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Erasmas
2014-07-22, 06:10 PM
Hey everyone, I am in need of just a name... the name of (as the title says) an undead creature from folklore that is associated with water. It doesn't matter if it deals with the ocean, rivers, lakes, or swamps... just so long as it is water-related.

I would prefer that it be something relatively easy to pronounce and the less obscure it is the better - in the same vein as wraith, ghost, banshee, etc.

I run a Halo-based RPG and have need of a Covenant watercraft, which I am creating from scratch. Since all of their vehicles are named thusly, I'd like it I could make this fit that model as well as reiterate its waterborne nature.

Any help is greatly appreciated!

Oneris
2014-07-22, 06:30 PM
Hey everyone, I am in need of just a name... the name of (as the title says) an undead creature from folklore that is associated with water. It doesn't matter if it deals with the ocean, rivers, lakes, or swamps... just so long as it is water-related.

I would prefer that it be something relatively easy to pronounce and the less obscure it is the better - in the same vein as wraith, ghost, banshee, etc.

I run a Halo-based RPG and have need of a Covenant watercraft, which I am creating from scratch. Since all of their vehicles are named thusly, I'd like it I could make this fit that model as well as reiterate its waterborne nature.

Any help is greatly appreciated!

Umibozu (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Umibozu) is a Japanese water ghost/demon that capsizes any ship it comes across.
Bake-kujira (http://hyakumonogatari.com/2013/05/10/bakekujira-and-japans-whale-cults/) is a skeletal undead whale that's said to roam the coasts of Japan surrounded by a cloud of undead fish and seabirds.

Palanan
2014-07-22, 10:22 PM
The rusalka (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rusalka) is the first thing that came to mind, from Slavic folklore. Dangerous water-spirits that lure men to their doom, always female and generally held to be unliving.

Ravens_cry
2014-07-22, 10:29 PM
Nuckelavee (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuckelavee). It's most common description is as a skinless horse and rider fused together, the 'rider' having no legs. That could certainly be described as 'undead'.

Slipperychicken
2014-07-22, 11:55 PM
Well, I found a bunch of names of Thai Ghosts (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghosts_in_Thai_culture).

Of particular interest in that list is Phi Tai Hong (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phi_Tai_Hong), ("tai hong means 'to die an unnatural and violent death, such as being murdered or drowning' and Phi Tai Hong means the ghost of a person who died in such manner.").

Sartharina
2014-07-23, 01:47 AM
The rusalka (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rusalka) is the first thing that came to mind, from Slavic folklore. Dangerous water-spirits that lure men to their doom, always female and generally held to be unliving.

This is also what I first thought of, thanks to Quest for Glory IV: Shadows of Darkness, which featured a particularly memorable encounter with a Rusalka, especially for Paladins (For everyone else, it was merely Yet Another Stupid Death)

hamishspence
2014-07-23, 08:13 AM
Will-o'-the-wisp is sometimes a ghost in folklore. Found in swamps.

CarpeGuitarrem
2014-07-23, 08:44 AM
Will-o'-the-wisp is sometimes a ghost in folklore. Found in swamps.
Seconding Wisp or Willowisp as the name. Easy to pronounce, and it draws from the same folklore as Banshee.

Thinker
2014-07-23, 08:45 AM
Sirens (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siren_(mythology)) fit your requirements. Easy to pronounce, close to death (luring ships to their demise and being associated with Persephone), and associated with water.

Palanan
2014-07-23, 10:22 AM
Originally Posted by Sartharina
This is also what I first thought of, thanks to Quest for Glory IV: Shadows of Darkness, which featured a particularly memorable encounter with a Rusalka....

For me it was C.J. Cherryh's novel Rusalka (http://www.amazon.com/Rusalka-C-J-Cherryh/dp/0345369343/), which is a great read and the first in a trilogy inspired by Slavic folklore.

CarpeGuitarrem
2014-07-23, 10:28 AM
Sirens (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siren_(mythology)) fit your requirements. Easy to pronounce, close to death (luring ships to their demise and being associated with Persephone), and associated with water.
...this is very, very clever. Sirens and banshees feel like they've gotta be cousins or something.

BWR
2014-07-23, 10:46 AM
The draug (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Draugr). Sort of.

Yora
2014-07-23, 10:53 AM
For a covenant vehicle, I would go with Siren. All the others have names that are reasonably common in the english language. Wouldn't look out of place next to all the Ghosts, Wraiths, Phantoms, and Banshees.

Mark Hall
2014-07-23, 10:54 AM
This is also what I first thought of, thanks to Quest for Glory IV: Shadows of Darkness, which featured a particularly memorable encounter with a Rusalka, especially for Paladins (For everyone else, it was merely Yet Another Stupid Death)

You could still befriend her as a non-Paladin... they just wouldn't let you save her, which annoyed me.

Palanan
2014-07-23, 11:34 AM
Originally Posted by Yora
For a covenant vehicle, I would go with Siren. All the others have names that are reasonably common in the english language. Wouldn't look out of place next to all the Ghosts, Wraiths, Phantoms, and Banshees.

