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Machinekng
2011-12-15, 03:15 PM
Dracul is a rules-lite homebrew RPG Iím developing that is primarily inspired by Bram Stoker's Dracula.

Intro
November, 13, 1878.
It is a cold, rainy night. A large cargo ship is found derelict on the Sussex beach. The crew is unaccounted for, although scatterings of cloth and what looks suspiciously like blood is littered throughout the ship. The cargo hold is filled with hundreds of various crates and cages, all empty. The ship manifests suggests that the cargo has come in part from every continent in the world.

Documents found on the ship suggest the cargo's owner.

A certain Mr. Dracul...

Core Mechanic
Dracul's core mechanic is the Challenge roll of the 2d10. A Challenge is any action that can possibly result in a negative impact on the character or his allies. To perform a challenge, the player rolls a 2d10. If the roll is equal to or below the character's skill rank, the action succeeds. Only the player characters roll dice. GM run characters and other factors modify player rolls.

Note: A d10 has 0-9 on it. In Dracul, the zero is treated as a 0, rather than a 10, as it is in D&D.

Abilities
Dracul is a skill-based RPG. Instead of having ability scores or similar statistics, player characters have between 0 to 18 ranks in any of Dracul's 16 skills. At character creation, a character has 75 ranks to invest.

Athletics: Athletics represent's a character's physical condition and quickness. A character with low Athletics may be plodding and overweight. A character with high Athletics is fleet of foot and strong of arm.

Connection: Connection represent's a character's social connections and prestige. A character with a low Connection is a nobody and has few associates outside side of the party. A character with a high Connection is a notable figure, and has friends in high and low places.

Evasion: Evasion represents a character's talent for dodging hazards and attacks. A character with low Evasion has a slow reaction time and may be somewhat clumsy. A character with high Evasion can quickly reaction to situations and can dodge and duck blows with ease.

Guile: Guile represents a character's ability to deceive others, through sleight of hand or false witness. A character with low Guile is transparent and cannot tell a lie. A character with high Guile can easily run a con and can get away with lying to the authorities.

Lore: Lore represent's a character's knowledge of legendary creatures and the occult. A character with low Lore may be naive and ignorant in relation to the things that go bump in the night. A character with high Lore knows what he's doing when he comes face to face with monsters.

Mechanics: Mechanics represents a character's affinity for machines and similar technology. A character with low Mechanics has no clue how that thing does. A character with high Mechanics can fix it up and then explain it to you.

Medicine: Medicine represents a character's knowledge of physiology and his ability to treat injuries. A character with low Medicine has trouble remembering how to bandage a wound, and can easily do more harm than good. A character with high Medicine can fix you up in a jiffy.

Melee: Melee represents a character's talent for up close and personal fighting. A character with low Melee will hurt himself if he keeps swinging that sword around. A character with high Melee can go toe to toe with a monster.

Perception: Perception represents a character's awareness and sense perception. A character with low Perception may miss something right in front of him. A character with high Perception has an eye for detail.

Precision: Precision represents a character's talent for combat at range. A character with low Precision has trouble hitting a can off a fence. A character with High precision can shoot the gun out of a man's hand and a sparrow from out of the sky.

Persuasion: Persuasion represents a character's ability to get others to do what he wants. A character with low Persuasion has trouble staying coherent in a heated argument. A character with high Persuasion has a silver tongue and is an excellent orator.

Research: Research represents a character's ability to track down and disseminate relevant information. A character with low Research may have trouble searching a library for the right book. A character with high Research can find and interpret cryptic clues and riddles.

Resilience: Resilience represents a character's pain threshold and endurance. A character with low Resilience may be frail and sickly. A character with high Resilience can take a bullet without more than a grimace and can weather harsh environments.

Science: Science represents a character's understands of the natural sciences. A character with low Science doesn't quite get why things work like they do. A character with high Science is up to date on the latest scientific breakthroughs and can apply scientific knowledge to practical situations.

