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thubby
2012-09-01, 01:44 AM
going to be spending a lot of time on the train when school starts up again, so i need some good reading.

I've liked E.E. Knight, Brent Weeks, "The warded man", and "name of the wind" (plus their sequels)

I realize these are overwhelmingly fantasy, but im open to any genre.
Before anyone suggests it, yes im aware of the sword of a ice and fire, and no i dont like it.

Liffguard
2012-09-01, 05:53 AM
Daniel Abraham. He's written my favourite completed fantasy series in The Long Price Quartet and also an extremely good ongoing scifi series, The Expanse, with Ty Frank under the pen-name SA Corey. I heartily recommend them both.

Manga Shoggoth
2012-09-01, 06:38 AM
Well...

Almost any of the Terry Pratchett Diskworld books (each fairly self-contained, but with a common world). Each book tends to look at a particular style or genre so you may not like all of them.

The Belgariad and Elenium (a series of 5 and 3 books respectively) by David Eddings. His other stuff is less good and only worth getting if you really enjoy these two.

Bridge of Birds and Story of the Stone by Barry Hughart.

Should keep you going for a while.

EDIT: Also the Falco novels by Lindsay Davis - Private Detective stories in Vespasian Rome.

Weezer
2012-09-01, 07:03 AM
Could you say what you don't loke about A Song of Ice and Fire, not so I can try to prove your opinion wrong, but so I can get anbetter feel for what you like and why you like it.

Try Bakker's Prince of Nothing series. It's chock full of (legitimate) philosophy, and is based around a man who uses an almost supernatural knowledge of psycology and cause/effect to manipulate those around him during a holy war. It's full of politics, warfare, interesting characters, and a great magic system. Though it is very long and a bit slow to start, as well as very dark, so if that isn't your thing then you may want to avoid it.

Neftren
2012-09-01, 10:36 AM
going to be spending a lot of time on the train when school starts up again, so i need some good reading.

I've liked E.E. Knight, Brent Weeks, "The warded man", and "name of the wind" (plus their sequels)

I realize these are overwhelmingly fantasy, but im open to any genre.
Before anyone suggests it, yes im aware of the sword of a ice and fire, and no i dont like it.

Hah, I have the opposite situation, where school limits my reading opportunities. :smallbiggrin:

Check my summer reading thread (http://www.giantitp.com/forums/showthread.php?t=244593) for a list.

From that selection though, I especially loved Partials, by Dan Wells.

thubby
2012-09-01, 10:49 AM
Could you say what you don't loke about A Song of Ice and Fire, not so I can try to prove your opinion wrong, but so I can get anbetter feel for what you like and why you like it.


i got sick to death of the character switching. i don't mind changing perspective, but the author has a habit of building up to something, be it a battle or something else, then just switching off to something completely unrelated for 2 chapters. when we come back to it, the conflict has resolved itself off screen.:smallannoyed:

that is not suspense building.

ForzaFiori
2012-09-01, 11:02 AM
My personal favorite series are the Ring of Fire novels by Eric Flint (and others, but it's Flint's creation), and the Drenai Saga by David Gemmell. World War Z is also an amazing book if your into the zombie apocalypse.

pffh
2012-09-01, 11:06 AM
If you like star wars I've been enjoying the tales from books which are three collections of short stories (Tales from the Mos Eisley Cantina, Tales from Jabba's Palace, Tales of the Bounty Hunters) about various background characters we see in the movies.

CarpeGuitarrem
2012-09-01, 12:57 PM
Check out Jim Butcher's Dresden Files--urban fantasy that I find to be quickly-paced and set in a fantastic world.

Talanic
2012-09-01, 01:07 PM
Brandon Sanderson is really, really good in my experience. I particularly enjoyed the Mistborn saga, and the Stormlight Archive (starting with Way of Kings) looks to have immense promise but is only at the first book so far.

Hiro Protagonest
2012-09-01, 06:56 PM
Terry Pratchett's Discworld series. I listened to the first CD of Wintersmith on audio recently, very good writing.