This is certainly a good argument for Siren. It's a common, recognizable word, it's entirely thematic and it apparently fits well in the setting. Sounds like a good choice to me.

Erasmas
2014-07-23, 11:54 AM
Thank you everyone for the outpour of suggestions!

I had initially thought about sirens... but I wasn't 100% sold on the idea because they aren't usually a type on undead (that I know of, at least). But even still, I wholeheartedly agree that they fit as far as both the commonality and thematic elements are concerned. In the end, this is probably what I will go with.

Yora
2014-07-23, 01:24 PM
Sirens (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siren_(mythology)) fit your requirements. Easy to pronounce, close to death (luring ships to their demise and being associated with Persephone), and associated with water.

Scarabs are associated with death!

http://www.reactiongifs.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/ernie.gif

Ravens_cry
2014-07-23, 01:40 PM
Scarabs are associated with death!

http://www.reactiongifs.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/ernie.gif
Why the Bert?

Yora
2014-07-23, 01:54 PM
I never made that connection. Thought it's just a random name because it looks like a beetle.

Ravens_cry
2014-07-23, 02:03 PM
I never made that connection. Thought it's just a random name because it looks like a beetle.
Um, my confusion has, if anything, increased.

Palanan
2014-07-23, 02:05 PM
Originally Posted by Yora
I never made that connection. Thought it's just a random name because it looks like a beetle.

?!?!?!

This…hurts my brain, just trying to understand.

Muppets are not scarabs. Nor are they undead.



Let's call it a thread and move on.

Braininthejar2
2014-07-23, 02:15 PM
Utopiec

a generic "unbaptized guy drowned in a river, now he drowns others" thing

Kappa

a Japanese turtle-goblin thing that attacks swimmers (and sometimes sucks life force out of their ass, but you don't need to mention that)

Bulhakov
2014-07-23, 03:38 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Topielec
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vodn%C3%ADk

Durkoala
2014-07-23, 04:24 PM
Nuckelavee (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuckelavee). It's most common description is as a skinless horse and rider fused together, the 'rider' having no legs. That could certainly be described as 'undead'.
In the interests of 'defending' the reputation of my favourite monster, I would like to point out that the Nuckelavee is usually considered to be a fairy.

Also, it's generally associated with plagues and physical strength, so it doesn't really fit 'Banshee, but on water'

Thanks for the Draug. That thing is amazing! And overpowered.

Excession
2014-07-23, 06:32 PM
There's always the Flying Dutchman (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flying_Dutchman). It's an entire undead ship already.

Ravens_cry
2014-07-23, 09:26 PM
In the interests of 'defending' the reputation of my favourite monster, I would like to point out that the Nuckelavee is usually considered to be a fairy.

Also, it's generally associated with plagues and physical strength, so it doesn't really fit 'Banshee, but on water'


Fey, yes, so? Plenty of these monsters can be considered 'fey'. Fey is just a catch all term for various folklore creatures. Vampires before Dracula and similar media would have come under 'fey'.

Kane0
2014-07-24, 12:51 AM
Another vote to Siren

Yora
2014-07-24, 01:42 PM
There's always the Flying Dutchman (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flying_Dutchman). It's an entire undead ship already.

If you want to name a covenant battlecruiser after it, it would have to be called Sailor of the Even Lands or Floats above the Waves.
Ship names in Halo are great. :smallamused:

Erasmas
2014-07-24, 02:46 PM
Yeah they are!
Although some of them are a little questionable from a military standpoint (see the UNSC Say My Name (http://halo.wikia.com/wiki/UNSC_Say_My_Name)). At least there isn't a UNSC Teabagger... as of yet.

But again, thank you everyone for all of the advice!

May I present to you all... the newest vehicle in the Covenant Fleet!


The Siren
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v71/Erasmas/Halo%20Onyx%20Wind/Ripples%20to%20Waves/Siren_zps6b095604.png~original

Katuko
2014-07-25, 12:28 AM
The draug (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Draugr). Sort of.

The Draugr that results from people drowning at sea should definitely count as "water-based" undead. They work pretty much like a normal zombie in folklore, but they might show up leering in through windows and portholes at night before they actually do anything harmful. They do this to scare you, or at least to survey the area while scaring you in the process. At sea they would magically appear outside the porthole before quickly disappearing when someone noticed them, while on land they would walk up from the shoreline and stand outside the windows of houses built near the sea.

"Draug" can refer to several things in Norwegian Folklore, but the main stories I have been told involve water and people who died at sea and then returned. In particular, "The" Draug was supposedly a man/creature that was once a fisherman. He would appear at night or in storms in his boat, being a sign of death. Some say he would even sink ships outright, but supposedly by magic and not by direct attack such as the Kraken.


One example of a story - which can be found on the Norwegian Wikipedia article for Draug - is that of a man who went out one night after a party to fetch a bucket, and found The Draug sitting on it, gazing out across the ocean. The man stabbed The Draug in the back and pushed him out into the ocean. As he fled from the furious creature, he crossed the town's graveyard and called out to the dead for aid. When he returned the morning after, the coffins were found to be opened, and the church was covered in seaweed. The Draug was never seen in the area again.

