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Sasaisen
2014-04-01, 05:27 PM
OVERVIEW

Final Fantasy Infinite is a rules-medium original system, designed to be mechanically robust, easy to prepare, and quick to run, all while maintaining the feel of classic Final Fantasy. Highlights of the system include simple math (single- and low-double-digit addition, with minor subtraction and halving/doubling), mix-and-match character creation and progression, and a tactical combat minigame with abstracted positioning.

Special credit goes to ThreadOfFate, my sounding board and partner in crime, as well as to Dust, author of Final Fantasy d6 (http://www.giantitp.com/forums/showthread.php?173958). This project was originally a revamping of her system before ThreadOfFate and I diverged massively into crazytown, and her work still serves as an inspiration.

WHAT IS

Final Fantasy Infinite is a roleplaying game for at least two people, ideally three to seven, and potentially as many players as can fit in a room. In it, players assume the roles of characters on various sides of a grandiose tale, and the story and fate of a fictional world hinge on their actions. Generally, most players will take on the role of heroes, major characters directly in the thick of events who are tasked with doing the impossible. One player (or possibly more) will take on the mantle of the Game Moderator, or GM, and play as various monsters - allies, opposition, and other characters who will weave in and out of the narrative. As the players add their own directions and spin to their shared tale, the GM keeps everything interesting and everyone on the same page, and serves as a tiebreaker when players can't reach a consensus.

WHAT NEED

Final Fantasy Infinite makes uses six-sided dice (the kind commonly found with board games) to resolve matters of chance. While, strictly speaking, only a single die (which can be rolled again and again in a time-consuming fashion) is needed, the more dice can be obtained, the better. Most checks involve three to five dice, but occasionally up to eight will be required, and things are much smoother if everyone has their own set to roll. Besides that, all that's needed is pencils and paper (or other handy record-keeping implements) and a healthy imagination.

HOW DO

Whenever your character attempts an action, you will typically be asked to make a check. You roll three six-sided dice, add the results together, and add the indicated attribute to the total, as well as any additional modifiers depending on the action or situation. This is compared to the difficulty for the action; if the result is equal or greater than the number associated with the difficulty, the check is a success. For some actions, if you also beat higher difficulties, you can produce greater or additional effects; for others, the harder you fail, the worse off you become.

When a character is attempting to do something to someone, this usually calls for something slightly different - an opposed check. Instead of one of the standard difficulties, the difficulty is based on one of the opponent's attributes, usually the same one the character is adding to their check unless otherwise specified. In all other respects, this functions as a standard check; notably and unlike other games, only the acting character actually rolls.

Finally, some checks may have no associated difficulty. These are typically used to set the difficulty for other, future checks in a situation, or to determine how long particular tasks take.

If the difficulty is……your total must at least be…
Trivial6
Easy10
Moderate13
Hard16
eXtreme20
Fantastic23
Ludicrous26
Impossible30
For an opposed check......you must roll higher than…
Simple6 + opponent's attribute
eVen10 + opponent's attribute
Challenging13 + opponent's attribute

BREAKS AND COMPLICATIONS

Even when totally outclassed, a character can sometimes stumble on and succeed through sheer luck. If at any time you roll three 6s on a check, you benefit from a break. Generally, this means you may roll an extra die and add that roll, minus 1, to your check (effectively, a bonus from +0 to +5). Alternatively, if you so choose or would already succeed at the check, your action results in an additional beneficial effect or fortunate circumstance, as determined by your group.

Similarly, bad luck can strike even the most competent of characters. If you roll three "1"s on a check, you suffer a complication. Not only does the check automatically fail (even if it would have otherwise succeeded), but now there's another negative circumstance or problem for you and your allies to deal with. This may be either a direct consequence of your failure, or an external event that "caused" you to fail.

EDGES AND FAULTS

A character's training, helpful circumstances, and outside assistance can give them an edge in a situation. Conversely, injuries, conditions, and other adverse circumstances can cause a character to suffer a fault. When an edge or fault applies to a check you're making, you roll an additional die, and add together either the three highest (for an edge) or lowest (for a fault) rolls for your result. Multiple edges and faults can stack, to a maximum of five extra dice (for a total of eight dice rolled), and each edge negates one fault when both apply to the same check. Breaks and complications are determined by the three dice you keep.

ASSISTANCE AND TEAMWORK

From time to time, everyone can use a little help to see a task through. Nearly any task that requires a check can benefit from assistance. When this is the case, each assisting character first makes a check. This is generally the same check required for the task at hand, with the difficulty reduced by one step, but a different check that could plausibly render assistance may be substituted (at its normal difficulty) at your group's discretion. Each success adds an edge to the leading character's check, while a failure adds a fault.

Many situations are better handled as considering one character to be "leading" and the rest "assisting", rather than everyone's actions being evaluated on their own. This is referred to as a teamwork check, and is recommended when characters are combining efforts towards a single specific goal, or when individual efforts are important but one lucky or unlucky roll shouldn't dictate success or failure for the entire activity. When making a teamwork check, the leading character is the one whose role is pivotal to the scenario or ties the others' actions together; if this isn't obvious, then treat the character with the highest modifier as the leading character. Common situations where teamwork checks are appropriate include negotiations, infiltrating a location as a group, and executing a heist.

