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View Full Version : How long did you need to save up for adventuring?



Kidbuu51
2015-07-31, 05:40 AM
Well now those of us who don't know now have a math formula to find out!
I worked out a simple formula while working on some home game stuff and I'd like to share it here with you. To be clear this is based on a couple expected variables that can change on settings. In my game workers earn 1 gold a week and living expenses are 1 silver per day in a 7 day week, in a 58 week year. So the formula looks like this

{[Formula X+(Y(0.358)=Z] X=year you started saving money to adventure, Y=starting gold amount, Z=years til gold gained}

I have tested it and it is fairly accurate. It also works with starting packages if you add up your items total gold cost and funds gained. Enjoy math folks and pay mind to your game settings laws on child labor, you can't quite work as an infant.

Xuc Xac
2015-07-31, 05:51 AM
My first D&D character was a fighter who started out in life as a dirt poor farmer. He stumbled across a buried chest in the field he was plowing that contained a mail shirt and a short sword wrapped in oiled cloth and a bag of silver coins. He saw that as his ticket off the farm and hit the road for adventure with the coins and a few personal effects wrapped up in a piece of canvas. His first big treasure score was spent on a nice pair of boots because he had never owned shoes before and had always dreamed about having some.

nedz
2015-08-01, 04:41 PM
Is this for any particular system ?

Also it's entirely setting, actually campaign, dependant.

INDYSTAR188
2015-08-01, 06:45 PM
My first D&D character was a fighter who started out in life as a dirt poor farmer. He stumbled across a buried chest in the field he was plowing that contained a mail shirt and a short sword wrapped in oiled cloth and a bag of silver coins. He saw that as his ticket off the farm and hit the road for adventure with the coins and a few personal effects wrapped up in a piece of canvas. His first big treasure score was spent on a nice pair of boots because he had never owned shoes before and had always dreamed about having some.

This is great! Bravo! Mind if I borrow this?

TheCountAlucard
2015-08-01, 09:29 PM
This also assumes that the starting gold/equipment is paid for wholesale by the PC instead of given or lent by a mentor or patron figure, inherited, stolen, made by the PC himself, randomly found in a field, looted off a corpse, or any other number of options. And also that gold pieces are the unit of currency where the PC is, instead of dinars, obols, scrip, cowries, yen, dollars, nuyen, Republic credits, and so on and so forth.

No, frankly, I don't tend to wonder exactly how long my character labored for his gear.

The Fury
2015-08-01, 10:08 PM
My first D&D character was a fighter who started out in life as a dirt poor farmer. He stumbled across a buried chest in the field he was plowing that contained a mail shirt and a short sword wrapped in oiled cloth and a bag of silver coins. He saw that as his ticket off the farm and hit the road for adventure with the coins and a few personal effects wrapped up in a piece of canvas. His first big treasure score was spent on a nice pair of boots because he had never owned shoes before and had always dreamed about having some.

Funnily enough this is similar to my last Pathfinder character. She was a peasant conscript that just had crappy, rusty gear issued to her.


This also assumes that the starting gold/equipment is paid for wholesale by the PC instead of given or lent by a mentor or patron figure, inherited, stolen, made by the PC himself, randomly found in a field, looted off a corpse, or any other number of options.


Yeah, I always assumed the "starting gold" was more of an abstraction to determine which gear your character could reasonably start play owning.

Xuc Xac
2015-08-02, 11:45 AM
This is great! Bravo! Mind if I borrow this?

Be my guest.