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Panda Bear
2014-04-06, 12:27 PM
Phases and Initiative
Since combat in the campaign is phase-based rather than turn-based, initiative is understood differently. As GM I will tabulate the average initiative score for the players versus the NPCs for each round of combat, and the side that has the higher average will be deemed to have the initiative for that round of combat. Completing a round of combat will result in a new initiative roll for each side going into the next round.

Players in a phase-based system announce how they want to move and act when they think of it rather than waiting for their turn. This means that players can declare their intentions in any order or discuss strategy as a group since their individual initiative scores as irrelevant. Once all decisions have been made, the phase can begin.

If players win the initiative, the NPCs' will reveal their movements and actions to the players. Players receive a tactical advantage by knowing what the NPCs will do, which will allow the players to counter and exploit the NPCs. If the players lose the initiative, the players will announce their moves and actions for the upcoming phase, and the NPCs will have the opportunity to counter and exploit the players.

Why phases and not individual turns?
There are a few reasons.

First, phases allow players to collaborate in a group strategy. You may have situations where a player chooses to try and crack a safe, so another player volunteers to defend his fellow player if any foes go to attack him. In the following phase the defending player will intercept any opponent that tries to attack the safe-cracking player. This isn't something that translates well in individual turn-based play.

Second, it speeds up combat. Players do not have to wait for their turn to state their decision. Instead the first responding player can declare he will do this or that, and the following players can build upon that initial decision or suggest alternatives. To speed up decision making, players can set up conditionals. For example, Player A may state that he will attack Opponent X if Players B and C attack Opponents Y and Z or that he will flee If Players B and C decide to flee as well, The phase will begin after the last responding player has declared his decision.

Third, phases allow for more realistic combat scenarios due to the fact that all character decisions are resolved simultaneously during the six-second round. Weapon speeds become important in deciding who strikes first. The difference in reach between weapons is realised as a song and dance as the 5' step becomes meaningless since both characters would get to take the 5' step at the same time. Attacks of opportunity are rendered obsolete.

First round
If there is an ambush or surprise round where there is 20' distance or more between parties, then the attacking side can use ranged weapons then move. The defending side can decide to use a ranged attack if and only if a crossbow has been readied in advance. The attacking side has priority attacks in ranged weapons.

If there is an ambush or surprise round where there is less 20' distance between parties, then the attacking side can use ranged weapons or melee weapons and move half the normal distance. The defending side can decide to use a ranged attack if and only if a crossbow has been readied in advance or a melee attack if and only if weapons have already been drawn. The attacking side has priority attacks in any case where melee weapon range is equal.

If there is no ambush or surprise round, then only range attacks from each side can be used in the first round. After the first round ends, then movement and attacking with any ranged weapon works.

Combat resolution
Both sides have their actions resolved simultaneously in a phase-based system. Attack priority is given to ranged weapons (when sides need to close distance) then 10' reach weapons (i.e. long melee) then 5' reach weapons (i.e. short melee).

Range

Ranged weapon attacks are always resolved before melee weapon attacks as priority attacks.
The combat participant cannot use an unreadied ranged weapon if he is within the attacking range a melee weapon user.


