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CrossP
2006-12-07, 02:35 AM
Many of the characters in the preview seem to have jokes built into their names. I imagine this trend will continue into the comic as well. I figured we could make a thread for spotting them.

So far I have...

Jillian Zamussels - Jillions of muscles

Prince Ansom - Prince handsome

Wanda Firebaugh - Wanna fireball

Has anyone else picked up any more of these?

EdgarVerona
2006-12-07, 03:20 AM
Manpower the Temporary was a HILLARIOUS reference!

(For those who don't know, Manpower is one of the largest Temp Agencies in the U.S. It was utterly appropriate and I almost fell out of my chair when I realized the reference =) )

Death, your friend the Reaper
2006-12-07, 04:41 AM
There was a easy reference to msn or a instant messaging with the book there, a reference to the singer Elvis at the beginning, a dwagon is like a dragon but with a little spelling mistake. Most likely for the cuteness factor.

Well, that's all references I got so far. Just getting the easy ones before anyone else does though. :smallwink:

Heads_or_Tails
2006-12-07, 05:32 AM
Wanda Firebaugh - Wanna fireball

Hmm... I actually saw that one as "Wand of Fireball."

Also, there's Bogroll, as in toilet paper.

Shhalahr Windrider
2006-12-07, 08:24 AM
Also, there's Bogroll, as in toilet paper.
Certainly explains the last panel of page 6, then, doesn't it? :smallbiggrin:

Ashes
2006-12-07, 09:14 AM
Hmm... I actually saw that one as "Wand of Fireball."

Also, there's Bogroll, as in toilet paper.

I agree with you on the "Wand of" pun. God, that was hilarious.

cuchulainshound
2006-12-07, 12:00 PM
(Do you really think a "dwagon" is a reference to a "dragon"??? Hmmmm, I dunno...) :P

There are at least 3 more going on, and I doubt we've seen the end of them (and that's a good thing!)

In the Cast List, there's Sizemore Rockwell, the dirtomancer, and I'm guessing that Sizemore is a spin off of "seismic", tho' we'll have to see.

Stanley's counterpart is King Slately, of the Jetstone tribe, and slate is a dark stone, so... also, it echoes of "stately"- but again, we'll have to see him to know for sure.

But the most obvious is in the series name itself, "Gobwin Knob". With the "cutesie" baby language going on (dwagons, spidews, erfworld*), that's Goblin's Knob, which is the smallest of the small challenges in one of the greatest timewasters on the internet, The Kingdom of Loathing. (In which "key lime pie" also plays a very, very small part.) (And we won't go into what a Knob Goblin is, ahem.)

(* erfworld = earthworld (and/or possibly "elfworld"), btw, in case anyone is still working at the "dwagons = dragons" level. Right, then.)

Lord Stanley the Plaid, of the Plaid tribe - I wanna believe that there's gotta be something there, but I'm just not seeing it if there is.


Certainly explains the last panel of page 6, then, doesn't it? :smallbiggrin:
Yup! We were told (specifically!) that some of the jokes would take many panels to play out. I'm still thinking there's something going on with the Arkenhammer (Arm & Hammer? or just a Norse/Tolkienian spin?), what it looks like (a baby's squeeky toy) and the pigeons, but I'm just not sure.

The Hammer of Thor
2006-12-07, 12:14 PM
I want to know what the caster's names all mean. They're sort of like puns I guess. I take it Croakamancer=Necromancer, but I get a bit lost after that.

Shhalahr Windrider
2006-12-07, 12:19 PM
In the Cast List, there's Sizemore Rockwell, the dirtomancer, and I'm guessing that Sizemore is a spin off of "seismic", tho' we'll have to see.
According to info in another thread, it's a reference to some band I've never heard of.


I want to know what the caster's names all mean. They're sort of like puns I guess. I take it Croakamancer=Necromancer, but I get a bit lost after that.
Well, we have Findamancers. Obviously, they find things.

And then there are Predictamancers. They predict things.

So, for the D&D inclined, they're two different flavors of Diviners.

cuchulainshound
2006-12-07, 12:24 PM
(For real???

Findomancers "find" things.
Predictomancers "predict" things.
Dirtomancers... um, do stuff with "dirt".

If I'm going too fast or my vocabulary too technical, just ask specific questions, we can go back over it one item at a time.)

Okey dokey...

There's one more "pun" that's going on - actually a double entendre, technically. (was going to edit it in the above, but...)

It's in Lord Plaid's explanation of why he's using the Arkenhammer for such a mundane purpose. But, since the reference is in the same category as Knob Goblin, I'll just say that there's more than one way to bust a nut. :smallwink:

Beleriphon
2006-12-07, 02:55 PM
Stanley's counterpart is King Slately, of the Jetstone tribe, and slate is a dark stone, so... also, it echoes of "stately"- but again, we'll have to see him to know for sure.


Its an oblique reference to the Jetsons and the Flintstones. Georege Jetson's boss was Spacely and Fred Flintstone's boss was Slate.

squeakyreaper
2006-12-07, 03:48 PM
I want to know what the caster's names all mean. They're sort of like puns I guess. I take it Croakamancer=Necromancer, but I get a bit lost after that.
Croak... Cockroach or possible 'croak' reference, because when someone dies they 'croak'.

cuchulainshound
2006-12-07, 04:38 PM
Its an oblique reference to the Jetsons and the Flintstones. Georege Jetson's boss was Spacely and Fred Flintstone's boss was Slate.
I... would say that's quite plausible, and convincing. Nice catch! I expect similar ones throughout (from the artists, that is, not necessarily from you, Bel'), it's just a matter of finding them.
;)

Grey Knight
2006-12-07, 05:06 PM
But the most obvious is in the series name itself, "Gobwin Knob". With the "cutesie" baby language going on (dwagons, spidews, erfworld*), that's Goblin's Knob, which is the smallest of the small challenges in one of the greatest timewasters on the internet, The Kingdom of Loathing. (In which "key lime pie" also plays a very, very small part.) (And we won't go into what a Knob Goblin is, ahem.)

Actually, the location in KoL is called "Cobb's Knob", inhabited by Knob Goblins. And it's not so small once you get to a high-enough level to open the rest of the area up.

CrossP
2006-12-07, 07:39 PM
I'm guessing dirtomancers are genereic earth elementalists. I'd be willing to bet we'll see burnomancers, wetomancers, and... wind ones in the near future.

This is getting amusing. It's like a Where's Waldo for jokes.

cuchulainshound
2006-12-07, 08:16 PM
If you say so, probably. I haven't had the time to waste there in a long time, but remember it was the place small characters started.