DEFAULT AND ROUTINE CHECKS

In many cases, a character will attempt a task that isn't worth rolling for success or failure. Perhaps there is no penalty for failure (barring a complication), so success is a question of "when" rather than "if", or maybe the consequences simply aren't that interesting. To save time, there are two shortcuts to quickly establish whether success occurs.

If the check is not opposed, or opposed but made against an object, it can be performed as a default check. Instead of rolling, the character simply acts as if they rolled a 5, and thus automatically succeeds if 5 + their attribute meets the difficulty; essentially, this is a task well within their ability, and thus with little chance of failure under most circumstances.

If the check is not opposed, or opposed but made against an object, and additionally has no faults after edges are applied, it can be performed as a routine check. This is similar to a default check, except the character is treated as if they rolled a 10, and represents an "average" effort on their behalf, with no adverse conditions (or enough training to counteract them).

MEASUREMENTS

To make things more manageable at the table, this game uses abstract values for quantities such as distance or time. While real units still apply whenever the situation may call for it, for gameplay purposes it usually doesn't matter exactly (for instance) how far apart two characters are, only their rough separation.

Range is the most straightforward, and measures the approximate distance between two points. Each Range increment represents a spread of values as indicated on the table below, and is approximately twice as large as the previous increment. Area (the two-dimensional extent of a location) and Size (of characters and objects) use the same scale, and are both generally measured along the longest dimension. Places, characters, or objects with an unusual shape may have an adjusted Area or Size.

Range/Area/SizeActual Length
0Less than 1m
11m to 2.5m
22.5m to 5m
35m to 10m
410m to 25m
525m to 50m
650m to 100m
7100m to 250m
8250m to 500m
9500m to 1km
101km to 2.5km
112.5km to 5km
125km to 10km

Time (at least on a fine scale) is tracked in rounds, each roughly fifteen to twenty seconds in length, during which characters have one or more chances to move and take action. This is described in more detail in Chapter 4.


Heroes are the vehicles through which players explore the world of Final Fantasy. They may run the gamut of appearances, personalities, and archetypes, but at their core they are represented by a common set of abilities and numerical "stats". These are the foundation for how the character interacts with the world, and how they likely they are to succeed at their endeavors.

CORE ASPECTS

Level and Tier are separate but related measures of a character's overall capabilities. Level is an abstract value and not usually recognizable by characters; it ranges from 1 to 15 and determines the minimum and maximum attributes and quantity of abilities a character can possess. Tier, on the other hand, is readily observable, whether through appearance, lore, reputation, or simply the "aura" they radiate (i.e. "I have a bad feeling about him…"), and determines which jobs, spells, and equipment they are qualified to access or use. Each Tier corresponds to a spread of Levels, and can be identified either numerically (for clarity) or descriptively (through titles or epithets); a very high-Level character thus might actually be known as a Legendary Soldier or a Black Sage.

LevelsTierExample Titles
1-31Acolyte, Adept, Novice
4-62Expert, Magus
7-93Master, Theurge
10-124Champion, Paragon, Wizard
13-155Legend, Sage

This chapter assumes a hero starts at Level (and Tier) 1 - while they may have a mundane career or minor heroic antics behind them, their legend is just beginning. Heroes who have adventures and experience behind them, or are joining in the middle of a story, may be higher in Level at the group's discretion; this is discussed in Chapter 2.

Type is the biological and physical classification of a character, and with few exceptions is obvious to the world. There are ten types: Aerial, Arcane, Aquatic, Beast, Construct, Dragon, Fiend, Humanoid, Insect, and Plant. Of these, a hero is assumed to be Humanoid by default; this gives them a weakness to elemental Shadow, a resistance to elemental Light, and an extra background. Characters of a special race or with a less-than-human biology can be represented by certain backgrounds (such as Strange Heritage), or can be another type outright at the group's discretion; backgrounds are located in Chapter 2, while non-Humanoid types are discussed in detail in Chapter 8.

Attributes represent, in general terms. how well a character interacts with the world. Any time a character makes a check, they will add one of these attributes based on the task in question. All characters have four attributes:
Might affects how much physical damage a character inflicts and takes, and determines their ability to exert force, carry loads, jump, overcome obstacles, and endure in the face of hardship.
Quickness affects how often a character strikes with and avoids physical attacks, and determines their ability to keep their footing, react quickly, avoid attracting undue attention, and finagle their way into where they shouldn’t be.
Presence affects how much magical damage a character inflicts and takes, and determines their ability to resist social or mental pressure, influence others, and take notice of the world around them.
Insight affects how often a character strikes with and avoids magical attacks, and determines their ability to think quickly on their feet, solve puzzles or conundrums, analyze an object/person/situation, and engineer solutions to tough problems.A hero begins with six points of attributes, divided in any fashion, but no attribute can be less than 0 or more than 3. On top of this, a bonus is added to their attributes based on their current job and level.