WarLegalomon
2012-09-01, 09:26 PM
I have always enjoyed Terry Goodkind's "Sword of Truth" series. I am presently reading Robert Jordan's "Wheel of Time" series and I like it so far.

Someone mentioned Star Wars. My fave era of books is just after "Return of the Jedi" up until the "New Jedi Order" series begins. The X-Wing novels are my most personal faves.

Some older faves of mine include the Valdemar series by Mercedes Lackey, and the Dragonriders by Anne McCaffrey. Mind-speaking horses and dragons respectively.

:)

Best of luck on the new school term!

Neftren
2012-09-02, 10:03 AM
Brandon Sanderson is really, really good in my experience. I particularly enjoyed the Mistborn saga, and the Stormlight Archive (starting with Way of Kings) looks to have immense promise but is only at the first book so far.

I found the Way of Kings rather dry actually, but the Mistborn series is fantastic. Also, Warbreaker is great!

Grytorm
2012-09-02, 11:51 AM
Try the unabridged Les Miserables. Stupidly long. The first fifty pages are introduce a guy who will not show up again after page one hundred. I have only read a fraction of it. But Victor Hugo's work is actually very engrossing.

comicshorse
2012-09-02, 12:15 PM
The First Law trilogy by Joe Abercrombie are excellent dark, complex fantasy with truely memorable characters

Talanic
2012-09-02, 12:49 PM
I found the Way of Kings rather dry actually, but the Mistborn series is fantastic. Also, Warbreaker is great!

Agreement about Warbreaker (particularly the conclusion), but I'm surprised about Way of Kings. It's probably one of my favorite books at this point.

Neftren
2012-09-02, 01:31 PM
Agreement about Warbreaker (particularly the conclusion), but I'm surprised about Way of Kings. It's probably one of my favorite books at this point.

I just found the constant character swapping rather jarring. I really only ended up caring about Kal. You can read my review if you want to know more (link to my reading list in my signature).

Talanic
2012-09-02, 01:45 PM
I can sympathize - I mostly cared only about Kaladin until the very end. The realizations of how the threads tie together was very interesting, albeit not fully explored. Very much a teaser for the rest of the series.

Man on Fire
2012-09-02, 01:55 PM
Glen Cook's Chronolicles of the Black Company - great dark fantasy series twisting a lot of classic fantasy elements, focusing strongly on ar and soldier's life, featuring most badass band of mecenaries I ever seen.

Roger Zelazny's The Chronolicles Of Amber, first five books collecting the tale of Corwin, pince of titular Amber, first world that all others are shadows of, through which he can travel, next five are about Merlin, one of many princes of Chaos, opposite force to Amber. Same author's Jack Of Shadows is very good too.

Dhavaer
2012-09-02, 03:58 PM
I can sympathize - I mostly cared only about Kaladin until the very end. The realizations of how the threads tie together was very interesting, albeit not fully explored. Very much a teaser for the rest of the series.

Really? I found Kaladin annoying until the end. As for recommendations, try Sasha or Crossover by Joel Shepherd. The first is mostly non-magical fantasy, the second is sci-fi/post-cyberpunk.

Baerdog7
2012-09-02, 04:11 PM
If you're interested in reading about an epic journey undertaken by a small band of friends that is not fantasy, I might suggest Long Way Round by Ewan McGregor (yes, that one) and Charlie Boorman. The two authors write alternating chapters as they tell the true story of their quest to travel from London to New York City by motorcycle...the long way around.

Weimann
2012-09-02, 04:31 PM
Most things by Pratchett. Each book is essentially self-contained, even if there's a certain continuity throughout them. They contain a surprising amount of epically awesome characters for the humorous tone. I'd recommend any book that's not among his very first (when he hadn't yet found his distinctive style) or his most recent (when he, in my opinion, has started to run a bit on autopilot). For a self-contained series, check out the Tiffany Aching line.