LordOfNarf
2006-12-08, 12:05 AM
Croak... Cockroach or possible 'croak' reference, because when someone dies they 'croak'.

its obvious that they mean death, with the refrence to gathering all the non-croaked soldiers. It seems that they are making the death bit anthropomorphised (I don't think thats the right word) to go along with the childish feel

hewhosaysfish
2006-12-08, 06:33 AM
its obvious that they mean death, with the refrence to gathering all the non-croaked soldiers. It seems that they are making the death bit anthropomorphised (I don't think thats the right word) to go along with the childish feel

If "euphemised" is actually a word then I think that's the word you're looking for. As in, they're glossing over it with a euphemism (although in the context of the setting, it appears to be the the actual correct term) . "Anthropomorphised" would mean that death is being treated as if it were a person/character/entity.

Shhalahr Windrider
2006-12-08, 08:54 AM
If "euphemised" is actually a word...
Hey, it's in my dictionary. (Oxford American, if you must know.)

Vargtass
2006-12-08, 09:08 AM
Marbits (first comic) = tiny marshmallows bit found in cereal... I don't see where the axemen come in, though...

Shhalahr Windrider
2006-12-08, 10:18 AM
An Elvis-titan loses one of his gems.
Marbits find big honkin' Elvis-gem.
Marbits get rich from gem.
Proceeds from Elvis-gem go to outfittng and maintaining an extra squad of axemen in the Marbit military.
Extra squad of axemen give Marbit army enough oomph to break through Manpower the Temporary's defensive line.
Manpower is left exposed and gets croaked.
Wanda mus now deal with replacing Manpower.

RandomNPC
2006-12-08, 07:16 PM
i find this comic to be quite punny, it makes me laugh on the inside.

cuchulainshound
2006-12-08, 09:56 PM
Marbits (first comic) = tiny marshmallows bit found in cereal... I don't see where the axemen come in, though...
Really?! That seems highly appropriate- what cereal?

battleburn
2006-12-09, 09:54 AM
Keep this thread going please. Since English is not my first language it is a bit harder to see where certain words come from.
Rest assured though, I did see what's funny about Dwagons and Findomancers.
Funny that the Giants/(Titans) brought that toyhammer to the playground and forgot it there. And for the little toy creatures that hammer suddenly is really mighty and coïncidentally able to make pidgeons out of nuts. (Not all nuts I hope)

robinmotion
2006-12-09, 12:57 PM
I'm guessing that the reason for the "cutesy" baby talk, the fact that Stanley is so short and childlike, and the reason the Arkenhammer looks like it is (and the reason Wanda looks like she does, for that matter . . . who knew a chick with a head bigger than her torso could look hot?), is because it's all some kid's home campaign world. Presumably Stanley is the GM, or world designer, or something.

cuchulainshound
2006-12-09, 02:11 PM
Keep this thread going please. Since English is not my first language it is a bit harder to see where certain words come from.
Rest assured though, I did see what's funny about Dwagons and Findomancers.
Seeing the humour in wordplay in a second language is extremely difficult, so Respect for that! It's hard enough to recognize a word, but to see the parallels with another word or similar construction, that's when you "know" the language!

re the X-omancer magic, that rang a bell right away. From bad martial arts movies (and good oriental-genre games), we use "X-ajitsu" or "X-fu" all the time:

Mouse-ajitsu - the ability to use a mouse on a computer, accurately and quickly, (especially in real time shooting gallery type games.)

Bike-fu - the skill that fails when you fall off a bike.
Coffee-fu - the ability to make a really (no, REALLY) good cup of coffee.

Maybe we can find some Punomancers (or a rare Doublentendromancer!) to help us figure out some of the other bits, like the pigeons and such, if our Omancer-jitsu is strong enough.

Learnedguy
2006-12-09, 02:44 PM
I liked the titans. Anyone who have overweight Elvises as creatorraces has a special place in my book.

Vargtass
2006-12-09, 02:55 PM
Really?! That seems highly appropriate- what cereal?

I have no idea... I found the info on the web, where else...

And on the other point, on where the axemen come in, I completely follow how they fit in the logic of the story, but fail to grasp if they have some connection to the pun, i.e. marshmallows in cereal.

cuchulainshound
2006-12-09, 05:06 PM
It can't all be connected.

(Altho', if it had been a squad armed with Bohemian ear-spoons (eawspoons?), that would have worked. But better I guess if you're attacking Marbits. To attack spidews... hmmm... flyswattos?)

Now, "the battle of Warchalking"... hmmmm. Shades of the white cliffs of Dover... (Where's a punomancer when you need one...)

Khantalas
2006-12-09, 08:00 PM
Seeing the humour in wordplay in a second language is extremely difficult, so Respect for that! It's hard enough to recognize a word, but to see the parallels with another word or similar construction, that's when you "know" the language!

re the X-omancer magic, that rang a bell right away. From bad martial arts movies (and good oriental-genre games), we use "X-ajitsu" or "X-fu" all the time:

Mouse-ajitsu - the ability to use a mouse on a computer, accurately and quickly, (especially in real time shooting gallery type games.)

Bike-fu - the skill that fails when you fall off a bike.
Coffee-fu - the ability to make a really (no, REALLY) good cup of coffee.

Maybe we can find some Punomancers (or a rare Doublentendromancer!) to help us figure out some of the other bits, like the pigeons and such, if our Omancer-jitsu is strong enough.

Of course, Japanese isn't your native language.

It's not -ajitsu that means "a collection of techniques about", it's -jutsu. Yes, Japanese isn't my native language, either.

Arian
2006-12-09, 08:28 PM
its obvious that they mean death, with the refrence to gathering all the non-croaked soldiers.

"Uncroaked". These would be the undead, and the Croakamancer would be responsible for turning them from croaked to Uncroaked. Now that Manpower has been Uncroaked as Stanley asked (in no. 2), we can see (in no. 3) that he has turned a pale green.

TinSoldier
2006-12-09, 10:51 PM
It can't all be connected.

(Altho', if it had been a squad armed with Bohemian ear-spoons (eawspoons?), that would have worked. But better I guess if you're attacking Marbits. To attack spidews... hmmm... flyswattos?)

Now, "the battle of Warchalking"... hmmmm. Shades of the white cliffs of Dover... (Where's a punomancer when you need one...)Gah! Stop with the W for R replacement! That is the only thing that really bugs me about this comic.

Plus your post was funny, if painful.

Shhalahr Windrider
2006-12-10, 09:03 AM
And on the other point, on where the axemen come in, I completely follow how they fit in the logic of the story, but fail to grasp if they have some connection to the pun, i.e. marshmallows in cereal.
They're not necssarily a pun in themselves.

Could be just because they're small.

hewhosaysfish
2006-12-11, 08:58 AM
They're not necssarily a pun in themselves.

