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Tavar
2012-02-16, 01:59 AM
In this thread (http://www.giantitp.com/forums/showthread.php?t=230657), and interesting question was raised, about what is the worst setting in terms of livability. Now, to narrow the field, I'm going to ask what the Worst Death World you can think of is.

A couple of Qualifications: the biggest danger should not necessarily be a sentient race, at the very least no as individuals. The Danger should be the environment itself.

Also, the environment should be livable normally. What I mean by this is that something like Pandora from the Avatar verse wouldn't count, nor would something like Jupiter, even though both would mean death for a normal human.


As for my offering, I bring this:
Redliners, by David Drake, and if up for free here (http://www.baen.com/library/067187733X/067187733X.htm)(put up by the publisher).

The planet has a device on it. The planet will therefore try it's upmost to kill you, and a anyone else who steps for on it. This includes altering the geography so that a stream has a layer of acid running underneath the water, engineered 'tribes' of natives who will continually attack, and trees that shoot spines at you if you get close enough, or react like a Fragmentation grenade if you shoot them. And it can alter the ecosystem in the span of days, if not hours.

Using advanced sci-fic Technology you might survive, if you bring a company force of what are effectively special forces. Might.

McStabbington
2012-02-16, 03:45 AM
Arrakis and the bottom level of Kashyyyk come most readily to mind. . .

hamishspence
2012-02-16, 04:51 AM
40K ones in general. While Catachan and Fenris are the most famous, humans without much tech seem to be able to survive them.

Dark Heresy has some nastier ones- with everything highly toxic, or a deadly virus all across the planet. Woe, and Feyrr, were the names of two of them in Creatures Anathema.

Cespenar
2012-02-16, 05:17 AM
The Labyrinth from The Death Gate Cycle. A botched up epic-magic powered mega-experiment, it's a world that actively and consciously tries to kill you, in ways not unlike an exceptionally vicious DM who is running the Tomb of Horrors, or something like that. The only people that can make it there is a super powered magic using race, and even then only in small groups and always on the run.

KingofMadCows
2012-02-16, 05:31 AM
Malachor V in Star Wars - a lifeless graveyard where the Mandalorian army was crushed and their spirits broken.

Plane of Death in the Might and Magic series - a world that is the embodiment of pure destructive death. It exists only to bring death to other worlds.

Hazzardevil
2012-02-16, 05:47 AM
I suppose the underdark would count? With the right supplies you could theoretically survive, but you are likely to come across Drow, Mindflayers or Duergar, so you wouldn't want to meet them.

hamlet
2012-02-16, 09:41 AM
Earth.

It has a 100% fatality rate so far.

Fictional, you mean? Then I'd probably go with Athas.

nyarlathotep
2012-02-16, 09:46 AM
Athas from Dark Sun ranks pretty high up there at least hedging out Dune simply by virtue of being the same place but with more monsters.

Lord Raziere
2012-02-16, 09:47 AM
Athas, Phyrexia or Grixis.

you could also make a case for Creation, with all the apocalypses and crazy Exalts around.

dehro
2012-02-16, 09:52 AM
Arrakis from Dune?
the Fremen manage to live there, which means it's possible..kinda

Traab
2012-02-16, 11:30 AM
The planet from Pitch Black. Once the suns go down...... yeah, you be dead.

Mewtarthio
2012-02-16, 11:38 AM
Earth as run by AM in "I Have No Mouth But I Must Scream." Or do Worse-Than-Death Worlds not qualify?

hamlet
2012-02-16, 12:39 PM
Earth as run by AM in "I Have No Mouth But I Must Scream." Or do Worse-Than-Death Worlds not qualify?

One good magnet would have fixed that entire problem . . .:smalltongue:

Avilan the Grey
2012-02-16, 12:47 PM
Tuchanka used to be one, AFAIK. Only 1 of 1000 Krogan survived to maturity.

factotum
2012-02-16, 03:22 PM
The planet from Pitch Black. Once the suns go down...... yeah, you be dead.

