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Dumbledore lives
2011-12-20, 03:08 AM
I realized that though I've seen a lot of movies I haven't seen very many which actually moved me, or made me feel that sad or even get close to crying, so I decided to browse the Tear Jerker page over on TVtropes. I won't link to it, because that would just be cruel, but I had some issues with their list of movies.

The thing is, it is a wiki, so anyone can edit it, meaning everyone adds their own personal little moments and you lose a lot of the effect because of that. So I was hoping the playground had some better recommendations than that page, for scenes which brought you to tears, or at least close to it.

For me personally the closest I've come was Toy Story 3, at the ending, but that was more of a legacy thing than anything, with the end of yet another era, like the ending of the Potter films, which I felt was not really that well done, as I didn't feel much of anything in the epilogue.

pita
2011-12-20, 03:57 AM
Scrubs season five episode 20 (I think) titled My Lunch. If you don't cry, you're a monster. Even if it does use one of the most overused songs in the history of the universe
Also, this was a while back, but Million Dollar Baby had me sobbing a little. My brother cried like a baby when he watched Changeling. That about does it for me, though I shed a Film Appreciation Tear (this only happens to people who take themselves, and film, way too seriously) at Inglourious Basterds.

Serpentine
2011-12-20, 06:15 AM
I hadn't even seen any of the show, but the end of Six Feet Under still made me cry.

First 10 minutes of Up?

Newman
2011-12-20, 06:22 AM
Hobo With A Shotgun. How can a movie with basically every bad ingredient in moviemaking ever turn out to be so moving? I blame the actor. "You... know I'm not a teacher, right?" "... Yeah. But everyone's gotta have a dream..."

Knaight
2011-12-20, 07:02 AM
Grave of the Fireflies.
Arguably parts of Tokyo Godfathers as well.

Dumbledore lives
2011-12-20, 07:50 AM
Well, I just watched Boy's Don't Cry, and while it stirred emotions they were mostly of anger instead of sadness. Some of these films, like the above-mentioned Grave of the Fireflies don't make me sad as much as angry.

I don't want to spoil Grave, because it is probably one of my most hated/loved films, but it made me really angry at the arrogance and pride displayed. I guess some of these films just dive into the deeper, darker, parts of human emotions which cause all these reactions, and I guess that is partially what I'm looking for.

I have also seen Up and Hobo with a Shotgun as well, and though both had some emotions, especially Up which has one of the best opening scenes in all of animation, but they don't quite evoke the same sort of emotions, or the kind I'm looking for I guess. I'm sorry I can't be more descriptive, it is a difficult thing to explain.

Brother Oni
2011-12-20, 08:03 AM
Grave of the Fireflies just made me really angry at the older brother, so the exact opposite effect of tear jerker.

Three movies that nearly did it for me:

The Last Samurai -The final glorious cavalry charge at entrenched machine guns. The ending of an era of Japanese history and of warfare, yet they decide to do it anyway.
Some people regard it as a pointless waste of life (and I see their point), but to the Japanese notion of duty, it's perfectly fitting.

Farewell My Concubine - The final scenes where Xiaolou denounces his wife, she commits suicide from a broken heart (in a very Chinese manner; hanging herself in her wedding dress, with everything in the house in impeccable order), then fast forward to Xiaolou and Dieyi's first meeting after 22 years, which have been placed as bookends to the entire film.

Hero - Again the final scene, where Nameless is just waiting at the gate for the King of Qin. His advisors are demanding that Nameless be executed as he was an assassin, in due accordance with the King's laws.
However the King has realised that Nameless understands his goal of uniting the country to bring peace and agrees with it, thus he is torn with obeying his own laws that unite his whole country (if the King can't keep his own laws, then how can he expect others to?) and not killing a person who truely understands him.
The part where the King reluctantly gives the command and the epilogue where it describes Nameless being executed as an assassin, but being buried with full imperial honours, still moves me.

Edit: Spoilered on request. Not sure why though - the most recent of those films is 8 years old and Farewell My Concubine is 18 years old. :smallconfused:

Serpentine
2011-12-20, 08:18 AM
Uh... Oni. Spoilers, much?