The Dresden Files by Jim Butcher. Urban fantasy noir following Harry Dresden on his misadventures trying to keep Chicago safe from the threats of the Nevernever. Much like Pratchett, the humour and shining moments of epic heroism carries the series, but here they clash very colourfully against the gritty tone of the setting with spectacular results. The series is currently 14 books long, but I'd still advice you to start from the beginning, even if the first two books actually aren't all that.

Joe Abercrombie's The First Law series clashes significantly with the above. His writing is dark, pessimistic and cynical, but his characters are fleshed out and lively and his books are engaging and hits close to home. There's an unrelenting logic to his works which makes one accept them despite their tragedy.

I only recently found Brandon Sanderson and I've read his stand-alone novels Elantris and Warbreaker. Strong, fast-paced traditional fantasy with royalty who actually does politics in unique worlds built with almost science fiction-like attention to detail and logical conclusions. There is character-jumping, but very little of consequence happens off-screen. Start with Warbreaker.

Aran nu tasar
2012-09-02, 04:53 PM
I second (third? fourth?) Sir Professor Terry Pratchett. The guy is amazing. Upon being knighted, he promptly collected iron and beat it into bars himself, and then had a local blacksmith forge him a sword. I also agree with Les Miserables, despite being very long (1400 pages or so, I believe), dense, and requiring a lot of patience. And the Dresden files, although I haven't been keeping up with those.

For other stuff, I have been reading Neil Gaiman recently, and his books and graphic novels are very interesting. They can, however, be rather dark, so be warned. American Gods, Sandman, and Good Omens (co-written with Terry Pratchett) are probably the best of them. And Good Omens and American Gods are being made into TV shows. Also Steven Brust. From the Vlad Taltos books to his brilliant Dumas parodies. Not always as profound or philosophical as the others, but very entertaining. Another option, of course, is to brush up on Tolkien before the Hobbit comes out. LoTR will eat up a chunk of time, and if you are patient the Silmarillion is wonderful.

thubby
2012-09-02, 04:59 PM
where does one start with discworld?

Sanguine
2012-09-02, 05:04 PM
I would say either Mort or Guards! Guards!. These aren't my favorites, but they are both good books; and much better starting points than my favorites.

pffh
2012-09-02, 05:17 PM
I second (third? fourth?) Sir Professor Terry Pratchett. The guy is amazing. Upon being knighted, he promptly collected iron and beat it into bars himself, and then had a local blacksmith forge him a sword.

Not only that he also used iron from a meteor that landed in his garden so he has a real space sword.

Man on Fire
2012-09-02, 05:37 PM
where does one start with discworld?

Depending who you want to read about. It's goes sorta like this (http://www.lspace.org/books/reading-order-guides/the-discworld-reading-order-guide-20.jpg).

Also, some other recommendations - Patricia A. McKillip's "Riddlemaster Of Hed" series and "Forgotten Beasts of Eld", her stories have strong, very unusual climate and tone, there is a amazing sense of wonder of the world in her writing, stories are pretty clever and focus strongly on character development. In similiar vein there is Earthsea series by Ursula Le. Guin - also strongly focuses on character development and it's just beautifully written.

ForzaFiori
2012-09-02, 05:44 PM
Another great series by Gemmell - The Stones of Power. First half is a redone version of King Arthur (very well done, and probably my favorite adaptation), the second half is a post-apocalyptic earth (kinda similar to fallout in the sense that it's a sparsely populated world using a mix of pre- and post-fall tech, except the poles shifted to cause the apocalypse rather than nukes)

Weimann
2012-09-02, 06:09 PM
where does one start with discworld?Referring to the handy map posted above, I'd say Equal Rites, or Guards! Guards!, mostly because the books about the Witches and the Watch are my favourites. I'd advice against The Colour of Magic since the Rincewind books tend to be his earliest ones, and as pointed out above, I don't think they are his best work.

