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Giegue
2012-06-19, 03:47 PM
YA fiction sometimes gets a bad rap due to preconceived stereotypes that come from works like Twilight. However, despite this YA still sells, but there is yet another stereotype that a friend of mine holds; that it is the almost exclusive realm of teenage girls. I want to break all the stereotypes and as a result am posting this thread to find out if anybody here actually reads YA or read it when they where a teenager. Also, Harry Potter, while YA, dose not count if it is the ONLY piece of YA fiction you have read due to it's massive 90s/early 2000s pokemon-scale popularity/the fact that EVERYBODY has read Harry Potter. Most of all, I want to prove my friend wrong and show him that YA readership is not made exclusively of teenage girls.


Anyway, so if any of you where or are YA fiction readers, I'd like you to post here. Also, feel free to mention any good titles or works that stand/stood out to you as well.

Mauve Shirt
2012-06-19, 03:53 PM
I enjoy going back and reading the YA books I used to love. Not just for the nostalgia factor either. There's some really good writing in the genre, and some really great story ideas. I'll list examples when I am not on my phone, but to start with, Ella Enchanted, the book not the movie.

erikun
2012-06-19, 04:08 PM
Yes, I read young adult fiction. I wasn't under the impressing that it was almost exclusively for teenage girls, though. :smallconfused: Harry Potter, Percy Jackson, Maximum Ride, Ranger's Apprentice, Warriors (to state examples I've read) along with Eragon (for an example I haven't) all strike me as aimed towards young adult males.

I do note that I've seen more Eon and Clockwork Prince within the last few years, which are clearly marketed towards young women, but I wouldn't really consider them a large majority - and certainly not the whole current market.


The books themselves are generally a quick and easy read, although frequently not all that involved.

Raistlin1040
2012-06-19, 04:10 PM
My best friend and I are both college-bound 18 year old boys and we are massive John Green fans, to the point of going to one of his book signings. In addition, Maureen Johnson is pretty good too.

Yora
2012-06-19, 04:16 PM
I don't think I ever really got exposed to it. We're kind a family of academics and the books our parents read to us as kids where the really heavy stuff of childrens books. Neverending Story, Jim Button, the Hobbit, stuff like that. Oh, and my mothers old Adventure Series books, would they count? :smallbiggrin:
And our dad has complete collections of Asterix, Tintin, and Spirou. And we watches Star Trek five times per week for as far back as I can remember. So it was pretty much "read or perish!". I think we pretty much went straight to mainstream novels. My brother started at 9, maybe even 8 to read science fiction novels, even through he's by far the least bookish. But as the youngest child, he really didn't have a choice in learning to read. :smallamused:

Novels written for teens always appeared like an odd idea to me. I think they would probably be about ordinary teens doing... I don't know.
Wait, we did had the massive collection of The Three Investigators and TKKG from my aunt (today you'd call them audiobooks). Those would probably be quite spot on. And I did have a few Three Investigators books. No clue why, but those were HUGE in Germany in the 80s. Quite dark I would say, but that's what made them cool. They did have to compete with Borgs and Sauron, mind you. :smallwink:
You could make a point for Donald Duck paperback books as well. I wonder where they ended up, they could probably compete quite well with many peoples manga collections. Had there been seinen manga in the 90s in Europe, we probably would have had a lot of those as well.

thubby
2012-06-19, 04:18 PM
My best friend and I are both college-bound 18 year old boys and we are massive John Green fans, to the point of going to one of his book signings. In addition, Maureen Johnson is pretty good too.

*brohoofs fellow nerd-fighter brony*

I've always liked YA fiction. holes remains a personal favorite, and I'm actually reading "divergent" right now.

Aotrs Commander
2012-06-19, 06:29 PM
Wasn't Tamora Pierce's earlier stuff technically classed as YA fiction (at least over here, or at least marketed as same?)

The Three Investigators are awesome. (I made a point to expand my collection a year or two back so that I think I've pretty much got them all now.)

The Alex Ryder books were quite good, and Skullduggery Pleasent, which is a bout a freaking Lich, basically, fer cryin' out loud, had me hooked on that point alone.

Douglas Hill's old stuff (especially the ColSec Trilogy and the Last Legionary stuff) may qualify, it was certainly delightfully violent enough (that was during the stage my Mum read to me1); limbs snapping, neck breaking, all the gory details (y'know for kids!)