The Succubus
2011-12-20, 08:56 AM
The end of Terminator 2:

The pit of molten metal, the thumb? :smallfrown:

and this next one will catch a lot of people by surprise:

Star Wars Episode III - Revenge of The Sith. Yes, one of my most despised films is actually capable of moving me. It's the very final scene, where baby Luke is handed to Beru and Owen. The original Star Wars song plays as they look into Tattooine's twin sunset...excuse me, I have something in my eye....:smallfrown:

Serpentine
2011-12-20, 09:02 AM
I was incapable of taking anything seriously after that ridiculous "NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!"

Medic!
2011-12-20, 10:15 AM
Lonesome Dove

When Gus dies I squirt girly man tears every single time

Serpentine
2011-12-20, 10:21 AM
Edit: Spoilered on request. Not sure why though - the most recent of those films is 8 years old and Farewell My Concubine is 18 years old. :smallconfused:Just because they're old doesn't mean everyone's seen them, especially if they're not blockbusters and/or super-duper pop-culture levels famous.
I saw Psycho without it being spoiled for me, and was very proud of everyone around me who'd seen it and didn't tell me the twist.

tensai_oni
2011-12-20, 10:26 AM
I don't want to spoil Grave, because it is probably one of my most hated/loved films, but it made me really angry at the arrogance and pride displayed.

Slightly offtopic, but this is the correct reaction. Grave of the Fireflies is 50% cautionary tale of how not to act in that situation and 50% an apology. Remember that it is loosely based on a book based on real events.

That's the real tragedy.

Serpentine
2011-12-20, 10:29 AM
Oh, really? I didn't know that. Man, that makes it terrible...

Brother Oni
2011-12-20, 10:34 AM
Just because they're old doesn't mean everyone's seen them, especially if they're not blockbusters and/or super-duper pop-culture levels famous.

I take your point, although I'd dispute the blockbuster aspect of The Last Samuari and the others are at least notable (Hero was riding the wuxia wave of films post Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, and Farewell My Concubine won several international awards for best film).


Slightly offtopic, but this is the correct reaction. Grave of the Fireflies is 50% cautionary tale of how not to act in that situation and 50% an apology. Remember that it is loosely based on a book based on real events.

I know that, but it still doesn't help when all the pop culture references say it's the saddest thing ever, and all you want to do is slap the brother around the head, tell him to swallow his pride and do whatever it takes to look after his sister.

I think it affected me more as I'm the eldest child and hence have been in same position of authority (looking after my younger siblings), especially since my culture emphasises family.


Oh, really? I didn't know that. Man, that makes it terrible...

Specifically, the author wrote it as an apology to his sister.

Radar
2011-12-20, 11:42 AM
I'd like to recommend "Life is beautiful". It's a comedy, but it hits even harder because of this.

"Dr Horrible's Sing-Along Blog" evokes quite strong emotions in many people as well - mostly thanks to the brilliant performance of Neil Patrick Harris.

Telonius
2011-12-20, 12:06 PM
I've seen just about every tear jerker known to man, and I always have the only dry eyes in the house. Bambi's mom? Meh. ET? Bridge to Terebithia? Million Dollar Baby? Lion King? The Dirty Dozen, where Jim Brown was throwing these hand grenades down these airshafts...? Nada.

Pan's Labyrinth came close, but still nothing.

There is only one exception to the rule.

The Last Unicorn.

Vacant
2011-12-20, 01:51 PM
I can't think of the last time I cried at a movie, but there are times I feel that I should have done so:Allegro no Troppo's "Valse Triste" is a classic, a few scenes from The Last Picture Show, the final scene of Modern Times, the phone call in Paris, Texas, pretty much all of Remains of the Day, similarly with Whale Rider. There's others, I'm sure, but those quickly come to mind.

Tyndmyr
2011-12-20, 02:34 PM
The dog episode of Futurama.

Edit: Also, a yes to the first ten minute of Up. Ridiculously sad.

McStabbington
2011-12-20, 03:38 PM
Brian's Song.
Old Yeller.
King Kong.

These three comprise the Holy Triumverate. You are allowed to cry at these movies, as copiously as one wants.

A more modern holy triumverate would be Rudy, The Iron Giant, and Pan's Labyrinth.

AtlanteanTroll
2011-12-20, 03:49 PM
The dog episode of Futurama.
FTFTY.

Also, Goodbye, Farewell, and Amen. Except that probably wont make you sad unless you actively followed M*A*S*H. Going back to Scrubs ... That last scene (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EiJGk3Rzbvs) which was suppose to be the end get's me every time. Once again it probably wont get you unless you liked the show, but the song is a decent tearjerker on it's own.