Remember also that the arrangement into "series" in that picture isn't really an official thing; personally, I'm sceptical to if I'd call the "Industrial Revolution" line a series in it's own right. On the other hand, the Tiffany Aching books (The Wee Free Men, A Hat Full of Sky, Wintersmith and I Shall Wear Midnight) very much are a concluded series, and it's not really pointed out as such in that picture, so yeah.

Furthermore, that picture doesn't portray the actual release order at all.

Zaydos
2012-09-02, 06:12 PM
I will also recommend Discworld and suggest Guards! Guards! or Mort. Partially because unlike the other poster to suggest these two they probably are my favorite two and because they start off the two books with the Watch and DEATH respectively and those are my favorite character lines (in fact that might be why I like them so much).

Cyrion
2012-09-04, 05:32 PM
I've recently been re-reading some of my Charles deLint stuff. He does some really good urban fantasy. In some way's it's got some of the same tone as Gaiman's stories, though the focus is quite different. Memory and Dream is quite good, as is Dreams Underfoot.

Going outside the fantasy/sci fi genre, take a look at The Life of Pi by Yann Martel. Once you get past the opening premise, it's really well done. By the same author, check out The Facts Behind the Helsinki Roccamatios.

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime was also one I really enjoyed (by Mark Haddon).

Feytalist
2012-09-05, 02:41 AM
Has anyone mentioned the Wheel of Time yet? Cause that's a whole lot of book. Pretty good, too, mostly. And by the time you finish with the whole series, the final book should have been released already, heh.

For easy-reading, low-concentration books, the Discworld books are really the best you can do. Someone mentioned the Dresden Files as well, which is in a similar category. Not overly cerebral, is what I'm saying.

For something a bit more challenging, try Richard Morgan's novels. The Kovacs Trilogy (Altered Carbon, Broken Angels, Woken Furies) is a sort of a cyberpunk neo-noir SF something. Plus Martians. Brilliantly written. A Land Fit For Heroes (The Steel Remains, The Cold Commands) is a really dark fantasy series. Deals with racism, prejudice and other fun topics. But just as well written.

Or for something lighter, Trudi Canavan's Age of the Five fantasy series is really good. Or her Black Magician series, which some people think is even better.



The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime was also one I really enjoyed (by Mark Haddon).

That's the one with the kid with Asperger's? Meh, something about that book really irritated me. I finished it, but I really didn't enjoy it.

JoeMac307
2012-09-07, 10:08 AM
Anyone mention Roger Zelazny's Chronicles of Amber?

From Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Chronicles_of_Amber): The Amber stories take place in two "true" worlds: Amber and the Courts of Chaos. Other worlds, including our Earth, are but "shadows" of the tension between the two true worlds. The Courts of Chaos is situated in Shadow at the very edge of Chaos itself. Royals of Amber who have negotiated the Pattern can travel freely through the shadows. By shifting between shadows, one can appear to alter reality by choosing which elements of which shadows to keep, and which to move between.

How about Susanna Clarke's Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell?

From Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jonathan_strange): An alternative history set in 19th-century England around the time of the Napoleonic Wars, it is based on the premise that magic once existed in England and has returned with two men: Gilbert Norrell and Jonathan Strange. Centring on the relationship between these two men, the novel investigates the nature of "Englishness" and the boundaries between reason and unreason, Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Dane, and Northern and Southern English cultural tropes/stereotypes.

I also personally liked Lev Grossman's The Magicians and The Magician King, but that might be my own personal taste. It's kinda like Chronicles of Narnia meets Harry Potter, only R-rated (maybe NC-17?) and unbelievably cynical. Way cynical.

Aidan305
2012-09-08, 07:37 AM
How about Susanna Clarke's Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell?

From Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jonathan_strange): An alternative history set in 19th-century England around the time of the Napoleonic Wars, it is based on the premise that magic once existed in England and has returned with two men: Gilbert Norrell and Jonathan Strange. Centring on the relationship between these two men, the novel investigates the nature of "Englishness" and the boundaries between reason and unreason, Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Dane, and Northern and Southern English cultural tropes/stereotypes.
I'll second this recommendation, though I will also follow it up with a heavy reading advisory. Very heavy.