1Of course, that was because I liked Mum reading to me (rather than any deficiency in my very high literacy standards!); she was really good at it, and I got her to read all sorts of stuff, like the True Game series; heck, I only stopped because she put her foot down (as it was quite likely that stuff like the Anne McCaffery dragon series would have been next on the list!) My Dad no so much, but he did read Hitchiker's Guide to the Galaxy to me. (I still laugh at the little green pieces of paper joke.)

Lord Seth
2012-06-19, 11:58 PM
And our dad has complete collections of Asterix, Tintin, and Spirou.Is Tintin young adult? Certainly, a number of young adults and kids read them, but I thought they were actually made for adults when they were originally published.

The only real "young adult" series I can say I've read anytime recently is the Vampire Academy series (and then its spin-off series Bloodlines). Pretty good stuff overall, though I wasn't that fond of the most recent book in it, which came out last week.

DomaDoma
2012-06-20, 06:05 AM
I inhale YA like popcorn, and find it has about the same level of substance as compared to traditional fare. I confess I've never read the ones that are all TASTE THE GRIT OF REAL LIFE, so different tropes would at least apply there, but the ones I've read all have paper-thin worldbuilding, usually with a big side of forced romance, and are proud of it. By far the best worldbuilding is in Harry Potter, which isn't too good itself and stumbled into the YA genre by chance.

Lateral
2012-06-20, 10:53 AM
I used to, when I was about eight or nine. Moved on. Bores me now, for the most part.

Sanguine
2012-06-20, 11:15 AM
I read some, it's not a section of the library I regularly stroll through looking for books, but there is some YA fiction that I absolutely adore.

The Alcatraz series by Brandon Sanderson is great. Also all of Terry Pratchett's YA fiction is magnificent.

I can't think of any other stand outs at the moment.

Serpentine
2012-06-20, 02:06 PM
Some of my favourite books and authors are Young Adult Fiction. Some of my favourites/stuff I'd recommend to just about anybody are:

Animorphs
Tamora Pierce
Ella Enchanted
Everything by John Marsden, especially the Tomorrow... series (starting with Tomorrow When The War Began)
Paul Jennings' short stories
Sirena
Earthfasts
Deltora Quest
Robert C. O'brien (his most famous work would be Mrs Frisby and the Rats of NIMH)
Stephen King's Through the Eyes of the Dragon and The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon
Neil Gaiman (Stardust is definitely YA, not sure about the rest of his stuff)
David Eddings (I particularly like The Redemption of Althalus)


Hmmm... Unfortunately I'm a planet away from my book collection, so can't see what else I've got. But here's a list of good Young Adultish literature with strong female protaganists (http://www.giantitp.com/forums/showthread.php?p=12120708), and I found an older post by me on the same subject:



I like Ella Enchanted too (although not the catastrophe of a movie based on it :smallyuk:). I said I'd tell you what else I have to recommend...
The Ordinary Princess by M. M. Kaye - a nice proper fairytale.
The Princess Bride by William Goldman - I'm sure this one needs no ennumeration.
The Eyes of the Dragon by Stephen King - Many others don't like it, but I do a lot. He, from what I understand, wrote it for his daughter who was too young to read his other books.
Various by Anne McCaffery, particularly The Ship Who Sang and (more controvercially) the Dragonriders of Pern series - the former is one of my favourite books.
The Unicorn Sonata by Peter S. Beagle
The Dragon Chronicles (of which I've only read Dragon's Milk) by Susan Fletcher.
The Dragon and the George by Gordon R. Dickson - another one of my favourite books. If you know the movie The Flight of Dragons (which I haven't seen), it's partially based on this one (and partially on something else). Has a sequel, but I haven't read it.
How to Train Your Dragon, by Hiccup Horrendous Haddock III (translated by Cressida Cowell)
She's Fantastical, "the first anthology of Australian women's speculative fiction, magical realism and fantasy", edited by Lucy Sussex and Judith Raphael Buckrich.
The Blue Dress, a collection of short stories based on a painting, compiled by Libby Hathorn - a mixture of stories, some fantasy some dark, pretty much all very good. Studied it in high school.
The Chrysalids, Day of the Triffids and (if you don't mind being creeped out) The Midwich Cuckoos by John Wyndham.
Earthfasts by William Mayne - an odd fantasy set in country England, and on the backdrop of a variety of English myths and legends. Was also made into a TV series I haven't seen for a long time.
The Seer and the Sword by Victoria Hanley - a very solid fantasy tale which I've read several times.
Sirena by Donna Jo Napoli - Greek myth from the point of view of a mermaid.
Everything by Robert C. O'Brien. I haven't heard him get much attention, but he really does deserve a lot. Mrs Frisby and the Rats of NIMH, The Silver Crown and Z for Zachariah are the ones I've read, and they're all very good.

