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DaenerysStorm
2012-07-02, 09:59 AM
I have a letter which I believe is in TENGWAR ANNATAR (This is one of JRR TOLKIENíS made up languages) that I need translated/decoded. I am bemused as to where to find a translator for this made up language. Any suggestions would be helpful, thank you!

pendell
2012-07-02, 10:28 AM
Actually, it appears that Tengwar Annatar is a font, not a language.

Truetype fonts available here (http://home.student.uu.se/jowi4905/fonts/annatar.html).

If your document is online, I recommend you 1) Import the font into Microsoft word or similar 2) Import your document and ensue that Microsoft understands that the font is tengwar annatar 3) Change the font to 'Times New Roman' or something like.

This will give it to you in standard english font. If the language is English, you're good to go. If it's still in Elvish or one of the other languages, you'll need an English to Elvish (https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&client=firefox-a&hs=owO&rls=org.mozilla%3Aen-US%3Aofficial&channel=np&q=tolkien+elvish+translator&oq=tolkien+elv&gs_l=serp.3.0.0l10.179388.183056.0.184335.17.12.3. 2.2.0.158.843.11j1.12.0...0.0.ZQAatBcL9mg) dictionary.

If the document is actual paper .. then I don't see any choice but to transcribe the document. Upload the font and switch to it. Then hit a key on the keyboard until you find one that matches the letter. Then on to the next letter. In this way you should be able to EVENTUALLY transcribe the letter. It's painful and time-consuming but I have to do the same for Greek Papyri at ancientlives.org .


Regrettably, there does not appear to be an automatic language translator utility.

Barring this, you'll have to find someone who is competent at translating his particular language and is willing to do it at a price you can afford. There's are a couple of projects out there to translate the Bible into Elvish. Regrettably, I cannot help you find that, but google may. Possibly one of the people on such a project would be a hobbyist willing to take it on.

Respectfully,

Brian P.

WalkingTarget
2012-07-02, 08:52 PM
A further note: Tengwar (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tengwar) is the term for the alphabetical system that Tolkien invented to transcribe his invented languages (in-setting, the alphabet was invented by FŽanor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F%C3%ABanor)).

Like many writing systems, it is best suited to the language that it was designed to transcribe (in this case, there are two primary Elvish languages, Sindarin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sindarin) and Quenya (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quenya) - although there are different "modes" of use even within those languages). As such, there are sounds in, say, English that do not map directly to the individual letters of Tengwar and sounds that use a single letter there that take a combination of letters in English orthography (for example, there are different, single letters to represent the "th" in "there" or the "th" in "thin" in Sindarin). Various people (and groups) have their preferred "correct" ways to transcribe English using the Tengwar, but it's not a one-to-one mapping.

Edit - Also, while there are plenty of websites around that cover a lot of these things, a good starting place would be Appendix E from the Lord of the Rings if you have a copy sitting around somewhere - that should at least give you a starting place for how to sound out what you have.

Another edit:

If your document is online, I recommend you 1) Import the font into Microsoft word or similar 2) Import your document and ensue that Microsoft understands that the font is tengwar annatar 3) Change the font to 'Times New Roman' or something like.

This will give it to you in standard english font. If the language is English, you're good to go.

Something I've found out after looking into the way a lot of these fonts work: a lot of them, including Tengwar Annatar don't make an attempt to map the Elvish characters to the equivalent (or approximate) sounds of the Latin alphabet. Mostly, they map the Tengwar table as it appears in the Appendix to the left side of a qwerty keyboard (after rotating and flipping it).

So, the leftmost column of the table runs across the number keys (the 1 key maps to the "t" sound, q maps to "p", a maps to "k", and so on). So, having something that's phonetically correct usage of the Tengwar script couldn't just be swapped to a Latin font and make sense.