I saw a mention of the Dresden Files earlier in the thread as well, and I'll accompany it with a recommendation for the Codex: Alera, also by Jim Butcher.

hamishspence
2012-09-08, 07:41 AM
Another great series by Gemmell - The Stones of Power. First half is a redone version of King Arthur (very well done, and probably my favorite adaptation), the second half is a post-apocalyptic earth (kinda similar to fallout in the sense that it's a sparsely populated world using a mix of pre- and post-fall tech, except the poles shifted to cause the apocalypse rather than nukes)

Actually, nukes played a part- when "the world toppled" the nations' computers interpreted it as an attack by their enemies- and launched missiles.

So there's big irradiated patches on the planet.

Douglas
2012-09-08, 11:32 AM
Agreement about Warbreaker (particularly the conclusion), but I'm surprised about Way of Kings. It's probably one of my favorite books at this point.
No question about it for me, Brandon Sanderson just keeps getting better.


I just found the constant character swapping rather jarring. I really only ended up caring about Kal. You can read my review if you want to know more (link to my reading list in my signature).
Constant character swapping? I'm really not sure what you're talking about. Yes, there are several characters in widely separated areas each with their own plot lines, but I don't recall the narrative ever switching away from a character when the character wasn't at a reasonable break point. Also, each section of the book concentrates on a sub portion of the characters and lists up front which ones it will be.


I can sympathize - I mostly cared only about Kaladin until the very end. The realizations of how the threads tie together was very interesting, albeit not fully explored. Very much a teaser for the rest of the series.

Really? I found Kaladin annoying until the end.
Kaladin is the primary focus character of the book, so neither of these reactions really surprises me. He undergoes the most character development, and that development can attract attention, but to some extent it also means he had the farthest to go and so his starting position can be off-putting. In any case, all the major characters do a lot of interesting stuff, and it all adds up to both some good and satisfying resolution for the one book and excellent setup for the remainder of the series.


I only recently found Brandon Sanderson and I've read his stand-alone novels Elantris and Warbreaker. Strong, fast-paced traditional fantasy with royalty who actually does politics in unique worlds built with almost science fiction-like attention to detail and logical conclusions. There is character-jumping, but very little of consequence happens off-screen. Start with Warbreaker.
I've read all of his novels, and I think Mistborn is actually the best place to start as an introduction to his work. It does sort of commit you to a trilogy, but it was written later than Elantris and Warbreaker, Sanderson learned from the experience of writing those, and it shows in the plot design and general writing. At the same time, it's a completed work (in as much as any work by Brandon Sanderson is completed), and still fairly early in his career.

Gettles
2012-09-08, 02:16 PM
Referring to the handy map posted above, I'd say Equal Rites, or Guards! Guards!, mostly because the books about the Witches and the Watch are my favourites. I'd advice against The Colour of Magic since the Rincewind books tend to be his earliest ones, and as pointed out above, I don't think they are his best work.

Remember also that the arrangement into "series" in that picture isn't really an official thing; personally, I'm sceptical to if I'd call the "Industrial Revolution" line a series in it's own right. On the other hand, the Tiffany Aching books (The Wee Free Men, A Hat Full of Sky, Wintersmith and I Shall Wear Midnight) very much are a concluded series, and it's not really pointed out as such in that picture, so yeah.

Furthermore, that picture doesn't portray the actual release order at all.

I'd specifiably recommend against Equal Rites as that was still in his "Figuring out what the hell he's doing period." If you want to read about the witches you can just as easily start with Wyrd Sisters

Feytalist
2012-09-10, 05:08 AM
I've read all of his novels, and I think Mistborn is actually the best place to start as an introduction to his work. It does sort of commit you to a trilogy, but it was written later than Elantris and Warbreaker, Sanderson learned from the experience of writing those, and it shows in the plot design and general writing. At the same time, it's a completed work (in as much as any work by Brandon Sanderson is completed), and still fairly early in his career.