I'll reiterate John Marsden, Paul Jennings and Tamora Pierce, and urge you to try to track down The Ordinary Princess, The Ship Who Sang, Sirena, Earthfasts and The Seer and the Sword as books that I either think you'd particularly like or that I think should get more attention (or both).
Also, if you like Terry Pratchett I recommend trying Jasper Fforde and Douglass Adams.

Traab
2012-06-20, 02:09 PM
I like the wrinkle in time series, all those books are awesome, and last time I checked they were young adult.

Mauve Shirt
2012-06-20, 05:25 PM
Everything by Margaret Peterson Haddix I've found to be quite rereadable as an adult. Also some of the literature we read at school, like The Giver, and some Ray Bradbury short stories, I've still appreciated.

Whiffet
2012-06-20, 07:18 PM
Animorphs

*squee* I was just thinking today, "Huh, I remember Animorphs. Those were seriously awesome. I wonder if I still own any of the books?" Back in the day I barely read anything else. I should track them down and see if they hold up. (Probably yes. So definitely should track down.)

If someone thinks there's no good YA, that's a perfect example of the good stuff right there.

Eldonauran
2012-06-20, 07:28 PM
Eh, I probably read some books that fit into the YA Fiction category. I'm a bit hesitant to pick up any new books without reading a review first. Ever since 'supernatural orgy/romance' squeezed its way into my sword and sorcery 'Fantasy' category, I've had a very hard time actually finding books that I like to read. Too much garbage to sort through. :smallmad:

Big fan of Animorphs. I read most, if not all of them at one time.

I don't read much of it anymore. But still find a good one now and then. I did read the Twilight series, and somewhat enjoyed it (BURN THE SECOND BOOK! :smallfurious::smallfurious: RAGE RAGE).

Aotrs Commander
2012-06-20, 07:36 PM
Some of my favourite books and authors are Young Adult Fiction. Some of my favourites/stuff I'd recommend to just about anybody are:

David Eddings (I particularly like The Redemption of Althalus)

Eddings is YA fiction? Really? Huh. I don't recall it being when I bought 'em, but it's been a long while since I did, so... I mean, you would know, being in the profession and all.


Various by Anne McCaffery, particularly The Ship Who Sang and (more controvercially) the Dragonriders of Pern series - the former is one of my favourite books.


Why is liking the Dragonriders controversial? I ask since my Mum is a big fan, and I've read all but the most recent (Todd McCaffery's stuff) myself (and Mum has got them too). I can't think of anything that'd strike as particularly unusual or objectional (any more than her other work, or say, Mercedes Lackey or something). Honestly, I'd say some of the her other stuff is a bit more controversial (like whichever series it with the dinosaur planet where eating meat is seen as some kind of barbarous sin, for example.) Is it the sci-fi elements or something?

Serpentine
2012-06-20, 07:45 PM
Eddings is YA fiction? Really? Huh. I don't recall it being when I bought 'em, but it's been a long while since I did, so... I mean, you would know, being in the profession and all.I think a lot of his stuff is fairly borderlinish, but I'd pretty definitely put The Belgariad under Young Adult.
Why is liking the Dragonriders controversial? I ask since my Mum is a big fan, and I've read all but the most recent (Todd McCaffery's stuff) myself (and Mum has got them too). I can't think of anything that'd strike as particularly unusual or objectional (any more than her other work, or say, Mercedes Lackey or something). Honestly, I'd say some of the her other stuff is a bit more controversial (like whichever series it with the dinosaur planet where eating meat is seen as some kind of barbarous sin, for example.) Is it the sci-fi elements or something?Mostly just a taste thing - I've seen several people say they despised it - and also she's been criticised from a feminist viewpoint, although I've never really figured out why (but then again, I haven't really read them since I started consciously thinking about feminism).
It might've been because I started with the second book instead of the first, but I found Dinosaur Planet dead boring.

turkishproverb
2012-06-20, 08:18 PM
The Pern books also got worse when her son got involved in them.