BACKGROUNDS AND DESTINY

Backgrounds are perks that help to represent their upbringing, heritage, accomplishments, defining moments, and driving influences. These support a character's history by providing tangible benefits (and occasionally drawbacks or obligations) but are not all-encompassing - not every twist or detail needs to have a background attached to it.

Destiny on the other hand, indicates a character's future - their importance, their untapped potential, and the great (or terrible) deeds they may yet perform. While every character possesses a background or two, only notable or "named" characters have Destiny. Watch Commander Robert Stein, Dead Hand Jack, and the Terror in the Night are destined characters; the faceless palace guard, unnamed bandit #3, and randomly-encountered pack of wolves are standard characters with no Destiny. Simply having Destiny helps to prevent an untimely demise, and it can be either temporarily spent or semi-permanently "burned" to represent the universe working (or cheating) in one's favor.

Of course, a character isn't simply destined, they are destined to do things. Those things are called fates, and can include personal goals or aspirations, roles the character will play in future events, critical decisions they must make, or an impending doom they must struggle to avoid. A character confronting their fate (whether they meet it or "avert" it) allows them to grow, not just in power but in influence.

Heroes are always Destined characters, and a Humanoid hero begins with either three backgrounds and a Destiny of 1; two backgrounds and a Destiny of 2; or one background and a Destiny of 3. Heroes of other types have one fewer background. Backgrounds, Destiny, and fates are elaborated upon in Chapter 2.

JOBS AND ABILITIES

In the world of Final Fantasy, a character's profession is a vital part of their identity. While there are thousands of possible professions one could have, only some of these provide the skills necessary for adventuring; these are collectively referred to as jobs. Jobs are grouped together by Tiers; Tier 1 jobs (basic jobs), are easily accessible and provide a well-rounded and foundational set of job abilities; while higher-Tier jobs (advanced jobs) represent more specialized, tangential, or difficult-to-master paths.

A fledgling hero may be of any of the basic jobs, granting them the appropriate core ability, attribute bonuses, equipment proficiencies, and magic affinities. They possess two job abilities, one from their current job and the other from any basic job. The job system, as well as the various jobs and abilities, are detailed in Chapter 3.

EQUIPMENT AND SPELLS

A character's talents and abilities can carry them far, but they'll also need the proper tools get the job done. A character's equipment includes the trusty weapon at their side, the armor or clothing keeping them safe from the world, and all the various accessories and knicknacks they acquire over their travels. For the more mystically-inclined, there are also spells, individual effects that are each the magical equivalent of weapon or tool at their disposal.

A typical hero begins with 500 Gil, which they may spend or have spent on Tier 1 items equipment and spells. Their backgrounds and job abilities may modify the amount of funds they begin with, or grant certain equipment or spells for free. Chapter 6 describes equipment and how to obtain it, while Chapter 7 explains how magic works.

MISCELLANEOUS

Hit Points (HP) - Every character has 20 of these, which are lost whenever they fail to resist damage and regained when they rest or are healed. Tougher characters have higher resistance attributes, defense ratings, or are larger, but still have the same amount of HP.

Magic Points (MP) - Every character also has 20 of these, which are spent to use magical job abilities or spells and recovered via resting or items.

Size - A rough estimation of how large a character is. Most Humanoid characters are Size 1, unless something states otherwise.

Speed - How far a character can move in a combat round. A character's Speed is equal to 1/2 of their Might (ignoring their level bonus), rounded up, plus the greater of their Size or Tier.

Sasaisen
2014-04-01, 05:28 PM
Reserved for character options and job system.

Sasaisen
2014-04-01, 05:30 PM
Whenever the order people act in is important or contested, the party is considered to be "in combat". Despite the name, this doesn’t necessarily mean that anything violent or hostile is happening, though that is usually the case. Nothing is fundamentally different about how the world works; anything that can be done "in combat" can be done "out of combat", and vice versa (although it may take time enough to be impractical).

INITIATIVE AND ACTING ORDER

Combats are divided into rounds, each about twenty to thirty seconds in length, during which each character will have at least one chance to act. Whenever a round starts, all characters involved make an initiative check. This is a special Quickness check with no associated difficulty; instead, the result of this check is the character's initiative, which determines how soon (and often) they can act in this round.

The character with the highest initiative (ties are broken by Tier, then by Quickness) takes their turn first. During their turn, they perform one action of their choice. They may also move both before and after their action, and carry out as many minor or inconsequential tasks (non-actions) as they wish.

After a character completes their turn, their initiative is reduced by 20, and the character with the next highest initiative takes a turn. Characters whose initiatives fall below 0 "drop out" of the round and can't act further; otherwise, they will be able to take an additional turn later in the round when their new initiative is reached. In this way, characters who are sufficiently Quick (or lucky, or prepared) are able to act two or even three times in a round. Once no one is left to act, the round ends and everyone rolls initiative for the next round.