Agreed. Warbreaker was kind of an experiment in writing. And while it turned into a very serviceable novel (I'm still not quite sold on the ending; I think it came about 300 pages too soon) it's not the best showcase of his work. The Mistborn trilogy is.

Socratov
2012-09-10, 05:32 AM
Concerning PTerry: Start with anyone you want. They do have some chronological order but that doesn't really matter in terms of enjoyment since the books basically stand on their own and any information pertaining the storylines is repeated when it's neccessary.

Other books:

Fantasy:

The Inheritance series (ERagon, Eldest, Brisingr and Inheritance)
are nice to read.

Slightly Childish, but awesome none the less are the books of Artemis Fowl. Great reads and slightly... cynical...

Science fiction:

Asimov's foundation trilogy. They look smaal books, but htey are a tough read, even though tey are really worth it. Classic. If you liek these, continue with I Robot and the next novels.

Hyudra
2012-09-13, 04:10 PM
Lies of Locke Lamora. The sequel Red Seas under Red Skies is also good but derails awkwardly for a stretch. Fantasy.

I rather enjoyed The Mystic Art of Erasing All Signs of Death. Dark and gross, but in a good/fun/humorous way. Modern fiction.

If you have a handheld that lets you browse the web, try reading a web serial? Free, so it won't eat into your budget, and they need more exposure. I've heard good things about An Intimate History of the Greater Kingdom (http://www.meilinmiranda.com/intimate-history) (the highest rated web serial on Webfictionguide) but haven't read it. Worm (http://parahumans.wordpress.com/2011/06/11/1-1/) is dark superhero fiction with a strong following (~6 books worth of content at the moment) and Legion of Nothing (http://inmydaydreams.com/) is a veteran web serial now, with a more classic take on superheroes.

JoshL
2012-09-13, 07:10 PM
Crazy awesome points, Cyrion, for the de Lint recommendation. One of my favorite authors. Dreams Underfoot is a great starting place, really blurs the line between novel and short story collection. I can't say enough good things about Onion Girl. For his non-Newford books, Jack of Kinrowan has always been a favorite. Oh, if you're into Celtic/traditional music, you'll love de Lint. His books are a huge inspiration on me, musically.

I'm also seconding Wheel of Time, lamenting the passing of Jordan and really liking how Sanderson is doing, finishing the story from his notes/outlines/etc. His first was a bit clunky; it seemed like he was trying to write like Jordan (or maybe work in a lot of already written material), but plot awesomeness (one word: VERIN) more than made up for it. The last was much better. And also wrapped up one of the plot-lines I has most been anticipating.

Currently I'm re-reading Neal Stephenson's Baroque Cycle and I'd highly recommend it, or any Stephenson. Historical fiction from a geek's perspective. His narrative is loose and almost too hip for it's own good, in a fantastic way. A touch of magical realism, but not so far as Rushdie or Eco. It also connects with his Cryptonomicon which is a must-read.

Hyudra
2012-09-13, 08:00 PM
Just speaking for myself, I loved Neal Stephenson's Snow Crash and A Young Lady's Illustrated Primer. I couldn't stand The Baroque Cycle. Found it as dry and boring as plain toast.

JoeMac307
2012-09-14, 08:49 AM
I rather enjoyed The Mystic Art of Erasing All Signs of Death. Dark and gross, but in a good/fun/humorous way. Modern fiction.


I really enjoy everything Charlie Huston writes. The Joe Pitt Casebooks (Already Dead, No Dominion, Half the Blood of Brooklyn, Every Last Drop, and My Dead Body) were the best vampire / noir mashup I've ever read. Nothing terribly new, nothing terribly original, but ultra-violent, intriguing and extremely enjoyable. Real page-turners.