I like some YA fiction, though by and in large I don't notice the label until after I read it.

Serpentine
2012-06-20, 08:23 PM
I like some YA fiction, though by and in large I don't notice the label until after I read it.I think that's probably the sign of a good one.

Aotrs Commander
2012-06-20, 08:24 PM
I think a lot of his stuff is fairly borderlinish, but I'd pretty definitely put The Belgariad under Young Adult.

Fair enough.


Mostly just a taste thing - I've seen several people say they despised it - and also she's been criticised from a feminist viewpoint, although I've never really figured out why (but then again, I haven't really read them since I started consciously thinking about feminism).

Eeh, I suppose one could make an arguement for that, in that females are restricted to the queens only... But equally, one could make the point that's a restriction largely due to dragon biology itself (and that the natural world is not always very fair with gender). But I'd have thought it was stretching a bit, considering the role of females in a lot of... "traditional" (sic) fantasy novels tends to be somewhat worse...


It might've been because I started with the second book instead of the first, but I found Dinosaur Planet dead boring.

I think I may have managed to wade through the first book, but it was so dreadfully boring, and I'm even a big dinosaur fan...

Mind you, every author drops a few stinkers now and then; even Pratchett and Eddings haven't produced all gold...

Serpentine
2012-06-20, 09:00 PM
Eeh, I suppose one could make an arguement for that, in that females are restricted to the queens only... But equally, one could make the point that's a restriction largely due to dragon biology itself (and that the natural world is not always very fair with gender). But I'd have thought it was stretching a bit, considering the role of females in a lot of... "traditional" (sic) fantasy novels tends to be somewhat worse...Some of the other dragons are female (I forget which colours), but they don't produce fertile eggs. Also that's actually explained in Dragonsdawn:The dragons are genetically engineered versions of the... little ones, I forget what they're called. Flamelizards or something? The chief geneticist was an extremely sexist woman who believed that women are the "weaker sex" or something like that. Thus (iirc, it's been years), all the females are on the smaller and weaker side except the queens who can't flame.
edit: Ah, I think TVTropes has it: the smallest, weakest dragons are the Greens, and they're infertile because of the firestone. So, I guess, the Golds have to not use it because they have to breed. They have to be (from the thing in Dragonsdawn) either breeders or fighters, not both. Except, you know, they get around it...

Das Platyvark
2012-06-20, 09:03 PM
Fritz Leiber was a lot of fun, back in the day. Of course, he still isI just haven't gone back in a while.
I remember enjoying Airborn (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airborn), by Kenneth Oppel. I'm pretty sure that's when I realized that 'steampunk' is a thing, even though it only marginally fits the genre.

Tavar
2012-06-20, 09:35 PM
If I remember correctly, Dragonriders is controversial because of the slightly odd sexual themes present in the books. Whole complicated issue that would go off topic to really get into it, though.


Regarding Young Adult stuff, The Theif, by Megan Whalen Turner is enjoyable, and the first two sequels are good as well. Highly recommend them. There is another book to the series, but I've never read it, so can't give an opinion.

Abarat by Clive Barker is amazing, but you need to get a copy that have the illistrations: they are what really makes the book. It's a series as well, and I recommend it.

Aotrs Commander
2012-06-21, 04:03 AM
Some of the other dragons are female (I forget which colours), but they don't produce fertile eggs. Also that's actually explained in Dragonsdawn:The dragons are genetically engineered versions of the... little ones, I forget what they're called. Flamelizards or something? The chief geneticist was an extremely sexist woman who believed that women are the "weaker sex" or something like that. Thus (iirc, it's been years), all the females are on the smaller and weaker side except the queens who can't flame.
edit: Ah, I think TVTropes has it: the smallest, weakest dragons are the Greens, and they're infertile because of the firestone. So, I guess, the Golds have to not use it because they have to breed. They have to be (from the thing in Dragonsdawn) either breeders or fighters, not both. Except, you know, they get around it...

Oh yeah, I forgot that, it's been a few years since I read it myself.


If I remember correctly, Dragonriders is controversial because of the slightly odd sexual themes present in the books. Whole complicated issue that would go off topic to really get into it, though.

Now, you see, I didn't think they were really any more odd than in, say Mercedes Lackey or McCaffery's other books.