POSITIONING

Combats (especially at higher Tiers) are dynamic and complex affairs; to help streamline matters, locations are divided into abstracted and approximate regions, instead of being mapped out in hexes or squares. Rather than worry about a character's precise position, a character simply "occupies" a region and is assumed to be moving throughout during a combat round. Each region has an Area, is connected to one or more neighboring regions along an edge, and may be partially or completely subdivided further into smaller regions.

Range
What does matter are the Ranges between them, as well as to objects and points of interest. By default, the Range between any two characters is equal to that of the smallest region they share; this is also the greatest Range possible between them, without one of them moving to a different region. However, there are two sets of circumstances under which a better Range can be drawn.

First, every character may optionally have a focus - another character, object, or point that they orient themselves to and acts as a point of reference. The Range between each character and their focus is tracked separately, and characters can increase or decrease the Range between them and their focus during their turn as part of their movement.

Second, if a "chain" of Ranges between multiple characters or objects are known, the Range between any two characters in the chain can be found by adding the intervening Ranges. When adding two Ranges, the sum is the greater of the two Ranges plus 1 if the Ranges are within one increment of each other, or the greater of the two Ranges otherwise. Multiple Ranges can be added by first adding the two smallest Ranges, then the next two smallest, and so on.

Reach
Every character has a zone of influence around them, or Reach, normally equal to their Size. Reach represents how near a character has to be to physically interact with another character or object; this includes the use of Close abilities and attacks. It also represents the area where characters can effectively defend themselves: all attacks made against a character while within their Reach are treated as Close attacks.

MOVEMENT

Whether a character can perform a certain movement is determined by their Speed. Some movements are considered long movements; these decrease the character's Speed by 1 (and thus limit further movements) for the rest of the round.

Focus
The character chooses another character or object as their focus, determining the Range appropriately and replacing their current focus (if any). Alternately, they may simply drop their current focus.

Engage


Disengage


Advance
The character moves to another region, provided the Range between them and their destination is less than or equal to their Speed. If the Range is within one increment of their Speed, this is a long movement for them.

ACTIONS

The following are the basic abilities available to every character. Various job abilities can modify these, or allow for new actions.

Assist (Personal)
As with most other activities, characters can aid one another during a fight. Combat assistance generally requires an accuracy check against an enemy, and either gives all characters an edge on any accuracy check against that enemy until it next acts, or gives the enemy a fault on its action next turn.

Cast (Varies)
A character can cast any spell they know as their action, provided they have enough MP.

Dash (Personal)
When getting from point A to point B (or staying away from enemy C) is essential, a character can trade their action to increase their Movement by 1 for rest of the round. This can't raise their Movement to more than their normal Movement, plus 1.

Defend / Delay (Personal)
Sometimes, inaction is the best course of action. If the character has not moved on their turn, they are Defending; otherwise, they are simply Delaying. Both actions immediately end their turn, but their initiative is only reduced by 10 (instead of 20). If this results in them dropping out of the round, they receive +10 to their initiative next round. Defending characters gain two edges on all resistance checks until their next turn.

Prepare (Personal)
Preparing allows a character to trade time for success, whether they're lining up the perfect shot, charging up a fireball, waiting for the opponent's guard to slip, or simply taking the time to do a thorough job. When a character Prepares, they specify a particular action that requires a check; if they perform that action before the end of their next turn, they gain an edge on their check. Multiple turns can be spent Preparing the same action, and the edges will accumulate. However, any unresisted damage taken, or performing any action other than Defending, Delaying, or Preparing the same action, results in the loss of these edges.
Special: Some abilities or activities require multiple actions to complete, or happen in a longer timeframe than a single combat turn. Gaining a single edge on these tasks usually requires the same number of actions or amount of time spent Preparing as the task itself. Other activities require an indeterminate amount of time, or have the time they take influenced by the check result; these generally cannot be Prepared.

Strike (Close Physical Attack)
A character can make an attack with any weapon at hand (including their innate Brawling weapon), with the description of what exactly this entails left to the attacker. By default, this is a Close Physical attack against a single target, with the Size equal to the greater of their Size or Tier, and inflicting damage based on the weapon’s Tier. Certain weapon traits can modify how this attack works, as follows:
Grappling - The character can choose not to deal any damage with an attack from a Brawling weapon. Instead, they can make an opposed Might + (Size or Tier) check; success allows them to perform one of the three following options:
Climb -
Lift -
Pin -
While you are grappling, the Range between you and your opponent is 0. At any point during your turn, you may change which option you are applying, or end the grapple. On your opponent's turn, as their action they may attempt the same opposed check to gain control of the grapple; success allows them to either grapple you instead or break free entirely.
Mystic - Attacks with Arcane weapons are Magical, rather than Physical, and thus apply Insight to accuracy and Presence to damage.
Ranged - Archery, Marksman, and Throwing weapons can make Ranged attacks.
Sweeping - Great and Reach weapons can make Close Burst attacks, with an Area equal to their Reach.

RANGE AND TARGETING

Every ability has one or more of these tags, determining how it can be used and whom it can be used upon.