GolemsVoice
2012-09-14, 10:34 AM
All good recommendations here, and I think I won't add anything fantasy, but if you want a change of pace from most of the usual literature, I'd recommend House of Leaves, by Mark Danielewski. A very strange, very post-modern book that has many genres inside it and is, as a whole, either fascinating without end or, as a friend said, "a case of trying to hard". It touches a lot of academic points, from the academic world to fiction and meta-fiction, but it's also a damn good horror story.

JoshL
2012-09-14, 11:40 PM
Just speaking for myself, I loved Neal Stephenson's Snow Crash and A Young Lady's Illustrated Primer. I couldn't stand The Baroque Cycle. Found it as dry and boring as plain toast.

Yeah, I can see that. The heavier Stephenson books definitely relies on the reader being interested in excruciating detail about a wide variety of things (book 2, where I am now, gets a little TOO much into finance for my tastes). You have to care as much about calculus as you do about pirates, which is not for everyone. That said, I think Cryptonomicon and Reamde are a good middle ground between his "lighter" fare and the Baroque cycle. I loved Anathem too, but that's not one of his easier ones!

I'll also second House of Leaves. Great book, lots of fun, plays with the medium a lot. Clive Barker's "Mister B. Gone" is another great post-modern horror story, and great if you like that sort of thing.

Socratov
2012-09-17, 05:31 AM
Lies of Locke Lamora. The sequel Red Seas under Red Skies is also good but derails awkwardly for a stretch. Fantasy.

snip

I liked Red seas under red skies, still need to read Lies of Locke Lamora, my father has this habit of buying sequels before buying the starters of the series :smallsigh:, except for once, where he actually did buy the first part of a series (I was so proud of him :smallbiggrin:)

Another good read is The Art Thief.

Logic
2012-09-18, 05:18 PM
No to A Song of Fire and Ice? That's a shame. Oh well, to each their own.

Good books I have recently read:
Ender's Game
A Princess of Mars
The Call of The Wild
Fahrenheit 451

comicshorse
2012-09-18, 07:15 PM
Y Clive Barker's "Mister B. Gone" is another great post-modern horror story, and great if you like that sort of thing.

Seconded. Also by the same author read 'Weaveworld' a genuinely compelling and magical modern fantasy set mostly in the modern world

Socratov
2012-09-19, 01:20 AM
snip
Good books I have recently read:
Ender's Game
snip

that was actually one of the only books to really frighten me... Not becuase of horror ro anything but becuase I can see this happening in the near future :smalleek: (well written btw)

LordDeathkeeper
2012-09-19, 02:25 AM
Wheel of Time is very high on my list; I'm not sure I ever really disliked any of it, although I agree that Sanderson's start was a little clunky. He did GREAT after a while, though.

Steven Brust's Vlad Taltos novels are my personal favorite. They're never very long, but if you like novels with the swash-buckling feel it's as good as it can get sometimes (although it loses this tone in some situations), and is one of the good series that can still be VERY funny while taking itself completely seriously in terms of plot.

Socratov
2012-09-28, 04:15 AM
I dont know if mentioned allready, but try Raymon E. Feist's books. Start with Magician and work your way forward, or start with the Krondor series, it is sort of a flashback (though you will slightly miss some details explained in other books).

Man on Fire
2012-09-29, 02:50 AM
Currently I'm reading Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials, great series so far. Author really understands how kinds think and behave, characters are belivable. Also, Lord Ashiel is both grade a ******* and pretty entertaining. I mean what kind of guy would

Decide to kill God, only because he finds destroying all-powerfull, tyrannical Church controlling most of the world to be not enough challenge?

LordDeathkeeper
2012-09-29, 06:38 AM
Currently I'm reading Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials, great series so far. Author really understands how kinds think and behave, characters are belivable. Also, Lord Ashiel is both grade a ******* and pretty entertaining. I mean what kind of guy would

Decide to kill God, only because he finds destroying all-powerfull, tyrannical Church controlling most of the world to be not enough challenge?

I liked that series. It gets pretty weird by the end, though, and not a lot of explanation at times.