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noparlpf
2012-01-17, 03:17 PM
So I've apparently suffered some kind of reading-based trauma from the past three semesters of mandatory lit courses and I want to go back to being able to read books for fun properly. Apparently the association between reading and those classes has made it difficult for me to even read a novel and enjoy it. Therefore, I'm looking for some fun novels (I generally read fantasy or sci-fi) I haven't read before in hopes that I can get back into reading as a regular and enjoyable pastime. Any suggestions?

Strawberries
2012-01-17, 03:22 PM
Possibly. :smalltongue: What do you like? What are some book that you've read and enjoyed? It would help us narrowing things down a little :smallwink:.

Asta Kask
2012-01-17, 03:27 PM
The Dark Is Rising cycle is one of the best contemporaneous fantasy stories I know of. I like the HP novels, but they can't hold a candle to this IMO.

SaintRidley
2012-01-17, 03:31 PM
Don't know what you have read, but here's a list of gun stuff that I've read recently:

The Foundation series by Asimov
The Dune series by Frank Herbert (not worth bothering with anything after Chapterhouse)
"'Repent, Harlequin' Said the Ticktockman" by Harlan Ellison
The Book of Sand a short story collection by Jorge Luis Borges
At the Mountains of Madness by H.P. Lovecraft
American Gods by Neil Gaiman
Fun Home by Alison Bechdel
Blankets by Craig Thompson
Fragile Things a short story collection by Neil Gaiman
If This Goes On by Robert Heinlein


I'll add some more general stuff later when I think about it, but this is stuff I've read recently independent of my literature classes, so it should help.

noparlpf
2012-01-17, 03:33 PM
Possibly. :smalltongue: What do you like? What are some book that you've read and enjoyed? It would help us narrowing things down a little :smallwink:.

Let's see...obviously Tolkien's LotR trilogy and The Hobbit, I liked Anne McCaffrey, Asimov, Tad Williams, David Eddings, Patrick Rothfuss, Le Guin, I've read a bit of Marion Zimmer Bradley and liked it, Alan Dean Foster was pretty good, I just read the Mistborn trilogy by Brandon Sanderson and liked that, I read some of Heinlein when I was younger and it was alright, Burroughs was pretty good, H.G. Wells was good, I read most of Brian Jacques' books when I was younger.


Edit: I read the Dune books a while back, Foundation was great, and Gaiman and Lovecraft are both pretty good, though I haven't read all of any of those authors' works.

Strawberries
2012-01-17, 03:50 PM
I'll mention authors as I'm not sure how titles translate from Italian to English... when I was younger, I liked Philip **** and the early stuff written by Ray Bradbury. I say "when I was younger", because I haven't read anything by them in recent times, so I don't know if my tastes were influenced by the fact I was 14...

More recently, I read George Martin and I liked it, but I know of people who really loathe the series, so take it with a grain of salt.

Grinner
2012-01-17, 04:02 PM
Well...It might be a bit simple, but I found one of the Shadowrun novels, The Lucifer Deck, rather entertaining. Good luck finding a copy though.

noparlpf
2012-01-17, 04:10 PM
I'll mention authors as I'm not sure how titles translate from Italian to English... when I was younger, I liked Philip **** and the early stuff written by Ray Bradbury. I say "when I was younger", because I haven't read anything by them in recent times, so I don't know if my tastes were influenced by the fact I was 14...

More recently, I read George Martin and I liked it, but I know of people who really loathe the series, so take it with a grain of salt.

I've read a few things by Philip censored-naughty-word and several by Bradbury. They were both pretty good but not quite my usual taste.


Well...It might be a bit simple, but I found one of the Shadowrun novels, The Lucifer Deck, rather entertaining. Good luck finding a copy though.

It's available on Amazon. What's it about?

Weezer
2012-01-17, 04:18 PM
The Dark Is Rising cycle is one of the best contemporaneous fantasy stories I know of. I like the HP novels, but they can't hold a candle to this IMO.

For a second I thought you were calling a series written in the 60s/70s contemporary, which made me wonder how old you are. Then I realized you meant it in the sense that it is fantasy set in a contemporary setting and I felt silly. I'll second this though, they were very good books and did an excellent job with the "boy discovering he has magic talent and being pulled into the magical underside of the world" type plot.