@Serp: What ... What did you think it was? Fiction? :smallconfused:

Howler Dagger
2011-12-20, 03:50 PM
First part of Up. so sad.

Starwulf
2011-12-20, 04:07 PM
The ending of Ladder 49. I refuse to ever watch that movie again because of the ending. I practically bawled on that one.

On a bit different note...


I take your point, although I'd dispute the blockbuster aspect of The Last Samuari and the others are at least notable (Hero was riding the wuxia wave of films post Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, and Farewell My Concubine won several international awards for best film).


I've never heard of any of those films ^^

Edit: I'll list other moments on here that I read on this thread and agree with. For example, the Dog episode of Futurama. So sad :-(.

The first ten minutes of Up is close, it makes me choked up, but I never shed a tear over it.

Oooh, Bridge to Terabithia. Again, didn't make me cry, but I was quite saddened by it.

Radar
2011-12-20, 04:08 PM
Another movie I'd consider moving is "The Man from La Mancha". It's bitter-sweet rather then outright sad, but quite touching.

The dog episode of Family Guy.

Edit: Also, a yes to the first ten minute of Up. Ridiculously sad.
I think, that the ending of Jurasic Bark had a stronger impact on me. It might have had something to do with Connie Francis (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vLmnyRozFKk&feature=fvwrel).

If TV series are a go, then Cowboy Bebop might make people shed a tear or two at the very end. It's worth watching anyway.

The most difficult thing is, emotional reactions to art in general are subjective, so there is no guarantee, that any of the suggested movies will work.

Weezer
2011-12-20, 04:17 PM
Grave of the Fireflies.

Seconding Grave of the Fireflies, such a powerful movie.

I think one movie that has moved me the most was Schindler's List, that one always crushes my soul when I watch it.

Brother Oni
2011-12-20, 04:54 PM
I've never heard of any of those films ^^

*Looks at location*

I'm not surprised. :smalltongue:

On a more serious note, if you're not into that genre of films, I suppose you wouldn't have heard of them.
However I haven't seen a number of films listed on this thread, but I've at heard the name at least - I suppose it depends on how into films you are.

Dsurion
2011-12-20, 05:02 PM
The ending to Marley and Me :smallfrown:

Also seconding the dog episode of Futurama.

AtlanteanTroll
2011-12-20, 05:20 PM
Also seconding the dog episode of Futurama.
More like fifthing at this point. Though, the dog episode of Futurama is mentioned in the Tearjerker section on TV Tropes, which the OP said never actually made him cry.

Of course, reading about it wont quite do the same as watching it.

Aotrs Commander
2011-12-20, 07:45 PM
I always found Wrath of Khan's closing scenes to be quite powerful (I'm not just saying that because Linkara just reveiwed the comic version, but it did make me think about it!)

The end of the movie version of Return of the King (specifically, the departure to the Undying Lands) was quite moving as well, I thought.

(Actually, for that matter, I always found the death of the President's wife in Independance Day was quite strong one. I kinda like that movie...)



I might have said the death of Optimus Prime, but after the umpteeth time, you get kinda inured to it... (Seriously, he dies, like, once or twice in every single Transformers continuity ever! He's died more times than Buffy and Jean Grey combined!1)



1Indeed, he coined the phrase "died more than Optimus Prime" as a humoursly exaggerated descriptor for someone who dies frequently (e.g. Rory Williams from Doctor Who...)

t209
2011-12-20, 11:42 PM
Saving Private Ryan
It's kinda sad that Tom Hanks is not the old man watching at the grave. It was Ryan (Matt Damon) looking at Miller's grave (Tom Hanks)

Surrealistik
2011-12-21, 12:00 AM
Terminator 2. Between all that awesome shoot em up action and SFX, there were some moving reflections on existentialism, the human condition and the meaning and value of (human) life, a recurring theme throughout the series; I found the end to be a surprisingly effective minimalist consolidation of all this.

Memento.

The Fountain. Gets me every time.

Brother Oni
2011-12-21, 06:34 AM
Saving Private Ryan
It's kinda sad that Tom Hanks is not the old man watching at the grave. It was Ryan (Matt Damon) looking at Miller's grave (Tom Hanks)

And then his asking the question: "Am I a good man?" as he breaks down in tears.

Das Platyvark
2011-12-21, 10:40 AM
The Illusionist
(that animation of the Tati script)

Zale
2011-12-21, 11:14 AM
I also found the first ten minutes or so of Up to be very sad.