The story is actually called "The Sea Draugr and the Land Draugr".


In short, though: If you need a creepy zombie for your sea adventure, a Draug (whether singular or plural) can work. :P

BWR
2014-07-25, 04:30 AM
The Draugr that results from people drowning at sea should definitely count as "water-based" undead. They work pretty much like a normal zombie in folklore, but they might show up leering in through windows and portholes at night before they actually do anything harmful. They do this to scare you, or at least to survey the area while scaring you in the process. At sea they would magically appear outside the porthole before quickly disappearing when someone noticed them, while on land they would walk up from the shoreline and stand outside the windows of houses built near the sea.

"Draug" can refer to several things in Norwegian Folklore, but the main stories I have been told involve water and people who died at sea and then returned. In particular, "The" Draug was supposedly a man/creature that was once a fisherman. He would appear at night or in storms in his boat, being a sign of death. Some say he would even sink ships outright, but supposedly by magic and not by direct attack such as the Kraken.


One example of a story - which can be found on the Norwegian Wikipedia article for Draug - is that of a man who went out one night after a party to fetch a bucket, and found The Draug sitting on it, gazing out across the ocean. The man stabbed The Draug in the back and pushed him out into the ocean. As he fled from the furious creature, he crossed the town's graveyard and called out to the dead for aid. When he returned the morning after, the coffins were found to be opened, and the church was covered in seaweed. The Draug was never seen in the area again.

The story is actually called "The Sea Draugr and the Land Draugr".


In short, though: If you need a creepy zombie for your sea adventure, a Draug (whether singular or plural) can work. :P

Don't forget 'dodraugen'. It's the most scary type: it hides in your toilet and waits for you to sit down.

Morph Bark
2014-07-25, 07:04 AM
Don't forget 'dodraugen'. It's the most scary type: it hides in your toilet and waits for you to sit down.

I live plenty close to Norway, and I read this right when I was on the toilet. Whelp.


In the Netherlands there are the Witte Wieven (white women or wise women), ghosts of women who were herbalists or witches that haunted ancient graves and swamps. They mostly did not harm people who did nothing to them, but could be quite vengeful. There are several tales where they were helpful, too.

Katuko
2014-07-25, 05:32 PM
Don't forget 'dodraugen'. It's the most scary type: it hides in your toilet and waits for you to sit down.
Of course! How could I forget? :P

There's also "Nøkken" or "Fossegrimen" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neck_%28water_spirit%29), which is much like the Japanese Kappa and the Greek Sirens in that it tries to lure people (children in particular) into the water. In Norway it's said to appear as a young man playing an entrancing tune on his violin. It's also been portrayed as a white horse.

BWR
2014-07-26, 12:16 AM
Of course! How could I forget? :P

There's also "Nøkken" or "Fossegrimen" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neck_%28water_spirit%29), which is much like the Japanese Kappa and the Greek Sirens in that it tries to lure people (children in particular) into the water. In Norway it's said to appear as a young man playing an entrancing tune on his violin. It's also been portrayed as a white horse.

Except those aren't really undead.

Katuko
2014-07-26, 06:35 AM
Except those aren't really undead.
That is true.

Sartharina
2014-07-26, 04:18 PM
Well, the Covenent vehicle names are just as much named after "Spirits" even moreso than perhaps even "Undead".

Lord of Shadows
2014-08-13, 06:45 PM
Something I used on a recent adventure got everyone's attention: Jack Shear's Drowned Witch from his Gothic Earth PDF (https://docs.google.com/file/d/0BwQATTvvXyh3c2ZaTk5PXy10ekk/edit?usp=sharing). Which has a lot of other cool stuff in it too. In fact, most of Jack's stuff (http://talesofthegrotesqueanddungeonesque.blogspot.ca/) is cool, in a horrific sort of way. I had to tweak the wording of the flavor text and assign a DC to it (I went with Knowledge (Religion or Local), DC 15). Here is the flavor text from the original:


Drowned Witch flavor text from "Gothic Earth" by Jack Shear:
In the moors of Yorkshire it was once tradition to seal demon-worshiping witches into wells as punishment for their blasphemy. The witches drown within the well, but sometimes seek vengeance beyond death and return as Drowned Witches. Drowned Witches are pallid, water-logged wretches; their faces are continually obscured by long manes of sodden black hair.

The original also has an OSR style - I think it's Savage Worlds - stat block.

Enjoy...
.

turbo164
2014-08-13, 08:02 PM
"Undine" is used for a water spirit/ghost/mermaid depending on where you look.

Angelalex242
2014-08-13, 10:15 PM
I'll cast a supporting vote for the Flying Dutchman.

Note, in the Ravenloft Campign, the equivalent is The Relentless, piloted by a Rank 5 ghost who's the Domain Lord of the Oceans.

http://voltor.narod.ru/dod/dod02023.htm