Mind you, I suppose that given the flak Bioware gets, for attempting to be inclusive to all orientations (whether or not you think they succeed would be down to personal opinion), maybe it's not that surprising.

Eh, I'll just chalk that up to "people is strange sometimes", then.

Traab
2012-06-21, 08:17 AM
I love mercedes lackey, valdemar rules all. There are most definitely certain themes in her books, to me its like she is desperate to showcase her heroes as being different from the most common styles, either homosexual such as vanyel, or the strong women who dont need no stinking men like tarma and kethry (and yes I know how kethry winds up) Really almost all of her main characters tend to be off standard. You dont see any conan types, or secret royalty pretending to be a farm boy. I think the closest we get to a classic hero type is skandranon, although there are plenty of leanings towards "Chosen One" with Karal.

*EDIT* As far as dragonriders. I never got into that set of books for some reason. I dont know why, but then, I am a massive fantasy reader who doesnt like terry brooks either. I have a few of his series that I read once then ignored forever afterwards. Magic kingdom for sale was a fun set, and the Shanarra series wasnt too bad, they just never really clicked.

More young adult books, The cleric quintet by RA salvatore, the Drizzt series, Raymond Feists Midkemia books, though I stopped really enjoying them after shards of a broken crown. *EDIT EDIT* Brian Jacques Redwall books. I read a lot of them, but got burnt out after so many that kept feeling like the same story repeated forever.

Yora
2012-06-21, 09:38 AM
Is Tintin young adult? Certainly, a number of young adults and kids read them, but I thought they were actually made for adults when they were originally published.
No, and neither is Spirou, which is my point. We had so much grown-ups stuff at home that we basically skipped the young-adult stuff completely. Sure, it's a bit snobbish to say, but when you already have more "advanced" things to read and are used to it, why go and search for things of a "lower level".
(I completely forgott about all the french graphic novels they had in the library in the childrens section. Lot's of Tif and Tondu, Clifton, and Gil Jourdan. No clue when we started, but we did stop when we moved to another city when I was 10 and my brother 8.)

Dienekes
2012-06-21, 09:49 AM
I have nothing against it, and actually a few of my favorite books are young adult. Hell, most of the books that got me into reading where young adult.

However, very recently I went into my local bookstore strolled over to that section, and I kid you not, 3 of the 4 shelves for young adult were proudly displaying gothic romance.

Well, I despise reading about romance, and find vampires so incredibly dull as a monster that I quickly left that section and don't have any desire to go back for the next couple of years. Once this phase of writing goes to die in a ditch somewhere I'll probably return.

Or I could go find another bookstore, I suppose.

Tavar
2012-06-21, 12:29 PM
Now, you see, I didn't think they were really any more odd than in, say Mercedes Lackey or McCaffery's other books.

Mind you, I suppose that given the flak Bioware gets, for attempting to be inclusive to all orientations (whether or not you think they succeed would be down to personal opinion), maybe it's not that surprising.

Eh, I'll just chalk that up to "people is strange sometimes", then.

Less orientation thing and more the non-consensual sex stuff.

Serpentine
2012-06-21, 01:48 PM
Yeah, according to TVTropes it's more the whole "falling for your rapist" thing. Also apparently she had some... interesting opinions on what causes homosexuality, although I don't recall it coming up too much in the books.
Sure, it's a bit snobbish to say, but when you already have more "advanced" things to read and are used to it, why go and search for things of a "lower level".Because there's great stories in there. There's nothing "lower" about them, they're just somewhat easier to consume and are more likely to have characters to whom young people can relate - which does not mean that older people cannot relate to them. By saying "I don't read Young Adult Fiction", all you're doing is depriving yourself of some really great books for no good reason.

Joran
2012-06-23, 11:47 PM
Neil Gaiman (Stardust is definitely YA, not sure about the rest of his stuff)

Neil Gaiman has a couple more YA works: Coraline and the Graveyard Book. The Graveyard book also won the Newberry Medal.

Showing what a ghetto Young Adult fiction is, even for an established author like Neil Gaiman, the publisher is now selling the paperback version of the Graveyard Book not even mentioning the Newberry Medal win, with a black cover to show it's a serious work ;)

P.S. I like Y.A. fiction, mostly for the science fiction/fantasy versions. I recently finished the Hunger Games trilogy and both Breadcrumbs and Bigger than a Breadbox.