Attack abilities require an accuracy check to affect their target. This is a special opposed check: the attacker rolls 3d6 + Quickness (for a Physical attack) or Insight (for a Magical attack) against 10 + the defender’s Quickness/Insight. This is modified as follows
If the attack is Close, or is Ranged but is made within the defender's Reach, this check has one edge for every Size increment the attacker is larger than the defender, or one fault for every Size increment the attacker is smaller than the defender. A smaller attacker can negate a number of these faults equal to their Tier.
If the attack is Ranged and made from outside the defender's Reach, this check has one edge for every Size increment the attacker is smaller than the defender, or one fault for every Size increment the attacker is larger than the defender. A larger attacker can negate a number of these faults equal to their Tier.

Physical abilities are based on the user's and target's Quickness and Might, while Magical abilities instead use Insight and Presence. Some abilities may allow a character to make a Physical attack (Quickness) that deal Magical damage (Presence), or a Magical attack (Insight) that deal Physical damage (Might), but these are generally rare.

Personal abilities only affect the user.

Close abilities can only target the user or something within their Reach.

Ranged abilities can target anything within their Range, or anything the user can perceive if no Range is specified.

Burst abilities can affect multiple characters. Close Bursts are centered upon the user (who is excluded from effect unless otherwise stated) and affect all characters within the appropriate Area around them. Ranged Bursts affect a target within Range and everything in the appropriate Area around them, or alternately everything within a region of the same Area or smaller. If the Burst is an attack, a separate accuracy check is made for each notable character and for each "group" of identical standard characters.

Selective abilities are like Burst abilities, but allow the user to exclude characters from their effects.

Grounded abilities do not affect Floating or Flying characters.

DAMAGE, INJURY, AND DEATH

The most common consequence of an attack is damage, which results in the character losing HP (or MP, in special cases). Before this occurs, they are entitled to a resistance check to mitigate it. This is a special opposed check: 3d6 + Physical/Magical Defense + Might/Presence + Size, against a difficulty of the attack's base damage + the attacker's Might/Presence + the attack's Size. If the damage was from an attack, this check has one fault for every 5 over the difficulty the attacker rolled on their accuracy check. Success means the character "shrugs off" the damage entirely; otherwise, they lose 1 HP (or MP) for every 1 by which they failed. Abilities or effects that result in a character directly losing HP or MP, instead of inflicting damage, do not allow a resistance check.

HP represents a character's ability to keep fighting, and by itself doesn't correspond to any lasting physical harm; the only "penalty" from losing HP is that a character is now closer to defeat. However, if they lose 5 HP or more from a single effect, or roll a complication on a resistance check, they sustain an injury - a broken limb, nasty wound, impaired sense, concussion, or something else of lasting consequence. The exact nature and effects of the injury are left to the group; typically, an injury will give one to three faults on checks involving the affected limb or area, and/or reduce a trait such as Movement or MP. Effects that restore HP generally do not also heal injuries; instead, a character needs time and rest (in some combination) to recover. Insight checks, especially combined with medical knowledge or White Magic ability, can be used to speed up the recovery process.

Though a character can fight fine all the way down to 1 HP, they are in real danger once they reach 0 HP. What happens then depends on how "important" they are - more specifically, whether or not they have a Destiny rating (regardless of how much they actually have left to spend):
Characters without Destiny are Knocked Out (KO'ed) if the attacker who struck the finishing blow so wishes; otherwise, or if they were downed by a non-discerning source, they are dead.
Characters with Destiny are always KO'ed when reduced to 0 HP.
Characters who are KO’ed are in serious trouble. They are unable to take action or avoid attacks, and any damage they take results in consequential injury or even death. However, most opponents will leave a downed character be - they no longer pose a threat, but their allies still do, and there will be plenty of time to finish them off (if so inclined) after the fighting is over.

Characters who are dead are really dead. The only way to bring them back from the other side is by burning Destiny, either through them cheating death or a player declaring that a plot device exists somewhere to return them to life.

ELEMENTAL EFFECTS

Every character has a set of elemental affinities, which determine how they react to each of nine elements.
A character who is weak to an element takes 50% more damage from the appropriate type, after the resistance check.
A character who is neutral to an element does not modify the damage taken. This is the default affinity for any element.
A character who resists an element takes only half damage, after the resistance check.
A character who is immune to an element takes no damage, regardless of what they roll on the resistance check.
A character who absorbs an element, instead of taking damage, actually heals half the damage they would have otherwise taken after the resistance check.
Fire effects are usually less effective against Dragons, and very effective against Plants.
Special: Characters who are weak to or resistant to Fire, increase or halve the damage from being On Fire, respectively. Characters who are immune to or absorb Fire cannot be set On Fire.

Ice effects are usually less effective against Beasts, and very effective against Dragons.

Lightning effects are usually less effective against Plants, and very effective against Aquatics.

Earth effects are usually less effective against Insects, and very effective against Aerials; however…
Special: Many (but not all) Earth abilities are Grounded. Grounded effects are unable to target characters who Float or are capable of Flight.

Poison effects are usually less effective against Constructs, and very effective against Beasts.
Special: Characters who are weak to or resist Poison, increase or halve the HP loss from being Poisoned, respectively. Characters who are immune to or absorb Poison are also immune to being Poisoned.