Something about Pixar does that to people.. (http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/TearJerker/Pixar)

t209
2011-12-21, 01:46 PM
I also found the first ten minutes or so of Up to be very sad.

Something about Pixar does that to people.. (http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/TearJerker/Pixar)

My brother also cried when he saw the old dude's wife died in Up.

Dumbledore lives
2011-12-21, 05:14 PM
I also found the first ten minutes or so of Up to be very sad.

Something about Pixar does that to people.. (http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/TearJerker/Pixar)

Pixar are the masters of emotion as Disney was before them.

Eldan
2011-12-21, 09:09 PM
I actually only recently saw Up. I'd deem it as one of the most soul-crushingly depressive movies I've ever seen. Some people call the ending uplifting (hah!) apparently. To me, the last few scenes and the credits were the worst of all.

Gaius Marius
2011-12-21, 09:15 PM
Well, maybe Futurama's dog episode was sad, but it never got me just as much as the 7-leaf clover episode.

That, or the ending of Bender's Big Score. I am sorry, but this is such a masterpiece!

McStabbington
2011-12-21, 10:01 PM
It's a Wonderful Life. If it hadn't been for the last ten minutes, it would be one of the saddest movies ever. Because of the last ten minutes, you still cry, but they're tears of joy instead.

Marillion
2011-12-21, 11:15 PM
Since TV shows are on the table, the scene where Will's dad leaves from Fresh Prince of Bel-Air (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bxulantPiXI) makes me bawl.

Every. Time.

Buuuuut it does hit a little close to home.

Serpentine
2011-12-22, 12:07 AM
@Serp: What ... What did you think it was? Fiction? :smallconfused:Why shouldn't I have? :smallconfused:

Nix Nihila
2011-12-22, 02:45 AM
I react weirdly to sad movies, it seems. There are some movies which have everyone around me bawling while I still have dry eyes, and then there are episodes of Charmed that made me cry. :smallconfused:

Anyways, here are some of the TV shows and movies that I cried during:

Angel
When Fred died. :smallfrown:
Buffy the Vampire Slayer
A few episodes made me cry. Most notably The Body. Whenever I'm in a crying mood, I watch The Body.
Hero

Pan's Labyrinth
Has made me cry every time I've watched it (three times).

Forrest Gump

And.. I'm not sure that this one counts since I saw it so long ago that I barely remember any of it, but I recall crying a lot when I saw Big Fish.

Starwulf
2011-12-22, 02:50 AM
Well, maybe Futurama's dog episode was sad, but it never got me just as much as the 7-leaf clover episode.

That, or the ending of Bender's Big Score. I am sorry, but this is such a masterpiece!

Hmm, I didn't even think about the 7-leaf Clover episode, but yeah, that was a heart-render as well.

Just got done the latest episode of Law & Order:SVU tonight(it's been on the DVR for a week or two, not sure), and I have to say, I definitely shed a tear over it. The whole dementia thing hits rather close to home, as my grandmother suffered through it the last 3 months of her life(which were all bed-ridden as it was), and I'll admit, I never got to emotional over it because I refused to let myself think about it. Watching that last episode of SVU though....those emotions I think finally surfaced as I began to realize just how bad it must have been for my grandmother. At the end, when the football guy shot himself...well, I definitely shed a tear, and then I looked over at my wife, and I told her "If I ever go through that, I will kill myself". I mean, I want to die with a bit of dignity, and not have to suffer with the occasional lucid moments where I realize the hurt and pain I'm putting my loved ones through as I slowly decline. Getting choked up just thinking about it and my grandmother ><

Hida Reju
2011-12-22, 03:16 AM
I have a few

The ending to Glory with Matthew Brodrick, Morgan Freeman, and Denzel.

The end to The Watchmen

The last basement Scene in Boondock Saints

Battlestar Galatica - The end of the Pegasus

Serpentine
2011-12-22, 03:26 AM
Yes, clearly he should be embarrassed of having a soul.

Feytalist
2011-12-22, 04:47 AM
I tend to get teary-eyed at epic or heroic scenes, such as the return of the Rohirrim in the Two Towers. Or, for that matter, Theoden's "Where now the horse and rider" speech slightly earlier in the same movie.

Another one is Book of Eli, that ending monologue after the reveal.

Or (and this is a bit of a silly one) the fight scene against Bahamut SIN in Advent Children. That one always gets me. I have no idea why.