Knaight
2012-06-23, 11:54 PM
I read some YA fiction - it's not a genre (for lack of a better term) I specifically seek out, but there are some very good books in it. I quite like Phillip Pullman's work, and would argue that it is worth reading a John Green novel at some point, though there's little point in reading several of them due to excessive similarities. Then there are the authors that write at the intersection of Fantasy and YA, such as Tamora Pierce, Chris Wooding, and J.K. Rowling. Some of them are very good.

Nomrom
2012-06-24, 10:59 PM
I don't read very much of it anymore, except for some books from when I was younger than I still reread and enjoy. However, my sister is actually a young adult librarian, and she is more than willing to disabuse anyone of the idea that all young adult literature is just "teenage girl books" like the Twilight series. If I have time I'll get her to make me a list of some of her favorites to post here.

Whiffet
2012-06-25, 11:47 AM
Neil Gaiman has a couple more YA works: Coraline and the Graveyard Book. The Graveyard book also won the Newberry Medal.

Thanks for that. I found a cheap copy of The Graveyard Book at a garage sale and remembered this post, so I bought it.

You know, because apparently being by Neil Gaiman and getting the Newbery isn't enough reason to assume it's good.

Joran
2012-06-25, 04:26 PM
Thanks for that. I found a cheap copy of The Graveyard Book at a garage sale and remembered this post, so I bought it.

You know, because apparently being by Neil Gaiman and getting the Newbery isn't enough reason to assume it's good.

Woohoo, glad to be of help. Hope you enjoy it!

Nekura
2012-06-25, 08:10 PM
I have read some of them but can't see much of a difference. Like with the Dragonrider books I read them when I was young but the bookstores I went to didn't set them aside as YA or have them labeled as such. I only read her Pern books are they all considered YA? What about her other books what are they labeled as? If I were to guess the harper hall books staring a young girl menolly are YA considering their size. Terry Praechett's discworld books that were labeled YA were also smaller then the others. But then size can't be counted on some of the Harry Potter books were huge. Even when comparing books of the same author I can't see why one was labeled YA and the others not. Wikipedia isn't much help as it doesn't list all the books mentioned in this thread as YA. It lists the target audience as 12-18 or 10-25 which just muddies the waters of what counts as YA. It says most are about the challenges of youth is it enough to have a main character within that age gap to be considered young adult? If so that would be a huge amount of books 10-25 is a huge age gap. Ya books need a better definition to explain what they are other then just some marketing ploy.

Serpentine
2012-06-26, 11:43 AM
Young Adult books are books written for a teenage audience. This can mean (usually a combination of one or more of) a protagonist of about that age, themes relevant or appealing to teenagers, a writing level appropriate for their expected reading level, and with "maturity levels" (i.e. sex, violence, etc.) deemed appropriate for people of that age.
None of this means that people outside the "young adult" age range can't read it, just that it is intended, or at least appropriate for people of that age. It's all very subjective and extremely blurry around the edges - I mean, at the library where I worked, some Harry Potter books were in Junior, some were in Young Adult, some were in Adult, and others were in more than one section. For the most part it's just intended as a guide, although many authors make a living - and even a point - of writing Young Adult fiction (lookin' at you, John Marsden and Tamora Pierce). But it's not a "marketing ploy" (:confused:), it's just a classification - like (from my library) Easy, Junior and 8-12. It's so a teenager can walk into a library and go "here's a section of books that will be fine for me to read, and also more likely about things and people I'm interested in".
It's like film classifications: some movies have a PG rating. That means they probably shouldn't be watched (or aren't likely to be enjoyed or comprehended) by very small children, and it's relatively likely it was made with people who are older than children but not yet fully adult in mind, but people much older than the target audience can still watch and enjoy it, and certainly the line between G and PG, and PG and M* are far from well-defined.

*Using the Australian film classification system, there. Although, if I were to make the analogy more accurate, Young Adult could go right up to R (Animorphs, for one), but books get much more leeway in what they can depict.

Geostationary
2012-06-26, 01:38 PM
Some authors that tend towards YA that I enjoy include Garth Nix (Abhorsen/Old Kingdom Trilogy), Scott Westerfeld (Uglies, Leviathan, Midnighters), and Holly Black (Tithe/Valiant/Ironside, other series).

YA is a strange classification, especially when you can find the books in three+ different sections of the store.

Knaight
2012-06-26, 03:19 PM
...she is more than willing to disabuse anyone of the idea that all young adult literature is just "teenage girl books" like the Twilight series. If I have time I'll get her to make me a list of some of her favorites to post here.