Good as the movie was, that whole premise annoyed me. Why didn't the stars come out when the suns went down? Why was there no light from the other planets in the system?

As for a death world, I'll go with Pyrrus, from Harry Harrison's Deathworld books. Virtually everything on that planet is out to kill you, to the extent that people who manage to survive there develop superhuman reflexes.

Gnoman
2012-02-16, 04:58 PM
In this thread (http://www.giantitp.com/forums/showthread.php?t=230657), and interesting question was raised, about what is the worst setting in terms of livability. Now, to narrow the field, I'm going to ask what the Worst Death World you can think of is.

A couple of Qualifications: the biggest danger should not necessarily be a sentient race, at the very least no as individuals. The Danger should be the environment itself.

Also, the environment should be livable normally. What I mean by this is that something like Pandora from the Avatar verse wouldn't count, nor would something like Jupiter, even though both would mean death for a normal human.


As for my offering, I bring this:
Redliners, by David Drake, and if up for free here (http://www.baen.com/library/067187733X/067187733X.htm)(put up by the publisher).

The planet has a device on it. The planet will therefore try it's upmost to kill you, and a anyone else who steps for on it. This includes altering the geography so that a stream has a layer of acid running underneath the water, engineered 'tribes' of natives who will continually attack, and trees that shoot spines at you if you get close enough, or react like a Fragmentation grenade if you shoot them. And it can alter the ecosystem in the span of days, if not hours.

Using advanced sci-fic Technology you might survive, if you bring a company force of what are effectively special forces. Might.

As deathworlds go, that really isn't so bad.

They were in (by far) the nastiest area on the planet, and the main group was composed of the worst possible candidates for colonization even on a normal planet, guarded by a understrength group of strung-out lightly armed shock troops. While the biocontrol device proved a decisive weapon in the war, there was no indication that it would have gone beyond the plants and trees if a simple colony had been in place (instead of two armed groups very close to said device.)

Traab
2012-02-16, 06:09 PM
Good as the movie was, that whole premise annoyed me. Why didn't the stars come out when the suns went down? Why was there no light from the other planets in the system?

As for a death world, I'll go with Pyrrus, from Harry Harrison's Deathworld books. Virtually everything on that planet is out to kill you, to the extent that people who manage to survive there develop superhuman reflexes.

Could have been in a fairly empty section of space. Any stars would have been too far away to provide noticeable light. And the nearest other planet we saw was actually part of the problem, blocking one of the suns to actually cause the darkness. It was an odd solar system as it was, didnt it have three suns?

Coventry
2012-02-16, 06:19 PM
Alpha Complex (Earth).

Everyone dies *six times*.

factotum
2012-02-17, 02:40 AM
Could have been in a fairly empty section of space. Any stars would have been too far away to provide noticeable light.

Except you could see all the stars quite clearly in the space scenes, and there were plenty of them around! Anyway, this is derailing the thread somewhat...

Nibleswick
2012-02-17, 02:58 AM
Kessel from Star Wars is up there. It has a breathable atmosphere, but it is only dense enough deep in the caves. Caves that are full of giant spiders that can rip through armor and feed on energy. That mean that they are attracted to anything that produces any light or heat as a food source. It also means that blasters don't work on them, they just eat the blaster bolts.

hamlet
2012-02-17, 06:42 AM
Good as the movie was, that whole premise annoyed me. Why didn't the stars come out when the suns went down? Why was there no light from the other planets in the system?

As for a death world, I'll go with Pyrrus, from Harry Harrison's Deathworld books. Virtually everything on that planet is out to kill you, to the extent that people who manage to survive there develop superhuman reflexes.

I'm gonna go with "light pollution" from the twin suns. Even occluded by the planets/moons, they were bright enough to make the relative faint light of the stars invisible.

Yeah, I know it doesn't work, but stop trying to apply logic to a movie that's really about watching monsters eat stupid people and Vin Diesel do cool things.

Wardog
2012-02-17, 08:39 PM
Earth 200 million years in the future, as depicted in Brian Aldiss's Hothouse?

