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YPU
2007-05-04, 05:36 AM
Take a stereotypical gaming group 1DM 4Players normal dnd campaign typical party. What thing, person, whatever improves this game the most. Could be anything: a campaign, a specific book, a player who… the DM who…
My vote is: a steelsquire flipmat. Since you can still dry erase permanent marker from it after a week without problems.
Or better still two taped together for those real big battles.

Nevermore
2007-05-04, 05:44 AM
A group that stops trying to "be the best in the party" and figures out its time to work as a team and not PK or screw over eachother (Yay my old rp buddies back in central VA!)

Mr. Moogle
2007-05-04, 09:04 AM
The DM adds the worlds most annoying creatures, Rust Monsters
. And you have to make them go for the heal-bot cleric's full plate.

Dizlag
2007-05-04, 09:11 AM
The greatest asset to ANY game is the players. Players that understand it IS just a game and we're there to have fun! =)

Dizlag

Ceres
2007-05-04, 10:11 AM
The greatest asset to ANY game is the players. Players that understand it IS just a game and we're there to have fun! =)

Dizlag

Hey. Don't we DMs matter? :(

Fax Celestis
2007-05-04, 10:13 AM
...is it bad that I read your initial post as 1d4 players?

ssjKammak
2007-05-04, 10:32 AM
I would have to agree with both Ceres and Dizlag, the greatest asset is a bunch of good mates who play together and one of them happens to be a skilled DM.

Just an aussies 2 cents
Cheers

Zeta Kai
2007-05-04, 10:36 AM
I prefer 1d4+2 players, but that's a house rule. :smallwink:

As for the greatest asset, I'd say DM preparation. Nothing kills a gaming session faster than an unprepared DM. And nothing gets a game rocking like a DM ready for anything.

Dizlag
2007-05-04, 10:43 AM
LOL Ceres ... yes, that's what I meant to say. We're all "playing the game", DMs included. :smalltongue:

And ssj, 2 cents well spent. Hehehe

As a DM, my best asset to the game as of late has been The Red Hand of Doom (http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=products/dndacc/953857400) D&D adventure book. I'm going on almost a year of running my players through it. Best $29.95 I've ever spent on a D&D sourcebook. :smallsmile:

Dizlag

LotharBot
2007-05-04, 01:49 PM
The #1 most important thing is good chemistry between the players (including the DM.) My wife DM'ed an incredibly fun adventure where the only book present was a single PHB and we didn't have any miniatures or a gaming mat (used dice and paper.) The players? Me and 4 of my siblings. Despite the oldest being in his 30s and the youngest being only 12, we get along fantastically well. Add in a bit of creativity, no fear of standing out, and no desire to punk each other or hit on each other or any of the other goofy stuff that comes up in some groups, and you have the right ingredients for an incredibly fun adventure. I'd say the #2 thing is a solid adventure. Whether it's homebrew or something like Shackled City or Red Hand of Doom, it really helps to have an adventure where everybody at the table can contribute and the DM doesn't need to spend a lot of time trying to figure out what to do next. #3 a good gaming environment. This includes things like a nice gaming table or mat, miniatures, adequate markers or scratch paper for everyone, and so on.

Green Bean
2007-05-04, 02:47 PM
An extra large pepperoni pizza. :smallamused:

Person_Man
2007-05-04, 03:09 PM
1) Beer

2) A DM that's fully prepared and doesn't have to look up monsters, spells, etc, for the encounters he planned.

3) Players who argue about the rules after the game, not during it.

4) Terrain. Turns a boring encounter into a tactical challenge.

YPU
2007-05-04, 04:00 PM
1) Beer

2) A DM that's fully prepared and doesn't have to look up monsters, spells, etc, for the encounters he planned.

3) Players who argue about the rules after the game, not during it.

4) Terrain. Turns a boring encounter into a tactical challenge.

1 no way, that really screwed up my game last time.
2 as a dm copy al the really important stuff to one page and print it.
3 we never ever argue, real good.
4 very right about that one. Dungeons arenít the best set anyway.

Desaril
2007-05-04, 09:25 PM
Interesting comments from everyone.
I agree with Lotharbot that chemistry is the most important thing. In any game, there will be disagreements and trust/chemistry helps smooth them out. Also, having everyone on the same page (or at least in the same chapter) keeps the story moving. I've played too many games where one player just wants fights, another wants intrigue, the DM wants to display cool NPCs, and the other player just wants to hang out a drink beer. Once you have chemistry, the other stuff just improves the experience.

I think a flexible DM who is able to improvise is a close second. A well prepared DM is great, but all that preparation tends to reinforce a linear plot along the lines of the DMs preparation. A DM who can improvise allows the players to "take control" of the story and the DM can roll with it. Of course, preparation is an important part of improvisation. I don't remember who said it, but someone once explained that the improvisation of jazz is actually accomplished by practicing various routines and putting them together as the mood requires. DMing should be like that. You should be familiar with the rules, stats, etc so that you can put it together (or modify it) as needed to fit the player's actions.

Last_resort_33
2007-05-05, 04:06 AM
Players who sit in their seats and don't fight/argue/jump around/throw dice/whatever while it's not their turn.... the best games are when the players are relaxed, in their seats, and if not concentrating, then doodleing or something else unobtrusive and quiet... and I say this as both a DM and a player... it actually annoys me more as a player I think, becasue when I am DM I can put it down to me being dull.

DomarSaul
2007-05-05, 04:58 AM
Free time. I've gone ages without a group because it's always hard to find an evening where nobody had work, or rehearsal, or training, or class, or a date...