Water effects are usually less effective against Aquatics, and very effective against Constructs.

Wind effects are usually less effective against Aerials, and very effective against Insects.

Holy effects are usually less effective against Humanoids, and very effective against Fiends.

Shadow effects usually less effective against Fiends, and very effective against Humanoids.

Non-Elemental effects, while technically not elementally-based, act similarly to elemental effects for classification purposes. Non-Elemental is the "default" damage type, and while characters are not often resistant to Non-Elemental effects, they are even more rarely weak to them.
Special: Abilities or effects that reference "elements", or allow a character to select an element, do not include Non-Elemental effects unless specifically mentioned.

STATUS CONDITIONS

A number of non-damage effects, both good and bad, can happen to a character. Collectively, these are referred to as status conditions; negative conditions are also called status ailments while positive ones are status enhancements. Unless otherwise mentioned in the condition or the ability causing them, status conditions last indefinitely until removed.

Status Ailments
Cursed: The character suffers a complication when they roll only two 1's on a check; if they roll three, the complication cannot be overcome with Destiny. Being Cursed also requires a character to spend a point of Destiny to activate a break.
Guard Broken: The character suffers two faults on all Might and Presence checks they make, and are unable to take the Defend or Delay actions.
Knocked Out (KO'ed): A Knocked Out character is unconscious - they can take no actions, cannot recover HP or MP, are unaware of their surroundings, and are treated as if their Quickness and Insight were 0. Failing to resist damage while KO'ed results in a lasting injury or trauma of the attacker's choice; if the attack inflicts 5 or more damage, the character is instead permanently maimed or even dead if the attacker chooses. KO'ed Characters that take no damage and are left alone for five to ten minutes (i.e. a Quick Rest) regain consciousness and 1 HP.
Mind Broken: The character suffers two faults on all Presence and Insight checks (excluding resistance checks), and reduces all Magical damage they inflict by 2.
On Fire: At the end of the round, the character suffers Fire damage equal to that of the effect that inflicted this condition, which is resisted as normal (excluding any faults from a high accuracy check). Every round a character remains On Fire, the damage increases by 1. They, or a character Close by, can make a Quickness check (difficulty is the damage) as an action to extinguish the flames. The condition also ends if the character successfully resists all damage from being On Fire, and any Water damage taken is subtracted from the On Fire damage. Multiple On Fire conditions do not stack; only the more damaging applies.
Poisoned: Every round, at the end of their turn, a Poisoned character loses 2 HP. A character that is both KO'ed and Poisoned cannot regain consciousness through a Quick Rest or other natural means.
Power Broken: The character suffers two faults on all Might and Quickness checks (excluding resistance checks), and reduces all Physical damage they inflict by 2.
Speed Broken: The character suffers two faults on all Quickness and Insight checks they make, reduces their Speed by 1, and is unable to take the Dash action.
Status Enhancements
Auto-Life: After the character is KOed, they are brought back to consciousness with 5 HP at the end of what would be their next turn. This enhancement is always dismissed after it is triggered.
Floating: The character can hover and drift a short distance above the surface. While not enough to allow free movement in all three dimensions, this renders them immune to Grounded effects and most difficult or hazardous terrain.
Regenerating: Every turn, at the end of their turn, a Regenerating character gains 2 HP.

RESTING AND RECOVERY

Characters will likely have many ways to heal and recover after a tough fight, but most of these cost valuable resources, usually in the form of consumable items or MP. If they can’t or don’t wish to expend their reserves, then they can always heal the natural way - by resting. There are three grades of rest, each of which provides an increasing benefit.

A Quick Rest is simply a break after a bit of excitement - five or ten minutes for characters to catch their breath. Characters don’t recover any HP or MP after a Quick Rest, but provided they possess a Destiny rating, they do regain a single point of Destiny if they currently have none. A Quick Rest also brings an end to many status conditions, including being Knocked Out, and allows certain limited-use Job abilities to "reset".

A Travel Rest is the typical quality of rest one can expect when on the road or away from civilization. With eight hours of such, a character recovers 5 HP and 5 MP, and their Destiny is refreshed. While getting some sleep is generally expected, characters mustn’t necessarily sleep for the entire duration, but they do need to rest. Sitting, conversing, keeping watch, and the like are acceptable, but anything more disruptive or strenuous will increase the amount of time before any recovery occurs by the length of the interruption (to a minimum of 1 hour and a maximum of 8 hours).

A Full Rest is a solid eight hours of sleep and recuperation in the comforts of civilization. After taking a Full Rest, a character recovers 10 HP and 10 MP, and their Destiny is refreshed. Any interruptions or strenuous activity downgrades a Full Rest to a Travel Rest.

Characters can only benefit from one Travel Rest or Full Rest in a 24-hour period. There is no such limit for Quick Rests.

ThreadOfFate
2014-04-02, 11:47 PM
Removed pending massive future update.

Sasaisen
2014-04-10, 06:16 PM
Reserved for monsters and environments.