Could be just because they're small.

Maybe they just made up the name and the fact that it's also used for the marshmallow bits in lucky charms is entirely coincidental.

Constantinople
2006-12-11, 04:26 PM
Someone could have already pointed this out but Erfworld Minty Mountains sounds like a parody of Middle-Earth Misty Mountains.

LurkerBeneath
2006-12-12, 10:15 PM
If there's an Arkenhammer, will there be...

1. an Arkensaw?
2. an Arkenstone? (perhaps the Little Rock the Titan dropped?)

Jorkens
2006-12-12, 11:02 PM
Now, "the battle of Warchalking"... hmmmm. Shades of the white cliffs of Dover... (Where's a punomancer when you need one...)
IIRC, the term warchalking was used at one point to mean chalking symbols to mark places where an insecure wireless network could be used to get interweb access. I'm not sure whether this refers back to some older use of the term, though - it seems like an obscure reference even for Erfworld...

And I'm also not sure whether googling for this sort of stuff would be spoiling the fun.

Taffer
2006-12-13, 01:15 AM
Dang, you beat me to the bit about warchalking. That's how I took it, and the cliffs of Dover are appropriate as they are themselves made of chalk.

Illiander
2006-12-13, 05:18 PM
Its an oblique reference to the Jetsons and the Flintstones. Georege Jetson's boss was Spacely and Fred Flintstone's boss was Slate.

SLATEly
FLINTstones

both types of rock, and I didn't see anyone else metion this, mabey it's a bit obvious

Roderick_BR
2006-12-19, 06:07 AM
You want bad puns? Try Dragon Fable, where all the knights have pun in the names, like Sir Prize, the guard, Sir Geon, the medic, Sir Vivor, the explorer, Sir Jin, the legendary owner of the energy weapons, Sir Pent, the guy that guards the bridge with the giant serpent...
Be happy nothing like that is used in Erf. I already have a hard time figuring all the obscure puns...:smalltongue:

Beleriphon
2006-12-19, 06:45 AM
SLATEly
FLINTstones

both types of rock, and I didn't see anyone else metion this, mabey it's a bit obvious

Yeah, but the important bit is the whole name: Slately from Jetstone. Both are are portmantaeus (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portmanteau) of Hanna-Barbera cartoon character names. In this instance Slate and Spacely along with Jetson and Flintstone.

While the idea of it being related entirely to rock is possible, the joke would be much funnier in that case if it were a stone age setting akin to the The Flintstones. One must also take into consideration there are loads of other pop culture jokes showing up, the O'RLY owl for example, would indicate that the Slately/Jetstone juxtaposition is meant to be a take on The Flintstones and the The Jetsons.

I'm sticking with that until such a time as proved otherwise. I'd also expect King Slately's first name to end up being Freorge or Gred.

chionophile
2006-12-21, 12:45 PM
It's King Slately of the Jetstone Tribe and his capital is Spacerock. That pretty much guarantees that it's a pun on the Jetsons and Flintstones.

Reptilius
2006-12-22, 03:01 PM
The command words for the "hats of communication (?)" are each famous people that have disappeared (Jimmy Hoffa/Dr. Livingston).

Xaspian
2006-12-23, 06:34 PM
Hoffa was the command to make the message 'disappear', and Livingston, who was famously lost and then found, seems to make it appear the other end, so, yeah.

Reptilius
2006-12-26, 08:33 AM
I believe the song the Hippiemancers were singing is from the movie "A Mighty Wind."

danielf
2006-12-26, 08:45 AM
The name of characters are very important, stan lee likes to use the same leters, like Peter Parker, Bruce Banner, Matt Murdock. I think it's cool that the character names have some meaning

Allandaros
2006-12-27, 08:45 PM
The unit of currency is a Rand, presumably named for Ayn Rand, devout worshiper of the Dollar Divine (and originator of the philosophy Objectivism).

Also, she couldn't write for beans.

EntilZha
2006-12-28, 10:54 PM
My first thought about Lord Stanley was the NHL championship trophy--Lord Stanley's cup--but I have yet to see any cup-related jokes. Or perhaps the writers are hockey fans and this one's meant to stand on its own. I'm just guessing, mind you.

chionophile
2006-12-28, 11:59 PM
So there are two units of currency we have so far - Rands and Schmuckers. Any thoughts on what a schmucker might be named after?

nweismuller
2006-12-29, 08:52 AM
Vis-a-vis the Rand, I'd be more inclined to suspect it's named after the actual South African currency, the Rand, than the novelist/philosopher.

Hart av Srednak
2006-12-29, 04:22 PM
Wandas tribe is a reference to WoD werewolf games. Croatan is one of the lost werewolf tribes there.

I also have this theory (don't think I'm only one with this) about meta-world of erfworld. Yes, it's turn based strategy game and yes, it's played by punch of kids. It's either homebrew strategy based on many computer and tabletop startegies or comercial one.

They use miniatures (goblinoids and skeletons) but can't affor to buy enough for large campains. That's why they use their toys along with fantasy miniatures. Gwiffon looks like chicken or some kind of other bird rather than griffin. Cloth golems and glass made unicorns also fit that description.

I also wonder if Power Ranger coloured Dwagons are really Power Rangers. Power Rangers and Dragons are both quite powerfull in minds of kids. Dragon miniatures aren't cheap and they seem to have many Dwagons.

chionophile
2006-12-29, 06:21 PM
That's a good thought Hart. I disagree about the gwiffon though, they're probably using a Peep (http://www.giantitp.com/forums/showthread.php?t=30018).

Jorkens
2006-12-29, 08:25 PM
So there are two units of currency we have so far - Rands and Schmuckers. Any thoughts on what a schmucker might be named after?
It might just be a slang term for the same thing, like 'bucks' or 'quid' or 'big boys' or something...

Beleriphon
2006-12-30, 01:16 PM
Any thoughts on what a schmucker might be named after?

I'm hoping for a Joel Schumacher + schmuck reference myself. It seems fitting after Batman and Robin. :smallwink:

Hart av Srednak
2007-01-05, 09:30 AM
Who would be Parson Gotti ?

PS I posted this here instead of Hamstard thread cause I want to keep this alive. This has been good thread: good conversation and explanations that are not so obvious for non-english speaking folks (like me).

EDIT: I'm not asking who he is (cause I think I know) but is there some hidden meaning in this name (like Wandas wand of fireball)

EDIT: someone came up with an answer. Parson Gotti is anagram of Protagonist

Darth Paradox
2007-01-05, 05:04 PM
Wandas tribe is a reference to WoD werewolf games. Croatan is one of the lost werewolf tribes there.