Balain
2012-01-17, 04:59 PM
I really like the myth adventure series. Each book is a quick read, but there is like sixteen or so books in te series so takes awhile to read them all maybe.

They are a comedy mix of fantasy ad sci-fi. The first 12 or so books written by Robert Asprin. The other ones he co-authored with Jody lyn nye.

noparlpf
2012-01-17, 05:08 PM
I really like the myth adventure series. Each book is a quick read, but there is like sixteen or so books in te series so takes awhile to read them all maybe.

They are a comedy mix of fantasy ad sci-fi. The first 12 or so books written by Robert Asprin. The other ones he co-authored with Jody lyn nye.

I remember those, I read a good number of them in my early teens.

Grinner
2012-01-17, 05:18 PM
It's available on Amazon. What's it about?

One of the corporations attempts to develop a new variety of cyberdeck, the eponymous Lucifer Deck. Naturally, things go awry, and a young orc girl is caught in a web of deceit and betrayal. It's a little tragic, really.

factotum
2012-01-17, 05:37 PM
I can recommend a few:

Tigana (Guy Gavriel Kay)
Anything by Terry Pratchett
Magician, Silverthorn and A Darkness at Sethanon (Raymond E. Feist)

Dr.Epic
2012-01-17, 05:56 PM
Well, there's always this! (http://www.homestarrunner.com/amazon.html):smallwink:

Knaight
2012-01-17, 06:07 PM
I can recommend a few:

Tigana (Guy Gavriel Kay)
Anything by Terry Pratchett
Magician, Silverthorn and A Darkness at Sethanon (Raymond E. Feist)

I'd strongly recommend avoiding Tigana. Kay has far better work, starting with The Lions of Al-Rassan. On top of that, I recommend The Founding of the Commonwealth by Alan Dean Foster, Fevre Dream by George R. R. Martin, and The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss.

DonutBoy12321
2012-01-17, 11:02 PM
The Ender's Game (Ender Games) series is really good, in my opinion.

factotum
2012-01-18, 02:32 AM
I'd strongly recommend avoiding Tigana. Kay has far better work, starting with The Lions of Al-Rassan.

But Tigana is *good*. Saying you should avoid it because he's written better is like saying you shouldn't eat a delicious cream cake because the chef has baked better... :smallconfused:

Feytalist
2012-01-18, 02:56 AM
"Fun" novels is a bit of a nebulous concept. I guess you mean easy-to-read and not so heavy?

Cause in that case Pratchett fits your bill. Eddings also has a nice flowing writing style you can get into. But I guess you know that already.

I'm also (once again) going to suggest David Gemmell. He writes a bit darker than the other authors mentioned, but his works are all very nice reads. The Druss stories in particular.

Also, anything by William Gibson. His descriptions are amazing. Start with Neuromancer.

Oh yeah, do yourself a favour and read the rest of Gaiman's work. I can almost guarantee you won't be disappointed. Neverwhere, Stardust, Anansi Boys, anything you can get your hands on.

Melayl
2012-01-18, 06:02 AM
Since noone has mentioned the Dresden Files by Jim Butcher, I will.

Also, the Mercedes Thompson novels by Patricia Briggs

Anything at all the Mercedes Lackey has ever written

I'll second (third?) the Dark is Rising and Name of the Wind as well.

Keveak
2012-01-18, 07:01 AM
I too will suggest Terry Pratchett's works, brilliant Fantasy writer.

I would also suggest the Bartimaeus Trilogy by Johnathan Stroud, the Dragonlance Chronicles by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman and Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll. :smallsmile:

Although, do beware that my suggestions come from my mind, not exactly a sane place. :3

Knaight
2012-01-18, 10:46 AM
But Tigana is *good*. Saying you should avoid it because he's written better is like saying you shouldn't eat a delicious cream cake because the chef has baked better... :smallconfused:

Allow me to clarify:
There is a level of similarity in all of Kay's work that essentially cheapens later books as you read them. If you read Tigana before The Lions of Al-Rassan, you will enjoy The Lions of Al-Rassan less than you would otherwise, which is a shame as it is far better than Tigana.