Reach

Same reach melee weapons (range vs range, long vs long, or short vs short) have combat resolve simultaneously (i.e. both attackers get attack rolls regardless of whether a received blow would incapacitate or kill them). Combatants with the same reach can choose to tie up the weapon of their opponent, but successfully doing so prevents either character from scoring a blow.
e.g. Two swordsman (5' reach) engage in combat. Their attacks are rolled simultaneously, which means that both are capable of injuring the other for that phase of combat.
Long melee weapons (10') get a prioritised attack against short melee weapons (5') if the latter tries to close the gap on the former in order to deal damage, i.e. if the short melee user tries to go from 10' away to becoming adjacent to the long melee user. If the long melee weapon user successfully strikes the short melee weapon user, then the short melee weapon user is assumed to not have closed the distance. If the long melee weapon user fails to strike, then the short melee weapon user is assumed to have closed the distance regardless of whether or not his attack lands.
e.g. A swordsman and a spearman move to engage in combat. The spearman will have his attack land with priority, which means that a successful attack will prevent an incoming attack from the swordsman and maintain the gap.
Once the short reach melee user closes the gap on, i.e. is now adjacent to, the long reach melee user, combat is now resolved according to melee weapon speeds at the 5' distance.
If there is a free space behind him, the user of a long melee weapon can choose to re-establish distance in combat with a short melee weapon user. The long melee weapon user takes defensive actions that round and cannot attack. The next round will re-establish the long melee weapon's priority attack over the short melee weapon.
e.g. A swordsman and a spearman are engaged in combat. The spearman chooses to re-establish distance and receives a +4 AC bonus that round while the swordsman is still able to attack. In the following round the spearman will have a priority attack over the swordsman due to the combat range.
Tying up two long melee weapon users allows a short melee weapon user to enter short melee combat range without requiring he dodge a blow.
Short melee weapon users do not need to evade an incoming blow to close the gap if there is no targeted attack from the long reach user against them.


Speed

Same speed melee weapons (slow vs slow, normal vs normal, fast vs fast, very fast vs very fast) have combat resolve simultaneously (i.e. both attackers get attack rolls regardless of whether a received would incapacitate or kill them).
A faster melee weapon will have a priority attack against a slower melee weapon.
e.g. A swordsman and a maceman are engaged in combat. The swordsman will have his attack land with priority, which means that an incapacitating attack will prevent an incoming attack from the maceman.
e.g. A swordsman and a halberdier are engaged in combat, which means that the halberdier has already had his reach priority attack on the swordsman executed in a previous round. The swordsman will have his attack land with priority, which means that an incapacitating attack will prevent an incoming attack from the maceman.


Combat maneuvers
Disarm, trip, and other combat maneuvers that affect opponent actions are treated as standard actions.

Disarm

Disarming an opponent means that the opponent drops his primary weapon. A standard action is required by the opponent to pick up the primary weapon again. Since weapons are used to direct the flow of combat, an unarmed opponent has a -4 AC modifier.
Disarming an opponent assumes that you have one of the following: a free hand (or two) to grab an arm and submit the opponent; an off-handed weapon designed to catch and torque a weapon out of an opponent's grip; a weapon that can hook onto the opponent's weapon; or completed a strike that hits the opponent's weapon hand.
Disarming an opponent completes as a priority action following a successful roll. The reach of a weapon is not treated as relevant to the success of a disarming, but the reach is relevant to the result of a failed disarming.
e.g. Swordsmen A and B are engaged in combat. One goes to disarm while the other attacks. If A's disarm is successful, then B's attack is not completed. If A's disarm is unsuccessful, then B's attack is completed.
e.g. Swordsmen A and B are engaged in combat. Both go to disarm each other. If both A and B have successful disarmings, then both A and B lose their weapons.
e.g. A Swordsman and a Spearman are not engaged in combat yet. The Spearman engages with a priority attack due to reach, but the Swordsman has elected to disarm. If the disarming is successful, the disarming is assumed to have superseded the attack.
e.g. A Swordsman and a Spearman are not engaged in combat yet. The Spearman engages with a priority attack due to reach, but the Swordsman has elected to disarm. If the disarming fails, the spearman's attack is completed and the swordsman has not closed the gap in combat.


Reorienting combat

Reorienting combat means that a character has manipulated where he and an opponent are standing. The character and his opponent can swap positions or be reoriented in 5' in any direction. This means that a character can manipulate an opponent with a reach weapon to being unable to re-establish distance due to being backed against a wall, or to expose him to an attack from behind by an ally.
Reorienting combat is an attack that doubles as a combat maneuver. One die is rolled for the maneuver and another is rolled for the attack. The reorienting character suffers a -2 to AC and a -2 to Attack Roll due to the complications in manipulating an opponent's footwork to a desired location.