The lost werewolf tribe is in turn named after the Croatan tribe of American Indians, most famous for their possible involvement in the disappearance of the Roanoke Colony and the word "CROATOAN" carved into a tree: Wikipedia article (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roanoke_Island#Second_group_of_colonists_and_the_. 22Croatoan.22).

I'm guessing that Wanda's tribe name refers to the original source, just like the werewolf tribe name.

Mystery_Cat
2007-01-10, 08:07 AM
*Thinks* Working on the principle that Lord Stanley's tribe are the one people end up controlling in the game... It's not 'Plaid', it's 'Played.' :smallamused:

Deuce
2007-01-10, 12:04 PM
I was thinking Stanley the Plaid might just be a play on names like "Eric the Red" or "Ivan the Terrible" (depending on your opinion of plaid). It might also refer to something that is being used to mark their area on the "map" or on their unit counters.

Sir_Faust
2007-01-11, 06:48 PM
I'm guessing dirtomancers are genereic earth elementalists. I'd be willing to bet we'll see burnomancers, wetomancers, and... wind ones in the near future.

This is getting amusing. It's like a Where's Waldo for jokes.


I know, it's like a easter egg within a easter egg. And it's adds enjoyment when your wandering what hidden jokes he put in this time:smallsmile:

Sir_Faust
2007-01-11, 06:56 PM
I also wonder if Power Ranger coloured Dwagons are really Power Rangers. Power Rangers and Dragons are both quite powerfull in minds of kids. Dragon miniatures aren't cheap and they seem to have many Dwagons.


I thought the same thing considering how i read angry zen masters, who the artist is the same. He had a few power ranger like themes, a group of heroes who are color coded. I definitely would fit.

Hart av Srednak
2007-01-11, 07:06 PM
I thought the same thing considering how i read angry zen masters, who the artist is the same. He had a few power ranger like themes, a group of heroes who are color coded. I definitely would fit.

Dragons are quite expensive figures and they seem to need them much. Atleast Stanley does use them. If we take take that peep is the size of Gwiffon would Power Ranger toys be Dwaghon sized?

I think that should be somewhat close.. thou I don't know exact size of peep (best picture I've seen is that where Parson eats one and the one where Wanda rides another) I have only distant meoryi mage about Power Ranger toys. But they should fit.

So if peep is Gwiffon.. what would be size of human?

mhoram
2007-01-12, 03:21 PM
A few quick notes:
Some of this is redundant, apologies:

w for r is a standard little child stereotypical substitution. I'm not sure why Parsons used it, and it's kinda off-putting, but clearly anything with a w might properly be an r.

Second 'erfworld'. We know that there are at least three tribes of elves, perhaps Parsons also used the 'engrish' style r for l substitution. In which case it's elfworld.

Putting these two together, goblin ->gobrin ->gobwin could give us the etymology of Gobwin. Given the two stage translation, all W's R's and L's are potentially interchangeable. One weirdness is that r's have been replaced by w's in some words, but not consistently.

Finally, given that we have a Sir Webinar, does it make sense to guess That Bogroll the Twoll might be a reference to a Blogroll?

Xaspian
2007-01-12, 03:28 PM
Erfworld is probably adapted from Earthworld. Said in a childish voice, they're the same.

The same with Gobwin. Young children often have trouble pronouncing the 'l' after the 'b', so it comes out sounding more like a 'w'.

The thing with these it that you need to listen to the sounds, not just swap letters. "Elfworld" is quite hard to mispronounce as "Erfworld". Even the initial 'e' sound is different, so you'd have to really struggle.

And surely Bogroll is a reference to toilet paper.

Reptilius
2007-01-16, 09:51 PM
Anyone ever seen Tron? Same bright blues and reds, same panels and designs in #17. If I'm not mistaken, the giant red pillar in panel 1 is the Master Control Program. Wanda's and Stanley's clothes have been "Tron-iffied" too, if I'm not mistaken.

Josh_Kablack
2007-01-16, 10:01 PM
And the "PLOT" sound effect at the end is in the Tron font.

While this just looks like a nerd-culture reference at first, I think it's worth noting that Tron was a major step forward in using computer-generated imagery in movies. And this is a webcomic, entirely generated on a computer.

chionophile
2007-01-17, 01:25 AM
http://www.partiallyclips.com/index.php?id=1009 <- This is the origin of Bogroll.

And as far as I've seen, only monster names are misspelled (ie., dwagon, gwiffon, gobwin, spidew) in a childish manner. It's really not that disconcerting or distracting if you ask me.

pclips
2007-01-17, 01:35 AM
http://www.partiallyclips.com/index.php?id=1009 <- This is the origin of Bogroll.

Quite correct. Bogroll the Cyclops is the only crossover character (so far, anyway, unless you count Hamstard). That 2002 PartiallyClips strip is the origin of the story which eventually became Erfworld.

But Xaspian is also correct. When I wrote that PClips strip, I called him "Bogroll" because it's an amusing Britishism for "toilet paper." :smallbiggrin:

Peregrine
2007-01-17, 01:46 AM
If I'm reading Erfworld #11 (http://www.giantitp.com/comics/erf0011.html) right -- I believe that the island depicted in the first panel is 'The Magic Kingdom'* -- then it appears there are eight kinds of -mancers, one for each colour strip of the island. The central bit is probably Portal Park.

So far I count six -mancers:
Croakamancers (raising the dead, i.e. uncroaking)
Lookamancers (clairvoyance, scouting ahead magically)
Findamancers (searching for specific things and possibly summoning them)
Predictamancers (predicting the future)
Dirtamancers (manipulating earth, and/or cesspool contents -- also 'dirty')
Hippiemancers (hippy peaceniks, can tone down or prevent fighting)

By the way, Janis, the Hippiemancer who was teaching Sizemore, is a reference to Janis Joplin, 60s American singer. Wanda mentions a Grand Abbie, apparently a powerful rank of Hippiemancer, which probably refers to activist Abbie Hoffman.

Edit: Oh and the thing they step out of after leaving Portal Park is an obvious Star Trek transporter room lookalike. (I know, technically this is the pun thread, not the pop culture reference thread, but thus far it seems there's a lot of crossover. :smalltongue:)

* Alternatively, the island could be the whole realm, and The Magic Kingdom is just the green bit the dialogue comes from, while the other colours are the different factions. But I think my guess is more plausible.

TinSoldier
2007-01-17, 01:46 AM
And Bogroll gets shat upon by a dwagon. And he consorts with a dirtomancer who makes crap golems.

I get it. Do you?

Peregrine
2007-01-17, 02:06 AM
That's right, I was going to comment on that one as well. I thought it was a fireball from the dragon, not anything else. Now that I look at it though, I can understand why people think that...