Stealth: Stealth represents a character's ability to blend with the shadows and avoid being seen or heard. A character with low Stealth just stands out even more when he tries to blend in. A character with high Stealth can easily avoid conventional detection, and can even slip past some monsters.

Willpower: Willpower represents a character's ability to resist supernatural enchantments and to overcome baser instincts. A character with low Willpower has a difficult time resisting simple temptations, much less supernatural ones. A character with high Willpower can overcome his fear and can stare down the monsters he faces.

Gaining Experience
There are no levels in Dracul, characters learn and grow by learning from their mistakes. When a character fails a challenge, they gain an experience point in the associated skill. When a character's experience in a skill equals their current skill level, they gain a rank in that skill and their experience resets to zero.

Tutelage
In addition to learning through direct experience, a character can persuade another player character or a friendly Extraordinary to tutor them in a specific skill. Tutoring requires a number of days equal to the characterís current skill level, with a minimum of 1 day, over which the character must occasionally meet and practice with his tutor. At the end of the tutelage period, the character gains a rank in the skill. If the tutor is a player character, his level in the skill must be two or more ranks higher that the player seeking tutelage.

NPC and Monster Rules (http://www.giantitp.com/forums/showpost.php?p=12381613&postcount=4)
Combat and Condition Rules (http://www.giantitp.com/forums/showpost.php?p=12384330&postcount=16)

Howler Dagger
2011-12-15, 03:37 PM
Gaining Experience
There are no levels in Dracul, characters learn through experience directly. When a character succeeds on a roll, they may roll again to see if they gained insight. If the roll is equal to or higher than the character's skill rank, the character gains a rank in that skill. Any bonuses and penalties that applied to the origional roll apply to the experience roll.
This is a problem, because why would you ever NOT roll for experience? It really slows down gameplay a lot. Random idea for fix

"Every time you us succesfully use a skill, you gain 1 experience point iin that skill. When your EPs in a skill reach a number equal to your skill ranks, you can make a roll. If your roll is equal to or lower than your experience, you gain one rank in that skill and your EP in that skill are reset to 0. If you fail, you may retry next time you get an EP in that skill"

If you needed to reserve any posts, tell me and I willl delete this and repost it after your done reserving.

Hyudra
2011-12-15, 03:38 PM
Problem with the insight based growth, I think, is that you're inevitably starting off weak, but you'll be virtually guaranteed success at a later point, so you're getting pretty crazy bonuses in the end. At the same time, it's hard to get improvement in skills you're bad at, which is almost opposite to the way things should work (that is, when we're poor at cooking, learning something new should be easier, not harder, but you've got 1 skill point in it and only a 8.3% chance of success in the first place). Sure, you'll beat your insight roll easily enough, but you've still got to pass that first check (and if you're capable making a lot of checks in short order, this exacerbates the problem in the next paragraph).

In a long-running campaign, you're getting enough bonuses over the course of each session that you'll be a master at everything by the end (provided you pay a modicum of attention to each skill).

There's also the issue that, in a group-based game, you're fighting over teammates about who gets to do every given thing, because doing it makes you better and we all want to do better.

Machinekng
2011-12-15, 03:41 PM
NPC Rules:
In Drcacul, NPCs do not have stat blocks like they do in many role-playing games. Instead, NPCs modify the playersí' rolls in relation to them.

There are three types of NPCs, Ordinaries, nameless background and scenery characters, Extraordinaries, named characters that interact with the PCs, and Monsters, the antagonists of Dracul.

Ordinaries
Standard ordinaries, laypeople, workers, petty thugs, etc... do not modify players' rolls. Any sort of elite but nameless ordinary, such as a soldier, a gang leader, or any other exceptional person that is not vital to the plot adds a +2 modifier to rolls in relation to them.

Extraordinaries
Extraordinaries are named, plot centric characters that interact with the player characters on a regular basis. Extraordinaries should be built individually, with their modifiers reflecting their personalities and profession.