I'm not much for "traditional" sad scenes, but the ending scene in Jin-Roh: The Wolf Brigade ended me :/

The Succubus
2011-12-22, 05:11 AM
Yes, clearly he should be embarrassed of having a soul.

My avatar might be able to help with that. :smalltongue:

In seriousness though, it is kinda cruel for you to tease him about it. Being the big tough manly man I am, I don't shed tears in public....but curled up under a duvet with a hot drink on a cold winter's evening, watching some of the films and shows in this thread...my face has been known to get a little damp. It's probably just condensation or something.

>.>
<.<

:smallredface:

The_Admiral
2011-12-22, 05:38 AM
Near the ending of Click. I don't know, I just teared up.

Emmerask
2011-12-22, 06:48 AM
Scrubs season five episode 20 (I think) titled My Lunch.

agreed


FREEEEDOMMM! well actually the scene after that one ^^

Oh and A moment to remember (korean movie from 2004 I think), normally I donīt really like romantic drama but somehow that one worked, maybe its because I could actually believe the romance between the two leads, a feat most of these kind of movies just donīt achieve.

Brother Oni
2011-12-23, 03:20 AM
Oh come on, don't tell me you don't occasionally joking tease a friend about something like that. It's not like I'm always going 'HURR DUDE YOU'RE A TOTAL GIRL YOU CRIED AT UP LOL'. Sometimes he'll say something and I'll reply with "This coming from the dude who was sobbing at the beginning of Up."

Chill people :v


Actually, no I don't.

Men in western society have generally been taught not to openly show emotion and it's reinforced by sterotypical behaviour like yours. This results in men, particularly those in very masculine occupations or roles like the military, not getting help when they very clearly need it, because they think they're weak for doing so.
They often subsequently end up committing suicide - I read a story about a soldier who only failed to blow his own head off because his roommate suspected that he was going to kill himself and stole the firing pin from his M4 without him knowing.

I apologise if this sound particularly harsh (I wasn't intending to say anything as Serpentine and The Succubus said it much more mildly and eloquently) and I understand he's your friend, so some mild ribbing is to be expected, but please, don't push it.

Tyndmyr
2011-12-23, 09:18 AM
Also, the second to last episode of firefly. The funeral scene.

Dumbledore lives
2011-12-23, 04:37 PM
Also, the second to last episode of firefly. The funeral scene.

That's what, when you can't walk, you crawl, and when you can't crawl you get someone to carry you? I personally didn't find it that sad, but it is a nice message. I've enjoyed all of the suggestions in this thread, and have begun watching some of the, including re-watching the Iron Giant which is an incredibly effective film assuming you ignore the last 30 seconds.

Also Joss Whedon is extremely good at this kind of stuff, especially a select few Buffy episodes definitely evoke something, even if maybe not to the extent of crying, except perhaps the Body. I guess everyone has lost someone, and I did fairly recently so all the experiences just seem so real, that it resonates better than pretty much any other death.

AtlanteanTroll
2011-12-23, 06:09 PM
My Lunch? Really? While it's sad, yes, My Old Lady is so much worse, IMO.

pita
2011-12-23, 07:51 PM
My Old Lady is depressing, but My Lunch is "there is no purpose in life but suffering" depressing. The key difference is in character reactions, I think, as well as a bit of a mood whiplash in the episode. In My Old Lady, the episode generally maintains the same feel. In My Lunch, the B plot is about Todd being possibly gay, and the A plot is about JD trying to get Cox to eat lunch with him. When the excrement hits the fan, it's a very noticeable difference. Also, Cox gives up during the most blatantly "NOW YOU CRY" song ever written since "Hello". In My Old Lady, they're strengthened by the experience.
On a meta level, My Lunch is also depressing as it's one of the last episodes before the show lost touch with both its sense of humor and its dramatic appeal.

Fri
2011-12-24, 12:14 AM
For some reason my tear jerker movie is Big Fish. to be precise, the ending of it.

SamBurke
2011-12-24, 02:17 PM
The movie Seven Pounds, with Will Smith.

Explanation, not spoiling any of this movie for anyone!

I started crying man-tears at about 2/3rds of the way through the movie, and didn't stop until the final moments. HOLY COW TEARS. You see, through about half of the movie, I was struggling to figure out half of what was going on; the basic plot was visible, but there were dozens of loose ends sitting there, making me go, "What's going on here?" The moment I figured out who he was and what he was doing was when I lost it.