Throws and Trips

Throwing or tripping an opponent means that the opponent is laying prone on the ground. A move action is required by the opponent to stand up again, which gives the attacker an automatic priority attack regardless of weapon speeds.
Throwing or tripping an opponent assumes that you have locked weapons and performed a manouevre with your body or that your weapon has a hook.
Throwing or tripping an opponent completes as a priority action following a successful roll.

Tying Up and Intercepting

Tying Up means a character with the same melee reach as an opponent to lock up weapons and prevent both characters from dealing damage that round. Successful rolls supersede any attack rolls. Failed rolls allow the opponent to roll a normal attack roll and penalize the attempting user a -4 AC modifier for that phase.
Tying Up allows a character to intercept an attack from an opponent directed at an ally within 5' of the character. A successful roll supersede the opponent's attack roll. A failed roll allows the opponent to attack the target of his choice normally, and penalizes the attempting character a -4 to AC.
e.g. Swordsman A and Halberdier B side-by-side in combat against Spearman C. Swordsman A chooses to attack, Halberdier B chooses to tie up Spearman C, and Spearman C chooses to attack Swordsman A. On a successful roll, Halberdier B will tie up the weapon of Spearman C and allow Swordsman A to close distance and attack in 5' range without having to evade a blow. On a failed roll, Halberdier B will suffer a -4 AC modifier for that phase. Since Spearman C chose to attack Swordsman A, Swordsman A now needs to evade a blow from Spearman C in order to close distance and attack in 5' range.
note: Halberdier B in the phase initiative can set up the conditional 'if Spearman C attacks me, attack back; if Spearman C attacks Swordsman A, tie up Spearman C's weapon instead'


Subsequent Rounds
Following the first round, combat occurs in the move-attack/full-round action model.

On the fifth round and every three rounds thereafter, both sides will roll for phase initiative.

Coup de Gras, Death and Incapacitation
When your character reaches 0 hit points or lower, he is deemed to be defeated and removed from combat. If a priority attack reduces a character to 0 hit points, the defeated character still completes his attack roll occur due to simultaneous combat. If a priority attack reduces a character to below 0 hit points, the defeated character is assumed to have been incapacitated by the priority attack and forfeits his own attack roll. If a character is reduced to 0 hit points or less by an attack with equal priority to his own (i.e. same speed and reach in weapons), then he will always complete his own attack roll before being defeated.

The opponent that defeats you can choose to perform a coup de gras for the next phase, which is a standard action. Priority actions like a faster attack, disarm or tying up from an ally are able to prevent an opponent from completing a coup de gras.

Dodging and Movement
A character's movement can grant him an advantage in combat if he has higher movement than his opponent. Since movement corresponds with fleetness of foot and encumbrance, it follows that a person unencumbered would have a better ability to dodge attacks due to less weight being negotiated by the dodging person. Every 5' of difference in movement speed grants the person with a higher movement speed a +1 dodging bonus to his AC.

e.g. Swordsmen A and B are engaged in combat. Swordsman A is unencumbered and has 30' movement. Swordsman B is encumbered and has 20' movement. Consequently Swordsman A has a +2 dodging bonus to his AC when facing attacks from Swordsman B.

Group Attacks
Group attacks can be performed when two or more characters attack a single opponent. The Fibonacci sequence, starting with 1 and 1, is used to calculate attack bonuses for the characters. This means that two characters attacking will each get +1 on their attack roll, three characters attacking will get +2 on their attack rolls, four characters +3, five characters +5, and so forth.

Falcon X
2014-04-07, 12:59 PM
This is really good. I think I want to use it, or something very similar in my own homebrew system. I've been trying to come up with a logical way of doing "attacks simultaneously" and avoiding complex initiatives, and this goes above and beyond by allowing for greater teamwork and introducing the priority system. Good job.

A few thoughts:

Because I'm unfamiliar with 4th edition, I don't know if this is a mod for 4th or a radical mod for 3rd. Could you clue me in? Also, if it is 4th, any chance we could port this to 3.5/pathfinder?

This might be me making things needlessly complicated, but it seems to me that a stab of a dagger is quicker than the slash of a halberd. Perhaps it should be: "If you are moving into range for the attack, the reach weapon gets priority, but if you are already beside him, the short range wins."