Sgt. Cookie
2012-01-18, 11:03 AM
The Cardinal's Blades by Pierre Pevel is a nice little read. It's the first in a trilogy set in a low fantasy (Read: Dragons) version of the world. Based primarily in Paris.

noparlpf
2012-01-18, 11:45 AM
Although, do beware that my suggestions come from my mind, not exactly a sane place. :3

From reading your posts in the LGBTA+ thread, your mind seems like a pretty neat place. Sanity is often overrated. I like your mind. :3


Wow, loads of suggestions. I've actually been meaning to read a few of the books/series suggested but had forgotten. Now I have a big pile of books to purchase/borrow, not to mention the pile I already dug up at home.
Thanks, everybody! Keep them coming!

douglas
2012-01-18, 01:47 PM
Since you liked the Mistborn trilogy, I strongly recommend picking up the rest of Brandon Sanderson's books. He's very consistently good and improving, and there's a sort of easter egg bonus content in that most of his books (the current exceptions are the Alcatraz children's series and the Wheel of Time books) are actually in the same universe and there are hints here and there about how they're all connected. The quality of writing is somewhat lower in Elantris thanks to it being an earlier book, but it's still good and the rest are even better.

There's even a Mistborn sequel, Alloy of Law, if you specifically want more Allomancy. It's set a few hundred years after the original trilogy, with the events of that trilogy having become mythological legends.

Asta Kask
2012-01-18, 01:52 PM
Wow, loads of suggestions. I've actually been meaning to read a few of the books/series suggested but had forgotten. Now I have a big pile of books to purchase/borrow, not to mention the pile I already dug up at home.
Thanks, everybody! Keep them coming!

Also, do not come back until you've read all crack fiction on the Internet. That should hold you for a while.

noparlpf
2012-01-18, 04:11 PM
Since you liked the Mistborn trilogy, I strongly recommend picking up the rest of Brandon Sanderson's books. He's very consistently good and improving, and there's a sort of easter egg bonus content in that most of his books (the current exceptions are the Alcatraz children's series and the Wheel of Time books) are actually in the same universe and there are hints here and there about how they're all connected. The quality of writing is somewhat lower in Elantris thanks to it being an earlier book, but it's still good and the rest are even better.

There's even a Mistborn sequel, Alloy of Law, if you specifically want more Allomancy. It's set a few hundred years after the original trilogy, with the events of that trilogy having become mythological legends.

When I was looking into the Mistborn world some more online I found out about Alloy of Law. So most of the others are set in the same universe? Do I ever learn more about Allomancy and the other things? Because he kind of left out some details in the trilogy. According to Wikipedia, (spoilers) there are four other metals, and atium doesn't even count as one of the sixteen, which doesn't make sense because the 16% of the population that was Snapped by mistsickness in the third book yielded atium and malatium Mistings. So now I'm confused and want to know more.


Also, do not come back until you've read all crack fiction on the Internet. That should hold you for a while.

First mental response: "Oh Pelor no."
Yeah...I've had one or two bad run-ins with crack fiction from the internet. Out of my one or two run-ins with crack fiction from the internet. My ex made me read one South Park fanfic that was actually worse than the Twilight books.

Riverdance
2012-01-18, 04:33 PM
So far I don't believe anyone has mentioned the Earthsea Quartet by Ursula le Guin, so allow me to now. I have just started them and already I am enthralled. Great fantasy writing.

noparlpf
2012-01-18, 04:36 PM
So far I don't believe anyone has mentioned the Earthsea Quartet by Ursula le Guin, so allow me to now. I have just started them and already I am enthralled. Great fantasy writing.

I mentioned Le Guin at some point. I loved that trilogy and then later, when I found it, the fourth book. I also liked the few of her other stories that I've read.

douglas
2012-01-18, 05:16 PM
When I was looking into the Mistborn world some more online I found out about Alloy of Law. So most of the others are set in the same universe? Do I ever learn more about Allomancy and the other things? Because he kind of left out some details in the trilogy. According to Wikipedia, there are four other metals, and atium doesn't even count as one of the sixteen, which doesn't make sense because the 16% of the population that was Snapped by mistsickness in the third book yielded atium and malatium Mistings. So now I'm confused and want to know more.
First, you should use [spoiler] blocks instead of text coloring to hide spoilers. White text becomes readable in quote blocks, and spoiler blocks are specifically intended for the purpose.

Now for your actual questions: Elantris, Mistborn, Warbreaker, Way of Kings, and a bunch of other books not yet written are all set in the same universe, though on different planets. Brandon calls this universe the Cosmere.