Let me just say it was one of the saddest movies I have ever, ever, ever seen, and I cried by far the most in it. I won't spoil it, but I recommend that movie *so highly*.

The other mega-tearjerker was the first time I watched We Were Soldiers with Mel Gibson

Again, no spoiler.

The whole movie was beautifully done; a true man was Mel Gibson's character.

The music was past amazing.

AtlanteanTroll
2011-12-24, 04:44 PM
What? No, no, no. John Cale's Hallelujah is so much worse then How To Save A Life. How To Save A Life has gotten way too much airplay to actually mean much of anything anymore. Though, I will admit, it's a powerful scene.

pita
2011-12-24, 07:53 PM
I don't recall Scrubs using Hallelujah.
Though Shrek killed with it.
Meh. None of these songs can ever beat "Hello". Any argument would be moot.
EDIT - I rewatched both episodes today and My Lunch nails it also be ause of John McGinley's amazing performance.

llamamushroom
2011-12-24, 10:37 PM
Red Dog is a fantastic tear-jerker surrounded by a fantastic film. I just about never cry when watching films/TV (something I blame on studying drama), but that film had me almost bawling.

Unfortunately, as it's an Australian film that only came out this August, I doubt it'll be widely available for a while, if ever, so... yeah. If you can find it, watch it. It's amazingly funny and really, really sad.

Now, to hope that my emotions weren't linked more to homesickness and being reminded of my old dog than the actual film...

Dumbledore lives
2011-12-25, 05:40 PM
Red Dog is a fantastic tear-jerker surrounded by a fantastic film. I just about never cry when watching films/TV (something I blame on studying drama), but that film had me almost bawling.

Unfortunately, as it's an Australian film that only came out this August, I doubt it'll be widely available for a while, if ever, so... yeah. If you can find it, watch it. It's amazingly funny and really, really sad.

Now, to hope that my emotions weren't linked more to homesickness and being reminded of my old dog than the actual film...

I might see this film now, but for some reason here it is only playing at 9:30 am downtown. Do they just want people to not see the film here?

JuanCudz
2012-01-04, 11:38 AM
Sitting on the sofa, bawling my eyes out, at the end of that sci-fi classic, 'Silent Running'. I was about 13 at the time so hormones may have had something to do with it. Don't fill up much at the movies nowerdays being a cynical 47 year old.

Fiery Diamond
2012-01-04, 01:12 PM
I actually only recently saw Up. I'd deem it as one of the most soul-crushingly depressive movies I've ever seen. Some people call the ending uplifting (hah!) apparently. To me, the last few scenes and the credits were the worst of all.

Personally, I found the ending to be bittersweet. The two of them (and the dog) are obviously happy, even despite their (admittedly rather depressing, especially in the boy's case) circumstances.

Maxios
2012-01-04, 01:16 PM
Gone with the Wind. First the dad dies, then the daughter,then the unborn baby,and then the one chick whose name I can't remember dies and the guy leaves.

Balain
2012-01-06, 02:03 PM
Saving Private Ryan had me bawling like a baby in the movie theatre. Mostly personal reasons though. My dad had passed away about a year before the movie came out. The last scene reminded me of my dad so much, he looked like my dad, dressed like my dad,sounded like my dad and then he asks his question and I start bawling like crazy.

Ravens_cry
2012-01-06, 02:11 PM
Titanic.
Looking back, some may be right to consider it exploitive, but damn if lines of tears weren't flowing down my face as the water rushed into the old couples room who decided to die together.

BadJuJu
2012-01-20, 02:57 PM
I react weirdly to sad movies, it seems. There are some movies which have everyone around me bawling while I still have dry eyes, and then there are episodes of Charmed that made me cry. :smallconfused:

Anyways, here are some of the TV shows and movies that I cried during:

Angel
When Fred died. :smallfrown:
Buffy the Vampire Slayer
A few episodes made me cry. Most notably The Body. Whenever I'm in a crying mood, I watch The Body.
Hero

Pan's Labyrinth
Has made me cry every time I've watched it (three times).

Forrest Gump

And.. I'm not sure that this one counts since I saw it so long ago that I barely remember any of it, but I recall crying a lot when I saw Big Fish.

About Angel,

Wesley's death scene was way more intense, IMO. Very gut wrenching. :

t209
2012-01-20, 03:07 PM
Battle LA
Mr Rincon's death!

polity4life
2012-01-20, 03:17 PM
It's funny how the older I become, the easier stories touch my heartstrings.