Panda Bear
2014-04-07, 04:43 PM
I technically designed this around Pathfinder for my friends who love 3.5.

Sorry, this means that I need to clean up my verbiage. Yes, the short reach melee weapon should (typically) be faster at 5' than the 10' reach melee weapon.

When the gap is maintained, that means there is 10' distance between combatants. The short reach melee weapon user must close the gap, i.e. move 5' closer to the target, which s/he can only do that phase if s/he has successfully evaded the 10' reach attack. When the gap is closed, i.e. the combatants are 5' from each other, the short reach melee weapon user (typically) has the advantage.

Exceptions would include the short reach melee weapon user using a heavy/awkward weapon or if the long reach melee weapon user has a weapon that can thrust damage at range in one grip, but can be held with a different grip for quick 5' combat (e.g. quarterstaff).

The system also introduces new options for feats based around closing gaps, maintaining gaps, weapon speeds, defending allies, defending against multiple enemies, reorienting combat, etc. I would definitely call this a WIP.

GorinichSerpant
2014-04-08, 08:45 PM
I'm a bit confused as to how this works. Do you mean that combat goes like this?:

First everyone decides what their actions are, the ones who got the intuitive getting to know what the others are going to do.

Then all the characters are moved to where they plan.

Next everyone who's attacking rolls their attack or does what ever they do.

And then rinse-repeat, and re-rolling intuitive every 3 cycles of this which is called a "phase".

Did I get all that right? I can't exactly tell if this is what you mean by "phases".

Panda Bear
2014-04-09, 07:36 AM
I'm a bit confused as to how this works. Do you mean that combat goes like this?:

First everyone decides what their actions are, the ones who got the intuitive getting to know what the others are going to do.

Then all the characters are moved to where they plan.

Next everyone who's attacking rolls their attack or does what ever they do.

And then rinse-repeat, and re-rolling intuitive every 3 cycles of this which is called a "phase".

Did I get all that right? I can't exactly tell if this is what you mean by "phases". Sorry for the unclear verbiage! I was trying to move away from saying "round" since many people associate that with individual turn based combat as per normal D&D/PF. I shouldn't have done that.

Let's call a cycle a round, and split the round into the "planning phase" and the "action phase". So we can call this phase-based combat where players collaborate/show teamwork in the planning phase, and then movement and actions are resolved simultaneously in the action phase.*

So every three cycles starting on the fifth, initiative is rerolled. The idea for rerolling is to allow for "momentum" to swing, but maybe a better mechanic could be considered for that.

*Just realized that I need to set up movement mechanics and how they get resolved in relation to actions. Free attack from opponent if you turn and run away from combat? What's the withdrawal mechanic?

Panda Bear
2014-04-09, 07:40 AM
There also needs to be a defend/stand your grand combat maneuver. Perhaps sacrificing your attack rolls so that you get a bonus defending two opponents (or more if you have two plus attacks)? Or how to dynamically defend another character/thing in a way that's not just intercepting an attack but closing down opponent before s/he can resolve intended action.

Falcon X
2014-04-09, 01:03 PM
Yes, you do need movement mechanic explained. My question about short range vs reach weapons largely hinged on my understanding of a 5-foot step.
Your current explanation seems to hold that 5-foot steps exist, but if one is used before the action, then you move a step down in priority of attacks?

Also, I REALLY like the idea that you are using a priority system for attacks, so that everything happens simultaneously, but we still know who hits first.
Can you make a priority chart?
Something like:
1st: Instantaneous Spells
2nd: Ranged weapons
3rd: Swift Spells
4th: Short Range weapons within reach (Stabbing)
5th: Short Range weapons within reach (Slashing)
6th: Short Range weapons within reach (Bashing)
7th: Reach Weapons
8th: Single-Action Spells
9th: Move Actions
10th: Full Round Attacks
11th: 2nd Action or move
12th: Full-Round Spells
etc....

