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Deth Muncher
2012-02-16, 06:49 PM
Hey, I'm hoping someone can help me out with this:

Last night, I went to see the World/Inferno Friendship Society in Richmond, and without thinking I slapped on a suit jacket because I know that when you go to punk shows, you either go looking like you haven't bathed in a week, or you go in a suit. And then I stopped myself and realized "Wait, why am I doing this? Why is this the social construct for punk shows?" And I just couldn't figure it out. I know in my head I've seen people do it loads of times - the lead singer of Inferno is always in a suit (with fedora), and I spied at least three others in full suits, while I and a few more still just had blazers.

So yeah. Anyone know the origin of this social construct? Is it parody? Is it because people like looking classy? Something else?

Sneaky Weasel
2012-02-21, 06:40 AM
Well, as far as I know it hearkens back to an era where not everyone looked the same(T-shirt and jeans), and also suits are just cool. And punk is about being cool. Aside from that, I'm not really sure.

thubby
2012-02-21, 11:27 AM
punk went against the norm. eventually punk gained its own norm. punks went against that norm and "tada!" punks in suits.

thats my theory anyway. all anti-conformity has the underlying problem.

GolemsVoice
2012-02-21, 12:00 PM
I guess it's also an additional way of mocking the kind of people punk rock generally sings against, e.g. politicians and corporate people.

Closet_Skeleton
2012-02-22, 07:39 AM
I was at a John Cooper Clarke (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Cooper_Clarke) performance at Edinburgh once where he brought up this exact topic.

Basically it was "punk is about dressing like what you want so you can't say suits aren't punk".

An Enemy Spy
2012-02-27, 02:13 PM
Well, as far as I know it hearkens back to an era where not everyone looked the same(T-shirt and jeans), and also suits are just cool. And punk is about being cool. Aside from that, I'm not really sure.

But everyone did look the same back when we all wore suits.

Moff Chumley
2012-02-27, 04:58 PM
This is why I never attend shows without my fez. :smallcool:

Agent 451
2012-02-28, 03:26 PM
Suits at shows have never really caught my attention to be honest. What did raise my eyebrow was seeing a guy break-dancing (and extremely well to boot) at an In Flames concert. Odd, but it sure was interesting to see.

Nix Nihila
2012-02-28, 04:47 PM
Curious. I know little about punk subculture, and have never been to a punk show, but I know a bit about fashion and it seems rather non-punk to wear a suit. Especially considering the underlying concepts behind punk fashion (or early punk fashion, I'm less familiar with more recent trends) are pretty anti-materialistic.

That's not, of course, to say that you can't be a part of punk subculture and wear suits.

SarahV
2012-02-28, 08:25 PM
Dunno about punk generally, but World Inferno Friendship Society is considered part of the 'dark cabaret' genre and those audiences seem to absolutely love dressing up, with bonus points for a Victorian/steampunk look and as much black as possible... :)

Moff Chumley
2012-02-28, 09:00 PM
While the Dark Cabaret scene might think of itself as punk, I can assure y'all that your garden variety leather-and-chain punk would take issue with that. :smalltongue:
To me, punk is an attitude: a lot of individualism, a little (or a lot of) belligerence, and a respect for the genuine, whatever "genuine" might mean to you.
Suffice to say, I have some less than flattering opinions of the losers who hang out at the local punk clubs and have color-coordinated mohawks. Apparently you're not allowed to hang out with them if you don't have the right Leftover Crack patch on your studded leather jacket. :smalltongue:

SarahV
2012-02-28, 09:37 PM
While the Dark Cabaret scene might think of itself as punk

I'm pretty sure they don't :smallconfused: There are a few bands that take elements from both genres, though. E.g., the Dresden Dolls, or World Inferno.

I hate genre categories, myself. All I care about is if they're good, not what people call them. :smallsmile: A rose by any other name, etc.