Oh, and I also forgot to comment on Stanley the Plaid. I too took it to be an epithet like 'the Red' or 'the Great'. Plaid is... different. It's kind of like being 'the Polka-dotted', or 'the Stripy', only more subtle: less silly-sounding, but when you think about it, still just as silly.

Vargtass
2007-01-17, 03:56 AM
In page 17, the name Scruby is from the portal figure of cast metal miniatures, used in wargaming (fantasy and otherwise). Would it be a pun to invoke his name during casting of a tremendous spell? that is used to mold a perfect warlord for a wargame...

ClericofPhwarrr
2007-01-17, 09:15 PM
Wanda is summoned to the "Tower of Efdup" -- which becomes the "Tower of F****d Up."

If this has been mentioned already, then sorry, but I didn't see it.

Madalin
2007-01-22, 01:48 AM
This is a bit late, but I'd like to state that Gobwin Knob is likely not a KoL reference, but a reference to what the knob goblins in KoL are a reference to.

That is to say. Knob Goblin. Knob Gobblin'. Gobblin' knobs. Yeah.

Luvlein
2007-01-22, 08:34 PM
I'm still thinking there's something going on with the Arkenhammer (Arm & Hammer? or just a Norse/Tolkienian spin?), what it looks like (a baby's squeeky toy) and the pigeons, but I'm just not sure.
There is of course the arkenstone in Tolkien's "The Hobbit".
I found the following in some Tolkien forum:

"The element arken comes from an Old English word, eorcan, meaning 'holy'. This may seem a strange derivation: despite its beauty and its great importance to the Dwarves, it's hard to claim that the Arkenstone was in any real sense 'holy'. Instead, it seems to have acquired its name by association with the word Eorclanstánas ('Holy Stones') the Old English name for the Silmarils themselves."

Zeb The Troll
2007-01-23, 06:34 AM
Just some observations I've made that I didn't see on the thread yet...

Page 5: Stanley is looking for tools. Stanley (http://www.stanleytools.com) being a well known tool manufacturer.

Page 11: When Dirtamancer Sizemore is studying with the Hippiemancer's and "in the presence of Flower Power" he loses track of time and gets the munchies. I suspect that's a reference to a certain kind of "flower". (Uh Oh, that wasn't a Marlboro!)

Page 17: Obligatory "shock and awe" statement regarding the war plans in panel 2.

I want to say there's some connection between Magic Kingdom (Probably a Disney reference) and summoning the Perfect Warlord too, but I'm not making it right now.

TinSoldier
2007-01-23, 10:28 AM
Page 5: Stanley is looking for tools. Stanley (http://www.stanleytools.com) being a well known tool manufacturer.Huh. That one is so obvious that I'm surprised no one else caught it.

Good job!

Wrecan
2007-01-23, 11:26 AM
Stanley the Plaid could also be read phoenetically as Stanley the "Play-ed", as in Stanley is being played, which, given his character is not unlikely.

Aidan305
2007-01-23, 12:12 PM
Interestingly, though I'm not certain wether it's just a conincidence, Manpower is wearing a target symbol on his armour, possibly as a symbol of status. In Paranoia the RPG, the party leader's badge is a target symbol.

pclips
2007-01-23, 01:48 PM
Page 5: Stanley is looking for tools. Stanley (http://www.stanleytools.com) being a well known tool manufacturer.

D'oh! Couldn't you have waited two days to have that realization? :smallwink:

Alynn
2007-01-23, 03:43 PM
I noticed that a long time ago, I never never thought it was worth mentioning because it was TOO obvious.

Shows that not everyone is so observant :P

Hart av Srednak
2007-01-23, 09:39 PM
I noticed that a long time ago, I never never thought it was worth mentioning because it was TOO obvious.

Shows that not everyone is so observant :P

Or everyone doesn't live in part of the world where Stanleys is such a key maker :P

I went to Stanleys pages and looked some of their tools. I did regonize their logo but just after I saw it at right context (measuring tape did seem familiart).
And this isn't about me readining geeky comics and not wisiting hardware stores. It's more nationally based matter. We have different key manufacturers here and Stanley isn't advertising here. (Some harware stores might advertise their products along with other products.. that's all).

Now to the point again:
I like this thread cause it can help you to understand language and cultural based jokes. Even if next episode would have given me more clear references to Stanley tools I would't have necessarily understand those.

So thank you for bringing that up

PS and google didn't help until I knew to use word tool with the word Stanley
PPS Stanleys Bostitch tools look very familiar but I haven't seen any connection between them and measuring tape I've seen quite alot
PPPS ;-P

EDIT: now after erf #20 I can say that I wouldn't have got Stanley the Tool joke as refence without this thread.. ok, maybe the picture of stanley measuring tape in erworld 20 would have helped ;-)

TinSoldier
2007-01-23, 10:50 PM
D'oh! Couldn't you have waited two days to have that realization? :smallwink:OMGWTFBBQ!

PWND!

(Just kidding... :wink:)

Magi_Ring_O
2007-01-24, 04:21 PM
Findamancer are more like conjurers, than like diviners.
I wonder if we will see any generalists?

chionophile
2007-01-24, 06:24 PM
I wonder if we will see any generalists?

We already have. Wanda has stated that she can handle most magics, she just isn't interested in them. That qualifies as a generalist in my book.

Darth Paradox
2007-01-24, 06:58 PM
That seems at contrast with her inability to execute the finer details of a Findamancer spell, though. Which makes me wonder how good a Croakamancer she is - she might just have the jack-of-all-trades thing going.

chionophile
2007-01-25, 01:33 AM
We don't know if Stanley was being reasonable in his demands or not. For all we know, the best findamancer in the world wouldn't have been able to do what he wanted.

Wanda is probably a very good croakamancer because it seems to be her chosen profession, which implies that she enjoys it and thus is probably the -mancy she is best at.

Bluelantern
2007-01-25, 10:02 PM
I thouth the "tool" thing was a sort of pun with "fool", like "Stanley the fool"

chionophile
2007-01-25, 11:07 PM
Or maybe it's exactly what it sounds like, and Parson is just calling Stanley a tool (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tool_%28insult%29)

Soulus101
2007-01-26, 10:30 AM
There's also the possibility of stanley on plaid (http://www.etsy.com/view_listing.php?listing_id=5115390)

also these references from urban dictionary (not that I would stick by them if challenged):

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=plaid
4. Plaid: Stanley's magical shirt

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=stanley
1. stanley: Term used to describe someone who is a real tool.

although those are probably in relation to aforementioned Stanley Tools and Plaid Stanley references. definately a culture barrier with this one. I'm South African and living in the UK, and I've never heard of Stanley as a brand.