(The sun has expanded to fill half the sky, the earth is now tidally locked so once half is in permenant day; only a handful of animal species still exist, most of which are highly evolved giant insects, and/or hostile; plants are now the dominant form of life, and occupy all the top predator niches, and some functioning as mind-control parasites. Oh, and humans have evolved into 12-inch high pixie-like creatures, that firmly occupy the "prey" niche).

Istari
2012-02-17, 08:49 PM
I'll throw out Lusitania with the Descolada (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Descolada#Descolada) virus. A self modifying virus with near sentience.

Inglenook
2012-02-17, 08:55 PM
"Beachworld" (from the similarly-titled Stephen King short story) is a planet composed entirely of sand, with no solid surface—or subsurface, I suppose—whatsoever. It's not immediately lethal because there are no monsters or anything, but slowly sand begins to work its way into places it shouldn't, and the sound of the dunes shifting drives you first to distraction, then fascination, then madness. Beachworld is actually a gigantic sentient mass floating through space, and when the slow method of driving insane the people who crash land on it doesn't work, it animates the "sand" to kill them.

I think there's a similar Bradbury story about astronauts crash-landing on a sentient planet only for them to discover it's the place of their dreams. But when they piss it off it strikes back, transforming into a gigantic ball of magma and death.

ETA: I think the Bradbury story was "Here There Be Tygers".

SlyGuyMcFly
2012-02-17, 08:56 PM
The Labyrinth from The Death Gate Cycle. A botched up epic-magic powered mega-experiment, it's a world that actively and consciously tries to kill you, in ways not unlike an exceptionally vicious DM who is running the Tomb of Horrors, or something like that. The only people that can make it there is a super powered magic using race, and even then only in small groups and always on the run.

Was going to mention the Labyrinth. There are many nasty deathworlds out there, but in few of them does the terrain itself shift around when you're not looking just to screw with you.

HandofShadows
2012-02-18, 02:06 PM
The Earth in Half Life 2.

The Combine is draining away the water and ripping any other resource from the planet leaving behind huge pools of radioative/toxic slug. If you are in the wrong place they turn you into a Stalker ( http://combineoverwiki.net/wiki/Stalker ). You can be attacked by antlions for just walking across a beach. And no place is safe from headcrabs. And if one gets you, you don't die. But live on in unending agony while your body is the headcrabs meat puppet. Oh yeah. No childeren have been born in 20 years. :smalleek:

H Birchgrove
2012-02-19, 11:05 AM
Mars/Barsoom in Edgar Rice Burroughs' John Carter novels.

Venus in one of Ray Bradbury's short stories. Also, Earth proved to be a death world to the invading Martians in another (hilarious) Bradbury short story.

Philip K. **** had a few examples in his short stories.

factotum already mentioned Pyrrus, from Harry Harrison's Deathworld books.

Wardog mentioned Brian Aldiss's Hothouse.

TheOtherSidhe
2012-02-19, 01:41 PM
The Metroid series has quite a few, but I'm not sure how many count given the "must be survivable" requirements. From most to least lethal:

Phaaze- A sentient planet made almost entirely of Phazon, which is a highly radioactive substance capable of doing anything the plot requires, including disintegrating things, driving creatures insane, or corrupting them into service to it. The planet also throws pieces of itself at other planets to turn them into more copies of itself.

SR388- A planet featuring copious amounts of acid everywhere, as well as near constant earthquakes. It is home to the Metroids, energy draining monsters immune to most conventional weaponry, as well as the X-Parasites, which infect creatures like a virus, kill them, and then copy all of their abilities.

Aether/Dark Aether- Basically, it's a planet split between two dimensions, Dark and Light. The Dark half has corrosive air (and water) and is inhabited by shape-shifting aliens that can pull demonic possession. It's also full of Phazon, see above.

Pirate Homeworld- Never really given a name, but the planet is polluted to a degree that it rains acid at all times. Not specified what exactly said acid is, but the stuff can corrode metal and flesh nigh instantly. Not counting the fact that this is where Space Pirates live.