GorinichSerpant
2014-04-09, 05:22 PM
two characters attacking will each get +1 on their attack roll, three characters attacking will get +2 on their attack rolls, four characters +3, five characters +5, and so forth.

Do you mean that 5 attackers get +4? That seems like a typo.

Also thanks for clearing up what you meant.

You said that tripping assumes locked weapons, and tying up represents locking weapons with someone. So by that logic would it make sense to give some sort of bonus to trip while tied or allow for a free trip attempt. Actually a better solution is having trip affects not be blocked by tying. In the example you gave, in the next phase Spearman C could try to break out of Halibarder B's tie by tripping him.

TuggyNE
2014-04-09, 07:04 PM
Do you mean that 5 attackers get +4? That seems like a typo.

He's using the Fibonacci Sequence, which you may know from such illustrious works as the seed arrangements of sunflowers, the shell ratios of nautiluses, and (indirectly) the dimensions of the Greek Parthenon. It goes 1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21,34,55. So no, it's not a typo.

GorinichSerpant
2014-04-09, 11:35 PM
He's using the Fibonacci Sequence, which you may know from such illustrious works as the seed arrangements of sunflowers, the shell ratios of nautiluses, and (indirectly) the dimensions of the Greek Parthenon. It goes 1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21,34,55. So no, it's not a typo.

Really, well you learn new things in unexpected places.

Panda Bear
2014-04-14, 08:48 PM
Yes, you do need movement mechanic explained. My question about short range vs reach weapons largely hinged on my understanding of a 5-foot step.
Your current explanation seems to hold that 5-foot steps exist, but if one is used before the action, then you move a step down in priority of attacks?

Also, I REALLY like the idea that you are using a priority system for attacks, so that everything happens simultaneously, but we still know who hits first.
Can you make a priority chart?
Something like:
1st: Instantaneous Spells
2nd: Ranged weapons
3rd: Swift Spells
4th: Short Range weapons within reach (Stabbing)
5th: Short Range weapons within reach (Slashing)
6th: Short Range weapons within reach (Bashing)
7th: Reach Weapons
8th: Single-Action Spells
9th: Move Actions
10th: Full Round Attacks
11th: 2nd Action or move
12th: Full-Round Spells
etc....I think the system makes more sense without the five-foot step. I don't see how there could be a "free" five foot step in simultaneous resolution.

I have some rewriting for clarification to do on the 10' reach vs 5' reach weapons. My idea is that if a character is using a 5' reach weapon and is further away than 5', then the characters needs to close down his/her opponent. If the opponent has a 10' reach weapon, then the character has to step inside the opponent's reach before s/he can even attempt to do damage. The whole point of reach weapons in combat was to keep someone with a shorter weapon at bay, after all. I figure you the 5' reach user can only get close to the 10' if they don't get hit, be that because they dodged or weren't targeted in the first place.

Oh God. I forgot all about magic being a thing given that I was designing this for a no-magic campaign. Let me whip up a chart.


Do you mean that 5 attackers get +4? That seems like a typo.

Also thanks for clearing up what you meant.

You said that tripping assumes locked weapons, and tying up represents locking weapons with someone. So by that logic would it make sense to give some sort of bonus to trip while tied or allow for a free trip attempt. Actually a better solution is having trip affects not be blocked by tying. In the example you gave, in the next phase Spearman C could try to break out of Halibarder B's tie by tripping him.This is a great suggestion. It would have to be a chosen action for the next phase, and it would have immediate priority over the opposing character regardless of their action choice--unless they both go to trip. That would make sense, I think.

Panda Bear
2014-04-14, 08:56 PM
What are your thoughts on the priority being as follows:
1st: Instantaneous spells
2nd: Ranged weapon attacks
3rd: Swift spells
4th: Reach attacks against short melee users when at different reach
5th: Weapon attacks sorted by weapon speed when at same reach
6th: Single-action Spells
7th: Move actions
8th: Full Round attacks
9th: Second action or move
10th: Full-round spells

I figure that since there are some reach weapons like the spear that have a 10' piercing/stabbing reach, but can still function quicker at 5' than a very heavy maul, that it's best to merely sort weapons at 5' by attack speeds.