The omitted details in Allomancy are deliberate, both to go along with the characters having incomplete knowledge and to leave room for further development in future books. Brandon has mentioned a few times that he has two additional trilogies planned for the Mistborn world. One of them will be set centuries after the first trilogy and will feature a special police unit of mistings tracking down a mistborn serial killer, in a world where the allomantic bloodlines have been diluted so much that no known mistborn has been born for centuries (so the existence of a mistborn at all, much less that he's a serial killer, is big news) and technology has advanced to somewhere around modern day real-world standards. The other will be more futuristic sci-fi, with spaceships. Both trilogies will almost certainly have new reveals about Allomancy, Feruchemy, and possibly Hemalurgy, and Brandon has actually mentioned that Allomancy includes a way to travel faster than light somehow and that this will be discovered in or before the later trilogy. Alloy of Law is actually an unplanned extra book set some time before the middle trilogy, and it does include some new revelations about the magic systems.

Regarding the spoilers Atium is actually the solid form of Ruin's power, and is known as a "god metal". The other god metal is Lerasium, which is the solid form of Preservation's power, and it's what Vin found at the Well of Ascension and fed to Elend which made him a mistborn. Neither of these metals is part of the core system of 16 normal metals.

The mistsickness was something that Preservation set up deliberately, and Brandon has explained that Preservation omitted one of the at-the-time-unknown normal metals from the mists' attentions in order to fit Atium in while preserving the number 16. Malatium was, I believe, ignored entirely by the mists. Kelsier's discovery of malatium was actually a scheme by Ruin to help lead to the Lord Ruler's defeat.

Both atium and lerasium have a whole bunch of alloys with a wide variety of effects. Kelsier discovered the specific atium alloy that he did because it's the one Ruin had selected as most likely to lead to a successful overthrow of the Lord Ruler. What the other alloys are and what they do are secrets that Brandon might use as plot devices some day.

Oh, and people first figured out that atium wasn't a normal metal because they looked at the chart in the back of the book and noticed that it didn't fit the patterns right. When asked about this, Brandon said something along the lines of he was wondering when someone would notice, and yes something was up with it. He's so good about following his own magic systems' rules that when you see him breaking one it's a safe bet there's another rule or an error in character knowledge, and trying to figure out what it is can be interesting.

The other books, Elantris, Warbreaker, Way of Kings, etc., actually have their own completely different magic systems. They're set on different planets, and each planet has its own magic system(s). Except they're not really completely different because some portions of the metaphysics governing them are the same and they may have some common principles. Exactly what these shared metaphysics and principles are is one of the "easter eggs" of the whole set of Cosmere books, and speculation on the subject is one of the things people like to talk about on fan sites.

The Mad Hatter
2012-01-19, 01:57 AM
Les Miserable is a good and wordy book. :smallcool:

noparlpf
2012-01-19, 09:05 AM
First, you should use [spoiler] blocks instead of text coloring to hide spoilers. White text becomes readable in quote blocks, and spoiler blocks are specifically intended for the purpose.

Now for your actual questions: Elantris, Mistborn, Warbreaker, Way of Kings, and a bunch of other books not yet written are all set in the same universe, though on different planets. Brandon calls this universe the Cosmere.

The omitted details in Allomancy are deliberate, both to go along with the characters having incomplete knowledge and to leave room for further development in future books. Brandon has mentioned a few times that he has two additional trilogies planned for the Mistborn world. One of them will be set centuries after the first trilogy and will feature a special police unit of mistings tracking down a mistborn serial killer, in a world where the allomantic bloodlines have been diluted so much that no known mistborn has been born for centuries (so the existence of a mistborn at all, much less that he's a serial killer, is big news) and technology has advanced to somewhere around modern day real-world standards. The other will be more futuristic sci-fi, with spaceships. Both trilogies will almost certainly have new reveals about Allomancy, Feruchemy, and possibly Hemalurgy, and Brandon has actually mentioned that Allomancy includes a way to travel faster than light somehow and that this will be discovered in or before the later trilogy. Alloy of Law is actually an unplanned extra book set some time before the middle trilogy, and it does include some new revelations about the magic systems.

Regarding the spoilers Atium is actually the solid form of Ruin's power, and is known as a "god metal". The other god metal is Lerasium, which is the solid form of Preservation's power, and it's what Vin found at the Well of Ascension and fed to Elend which made him a mistborn. Neither of these metals is part of the core system of 16 normal metals.