I know it has been said a few times, but Up! gets me every time. And yes, the opening sequence is touching and brings up tears but the part when...
Carl rediscovers the Adventure Book and finds his wife added to it throughout their married years and left a message for him
...I can't help but to shed at least one tear. Even thinking about it chokes me up.

The opening to the new Star Trek surprisingly catches me. Honestly, I think that sequence about USS Kelvin was one of the best pieces of film making I've ever seen. I know there are countless movies that attempt to display heroism but that opening straddled the quintessence of the word.

Scarlet Knight
2012-01-24, 11:23 AM
I believe The Champ was chosen as the saddest film ever.

Me? I tear up everytime I see Dumbo being rocked by his mom through the bars....Blast! I'm tearing up now! :smallfrown:

DarthArminius
2012-01-24, 11:31 AM
Gone with the Wind. First the dad dies, then the daughter,then the unborn baby,and then the one chick whose name I can't remember dies and the guy leaves.

Spoiler
In the real life circumstances the movie was based on, the man leaves, comes back to look for her, saves her from prostitution in a game of cards, she converts to Christianity and they get married.

H Birchgrove
2012-01-24, 12:33 PM
Greystoke

Superman (re-watching it a month or so after my maternal granddad - the last of my grandparents - had passed away and been buried, could have something to do with it)

On Her Majesty's Secret Service

Good Bye, Lenin!

Life Is Beautiful (La vita č bella) - don't confuse it with the Frank Capra film.

Spirited Away (it's tears of joy, I think)

Worguron
2012-01-24, 12:47 PM
There have only been two movies that have actually made me cry at all.

What Dreams May Come - So many great scenes that evoked strong emotions.

When Chris realizes that the woman he is talking to is his daughter, I came close to crying. When he realizes that Albert is actually his son, I was a hairsbreath from tears. The floodgates actually opened during the climax of the movie when he is talking to his wife and the following lines were said:

Chris: I forgive you.
Annie: For killing my children and my sweet husband?
Chris: For being so wonderful a guy would choose hell over heaven just to be around you.

Tears... Oh so many tears.


The second movie was The Muppets. I took my brother to see it with a childhood friend of mine. During Kermit's first song, my buddy and I looked at each other and each of us wiped away tears. So sad and nostalgic all at once.

Brother Oni
2012-01-24, 08:01 PM
Spirited Away (it's tears of joy, I think)

Until...
... you remember that time passes differently in the spirit world compared to the real world and by the time Haku is finally free of his apprenticeship and goes to see Chihiro, she's either a very old woman or has died of old age. :smalltongue:

H Birchgrove
2012-01-24, 08:12 PM
Until...
... you remember that time passes differently in the spirit world compared to the real world and by the time Haku is finally free of his apprenticeship and goes to see Chihiro, she's either a very old woman or has died of old age. :smalltongue:
Oh... damn... :smalleek:

Why couldn't the time differences be just like in The Chronicles of Narnia? :smallfrown:

Scarlet Knight
2012-01-25, 02:20 PM
Does anyone remember The Red Balloon ?

Brother Oni
2012-01-25, 03:14 PM
Oh... damn... :smalleek:

Why couldn't the time differences be just like in The Chronicles of Narnia? :smallfrown:

Well in Eastern mythology, time has always passed differently in the spirit world compared to the human one. The only concrete figure I remember was for the film Rouge, where a day there was 50 years in the human one.


Chihiro and her family should be glad that only ~2 weeks have passed for their 2 days in Baba Yaga's realm (judging from the dust/debris in the car, but that the battery is still carrying charge).

ThreadKiller
2012-01-25, 06:57 PM
The boat scene in Little Big Soldier. Also, the last scene in Schindler's List.

Ravens_cry
2012-01-26, 01:53 AM
Well in Eastern mythology, time has always passed differently in the spirit world compared to the human one. The only concrete figure I remember was for the film Rouge, where a day there was 50 years in the human one.

A lot of Western Fae stories use a similar idea. A nights dancing in a fairy ring could cost more then simple exhaustion.