Runolfr
2007-01-26, 11:37 AM
I want to know what the caster's names all mean. They're sort of like puns I guess. I take it Croakamancer=Necromancer, but I get a bit lost after that.

I thought "Croakamancy" was the art of "croaking" people -- i.e. killing them. Wanda specializes in spells of death and destruction.

"Findamancers" are obviously skilled at "finding" things.

"Dirtamancy" is a bit vague, so far.

Runolfr
2007-01-26, 12:06 PM
Just spotted a new one...

In Erfworld 13, Stanely summons Wanda to the Tower of Efdup to cast her spell.

Efdup = F'd up = contracted profanity, for those not used to English slang

Dragor
2007-01-26, 01:13 PM
Yeah, I spotted that, too. I laughed :smallbiggrin:

'F'd Up' surely fits the description of that place...

Thanatos
2007-01-26, 05:08 PM
I doubt this one is intentional, but just the same... Wanda happens to resemble another cartoon character woman with black hair who is supposed to be beautiful (despite her cartoonish giant head)...

Betty Boop.

Darth Paradox
2007-01-26, 07:57 PM
I thought "Croakamancy" was the art of "croaking" people -- i.e. killing them. Wanda specializes in spells of death and destruction.

Well, she's probably good at that, too. But recall that the first spell action we saw her take (or saw the effects of) was uncroaking Manpower the Temporary. (Yegods, that name still cracks me up.) Necromancers are traditionally (in games, not "actual" necromancy) good at killing things, too, if only as a side effect of being able to reverse (somewhat) the effects of death in the first place.

Snowbird
2007-01-27, 03:23 AM
Its an oblique reference to the Jetsons and the Flintstones. Georege Jetson's boss was Spacely and Fred Flintstone's boss was Slate.

After reading this thread I went poking through the comics again and noticed that the ground-crew woman on page 7,3 looked very similar to Wilma Flintstone

Runolfr
2007-01-29, 01:14 PM
Well, she's probably good at that, too. But recall that the first spell action we saw her take (or saw the effects of) was uncroaking Manpower the Temporary. (Yegods, that name still cracks me up.) Necromancers are traditionally (in games, not "actual" necromancy) good at killing things, too, if only as a side effect of being able to reverse (somewhat) the effects of death in the first place.

Her instructions aside, I don't actually recall Manpower being "uncroaked" at any point.

Xaspian
2007-01-29, 02:19 PM
You can see a zombified version of him in page 3. One would assume that he has been uncroaked there...

Maurog
2007-01-30, 03:34 PM
I don't think anyone missed this, but the Eager Elf on page 21 is Link.

Hart av Srednak
2007-01-30, 06:51 PM
If you look closely the order wich Ansom speaks Elf names you'll see that Link is Schlemiel Elf. Picture angle is changed between two last panels but Ansom says names in that order wich he walks. I spose

5tephen
2007-01-30, 07:46 PM
Nah- I'd be going with Link being the Eager Elf.

"Woo! Yes!"

I don't get the reference to Schlemiel though. Is it to Peter Schlemiel (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Schlemiel)?
If so... still don't get it. Maybe next page.

The Demented One
2007-01-30, 07:51 PM
Schlemiel's a Yiddish word for someone who's something of an idiot. It's typically associated with the word schlimazel, meaning a very unlucky person. To put it in my mother's words, "a schlemiel's someone who looks for a needle in a haystack, a schlimazel's someone who finds the needle in his thumb."

Luvlein
2007-01-30, 08:35 PM
Well, I didn't even know this Link.

WarBrute
2007-01-30, 08:58 PM
If you look closely the order wich Ansom speaks Elf names you'll see that Link is Schlemiel Elf. Picture angle is changed between two last panels but Ansom says names in that order wich he walks. I spose

I believe you are quite incorrect. The Eager Elf would be the one that would be most EAGER to attack. Link is the only one happy to be attacking first.

Luvlein: Link is the main character of the popular nintendo games The Legend of Zelda

Zeb The Troll
2007-01-31, 12:30 AM
Schlemiel's a Yiddish word for someone who's something of an idiot. It's typically associated with the word schlimazel, meaning a very unlucky person. To put it in my mother's words, "a schlemiel's someone who looks for a needle in a haystack, a schlimazel's someone who finds the needle in his thumb."
Hmm, that explains a bit.

Time to date myself. The only time I've ever heard these words used were in the theme song for "Laverne and Shirley (http://www.lyricsondemand.com/tvthemes/laverneandshirleylyrics.html)". I honestly thought they were made up words.

Hart av Srednak
2007-01-31, 04:34 AM
I believe you are quite incorrect. The Eager Elf would be the one that would be most EAGER to attack. Link is the only one happy to be attacking first.

Luvlein: Link is the main character of the popular nintendo games The Legend of Zelda

After re-reading that comic and couple of thoughts about Links personality (so eager to save Zelda) I must say I agree. Link is the eager one.

BTW for anyone who haven't noticed: there is new Arkentool in panel 1

One Skunk Todd
2007-02-01, 04:06 PM
Revisiting the currency names. Schmucker is probably a combination of:

shmuck: an insulting term for a person, jerkiness combined with low intelligence (at least that's how I understand it)

and

smackers: an old term for dollars, I don't hear it used much any more

The Headache Spell scene somewhat recalls at least one Dilbert strip about flu shots, and I think one about headache pills.

Scubasteve0209
2007-02-01, 07:56 PM
I'm surprised this hasn't been mentioned here, But I believe

Vinnie Doombats, is a variation on a David Letterman character "Dr. Vinnie Boombats"

Peregrine
2007-02-01, 07:59 PM
I did wonder where Vinnie Doombats came from. It sounded familiar... but I'm not familiar with the Letterman character. Possibly they're both based off something I have heard of? Or else my sense of familiarity is wrong.

mandarinka
2007-02-11, 09:28 AM
Seems to me /and it was already noted elsewhere/ that Jillian "Zamussels" is intended to mean semi-useless. Sounds that way. It would make sense if she keeps getting captured.

Peregrine
2007-02-11, 08:07 PM
Zamussels... semi-useless... Zami-ussles... no, it's too much of a stretch for me. I really think "jillions o' muscles" is the only pun there.

Grendita
2007-02-13, 06:03 PM
I thouth the "tool" thing was a sort of pun with "fool", like "Stanley the fool"

Where I live at least its also a derogetary term, like calling someone a spanner. Basically someone who can be used/manipulated by others, which fits Stanley well :D.

Beleriphon
2007-02-14, 12:19 AM
Where I live at least its also a derogetary term, like calling someone a spanner. Basically someone who can be used/manipulated by others, which fits Stanley well :D..