The mistsickness was something that Preservation set up deliberately, and Brandon has explained that Preservation omitted one of the at-the-time-unknown normal metals from the mists' attentions in order to fit Atium in while preserving the number 16. Malatium was, I believe, ignored entirely by the mists. Kelsier's discovery of malatium was actually a scheme by Ruin to help lead to the Lord Ruler's defeat.

Both atium and lerasium have a whole bunch of alloys with a wide variety of effects. Kelsier discovered the specific atium alloy that he did because it's the one Ruin had selected as most likely to lead to a successful overthrow of the Lord Ruler. What the other alloys are and what they do are secrets that Brandon might use as plot devices some day.

Oh, and people first figured out that atium wasn't a normal metal because they looked at the chart in the back of the book and noticed that it didn't fit the patterns right. When asked about this, Brandon said something along the lines of he was wondering when someone would notice, and yes something was up with it. He's so good about following his own magic systems' rules that when you see him breaking one it's a safe bet there's another rule or an error in character knowledge, and trying to figure out what it is can be interesting.

The other books, Elantris, Warbreaker, Way of Kings, etc., actually have their own completely different magic systems. They're set on different planets, and each planet has its own magic system(s). Except they're not really completely different because some portions of the metaphysics governing them are the same and they may have some common principles. Exactly what these shared metaphysics and principles are is one of the "easter eggs" of the whole set of Cosmere books, and speculation on the subject is one of the things people like to talk about on fan sites.

Yeah, my bad. I usually use spoiler tags. Not sure why that time I used white text.

Hmm. I think I'll read those ones soon while Mistborn is still fresh in my mind.

douglas
2012-01-19, 09:38 AM
I'd recommend reading in order of publication - Elantris, then Warbreaker, then Way of Kings. Insert Alloy of Law wherever.

Very mildly spoilerish bit of trivia: There is a character, who most commonly goes by the name Hoid, who has appeared in every Cosmere book to date. Brandon has confirmed that this is, in fact, the same character, not multiple characters with the same name, and he can travel between planets. So far he has always taken a minor role, has never had a viewpoint scene, and usually tries to assist the main protagonists in some way. He does not always give a name when he appears, and when he does it is not always "Hoid", that's just the name he uses most often. He is tied to the overarching Cosmere plot, which has so far been no more than a background element that's only been hinted at.

This has, of course, led to the rise of Hoid-spotting as a sort of game among fans every time a new book comes out. He's even in Alloy of Law, though his appearance there is limited to an offhand mention that takes about half a sentence.

leakingpen
2012-01-19, 11:13 AM
The Dark Is Rising cycle is one of the best contemporaneous fantasy stories I know of. I like the HP novels, but they can't hold a candle to this IMO.

This. The Dark Is Rising is the foremost children's fantasy series of the last 100 years. JK wishes in her fever dreams she was half the author Susan Cooper is. (I wish I were a tenth the author she is. )

Fun fantasy? Magician: apprentice and beyond by Feist.

Bazil Broketail, forget the author name.

Another fine myth, myth conceptions, ect. I assume you've read the Myth series, if no, you need to. Robert Aspirin.

On sci fi, also Robert aspirin, phules company. Read Company and Paradise, the first two books. Then STOP. the other phule's books do not exist. They are a trick of the light, a lie online. DO NOT READ THEM!

Hbgplayer
2012-01-19, 01:08 PM
It's not sci-fy, but I've always enjoyed Tom Clancy's novels. The original Jack Ryan books are the best: Hunt for Red October, Patriot Games, Clear and Presant Danger, Sum of all Fears, Without Remorse, Debt of Honor, Executive Orders, Rainbow Six, and Teeth of the Tiger. The latest three are O.K., but it is obvious that they are ghost writers.
Two of his spin-off series that I enjoy as well are Net-Force and Op-Center.

