch Lawrence of Arabia I fell asleep. Granted two of those were during sleepover type things at a friends place, but it also happened once in the afternoon.

Same thing applied to Pans Labyrinth until I finally managed to get through it when we watched it in school.

McStabbington
2011-10-14, 01:43 AM
This last one rather suggests that you don't consider effectively telling a tragic story to have any 'value' itself. If this is an incorrect reading then I appologise, that's just how it comes across to me. In part because there are people who do hold the view that tragedy is 'valueless', which is what the following paragraph addresses.

Evoking sadness is, after all, kind of the point of tragedy as a genre. Criticising a tragic film for being too sad is rather like telling people to avoid a horror film because it's 'too scary'. The only real difference is that in the latter case someone who did find such a film outside their personal comfort zone will typically not go on to warn strangers away from it because evoking fear is part and parcel of that genre. With tragedy however there seems to exist a sizeable minority who will slam a work for being sad or tragic. Whereas with a scary film you'd get advice like 'this film is very scary, so if you don't have a high tolerence for this then you may want to pass it' a sad film will often attract statements like, well:

:smallfrown:

Aside from the fact that you're misunderstanding my objection to the film, you're incorrect about the purpose of tragedy, and I think one is playing into the other. Put simply, the purpose of tragedy is not to evoke sadness. Evoking emotions like sadness is a byproduct of the goal of storytelling, be the story tragic or comic, not the goal itself. Rather, the goal of any story is to create a situation and characters that that allows us to examine a theme or themes. At best, when a theme of a story deeply resonates with the audience, the characters and situation evoke an emotional response.

For example, I don't feel sad at the end of Unforgiven because it was supposed to be sad. Rather, I feel sad at the end of Unforgiven because the theme of redemption and being able to overcome the past resonates deeply with me, and to watch a man struggle so hard to be good, decent and redeem himself and yet at the end become an evil, ruthless man was to suggest that some people can't redeem themselves, a notion I find incredibly tragic. By the same token, I don't feel so bittersweet at the climax of The Iron Giant because it was halfway between a comedy and a tragedy. I feel that way because the theme that one's nature can be overcome by one's choice is a tremendously powerful theme for me, and at the climax the Iron Giant successfully overcomes his programming to do the heroic thing (sweet), but only at the seeming cost of his own life (bitter). I'm a sucker for the climax not because I automatically fall head over heels for any heroic sacrifice, but because this sacrifice overcame everything the Giant was designed to be.

My problem with RfaD is that it's themes are disproportionate with the emotions that it invokes. The themes of the movie were that drugs are bad, feeding your addiction leads you to do really bad things, and addiction leads to horrific consequences. Ellen Burstyn's performance came the closest to creating a genuinely powerful theme, since she was the one who had the clearest reason for falling into addiction. Her weight loss pills became her gateway to feeding the sense of loneliness she felt. But even that isn't a particularly nuanced theme, nor is it one that resonates particularly deeply with me. So when I finish with that movie and I examine the way it made me feel (horrible), and then I examine the rather shallow and facile moral themes evoked that feeling, I feel roughly the same way I do when I watch a schmaltzy rom-com. I feel cheated, because the emotions that they're trying to pull out of me are incongruous with the thematic effort they put in to draw it out.

Feytalist
2011-10-14, 02:33 AM
I'm quite capable with long, historical dramas (Barry Lyndon comes to mind) but for some strange reason every time I've tried to watch Lawrence of Arabia I fell asleep. Granted two of those were during sleepover type things at a friends place, but it also happened once in the afternoon.

I never had this problem with Lawrence of Arabia (it really is a good movie),but much the same thing happened with me and Ben Hur. In fact, I don't think I've ever finished it.

Older movies such as that had many more quiet scenes than modern movies. It does help with building tension and atmosphere, I think, but for our modern sensibilities it seems to drag the movie down. I still think it is worthwhile to see one or two of those types of movies, if only for reference.

Bruendor_Cavescout
2011-10-14, 01:44 PM
Very surprised I didn't see 12 Angry Men on here, as both the original and the remake are very good character pieces. They both limit the number of characters and sets so that all that energy can be focused from the actors portraying the story.

I'd also like to lend my support to at least one Kurosawa film being on the list - probably The Seven Samurai for its continuing legacy, but Rashomon or Yojimbo would be close seconds. Kurosawa's visuals in Seven Samurai are nothing less than striking, and his decision to realistically portray the samurai as human characters with real weaknesses and failings was a bold move; at the time, samurai were portrayed as noble characters much the same way cowboys were portrayed in the 40s and 50s. It's not just the direct descendent, The Magnificent Seven that shows this; it's the realistic cowboys we see in Unforgiven and The Good, The Bad and The Ugly owe this characterization to Kurosawa's films.

H Birchgrove
2011-10-14, 07:06 PM
I forgot to add Lawrence of Arabia? *facepalms at myself*


I thought it was banned by the French, not the Nazis... wait, I'm thinking of a different movie, about the French army in WWI... Which was also a very good movie, now that I remember it... if only I could remember the title.

Aw my gawd.

I've seen that film too...

... and it has Kirk Douglas in it. :smallredface:

Paths of Glory (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0050825/)

Gwyn chan 'r Gwyll
2011-10-14, 09:22 PM
I forgot to add Lawrence of Arabia? *facepalms at myself*



Aw my gawd.

I've seen that film too...

... and it has Kirk Douglas in it. :smallredface:

Paths of Glory (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0050825/)

THANK YOU. This movie was pretty darn good. Not a 'must-see' movie, but a good WWI war movie.

And I just finished Lawrence of Arabia today. I watched Act 1 last week, Act 2 today. T'was good. Literal cast of thousands. Mind-blowing landscapes. And a seriously disturbed Lawrence.

Viking_Mage
2011-10-15, 01:10 AM
Seconding: Some Like it Hot. Classic comedy.

Spartacus - or at least the chariot race. Preferably with 'cut & editted' and widescreen for comparison. It ensures that argument will never happen again.

H Birchgrove
2011-10-15, 05:01 AM
Seconding: Some Like it Hot. Classic comedy.

Spartacus - or at least the chariot race. Preferably with 'cut & editted' and widescreen for comparison. It ensures that argument will never happen again.

Thirded on Some Like it Hot.

It was Ben Hur that had a chariot race. Both are great films.