For example, the PCs are talking to Constable Edward Smith. Constable Smith is tight-lipped and stubborn, especially when people are investigating things that should be police work, so any persuasion rolls involving him take a +4 penalty. However, Smith is an honest man, and expects others to be honest too, giving players a -2 to their roll to deceive him.

Monsters
Monsters are the antagonists to the PCs, and are classified as monsters regardless of their nature. A monster is not necessarily supernatural, but often is.

Monster Terms

Banes
Many Lesser monsters, and all Greater monsters posses Banes, things that are antithetical to them. A Bane may be a certain item, a certain material, or even a certain strong, sincere, emotion. A monster is repulsed by its Banes, and usually will not voluntarily come into close contact with them. If a monster does come in contact with its Banes, it is weakened.

Condition Tracker
Each monster has a specific Condition Tracker which records the monster's physical status. The Condition Tracker begins at 0, meaning that the monster has received 0 successful attacks. When a monster is hit with a successful attack, advance the Condition Tracker by one. After 24 hours, if the monster has taken no additional hits, the Condition Tracker is reset to 0.
(Explained further in Combat)

Death Toll
Greater monsters have an associated Death Toll, represented by a die roll. At the beginning of each day, the GM rolls the die and adds the appropriate modifiers to the roll. The result of the roll is how many people were killed by the monster during the night, unless the PCs had acted to protect the monster's victims. This rate is a guideline, and can be revised or ignored as the plot demands.

Destruction and Recovery Conditions
All Greater monsters possess one or more Destruction condition. Unless this condition is fulfilled by the PCs, even if the monster is defeated, it will recover after a certain period of time, according to its Recovery condition.

Greater Monsters
Greater Monsters are the Villains of the campaign or their elite servitors and spawn. Greater Monsters are stronger, possess more supernatural abilities, and always possess Banes and Destruction/Recovery Conditions.

Lesser Monsters
Lesser Monsters are often the minor servitors or spawn of Greater Monsters. Lesser Monsters are weaker, and possess fewer supernatural abilities and banes.

Rampage
For the most part, Villains try to avoid detection. They hide out during the day, and attack those who are not easily noticed. However, if a Villainís existence and identity is revealed to the public, or if it is defeated but not Destroyed and later Recovers, the Villain will go on a Rampage, discarding all subtleties. During the Villainís Rampage, its Death Toll, Spawn Rate, and other statistics change as listed.

Spawn Rate
Some Greater Monsters have an associated Spawn Rate. This is the rate of how many spawn a Greater Monster produces over a certain period of time. This rate is a guideline, and can be revised or ignored as the plot demands.

Villains
Villains are the strongest monsters of their kind, and serve and the primary antagonists for a campaign. They share traits with Greater Monsters,.

Vulnerabilities
Certain monsters are vulnerable to specific weapons or tactics, and using such tactics modifies the roll as listed.

Howler Dagger
2011-12-15, 03:43 PM
NPC Rules:
In Drcacul, NPCs do not have stat blocks like they do in many roleplaying games. Instead, NPCs modify the palyers' rolls in relation to them.

So NPC's can't attack because they have no skills to do so?

You're right Hyurda, what about x-EP as the DC, so that it is easier to learn but true mastery takes longer. x would probably be 19 or 20.

Xefas
2011-12-15, 03:54 PM
So NPC's can't attack because they have no skills to do so?

Not that it's explained very well, but it looks like something similar to the way things work in the game 'Icons'. An NPC attacks by forcing a player to roll Evasion, and the NPC's skill at attacking modifies the player's Evasion roll.

To put it in D&D terms, imagine if a Dragon's claw attack was listed as "30", and a Fighter's armor class was listed as "+21". The DM says "The dragon attacks you with its claws. Beat DC 30", and then the Fighter rolls his armor class, adding 21.