Soultastic
2014-05-01, 10:30 AM
I've been meaning to post here for some time, but never took the time to actually do it. So here I am, posting now.

I'm excited to see how your system comes out, since I'm a fan of Dust's system. I am like most everyone else, I imagine, waiting for an update that we were promised over six months ago, and since then, have remainded in the dark as Dust has stopped posting.

Your system seems well thought out for a different change of pace without insulting the system we've come to love, so I look forward to playing around with this. Keep up the work. I just had to post to let you know your thread isn't going unignored. People are watching it.

Larkas
2014-05-01, 02:42 PM
Have you tried Marc's system (http://www.giantitp.com/forums/showthread.php?232101-Final-Fantasy-VII-D20-Roleplaying-Game-Core-Rulebook-(version-1-10))? It's not only actively maintained, but the creator is always after input from people who play it!

Now, that's not to discourage you from making your own system, I just thought it could be interesting to bring attention to a nice, well-thought out system that might actually help you out :smallsmile:

Sasaisen
2014-05-01, 03:58 PM
Status update, since apparently there's a tad of an audience: this is not dead. Over the past few weeks, I've been hashing out rules for basic adventuring tasks because a lot of what is in mind for the thief (and a good bit for the soldier) hinged on it - I can't make rules for a sneaky class without a solid foundation for sneaking. You can see some of this in the "Adventuring" section, which wasn't around when I last replied. Once that's done, I will technically have a playable system, and will add in the thief abilities (all of which are conceptualized, but not implemented).


I've been meaning to post here for some time, but never took the time to actually do it. So here I am, posting now.

I'm excited to see how your system comes out, since I'm a fan of Dust's system. I am like most everyone else, I imagine, waiting for an update that we were promised over six months ago, and since then, have remainded in the dark as Dust has stopped posting.

Your system seems well thought out for a different change of pace without insulting the system we've come to love, so I look forward to playing around with this. Keep up the work. I just had to post to let you know your thread isn't going unignored. People are watching it.

It's nice to know someone cares. :D If you have any comments on material I've posted, or questions about why I do X/how I plan to do Y, please post away.


Have you tried Marc's system (http://www.giantitp.com/forums/showthread.php?232101-Final-Fantasy-VII-D20-Roleplaying-Game-Core-Rulebook-(version-1-10))? It's not only actively maintained, but the creator is always after input from people who play it!

Now, that's not to discourage you from making your own system, I just thought it could be interesting to bring attention to a nice, well-thought out system that might actually help you out :smallsmile:

While I'm have nothing against d20 (like I mentioned, the game was run with such a system (http://www.finalfantasyd20.com/ffd20/) at the start), I'm deliberately shying away from it here. I know the system well, and it's too tight when I don't need it to be (e.g. positioning) and not tight enough when I do (e.g. skills). I do appreciate the link, though; I will shamelessly crib whatever I find useful. ;)

Larkas
2014-05-01, 06:20 PM
I do appreciate the link, though; I will shamelessly crib whatever I find useful. ;)

That's the idea! :smallbiggrin: Don't forget to give Marc some feedback, though, the guy has put some serious effort into that system.

Soultastic
2014-05-01, 09:14 PM
The only thing I can suggest is to be very careful about how you hit mobs and how avoidance works. In Dust's system we had to constantly tinker with avoidance since it seemed a little one sided to have people getting hit all the time. I'm not smart enough personally to tell if you've worked that out or not, personally. I'm no great number cruncher. :)

Sasaisen
2014-05-03, 04:47 PM
The answer to that is to keep the numbers on a tight range, which is what we're doing here. With the current setup, if two characters (and monsters follow the same rules as characters) have the same level, the largest possible difference in stats is 6. This takes you from a 62.5% hit chance (when your stats are equal) to either a 99.5% chance (if your stat is 6 higher) or a 4.6% chance (if your stat is 6 lower). A big difference, yes, but that's is the full extent of your stat range. Barring status ailments (which I'm okay with) and size differences (which need work, but are usually in your favor when hitting things anyway), even if you deliberately dump both your to-hit stats and your opponent has maximized both of theirs, your hit chance is still the equivalent of rolling a natural 20.

Larkas
2014-05-03, 05:41 PM
Hmmmmmmm... Crazy idea here, but have you thought of dumping size differences completely? FF characters don't seem to have much of a problem hitting anything from a tiny fly to a huge Weapon, nor grappling or throwing them. I mean, it might not be realistic, but it is in line with FF, is it not?

ThreadOfFate
2014-05-03, 11:37 PM
Hmmmmmmm... Crazy idea here, but have you thought of dumping size differences completely? FF characters don't seem to have much of a problem hitting anything from a tiny fly to a huge Weapon, nor grappling or throwing them. I mean, it might not be realistic, but it is in line with FF, is it not?

We've made a couple of conscious decisions with this game to emulate the Final Fantasy flavor as much as possible without sacrificing good gameplay mechanics. At a certain point, you have to say "this is cool, but doing this thing would throw balance out the window", so we've had to do a couple of losses of flavor and feel to make sure that the game is solid. This isn't a better approach than saying, for instance, flavor trumps all and mechanics be damned, but it is the approach that we're taking.