Bryyo- Its rotation and orbit are such that one side is always facing the sun, leading to one half of the planet to be fiery, while the other is completely frozen. The only livable area is around the equator or thereabouts. It's also covered in a corrosive, highly flammable substance called Fuel Gel. Just rivers of explosive acidic sludge.

chiasaur11
2012-02-20, 06:07 PM
40K ones in general. While Catachan and Fenris are the most famous, humans without much tech seem to be able to survive them.

Dark Heresy has some nastier ones- with everything highly toxic, or a deadly virus all across the planet. Woe, and Feyrr, were the names of two of them in Creatures Anathema.

I think there was a 40K novel called "Death World" that set the record. Catachan jungle fighters died in droves there. Sapient hive mind planet, able to adapt to anything on its surface and anything that dies there reanimates under the planet's control.

I think Catachan is being underrated here, though. Sure, humans survive. But Warhammer 40K has always been a setting where just being double 'ard is a better survival mechanism than advanced technology. The all toxin ones can be dealt with using breathing gear and hardsuits. Catachan, the best armor in the galaxy doesn't help if the frogs get mad.

Some scientists theorize the planet was invaded by Tyranids in the past. They wound up somewhere in the low middle of the planet's food chain without anyone noticing.

Metroid's Phaaze is also pretty good, considering the only being to ever set foot on it without dying or getting mutated into a puppet is Samus Aran, who is basically the human counterpart of a death world.

Oeep Snaec
2012-02-22, 10:51 AM
Yeah, Catachan. The typical child on Catachan is as thick as an Ogryn, and twice as mean.

The Durvin
2012-02-22, 02:02 PM
How about every single world from the Silver Surfer game for the NES? Every single enemy and surface kills with a single touch--kills someone wielding the Power Cosmic, no less.

If that's too vague for your tastes, I'll say any of the lower levels of Naraka, the Hell of Buddhism; levels include red-hot plains of molten metal where giant weights fly around crushing people, places so cold your flesh shatters, and a refreshing green meadow where the grass is flesh-piercing needles.

Gnoman
2012-02-22, 11:37 PM
The planet Doom from the old text adventure Countdown to Doom was pretty nasty.

dehro
2012-02-26, 12:27 AM
why has nobody given the obvious answer yet?

Australia

HandofShadows
2012-02-26, 04:05 PM
why has nobody given the obvious answer yet?

Australia

A death continent maybe, but not a death world. Of course if you want a a real world "death place" go to Death Valley. If you go outside in the summer time you can start to slowly cook in your own juices. :smalleek:

LordVader
2012-02-27, 05:09 PM
Arrakis definitely ranks up there, although the relative safety of already-established settlements prevents it from taking the top, I think.

In that vein, Planet (or, as you might know it, Chiron) from Sid Meier's Alpha Centauri is not a fun place to be. Humans cannot breathe the air (the game itself describes doing so as "a gasping death"). Additionally, the planet itself is semi-sentient and doing its best to kill you with a variety of horrific worm-based monsters which literally mind-rape you to death by psychically inducing a state of sheer terror (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lva8L-J8x04) and planting their embryos in your brain.

Oh, and a significant portion of the surface of the planet is coated in a highly resilient fungus that actively regrows when pushed back, is fully capable of overrunning human settlements, and both conceals and bolsters the native life-forms.

It's not only possible, but plausible for human settlements with thousands upon thousands of residents to be simply overwhelmed and slaughtered by fungal blooms and the resultant native life-forms. Indeed, the official storyline as gleaned from the game's tech quotes implies that the Spartans, who tend to live up to their Ancient Greek namesakes in terms of hardiness and military ability, had their headquarters and strongest redoubt entirely overrun by native life-forms unleashed by another faction.

As if that wasn't enough, the whole planet operates on a cycle of metamorphosis which will kill off literally everything on its surface every few thousand/million years. And it's climaxing right as the humans get there.

So yeah, not somewhere you want to be living. Makes Arrakis look like a cakewalk.