However, in this case, the DC is always equal to your skill rating. And the Dragon's claws would be rated as "-4" or similar.

Machinekng
2011-12-15, 04:04 PM
Didn't think anyone would reply until I had more rules down.


This is a problem, because why would you ever NOT roll for experience? It really slows down gameplay a lot. Random idea for fix

"Every time you us succesfully use a skill, you gain 1 experience point iin that skill. When your EPs in a skill reach a number equal to your skill ranks, you can make a roll. If your roll is equal to or lower than your experience, you gain one rank in that skill and your EP in that skill are reset to 0. If you fail, you may retry next time you get an EP in that skill"

If you needed to reserve any posts, tell me and I willl delete this and repost it after your done reserving.

It's a thought. Maybe instead of having to roll, as soon as you gain EPs equal to your skill level, you gain a rank.


Problem with the insight based growth, I think, is that you're inevitably starting off weak, but you'll be virtually guaranteed success at a later point, so you're getting pretty crazy bonuses in the end. At the same time, it's hard to get improvement in skills you're bad at, which is almost opposite to the way things should work (that is, when we're poor at cooking, learning something new should be easier, not harder, but you've got 1 skill point in it and only a 8.3% chance of success in the first place). Sure, you'll beat your insight roll easily enough, but you've still got to pass that first check (and if you're capable making a lot of checks in short order, this exacerbates the problem in the next paragraph).

In a long-running campaign, you're getting enough bonuses over the course of each session that you'll be a master at everything by the end (provided you pay a modicum of attention to each skill).

There's also the issue that, in a group-based game, you're fighting over teammates about who gets to do every given thing, because doing it makes you better and we all want to do better.

I still need to work on the experience system.

The game isn't really intended for long running campaigns. A standard campaign should end as soon as the big bad, the head monster of the campaign is defeated.

As to counter player competition, well, without specialization, it'll be harder to succeed in later challenges.


Not that it's explained very well, but it looks like something similar to the way things work in the game 'Icons'. An NPC attacks by forcing a player to roll Evasion, and the NPC's skill at attacking modifies the player's Evasion roll.

To put it in D&D terms, imagine if a Dragon's claw attack was listed as "30", and a Fighter's armor class was listed as "+21". The DM says "The dragon attacks you with its claws. Beat DC 30", and then the Fighter rolls his armor class, adding 21.

However, in this case, the DC is always equal to your skill rating. And the Dragon's claws would be rated as "-4" or similar.

Yes, that's mostly correct.

Except that it would Evasion +4, as it adds to the roll, rather than to the skill level. But yeah, the effect is the same.

The intention is to put all the die rolls into the hands of the players, allowing them full control over the characters' fates, and to allow the GM to focus on the narrative.

Thanks for the advice. This is my first foray into game design, and everything is still a work in progress.

Howler Dagger
2011-12-15, 04:17 PM
It's a thought. Maybe instead of having to roll, as soon as you gain EPs equal to your skill level, you gain a rank.
Interesting idea. Question: Do you automaticly start with one ranks in each skill? If not, you would never be able to train that skill since you could never gain EP because you fail every time your try.

This is an interesting idea, I would be up for a playtest PbP.

Machinekng
2011-12-15, 04:36 PM
Interesting idea. Question: Do you automaticly start with one ranks in each skill? If not, you would never be able to train that skill since you could never gain EP because you fail every time your try.

This is an interesting idea, I would be up for a playtest PbP.

Added tutelage rules, which allows characters with no ranks in a skill to learn it.

And actually, you can succeed if you have zero ranks. A d10 has 0-9 on it. In Dracul, the zero is treated as a 0, rather than a 10 (need to add that to the OP.)

Xefas
2011-12-15, 05:01 PM
For the feel of your original Experience idea, and the new tutelage dealie, might I suggest looking at Chronica Feudalis? It likely doesn't have exactly what you need, but it might inspire something.