Yes its an actually insult, with that exactly meaning. Its also, as mentioned on previous pages, that Stanley is a major international producer of all kinds of tools. They are particularly well known in North America for producing all manner of power tools.

CrossP
2007-02-14, 12:02 PM
"Tool" when used as an insult usually refers to a "tool" as slang for "phallus"

Cobra_Ikari
2007-02-14, 04:15 PM
...I loved how good of a Findamancer Wanda is. And especially the line "I want a guy who snacks on gwiffons and eats Marbits for BREAKFAST!"...I'll admit to an unhealthy amount of giggles there. How fearsome this man who eats peeps and Lucky Charms is.

KitsuneChan
2007-02-14, 07:12 PM
But I never got the "speak the language, breath the air and things." It just seems to unspecific, not like the other ones. Or am I just looking too deep into this? Does this belong in the explanations thread?

Zeb The Troll
2007-02-14, 11:00 PM
But I never got the "speak the language, breath the air and things." It just seems to unspecific, not like the other ones. Or am I just looking too deep into this? Does this belong in the explanations thread?Well, I can help with the "language" bit. What Stanley actually says is "He's gotta speak Language." I interpreted this to be similar to the usage of Common as a language in D&D. He just wants someone with whom he can communicate. As for the others, I'm guessing he just means he wants someone who's not gonna die as soon as he's summoned because he breathes water or carbon dioxide and sulfuric acid or something.

Sage in the Playground
2007-02-15, 08:07 PM
Well, I can help with the "language" bit. What Stanley actually says is "He's gotta speak Language." I interpreted this to be similar to the usage of Common as a language in D&D. He just wants someone with whom he can communicate. As for the others, I'm guessing he just means he wants someone who's not gonna die as soon as he's summoned because he breathes water or carbon dioxide and sulfuric acid or something.

I agree. And thats about the most logic we've seen Stanely show. After all, what if the perfect warlord was a butterfly?

ShneekeyTheLost
2007-02-15, 09:56 PM
I just knew there was a pun with the word tchotchke...

tchotchke (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/tchotchke) basically means a trinket or toy...

KitsuneChan
2007-02-15, 10:09 PM
Yeah, that's what I assumed... But it didn't fit in with the rest of his requirements, in a way. All that talk about Marbits and Gwiffons, then "he's gotta speak language." It kinda stands out.

Butterflies make pwnsome warlords.

Cobra_Ikari
2007-02-16, 01:18 AM
I don't know about warlords, but weapons? Just get one in the right place, and bam! Weather disaster!

EDIT: And in the spirit of the topic, I was sorely tempted to call KitsuneChan a foxy lady. Sorry!

Dhavaer
2007-02-16, 05:52 AM
The Jetstone soldier's battlecry 'My life for Jetstone!' seems to be a reference to the Protoss Zealot: 'My life for Aiur!'.

Peregrine
2007-02-18, 10:13 AM
Yeah, that's what I assumed... But it didn't fit in with the rest of his requirements, in a way. All that talk about Marbits and Gwiffons, then "he's gotta speak language." It kinda stands out.

Well, he did say "don't screw up the basics" at this point. Everything else was his wishlist for his Ultimate Warlord of Doom!!™ But, obviously familiar with literature's (and D&D DMs') grand history of screwing with wishes, he specified some basics to make sure he didn't get totally gypped. (Instead his wish only got somewhat twisted. :smalltongue:)

So yeah, "speak Language, breathe the air" was a bit less grand than "snacks on gwiffons and eats Marbits for BREAKFAST!", but it still fits in.

Jaguira
2007-02-18, 08:07 PM
Wanda's tribe is the "Croatan," which I'm fairly sure is a pun on "Croatoan," which had to do with the "vanishing" American settlement-dealie.
Jillian's sword looks suspiciously like Cloud Strife's, neverminding the discription of one of her strengths being "Unrealisticly over-sized weaponry."

Thanatos
2007-02-21, 10:27 PM
Hmm, that explains a bit.

Time to date myself. The only time I've ever heard these words used were in the theme song for "Laverne and Shirley (http://www.lyricsondemand.com/tvthemes/laverneandshirleylyrics.html)". I honestly thought they were made up words.
You've never heard "Pretty Fly for a Rabbi" by Weird Al? It has a good bit of Yiddish, including schlemiel.
http://student.santarosa.edu/~mferrand/rabbilyrics.html

I remember seeing Laverne & Shirley too, though I don't remember the theme song, apart from a vague recollection that it involved counting, similar to a jumprope cadence.

Zeb The Troll
2007-02-21, 10:32 PM
You've never heard "Pretty Fly for a Rabbi" by Weird Al? It has a good bit of Yiddish, including schlemiel.
http://student.santarosa.edu/~mferrand/rabbilyrics.html (http://student.santarosa.edu/%7Emferrand/rabbilyrics.html)No, never heard the song. I'm not a big fan of Weird Al. Nothing against him, just not my cup o' tea.

Darth Paradox
2007-02-23, 03:20 PM
Am I the only one that confuses Laverne and Shirley with Thelma and Louise?

TheOtherMC
2007-02-23, 03:30 PM
Am I the only one that confuses Laverne and Shirley with Thelma and Louise?

Erm.....I dont think Laverne and Shirly ever dealt with rape or suicide on the wrong end of a cliff wall.......well there WAS that one "very special episode..."

Darth Paradox
2007-02-23, 04:15 PM
Erm.....I dont think Laverne and Shirly ever dealt with rape or suicide on the wrong end of a cliff wall.......well there WAS that one "very special episode..."

It helps that I haven't ever seen either of them.

TheOtherMC
2007-02-23, 04:16 PM
It helps that I haven't ever seen either of them.

Not even Themla and Louise? Huh...kids these days....make me feel old. (18!)

TinSoldier
2007-02-23, 10:52 PM
I've seen both Thelma and Louise as well as Laverne and Shirley. No, they aren't very similar.

Thelma and Louise is a great movie! You should definitely watch it. Laverne and Shirley was a pretty good sitcom, but you really can't even compare it.

Thanatos
2007-02-23, 11:49 PM
Not even Themla and Louise? Huh...kids these days....make me feel old. (18!)
Never saw it either... but the only thing that seems similar is the "Uncommon Female Name & Slightly More Common Female Name" pattern.

Darth Paradox
2007-02-26, 11:52 AM
Never saw it either... but the only thing that seems similar is the "Uncommon Female Name & Slightly More Common Female Name" pattern.

That's exactly why my mind mixes them up. That's pretty much the only data I have to go on, except for having heard that one of them is a sitcom, and the other one a movie with a car going off a cliff.