Goosefeather
2012-01-26, 12:24 PM
My Old Lady is depressing, but My Lunch is "there is no purpose in life but suffering" depressing. The key difference is in character reactions, I think, as well as a bit of a mood whiplash in the episode. In My Old Lady, the episode generally maintains the same feel. In My Lunch, the B plot is about Todd being possibly gay, and the A plot is about JD trying to get Cox to eat lunch with him. When the excrement hits the fan, it's a very noticeable difference. Also, Cox gives up during the most blatantly "NOW YOU CRY" song ever written since "Hello". In My Old Lady, they're strengthened by the experience.
On a meta level, My Lunch is also depressing as it's one of the last episodes before the show lost touch with both its sense of humor and its dramatic appeal.

Has everyone completely forgotten about My Screw Up? I personally rank it on the same level as My Lunch, with both a little bit before My Old Lady. Again, it's McGinley's performance that does it for me, and that moment of realisation at the end which just flips the whole episode. 'Mood whiplash' is an understatement, to say the least...

GFawkes
2012-01-26, 12:36 PM
For me, The Iron Giant always gets me tearing up at the end, especially the last two lines before The Giant stops the missile:
Echoed voice: You are who you choose to be
Giant: Superman closes eyes and smiles

GeekGirl
2012-01-27, 11:48 AM
Saving Private Ryan had me bawling like a baby in the movie theatre.
+1

Armageddon.. every time, I dot know why I just can't make it through the end without crying a little.

H Birchgrove
2012-01-27, 10:25 PM
Watched Tears of the Sun.

Shed many a manly tear.

Read the wikipedia entry (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tears_of_the_Sun), thinking it must have been based on real life events, despite having not heard about the events in the film.

After reading said article, felt like a fool. :smallannoyed:

Tiki Snakes
2012-01-29, 03:35 PM
I remember the Last Unicorn being quite sad or bittersweet, but I haven't seen it since I was a nipper and can't actually remember almost anything about it.

Otherwise, the ones that spring to mind have mostly been mentioned already.
Big Fish, definately, Grave of the Fireflies and Up.
Though, it's Big Fish and Up that really do it, because whilst incredibly sad, it's....external? It doesn't really pull any existing psychological levers for me, whereas the other two attack my weak point for massive damage.

I also find a lot of the quiet moments throughout Up hit me, too, not JUST the early bit.

Honorable mention to Watership down.

Axolotl
2012-01-29, 04:01 PM
Grave of the Fireflies is the closest I've come to crying at a film, as others have said it's a great sad movie.

Although if you're willing to accept depressing as well as sad I'd reccomend Chinatown, it's a brilliant film but it's the polar opposite of all the heartwarming type stuff that Pixar and the like put out. The ending to it didn't even make me fell sad, just sort of empty.

turkishvan2
2012-01-29, 09:15 PM
I don't know if it had this effect on anyone else, but Winter's Bone made me cry. I just felt so much for the characters and the situation they're in, and Jennifer Lawrence's performance was just so wonderful, and I'm kind of getting teared up just typing about it.

Dumbledore lives
2012-01-30, 05:22 AM
Grave of the Fireflies is the closest I've come to crying at a film, as others have said it's a great sad movie.

Although if you're willing to accept depressing as well as sad I'd reccomend Chinatown, it's a brilliant film but it's the polar opposite of all the heartwarming type stuff that Pixar and the like put out. The ending to it didn't even make me fell sad, just sort of empty.

Seen both and agree with your opinions on them. Grave's saddest part is the true story it is based on, and how it was written as an apology.

DarthArminius
2012-01-30, 12:56 PM
Mysterious Skin:

Uh, an ADULT FILM to be sure. Please don't see it unless you are extremly thick skinned. Pun intended.

Oh, and the heartwarming moment of the film is a very sad moment in it indeed. When a film's heartwarming moment is the emotional equilavent to being punched in the nards, you know that the producers want your soul mounted on their wall!

Alex Star
2012-01-30, 02:39 PM
I cry at everything lol, Hell I cry at commericals if they're sappy enough. LOL I guess I'm just the kind of person who finds it incredibly easy to suspend his disbelief and put himself in someone elses shoes.

Dumbledore lives
2012-01-30, 05:37 PM
Mysterious Skin:

Uh, an ADULT FILM to be sure. Please don't see it unless you are extremly thick skinned. Pun intended.

Oh, and the heartwarming moment of the film is a very sad moment in it indeed. When a film's heartwarming moment is the emotional equilavent to being punched in the nards, you know that the producers want your soul mounted on their wall!

The synopsis on wikipedia sounds ... dark, but it also sounds like my kind of film, depending on if it actually deals with the issues correctly, which it sounds like it does.