As for fantasy/sci-fi, I enjoyed the Inheiratance Series by Christopher Paolini, and I enjoy the Star Wars Expanded Universe (After Battle of Yavin, not before), though I have not read anything after The New Jedi Order era.
I read quite a lot, if you cannot tell.

blackjack217
2012-01-19, 01:26 PM
The honor harington series by david weber is very good.
Compleatly legal link to get the books online (http://baencd.thefifthimperium.com/22-MissionofHonorCD/MissionofHonorCD/)

no really, its totally legal

Hiro Protagonest
2012-01-19, 01:40 PM
Percy Jackson and the Olympians/The Heroes of Olympus.

douglas
2012-01-19, 02:28 PM
The honor harington series by david weber is very good.
Compleatly legal link to get the books online (http://baencd.thefifthimperium.com/22-MissionofHonorCD/MissionofHonorCD/)

no really, its totally legal
And free. Legal*, free, and online. Such a great combination.

* David Weber books started including a CD in the back some years ago, with most of his books on the CD. Each of these CDs comes with clear licensing terms that amount to "copy and distribute this CD as much as you like, however you like, as long as you don't charge for it; we'll consider it free marketing." Then a group of people decided to combine this with a server and the Internet and things went from there.

Keveak
2012-01-19, 03:13 PM
And free. Legal*, free, and online. Such a great combination.

* David Weber books started including a CD in the back some years ago, with most of his books on the CD. Each of these CDs comes with clear licensing terms that amount to "copy and distribute this CD as much as you like, however you like, as long as you don't charge for it; we'll consider it free marketing." Then a group of people decided to combine this with a server and the Internet and things went from there.

Also downloadable and readable without download from Baen Books', the publisher, website. For the reason that it really is free publicity and that piracy is dwarfed by libraries and even people lending each other books. :smallsmile:

Yay for progressive authors! And toast, because toast is delicious. :3

The unfortunate side effect is that I now have at least forty books to read just because I decided to help someone find a good book. D:

Which is worth it, but necessities this:

Curse you Helpfulness! CURSE YOU!

:smalltongue:

noparlpf
2012-01-19, 08:40 PM
I'd recommend reading in order of publication - Elantris, then Warbreaker, then Way of Kings. Insert Alloy of Law wherever.

Very mildly spoilerish bit of trivia: There is a character, who most commonly goes by the name Hoid, who has appeared in every Cosmere book to date. Brandon has confirmed that this is, in fact, the same character, not multiple characters with the same name, and he can travel between planets. So far he has always taken a minor role, has never had a viewpoint scene, and usually tries to assist the main protagonists in some way. He does not always give a name when he appears, and when he does it is not always "Hoid", that's just the name he uses most often. He is tied to the overarching Cosmere plot, which has so far been no more than a background element that's only been hinted at.

This has, of course, led to the rise of Hoid-spotting as a sort of game among fans every time a new book comes out. He's even in Alloy of Law, though his appearance there is limited to an offhand mention that takes about half a sentence.

Huh. Was he in the Mistborn trilogy? I don't remember him.


Also downloadable and readable without download from Baen Books', the publisher, website. For the reason that it really is free publicity and that piracy is dwarfed by libraries and even people lending each other books. :smallsmile:

Yay for progressive authors! And toast, because toast is delicious. :3

The unfortunate side effect is that I now have at least forty books to read just because I decided to help someone find a good book. D:

Which is worth it, but necessities this:

Curse you Helpfulness! CURSE YOU!

:smalltongue:

That's what you get! Maybe next time you won't try to be a nice person. :b

douglas
2012-01-19, 10:11 PM
Huh. Was he in the Mistborn trilogy? I don't remember him.
He has one appearance in each book in the trilogy. All three are brief and minor, and I think only the one in Hero of Ages has a name mentioned. The Well of Ascension one was particularly difficult to figure out, with months (I think) passing between Brandon's confirmation that Hoid was in the book and someone getting it right.

Hoid's Mistborn appearances:
In Final Empire, he's the supposedly blind beggar informant that Kelsier gets some information from fairly early in the book.

In Well of Ascension, there's a group of Terris refugees. Hoid is helping organize and lead them.

In Hero of Ages, when Vin is going around collecting information from a series of spies, Hoid is the one she gets spooked by and doesn't actually meet.

Hiro Protagonest
2012-01-19, 10:53 PM
Oh yeah, there's also a new book that's also good. Ashtown Burials I: The Dragon's Tooth.

Please declare aloud: I hereby undertake to tread the world, to garden the wild, and to saddle the seas, as did my brother Brendan. I will not turn away from shades in fear, nor avert my eyes from light. I shall do as my Keeper requires, and keep no secret from a Sage. May the stars guide me and my strength preserve me. And no smoking in the library. Translation approved, 1946.