GorinichSerpant
2014-04-18, 04:51 PM
What are your thoughts on the priority being as follows:
1st: Instantaneous spells
2nd: Ranged weapon attacks
3rd: Swift spells
4th: Reach attacks against short melee users when at different reach
5th: Weapon attacks sorted by weapon speed when at same reach
6th: Single-action Spells
7th: Move actions
8th: Full Round attacks
9th: Second action or move
10th: Full-round spells

I figure that since there are some reach weapons like the spear that have a 10' piercing/stabbing reach, but can still function quicker at 5' than a very heavy maul, that it's best to merely sort weapons at 5' by attack speeds.

So are say saying that if there is any attack actions (excluding full round attacks) then they will be resolved before characters move, probably unless someone moves then attacks?
Like in an example, person A and person B decide to stab each other in a round and person C wants to run over to a lever or whatever. First A and B would roll their attack rolls then C gets to run over to the lever. If A is first walking up to B and B stand there waiting for him, then C and A would move to their respective places while B stands waiting and then they roll their attacks?

This seems like a very elegant way of doing things, and dues what OoA do by making it likely you'll get stabbed if you move away.

P.S. It would probably made sence to say sooner, I'm very much liking this system and will shamelessly steal it once it's complete. :smallbiggrin:

Panda Bear
2014-04-18, 06:09 PM
So are say saying that if there is any attack actions (excluding full round attacks) then they will be resolved before characters move, probably unless someone moves then attacks?
Like in an example, person A and person B decide to stab each other in a round and person C wants to run over to a lever or whatever. First A and B would roll their attack rolls then C gets to run over to the lever. If A is first walking up to B and B stand there waiting for him, then C and A would move to their respective places while B stands waiting and then they roll their attacks?

This seems like a very elegant way of doing things, and dues what OoA do by making it likely you'll get stabbed if you move away.

P.S. It would probably made sence to say sooner, I'm very much liking this system and will shamelessly steal it once it's complete. :smallbiggrin:You got it! :)

Although there are troubling bits remaining.

Example
In real-life scenarios it's absurd to stand within 5' of someone as it's too easy to get tied up or chopped--usually you're around 10' away. So if I have someone who wants to withdraw from combat, do I punish them for moving back instead of attacking?

There's the re-establish distance manoeuvre for 10' users against 5' users, which negates the 10' attack that phase so that they can re-establish priority. If the user still gets hit, maybe the attempt is negated. Do I do something similar for the person who wants to run away by giving them a defensive run with half movement where they're still facing their attacker? Or do I just say 'screw it, opponent gets a free attack so that you can run and do a different action after'?

Other considerations
Defend
You specify you want to defend an area/object/person. You can specify to hold your ground or to close ground against whichever attacker enters your specified zone. If two enemies enter the zone at the same time...who gets intercepted? I wonder if it's as simple as declaring "defend zone; if B and C both entering, then attack B and leave C", and if unspecified, then at GM's discretion. Furthermore, where does the location of each character resolve after that phase? GM's discretion again?

Defend manoeuvre/feat
You have a manoeuvre--or a feat?--called 'defend multiple enemies' or something of the sort, which lets you negate the Fibonacci sequence of group attacks to whatever level you can complete the manoeuvre/feat as well as giving you a chance to 'counterattack' each enemy based on reduced attack rolls and reduced damage. No direct attacks.

Range attacks
I realized that there's no need for a first round that resolves distance first. That's a bygone from the individual turn-based system. What I do need to implement, though, is priority for range attacks. For example, a prepped arquebus (a gun) would probably hit its target before a crossbow or a bow. The annoying thing about the priority system is that it calls for an entirely new stat for every weapon. (And don't get me started on my system for piercing/slashing/bludgeoning vs armours with ACs for those three.)

Thoughts?

Panda Bear
2014-04-18, 06:12 PM
I also separated out tying up from intercepting since they're different manoeuvres.