To explain the way advancement works in that game, you first have to know that every skill is ranked as one of the following "d4, d6, d8, d10, d12". When you test a skill, you just roll a die of that size against a target number.

Now, to advance, you first have to either Train With a Mentor, or Train By Yourself. This takes a few hours, and then you mark one skill you have (with a mentor, it has to be a skill that your mentor has rated higher than you). Only one skill may be marked for advancement at a time.

Whenever you roll a marked skill during a stressful situation in which actual stakes are on the line (so, nothing that would constitute more training, such as swinging at a combat dummy), you roll for learning. If you roll the max number on the die, your skill goes up (so, if you have Dodge d6, you have to roll a 6 to raise it).

If you Trained By Yourself, you only get to roll your normal one die.

If you were Trained By a Mentor, then you also get to roll your Mentor's rank in the advancing skill.

So, if you have Dodge d6, and your Mentor had Dodge d10, then when you use Dodge to dodge a sword swing, whether you succeed or fail, you then get to roll both a d6 and a d10, and if either are 6 or higher, you advance to a d8.

(I hope that makes sense.)

Machinekng
2011-12-15, 05:05 PM
For the feel of your original Experience idea, and the new tutelage dealie, might I suggest looking at Chronica Feudalis? It likely doesn't have exactly what you need, but it might inspire something.

To explain the way advancement works in that game, you first have to know that every skill is ranked as one of the following "d4, d6, d8, d10, d12". When you test a skill, you just roll a die of that size against a target number.

Now, to advance, you first have to either Train With a Mentor, or Train By Yourself. This takes a few hours, and then you mark one skill you have (with a mentor, it has to be a skill that your mentor has rated higher than you). Only one skill may be marked for advancement at a time.

Whenever you roll a marked skill during a stressful situation in which actual stakes are on the line (so, nothing that would constitute more training, such as swinging at a combat dummy), you roll for learning. If you roll the max number on the die, your skill goes up (so, if you have Dodge d6, you have to roll a 6 to raise it).

If you Trained By Yourself, you only get to roll your normal one die.

If you were Trained By a Mentor, then you also get to roll your Mentor's rank in the advancing skill.

So, if you have Dodge d6, and your Mentor had Dodge d10, then when you use Dodge to dodge a sword swing, whether you succeed or fail, you then get to roll both a d6 and a d10, and if either are 6 or higher, you advance to a d8.

(I hope that makes sense.)

It makes sense, but I'm trying to keep the game to a single die type. I do agree with the idea of adding a clause that limits experience gain to stressful situations.

Hyudra
2011-12-15, 05:19 PM
As to counter player competition, well, without specialization, it'll be harder to succeed in later challenges.

I guess what I'm trying to say is that in this system, the player who steps forward to act, speak, get involved the most is going to gain the most skill points, and thus get stronger and come to the forefront (and maybe he won't be 'specialized', but he could easily be as skilled as the three to four other group members put together). People who have trouble speaking up or stepping up to a given challenge are going to fall behind, perhaps get discouraged.

And in response to this, players who don't want to fall behind are going to fight to be in the spotlight, taking on challenges. Possibly at the expense of other (even more skilled) players.

Machinekng
2011-12-15, 05:48 PM
I guess what I'm trying to say is that in this system, the player who steps forward to act, speak, get involved the most is going to gain the most skill points, and thus get stronger and come to the forefront (and maybe he won't be 'specialized', but he could easily be as skilled as the three to four other group members put together). People who have trouble speaking up or stepping up to a given challenge are going to fall behind, perhaps get discouraged.

And in response to this, players who don't want to fall behind are going to fight to be in the spotlight, taking on challenges. Possibly at the expense of other (even more skilled) players.

I see your point.

I still want to keep some sort of growth by experience. What would you recommend to help fix this issue?

Kuma Da
2011-12-15, 06:18 PM
The major issue with a percentile system (regardless of whether or not it uses d100. If it's trying to roll under a number, then it's effectively percentile,) is that growth seriously upends game balance.