Also note that your to-hit not succeeding doesn't mean that you didn't hit it - it could also mean that you simply did not affect it with your attack, as it may have been deflected by armor or something similar.

Reiver Party
2014-05-08, 06:44 AM
Is it possible to put the basic jobs in seperate spoilers nested within the main "basic jobs" spoiler?

It would making reading and comparing the individual jobs easier.

Prim
2014-05-18, 01:41 PM
The only thing I can suggest is to be very careful about how you hit mobs and how avoidance works. In Dust's system we had to constantly tinker with avoidance since it seemed a little one sided to have people getting hit all the time. I'm not smart enough personally to tell if you've worked that out or not, personally. I'm no great number cruncher. :)

Assuming we're using the 2d6 system, this reference sheet (http://www.travellercentral.com/rules/dice.html) will give you a basic outline of the expected hit percentage. Adding bonuses will change the success rate and minimum score.

Sparx MacGyver
2015-03-31, 08:34 PM
Thanks @Sasaisen for posting a link to this. I couldn't find it again for awhile. Will be keeping an eye on this.

Sasaisen
2015-04-01, 06:31 AM
Nooo, not a bump, I wasn't ready! Anyway, I'm confirming that this is still alive, though the thread is silent and progress is slow (although quicker as of late). For anyone who's interested, I'm currently in the middle of a significant update on combat, and this will get a bump when that's done.

steelsmiter
2015-04-13, 12:47 AM
Nooo, not a bump, I wasn't ready! Anyway, I'm confirming that this is still alive, though the thread is silent and progress is slow (although quicker as of late). For anyone who's interested, I'm currently in the middle of a significant update on combat, and this will get a bump when that's done.

Yeah, you can count me among the interested. I'd like to see less "Stuff" and more actual stuff myself :D
But I suspect you probably are aware of that. Out of curiosity, was it Tactics that got you interested in doing the class system the way you are?

Sasaisen
2015-04-13, 08:17 AM
Yeah, you can count me among the interested. I'd like to see less "Stuff" and more actual stuff myself :DYou and me both, sir or mam.


Out of curiosity, was it Tactics that got you interested in doing the class system the way you are?While I'm ashamed that I have not played the original Tactics, TA and TA2 are definitely among my most worthwhile purchases. I'm a huge fan of the job system in general, with all of its crazy mix-and-match glory. It's one of the better and more iconic elements of classic Final Fantasy, and it makes me sad that the series has almost entirely abandoned it.

steelsmiter
2015-04-15, 10:21 PM
I like sphere grids and/or license boards myself. I'm fond of systems that aren't really multi-class per se, but where personal evolution is fluid. Like (as I understand it) FFT?? Job System. In some games, when you multi-class, you may lose some abilities, or take some sort of arbitrarily included penalty. I like GURPS, where character creation and subsequent point expenditures are relatively fluid. Evolutionary if you will.

Held
2015-04-15, 10:59 PM
Black Mage's core ability does nothing? :(

Looked nice until so far! I really like Final Fantasy but found the existing systems too, uh, expansive.

ThreadOfFate
2015-07-22, 01:51 PM
Hey guys. Just letting everyone know this is still active! Sasaisen has been doing a lot of work over the past few months with some help from me. We're still plugging away at it and are hoping to get the major update out to y'all soon.

Stay tuned! You know. Ish. Ideally subscribe and just check in every now and then.

Bruno Carvalho
2016-01-23, 09:48 AM
So, Sassaisen, ThreadofFate, hows this project going? I saw some edits in this thread these days, are there any playtest document ready? Something we can get a better grasp of the system to help?

Sasaisen
2016-01-23, 12:24 PM
I was actually going to bump this after I had combat done, but despite the sparseness of the thread it's been moving. I've been taking a hatchet to everything the past couple of months, and have the core mechanic done, with a fork stuck in it. Right now I'm working on combat, which should actually be done soon. After that, my to-do list is (in order):

Adventuring/non-combat rules - basically, filling out the "Might", "Quickness", "Insight", "Presence", "Destiny" spoilers. Mostly done from previous iterations, I just have to adjust and format it in accordance with the new mechanics.
Basic jobs (Black Mage, Soldier, Thief, White Mage) and first Tier of advanced jobs (Archer, Fencer, Gambler, Green Mage, Monk, Red Mage). The magical ones are effectively done; the less-magical ones need adventuring rules to interact with.
Backgrounds, same as less-magical jobs.
The first Tier or two of equipment and spells.
Environmental rules, so we're not adventuring around on featureless plains.
At which point, I will have the minimum that I can comfortably call a functional game, spanning the first few levels (1-3 or 1-6), to be released in an Alpha PDF. Following that will be (in rough priority):

Monster backgrounds and classes.
Higher-tier jobs, equipment, and spells.
Pre-built opposition.
Setting writeups and adventure hooks, for the main series games as well as notable spin-offs (Crystal Chronicles, Type-0, Bravely 'X').

So that's the plan.