Interception

Intercepting an opponent means that a character can choose to redirect an opponent's melee attack from an ally within his weapon's reach to himself, i.e. become the target of an opponent's attack in place of an ally within his weapon's melee range. Combat is resolved normally following a successful roll with the intercepting character receiving a -2 to AC to any opponent and a -2 to Attack Rolls against that opponent. A failed roll results in the character not redirecting an opponent's melee attack while suffering -4 to AC against any attacking opponent and a -4 to Attack Rolls against the targeted opponent.
e.g. Player A and Player B are standing 5' apart. Opponent X attacks Player B, but Player A chooses to intercept Opponent X's attack. Player A successfuly intercepts, and combat is resolved simultaneously with Player A and Opponent X instead. If Player B chose to attack Opponent X as well, then Player B gets a standard group attack bonus to his attack roll agains that opponent,.
Melee range is taken into account for interception. A 10' melee weapon intercepting a 5' melee weapon will place the former in close combat range with the latter. A 5' melee weapon intercepting a 10' melee weapon will place the former at range and needing to close distance to attack. Combat resolves normally.
If the character leaves one combat engagement by intercepting another combat engagement, then the original opponent targeting the character gets a +4 to Attack Rolls against that character.



Tying Up

Tying Up means a character with the same melee reach as an opponent to lock up weapons and prevent both characters from dealing damage that round. Successful rolls supersede any attack rolls. Failed rolls allow the opponent to roll a normal attack roll and penalize the attempting user a -4 AC modifier for that phase.
Tying Up allows a character to tie up an attack from an opponent directed at an ally within 5' of the character. A successful roll supersedes the opponent's attack roll. A failed roll allows the opponent to attack the target of his choice normally, and penalizes the attempting character a -4 to AC modifier.
e.g. Swordsman A and Halberdier B side-by-side in combat against Spearman C. Swordsman A chooses to attack, Halberdier B chooses to tie up Spearman C, and Spearman C chooses to attack Swordsman A. On a successful roll, Halberdier B will tie up the weapon of Spearman C and allow Swordsman A to close distance and attack in 5' range without having to evade a blow. On a failed roll, Halberdier B will suffer a -4 AC modifier for that phase. Since Spearman C chose to attack Swordsman A, Swordsman A now needs to evade a blow from Spearman C in order to close distance and attack in 5' range.
note: Halberdier B in the phase initiative can set up the conditional 'if Spearman C attacks me, attack back; if Spearman C attacks Swordsman A, tie up Spearman C's weapon instead'

Panda Bear
2014-04-18, 06:27 PM
Coup de Grace, Death and Incapacitation

When a character reaches 0 hit points or lower, he is deemed to be defeated and can no longer participate in combat. Defeated characters are unconscious. A character is deemed to be incapacitated when his hit points are reduced below 0 by a strike. Players with a positive constitution modifier are more resilient to incapacitation, and become incapacitated when a blow takes them to -1 hit points minus CON modifier. For example a character with 10 constitution has a modifier of 0, so becomes incapacitated at -1 hit points or lower. A character with 7 constitution has a modifier of -2, but still only becomes incapacitated at -1 hit points or lower. A character with 17 constitution has a modifier of +3, so becomes incapitated at -4 hit points or lower.
If a priority attack reduces a character to one hit point above incapacitation, then the character completes his attack roll for that phase before being defeated. (Note that a SMW cannot close distance on a LMW if hit, so a SMW cannot complete his attack roll even if not incapacitated in that circumstance.)
If a priority attack incapacitates a character, then the character is defeated and forfeits his standard action for that phase.
If an equal priority attack reduces a character to 0 hit points or less, then he will always complete his own attack regardless of incapacitation before being defeated.
The opponent that defeats you can choose to perform a coup de grace for the next phase, which is a standard action. Priority actions like a faster attack, disarm or tying up from an ally are able to prevent an opponent from completing a coup de grace. In the event that you are left alone, you will be deemed unconscious and wake up after 2d12-L hours.



I'll update the original post with all corrections once I feel it's suitable. :)