I'd note that there are some very good "teenage girl books". Twilight isn't among them, no, but Tamora Pierce's work very much is, and with the possible exception of the Lioness Quartet is universally good.

hamishspence
2012-06-26, 03:45 PM
I like the Robin Jarvis books. For example, the Deptford Mice/Deptford Histories books are a little like Redwall- but grimmer. "The absinthe to Redwall's home-made lemonade" I once saw them described as.

The Whitby trilogy and the Wyrd Museum trilogy tend to have human protagonists and be set in the modern era- yet still have supernatural beasties.

Deathscent is decidedly odder- but interesting.

Rallicus
2012-06-29, 04:43 PM
I suppose I do, but then again I read pretty much whatever I can get my hands on.

Currently I'm reading some generic spy thriller action book, which is listed as a YA but contains graphic scenes describing various sexual acts in extreme detail. Also it's written horribly and has the author promoting his right-wing beliefs to such an extent that it's annoying, because it's not subtle at all. He'd probably retort with something like, "But it's just this character thinking this!" if ever confronted with it, but it's pretty obvious he's speaking through his character.

It's a pretty awful book.

turkishproverb
2012-06-29, 05:51 PM
Well, hoplefully you can find a better book next time. :smallsmile:

JetThomasBoat
2012-07-04, 01:48 AM
I'm definitely liking this thread so far. Book talk is so neat. And not something I'm used to being a part of. So let me throw in my two cents.

I hadn't read anything YA in a really long time. For me, it was Stuart Little, TA Baron's Merlin stuff, a lot of Star Wars, then Lord of the Rings, then D&D novels. I'm only recently getting out of reading next to nothing but D&D novels. Because of this friend of mine that's trying to get her YA novel published and swears by the genre. I should probably ask her some opinions on this.

For me, YA novels I especially enjoy are usually individual books and not series. The ones that come most to mind are Stardust and The Graveyard Book (I'm on a huge Neil Gaiman kick at the moment, though). I swear I had more in mind when I started this post, but I've lost them now. Lately, I've been reading a lot of children's books, and it reminds me of something that I think some of you mentioned.

At my local library, there are a few series that are in both the children's floor and the YA section. Ones I remember are the Redwall books (which is convenient, since I'm reading those now for the first time and they are often checked out when I go in to get a new one) those books called...The Warriors or whatever? The ones with like a cat on the cover? (I'm sorry if I'm sounding dumb here, I just don't remember looking much into them) and a series I'm working on right now called The Last Apprentice, which is about someone that deals with witches and boggarts and stuff. Really kind of a neat series. All of these series have some copies in the children's section and some in the YA section. So yeah, sometimes it's hard to tell what is what.

Oh, and I'm reading the Percy Jackson series and I'm quite enjoying that. Also, I don't know if the book is YA, but the friend I mentioned before who's writing a YA book talked me into reading The Magicians by Lev Grossman. It's about teenagers, but it's very dark. Like I'm not in the very best place in my life and I barely managed to get through it, it affected me so much. But I mention it now because I remember her putting a link to an article written by Lev Grossman on her blog. In said article by Grossman, he talks about why he likes reading YA as a man in...I dunno, like his late thirties or something? So yeah, there are plenty of forum people here, as well as a Young Adult librarian, and an author, who all are quite supportive of the genre and don't think it's just for teenage girls.

Ravens_cry
2012-07-04, 02:11 AM
I really bypassed most of it, going straight to more adult stuff.
Still, books intended for younger readers sometimes have a certain bare-bones clarity that can be appealing, and when at the library lavishly illustrated versions of fairy tales and picture books can also be a joy.

Gnoman
2012-07-04, 08:42 PM
I rarely read YA fiction, unless I find something unusual at work and want to see how they handle a subject.

dps
2012-07-05, 07:56 PM
YA fiction sometimes gets a bad rap due to preconceived stereotypes that come from works like Twilight. However, despite this YA still sells, but there is yet another stereotype that a friend of mine holds; that it is the almost exclusive realm of teenage girls.

I'm a guy, and used to read a lot of YA fiction when I was in the young adult age group. I never was aware of there being a sterotype that it was largely the realm of teenage girls, but then the time I was in that age group was well befor Twilight--basically, the time I was reading YA titles was during the 1970's.