If your game follows the arc of a standard fantasy epic--with the characters getting more powerful over time--there's going to come a point where the PCs have an extremely hard time failing at the skills they invested in, and the only way to provide them with a challenge is piling on modifiers, which further unbalances the difficulty curve for PCs who did not assign their skill ranks the same way.

I know D20 is boring, and d12, d10, d8, or d4 target number systems don't have enough randomization in them to keep difficulty checks exciting at higher levels, where the stats have almost completely eclipsed the dice, so let's consider a few other alternatives for the core mechanic.

-You could do a 'pool' system, where you roll a dice for every point of an attribute, and the number of successes you get equals your score.

-You could limit growth in these core stats during gameplay, either making it so that character growth is more a matter of what items they find and what NPCs they befriend (making for a more social game,) or you could create some secondary stats to grow instead (depletables, like hero points or drama dice or World of Darkness' willpower points, would work pretty well here. Maybe your experience couldn't buy you more precision, but it could buy you a re-roll for a single precision check.)

-You could do a complex target-number system, like the Uni-System, where each stat has a dice value that you can improve, and you roll relevant stats together and add them up.

I actually like your exp system, but I think it gets exponential too fast. If you gain a point of exp every time you succeed, the people who crank one stat are going to gain exp for it much faster, leading to mastery pretty quickly. On the other hand, not assigning points to a stat means that it will probably never improve during the course of gameplay without serious assistance.

If I can make a suggestion, I'd say (if you're sticking with the same core mechanic,) gain an exp point every time you fail a check to represent learning from mistakes. That way, you'll improve more in skills you're not proficient in, and you won't grow as bogusly fast in ones you are. To prevent players from cheesing this, the DM decides when a dice roll is called for.

I think you have a great concept for a system (I'd certainly play in that world,) but the mechanics need a little tweaking.

Machinekng
2011-12-15, 06:53 PM
The major issue with a percentile system (regardless of whether or not it uses d100. If it's trying to roll under a number, then it's effectively percentile,) is that growth seriously upends game balance.

If your game follows the arc of a standard fantasy epic--with the characters getting more powerful over time--there's going to come a point where the PCs have an extremely hard time failing at the skills they invested in, and the only way to provide them with a challenge is piling on modifiers, which further unbalances the difficulty curve for PCs who did not assign their skill ranks the same way.

You could limit growth in these core stats during gameplay, either making it so that character growth is more a matter of what items they find and what NPCs they befriend (making for a more social game,) or you could create some secondary stats to grow instead (depletables, like hero points or drama dice or World of Darkness' willpower points, would work pretty well here. Maybe your experience couldn't buy you more precision, but it could buy you a re-roll for a single precision check.)

If I can make a suggestion, I'd say (if you're sticking with the same core mechanic,) gain an exp point every time you fail a check to represent learning from mistakes. That way, you'll improve more in skills you're not proficient in, and you won't grow as bogusly fast in ones you are. To prevent players from cheesing this, the DM decides when a dice roll is called for.

I think you have a great concept for a system (I'd certainly play in that world,) but the mechanics need a little tweaking.

I like the idea of character growth being based on who they meet and what information they gather. How would this work mechanically?

I've also entertained the idea gaining experience when you fail a check. The way you put it makes it sound reasonable. If you succeed, you're rewarded with success, if you failed, you have a better chance to get it right next time.

Also, I've added universal monster rules to the NPC post.

Machinekng
2011-12-16, 12:01 AM
Combat
Combat begins when the Player Characters and Monsters become aware of each other and begin to engage.

If the monsters are surprised by the PCs' engagement, the PCs take the first turn. If the monsters anticipated the PCs' engagement, the monsters take the first turn. Likewise, if the PCs' are ambushed or surprised by monsters, the first turn goes to the monsters. If the PCs' anticipated and prepared themselves for the monsters' engagement, they have the first turn.