RibbonViking
2007-02-28, 12:59 AM
Most of the points I would have made have already been posted, so I'll just throw on two more bits. Not that I really think this is the source of Stanley's "Plaid", but it struck me also as a connection to Spaceballs, and being ludicrous in general.

Also, regarding Laverne and Shirley, and their theme - it's referenced in the first Wayne's World movie, when they arrive in Milwaukee. That entire musical montage is shot-for-shot from the introductory sequence of the L&S show.

ShneekeyTheLost
2007-02-28, 05:14 PM
Going back to the original topic of pun translations...

Bogroll lacks an eye, and now he is a Lackey. So he is a lack-eye indeed.

*rimshot*

TinSoldier
2007-03-01, 12:50 AM
Thanks for pointing that out. It completely evaded me before.

Scientivore
2007-03-02, 02:58 AM
I already put this in the Erfworld 29 thread; it'll keep longer here.

I think that the color shift in Bogroll's SCREEECH to a halt was a clever way of showing a Doppler effect (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doppler_effect). Since he was approaching, his sound effects would've been metaphorically blue shifted (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_shift) to begin with. So then, when he decelerated, they would've been un-blue shifted -- or effectively redshifted (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redshift).

I would've been impressed even if it were backwards. Redshift is much better known than blue shift, so it would've been the better choice to show that effect regardless. That it was actually correct? Wow! :smallcool:

Thanatos
2007-03-02, 04:50 AM
I already put this in the Erfworld 29 thread; it'll keep longer here.

I think that the color shift in Bogroll's SCREEECH to a halt was a clever way of showing a Doppler effect (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doppler_effect). Since he was approaching, his sound effects would've been metaphorically blue shifted (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_shift) to begin with. So then, when he decelerated, they would've been un-blue shifted -- or effectively redshifted (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redshift).

I would've been impressed even if it were backwards. Redshift is much better known than blue shift, so it would've been the better choice to show that effect regardless. That it was actually correct? Wow! :smallcool:
Red is also the color for "stop" in traffic, so it'd be the natural choice for emphasizing a rapid deceleration. Maybe the redshift explanation is just a happy coincidence, like the Key Lime Pie/Dead Like Me thing.

Scientivore
2007-03-02, 07:27 AM
Good point. If anything it's easier for me to come up with a complicated explanation than a simple one. I hadn't even noticed that it was green/go vs. red/stop.

Vargtass
2007-03-02, 03:51 PM
Thanks for pointing that out. It completely evaded me before.

Ouch! Why did you point his eye out! :smallbiggrin:

Lackey indeed!

Caractacus
2007-03-05, 05:31 PM
If there's an Arkenhammer, will there be...

1. an Arkensaw?
2. an Arkenstone? (perhaps the Little Rock the Titan dropped?)


Sorry, I just posted the same idea in the Arkentool reference thread and only now noticed yours here.

I've never been ninja'd by nearly three months before. Feelin' old 'n' slow...:smallsigh:

MarshmallowPeep
2007-03-06, 02:38 PM
Got a nice one. In #31 tool looks like Thor the god of thunder (e.g. in the Marvel Comics), when he is airborn, hanging at his mighty hammer. Maybe he is throwing lightning soon.

Wolf53226
2007-03-06, 03:49 PM
Revisiting the currency names. Schmucker is probably a combination of:

shmuck: an insulting term for a person, jerkiness combined with low intelligence (at least that's how I understand it)

and

smackers: an old term for dollars, I don't hear it used much any more

The Headache Spell scene somewhat recalls at least one Dilbert strip about flu shots, and I think one about headache pills.

Personally, when I heard Schmuckers, I though of the brand of jelly and preserves. Since most things like Marbits and Gwifons are sugary foods. But that may have just been me.

Darth Paradox
2007-03-06, 04:47 PM
Personally, when I heard Schmuckers, I though of the brand of jelly and preserves. Since most things like Marbits and Gwifons are sugary foods. But that may have just been me.

At least there shouldn't be any concerns with its viability as a currency; I'm sure all the merchants are happy to be paid that way. After all, with a name like "Shmuckers"...

jjfoley
2007-03-06, 04:54 PM
Didn't see anyone mention the ORLY reference in Erfworld 9, so just thought I'd chime in. It's a common term on forums and in online gaming, as a short form of "oh, really?" Meaning "I don't believe you."

Usually followed by YARLY ("Yeah, really!")

Though here I imagine it being pronounced as if it rhymed with "sorely." It's funny imagining a bunch of owls flying around chanting it, either way.

That particular panel is right off of the picture that made the term somewhat famous: http://www.orlyowl.com/

Luvlein
2007-03-06, 05:07 PM
Didn't see anyone mention the ORLY reference in Erfworld 9, so just thought I'd chime in. It's a common term on forums and in online gaming, as a short form of "oh, really?" Meaning "I don't believe you."
O RLY?

http://www.giantitp.com/forums/showthread.php?t=30971&highlight=orly

Cobra_Ikari
2007-03-06, 05:28 PM
I just realized some connection between Sizemore and Seismic. Dunno if that's been posted, too lazy to look.

SteveMB
2007-03-06, 06:33 PM
Maybe it's a reach, but the "tssiff" sound effect from #30 (http://www.giantitp.com/comics/erf0030.html) sounds like the sarcastic dismissal "As if!" (which is pretty much Wanda's response to Jillian's proposition).

ryos
2007-03-20, 02:51 PM
I doubt there's any actual connection, but I got a chuckle out of the fact that Sizemore is a poopsmith (http://www.homestarrunner.com/vcr_poop.html).

"No, for real, Sizemore's a good guy--he's just got a crappy job."

Fabuloso
2007-03-21, 05:44 AM
EyeBook.
Eye. Eye.

...
I can't think of a joke about white notebooks with an Apple carved on top of them, boop me.

sethdarkwater
2007-03-24, 08:20 PM
Stanley the Plaid is Stanley the played.

Zeku
2007-03-25, 01:36 AM
Someone mentioned the ruby in an early strip as being sold to pay for another group of units. In all likelihood this refers to a 4x game, where a resource is automatically included into the economy of a nearby city. Using that extra gold or production to support additional troops is merely one possible use for it.

mandarinka
2007-03-25, 10:08 AM
Well, It seemed fairly obvious to me that the gem is a reference to that wacky "resource gathering" and economy in Heroes of Might and Magic - roaming the land and picking those logs, stones, color jewels, pink crystals and bowls of mercury. Then you would buy stuff for these.

Fineous Orlon
2007-03-27, 10:42 PM
I just realized some connection between Sizemore and Seismic. Dunno if that's been posted, too lazy to look.

I think he's somewhat melancholy, and he 'sighs more' than most people.

Ditto on being lazy, I am not claiming first here.