If one party is attempting to evade or sneak past the other, and is then detected, the detectors have the first turn.

After the first turn, combat goes back and forth between the combatants until one side is defeated or retreats.

Turns
A character can perform one Challenge on their turn. A character may take an additional number of non-challenging actions up to the GM's discretion.

Although they do not perform Challenges, monsters behave similarly, and can only take one major action per turn.

Attacks
When a character attacks a monster, the character rolls for the appropriate skill, adding any modifiers. If the roll is successful, the monster is wounded and advances on the condition track, which is specific for each monster.

When a character is attacked, the character rolls for Evasion, adding any modifiers. If the roll succeeds, the character has dodged the attack, but if it fails, the character must then roll for Resiliency, again, adding any modifiers. If the Resiliency roll also fails, the character is advances on his Condition Track (see below).

Condition Tack
Characters in Dracul possess a Condition Track that records a character's physical condition. The Condition Track starts at 0, and advances one stage when the Character fails a Resiliency roll against an attack, a hazard, or other damaging factors. Player characters, Ordinaries and Extraordinaries use the following Condition Track.

0-Normal: The character is in a normal condition.
1-Hurt: The character has condition has declined, but they do not impede the character.
2-Crippled: The characterís condition is severe enough to impede the character. If the Crippled character performs a challenge, he must make a Resiliency roll. If he fails, he advances one stage on the condition track.
3-Downed: The characterís condition is rather severe and prevents the character from operating. The character may not make any actions.

A character does not need to perform a challenge to kill a downed character monster, but killing a downed character does consume their challenge for the turn. Likewise, a monster must spend its major action to kill a downed character.

A successful Medicine challenge made by another character to treat the wounded character can allow the wounded character to act as he was one stage lower on the condition track, although he is still treated as being in his current stage for purposes of regressing and advancing the condition track.

For every eight continuous hours a character rests, he regresses one stage on the condition track. If a successful Medicine challenge is made by another character to treat the wounded character in conjunction with the wounded character's rest, the characterís condition track resets to 0.

Machinekng
2011-12-16, 02:02 PM
Went back and edited the rules posts, which included running them through a spellchecker.

Revised the condition rules. Now, all characters and monsters use the Condition Track rules, with normal humans using their own condition track.

Took Kuma Da's advice about learning from mistakes and revised the experience rules accordingly.

Howler Dagger
2011-12-16, 08:39 PM
I would reccomend having more than 3 on the condition track, ideas:

1.5:Wounded: PCs take a +1 penalty to all rolls, NPCs have the The penalty stays until you are restored to one or zero on the condition track
1.75: Weakened: Make a resilience roll each time you take an action. If you suceed, the penalty from being wounded increases by 1. If you fail, advance down the track.
4:Criticly wounded: make a resilience roll or die. If you suceed, roll again next turn, or at your DM's discretion.

Machinekng
2011-12-16, 08:49 PM
I would reccomend having more than 3 on the condition track, ideas:

1.5:Wounded: PCs take a +1 penalty to all rolls, NPCs have the The penalty stays until you are restored to one or zero on the condition track
1.75: Weakened: Make a resilience roll each time you take an action. If you suceed, the penalty from being wounded increases by 1. If you fail, advance down the track.
4:Criticly wounded: make a resilience roll or die. If you suceed, roll again next turn, or at your DM's discretion.

My main issue with applying penatlies for being wounded is that when you fail, you gain an EP, due to my most recent revision of the EP rules, and if you have monre penalties, the more likely you are to fail. I can't figure out how to get around this cheese.

Howler Dagger
2011-12-16, 10:04 PM
how about a clause where if you fail specificly because of the penalty from the wound track you don't gain EP?

Example: Johnny tries to climb a fence. His climb skill is 8, and he rolls a 7. However, he has a +2 wound penalty, and thus fails! Because of losing due to the wound track, he does not gain EP. :smallfrown:Sad johhny:smallfrown: