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Sammuthegreat
2015-08-11, 10:14 AM
Hello there!

I'm brand spanking new in every sense of the word - this is my very first post on this site, I'm fairly new to D&D having only starting playing with the 5th Edition, and this is my first attempt at a homebrew class. With that in mind, ensuring the class is balanced is my priority, and I've not had any experience of playing at high levels, so I'm hoping you fine people can help me out and tell me if any of this is horribly broken!

Anyway, without further ado... Introducing the Saboteur.

The Saboteur is largely inspired by the Combat Engineers/Sappers from Steven Erikson's Malazan Book of the Fallen series. Anyone who's read those books will know (A) how awesome the books are, and (B) how awesome the sappers themselves are, so hopefully I've managed to channel some of the Erikson magic into this homebrew.

The Saboteur's hook is that he's an explosives expert, using alchemical grenades or "charges" to deal damage. Obviously this homebrew therefore relies heavily on mechanics such as splash damage, object and structure damage, and the potential for projectiles to miss their target and explode elsewhere. Possibly not the most sensible class to choose for my first homebrew effort, but having done plenty of research and head-scratching with my gaming group, I think I've come up with a class that strikes the right balance of awesomeness, flavour and accessibility, while most importantly keeping intra- and extra-universe logic intact.

The three subclasses are the Sapper (slightly tankier, slightly suicidal, close-range damage and mobility); the Trapper (high mobility and elusive, tactical, uses the environment to his advantage); and the Thunderclapper (slow-moving but high ranged damage from a "charge launcher"). Hopefully the design and theme of each subclass, and the overall class, translates well into my draft.

I'm looking for any hints and ideas I can get, so please do feel free to comment!

Thanks in advance for your help.



A dwarf in a smoke-blackened chain shirt keeps his head low as he hustles around the side of an enemy encampment. Keeping his head down, he awaits the signal from his squad leader. When the whistle sounds, he leaps from cover, lighting the taper on his explosive charge, a ball of tightly packed and volatile combustibles. Heedless of flying arrows, he charges at the nearest orc, depositing the charge at the creature's feet before sprinting in the opposite direction, cackling with glee.
A wood elf wriggles backwards into the forest, tying off the last of a series of traps and hazards set up across this choke point. She finds the end of the long fuse leading down from the clifftop where she carefully planted her explosives, and lights it. She knows the charges were placed just right to send the cliffs crashing down into the hobgoblin troop below, and the only way out is straight through her field of snares. Closing her eyes in grim satisfaction, she awaits the blast.
A gnome sweats as he lugs a heavy contraption of iron and lead over his shoulder, picking a perfect vantage point in view of the ongoing battle. He thumps his load down on the floor and selects one of an array of balls from his pouch. Carefully slipping the heavy sphere into the barrel, he trips the fuse and claps his hands to his ears; as the shell is launched skyward he watches its trajectory. It arcs overhead and bursts in midair, showering the enemy forces with liquid fire. He nods in satisfaction; perfectly judged. Hefting the cannon once again, he waddles off to a new vantage point.
Whether they do their fighting at the van or in the rearguard, it is generally agreed that a saboteur must possess a delicate balance of intellect and insanity. Few know the intricate art of mixing chemical ingredients to create tools of war; fewer have the guts or the blind luck to use them in live combat; fewer still take satisfaction in the devastation they can wreak. It's said that war is madness; saboteurs have turned that madness into an art.

GENIUS OR LUNATIC?
Scholars and mages across the multiverse have long studied the effects of combining all kinds of chemicals, both mundane and virulent; the study of mixing these chemicals is both difficult and extremely dangerous. So, packing these unstable concoctions into balls of lead - called charges - and throwing, or even firing them at creatures, could be seen as tantamount to suicide; it is precisely this borderline between genius and insanity that the saboteur thrives on treading.
At the more prosaic end of the spectrum, some see the battlefield like a game of chess; a complicated matrix of strategy and pinch points - and nothing disrupts a game of chess like a well-placed explosion. Some like to stay back and bombard enemies with charges from afar, creating ballistae to launch them great distances using their knack for complex algorithms to accurately judge distances and trajectories; they like to think that the larger the target, the bigger the bang and the larger the crater. And barrelling headfirst through the line into outright madness, some prefer to ensure their charges hit home by hand-delivering them to the enemy's feet.

BETTER OFF AWAY FROM BUILDINGS
The saboteur is a natural adventurer. Their innate love of risk and excitement, coupled with the high incidence of blowing up their workshops, means that a saboteur is better off roaming free instead of endangering others in a town or city. However, many militias across Faerun recognise the value of a saboteur's charges, which can easily rout a group of well-placed enemies with a surprise attack, control a battlefield by funnelling or disabling enemies, or bring down walls from safe distances. It is therefore not uncommon to find many military platoons with at least one saboteur among their ranks, though they tend to suit marine squadrons better due to their highly specialised, guerrilla style of attack.
Some saboteurs see adventuring as a means to test out their latest inventions, some see it as a fine way to enjoy the camaraderie and competition of their peers. What is common to all saboteurs, however, is the desire to make things go boom.


As you make your saboteur, think about what might drive a person to focus their life on a practice that is as likely to end in an early (and messy) death before even finishing a single successful experiment. Were you born into a trade but bored of simply mixing herbs into potions and decided to see what would happen if you altered the mix slightly? Were you a keen but directionless intellect in your youth who was inspired by a display of pyrotechnics by a hedge wizard but, lacking any magical ability of your own, you decided to find another way?
Whatever your past, the common themes running through the psyches of saboteurs across the multiverse are an unhinged lack of regard for their own safety, and a deep obsession with explosions. This interest can be academic or bloodthirsty, but dealing with dangerous substances and eardrum-rupturing detonations every day will leave even the most level-headed saboteur a little crazed before long, if they weren't already. It is this touch of madness that leads saboteurs to be of a chaotic alignment more often than not.

QUICK BUILD
You can make a saboteur quickly by following these suggestions. First, Dexterity should be your highest ability score, followed by Intelligence or Constitution. Second, choose the sage or soldier background.

CLASS FEATURES
As a saboteur, you gain the following class features.

HIT POINTS
Hit Dice: 1d10 per saboteur level
Hit Points at 1st Level: 10 + your Constitution modifier
Hit Points at Higher Levels: 1d10 (or 6) + your Constitution modifier per saboteur level after 1st

PROFICIENCIES
Armour: Light armour
Weapons: Simple weapons, hand crossbows, pikes, shortswords, explosive charges
Tools: Saboteur's supplies, one type of gaming set
Saving Throws: Dexterity, Intelligence
Skills: Choose three from Acrobatics, Athletics, Deception, Investigation, Medicine, Perception, Performance, Sleight of Hand, Stealth

EQUIPMENT
You start with the following equipment, in addition to the equipment granted by your background:
(a) a shortsword or (b) a pike
(a) a hand crossbow and 20 bolts, or (b) a shortsword
(a) a burglar's pack, (b) a dungeoneer's pack, or (c) an explorer's pack
Studded leather armour, two daggers, and saboteur's supplies




THE SABOTEUR

Level
Proficiency
Bonus Features
Charges


1st
+2
Expertise, Explosive Charges (d8/d4)
3


2nd
+2
Volatile Mix
3


3rd
+2
Sabotage Style
4


4th
+2
Ability Score Improvement
5


5th
+3
Element of Surprise, Chemical Distillation
5


6th
+3
Expertise, Blind Luck
6


7th
+3
Sabotage Style Feature, Volatile Mix
7


8th
+3
Ability Score Improvement
7


9th
+4
Second Chance
8


10th
+4
Explosive Charges (d10/d6)
9


11th
+4
Sabotage Style Feature
9


12th
+4
Ability Score Improvement
10


13th
+5
Volatile Mix
11


14th
+5
Evasion
11


15th
+5
Sabotage Style Feature
12


16th
+5
Ability Score Improvement
13


17th
+6
Volatile Mix
13


18th
+6
Explosive Charges (d12/d8)
14


19th
+6
Ability Score Improvement
15


20th
+6
Ambidextrous
15







EXPERTISE
At 1st level, choose two of your skill proficiencies. Your proficiency bonus is doubled for any ability check you make that uses either of the chosen proficiencies.
At 6th level, you can choose two more of your proficiencies to gain this benefit.

EXPLOSIVE CHARGES

Beginning at 1st level, you are able to mix chemicals and herbs from your saboteur's supplies to create volatile explosives, which you pack into lead balls called charges. Charges detonate on impact. You may use the number of charges shown for your saboteur level in the Charges column of the Saboteur table.

Charges are ranged weapons with the Thrown property (saboteurs are proficient in using charges), with a range of 40/80ft. They deal 1d8 force damage on a direct hit and 1d4 splash force damage to any creature within 5ft of the impact point.

At 10th level, your damage dice when using charges becomes 1d10 for a direct hit and 1d6 for splash damage. At 18th level, your damage dice when using charges becomes 1d12 for a direct hit and 1d8 for splash damage.

The damage charges deal is dependent on the potency of the mixture in each charge, which is learned through trial and error as well as natural intellect. You add your Intelligence modifier to damage rolls when using charges, instead of your Dexterity modifier.

If you miss when using a charge, then you must roll a d8 to determine where the charge explodes, using 1 as "north" and then assigning each value of the d8 to a compass point (2 is north-east, 3 is east and so on). The charge will miss by 5ft for every point difference between your target's AC and your dice roll, to a maximum of 30ft. So, for example, if the target has an AC of 15 and you roll a 13 (inclusive of modifiers), the charge will miss by 2x5ft = 10ft, in the direction determined by the d8 direction roll.

If your target's size is Huge or above, your charges will automatically hit. The target must perform a Constitution saving throw against your charge save DC. If they succeed on the throw, they take half damage using the direct hit damage die. If they fail, they take full damage. The enemy does not take any splash damage.


Charge save DC = 8 + your proficiency bonus + your Intelligence modifier


If your charge detonates on contact with an object, use the rules governing object damage beginning at page 246 of the Dungeon Master's Guide. A single charge detonation will not normally be sufficient to knock a hole through a wall or bring down a cliff overhead, although the sound and any dislodged material may work as a distraction; flying chips of wood or stone could even cause damage to nearby enemies, at the DM's discretion.
You can replenish all used charges from your saboteur's supplies during a short or long rest. Refilling your charges requires at least one hour's work.

VOLATILE MIX
Starting at 2nd level, you have learned how to mix unique and exotic ingredients into your charges, which bestow your charges with additional effects. Your charges gain one volatile mix of your choice, which you can choose to activate before using each charge. Your volatile mix options are detailed at the end of the class description.
You gain additional volatile mixes again when you reach 7th, 13th and 17th levels. When you know more than one volatile mix, you can use all known mixes at once or in any combination.

SABOTAGE STYLE
At 3rd level, you choose a preferred style of making things go boom that you employ in the exercise of your saboteur abilities: Sapper, Trapper or Thunderclapper, all detailed at the end of the class description. Your choice of sabotage style grants you features at 3rd level and then again at 7th, 11th and 15th level.

ABILITY SCORE IMPROVEMENT
When you reach 4th level, and again at 8th, 12th, 16th and 19th level, you can increase one ability score of your choice by 2, or you can increase two ability scores of your choice by 1. As normal, you can't increase an ability score above 20 using this feature.

ELEMENT OF SURPRISE
An experienced saboteur knows the value of acting fast and staying one step ahead. When you reach 5th level, you gain +3 to initiative rolls, in addition to your Dexterity modifier.

CHEMICAL DISTILLATION
Beginning at 5th level, you can use your saboteur's supplies to purify water, rendering it drinkable if a little bland in taste.

BLIND LUCK
Regardless of their skill level, saboteurs tend not to survive for long without a healthy measure of luck on their side. Beginning at 6th level, if you are caught in the blast from one of your own charges, you may use this feature to take no damage from the charge. This can be used to avoid damage from either a direct hit or splash damage. You must then finish a short or long rest to use your Blind Luck again.

SECOND CHANCE
Saboteurs have to be clever with their fingers to build their charges; this skill transfers over to other areas of adventuring life too. Beginning at 9th level, you have advantage on ability checks relating to disarming non-magical traps.

EVASION
Beginning at 14th level, you have seen enough explosions that you can tell when one is coming. You can nimbly dodge out of the way of certain area effects, such as a red dragon's fiery breath or an ice storm spell. When you are subjected to an effect that allows you to make a Dexterity saving throw to take only half damage, you instead take no damage if you succeed on the saving throw, and only half damage if you fail.

AMBIDEXTROUS
At level 20, when you use a charge on your Attack action, you can choose to use two charges instead. This feature stacks with any other feature that affects the number of attacks and/or charges you use.


SABOTAGE STYLES
While all saboteurs enjoy creating large explosions, each saboteur likes to do it in a different way. These different styles of destruction are embodied by the sabotage styles.


SAPPER
The Sapper style involves throwing caution to the wind and hand-delivering high explosives to the feet of your enemies. As you learn the arts of the Sapper, you learn specialised techniques allowing you to move quickly across the battlefield and maximise the damage of your charges, with an increasingly flagrant disregard for your own safety.

BONUS PROFICIENCIES
At 3rd level, you gain proficiency with medium armour.

IN AND OUT
Beginning at 3rd level, you can guarantee a direct hit when you use a charge - when you use the charge within 10ft of an enemy, no attack roll is required and your charge is considered a direct hit. If you do so, you may also use the Dash action as a bonus action.

TINNITUS
Beginning at 7th level, you have been too close to so many charge detonations that you're desensitised to the sound. Either that or your ear drums have popped. Whatever the reason, you gain resistance to thunder damage, and you have advantage on saving throws against sound-based effects, for example a harpy's luring song.

SPECIAL DELIVERY
Sappers embrace their recklessness to use their charges to maximum effect. Beginning at 11th level, When you use your In and Out feature, you can ensure that your charge deals the maximum damage available on your direct hit damage die. You must roll for splash damage as normal. You may use this feature a number of times equal to your Intelligence modifier.

RIDE THE WAVE
The ultimate Sapper doesn't only risk his own neck, but he does it in style. Beginning at 15th level, when you use your In and Out feature, you may choose to remain within the blast radius. If you do so, roll a Dexterity check (DC 15). On a pass, you may use your reaction to use another charge, and you are pushed 20ft directly away from your target and cannot move any further. On a fail, the effects are the same, but you must take the maximum splash damage from your first charge. You must then finish a short or long rest to use your Ride the Wave again.


TRAPPER
The Trapper style involves caution, camouflage and surprise attacks. As you learn the arts of the Trapper, you learn specialised techniques that allow you to control the flow and direction of battle, using your environment to your advantage and remaining hidden while you trap enemies in place, leaving them unguarded and vulnerable.

EXTRA MOVEMENT
Beginning at 3rd level, your base movement speed increases by 10ft.

BONUS PROFICIENCIES
At 3rd level, you gain proficiency in the use of the Trapper's tools. These comprise of the following:
Resins. You have a large supply of highly adhesive resins, which can be used as glue to affix charges (or other items) to the environment as an action. No attack roll is necessary when sticking a charge to a surface, although some surfaces are too slippery. A Trapper may only stick charges to surfaces within 5ft of them; throwing a charge will cause it to detonate as usual.
Fuses. You have 500ft of quick-burn fuses. Fuses can be trailed from the affixed charge and cut to length, before being ignited using matches. The fuses are thin strings of highly flammable metal, so they burn very quickly - a placed charge can be detonated as a bonus action. Alternatively, if any creature should come into contact with a placed charge, the charge will detonate. The Wisdom (Perception) required to spot a placed charge is equal to the Trapper's charge save DC.
Matches. These can be struck as a bonus action to light the fuse leading to a placed charge.
Camouflage. You can cover yourself in mud and dirt to give yourself advantage on Dexterity (Stealth) checks. Using this feature in-combat uses up your Action.

You may spend an hour during a short or long rest to replenish your Trapper's tools using materials you have gathered on your travels.

TRAPS
At 3rd level, you gain the ability to use traps and snares to disable your enemies. You may pick two of the following trap options to learn. Traps can be laid as an action anywhere within 5ft of you as long as the terrain allows for it. All traps have an AC of 5 and 3HP unless otherwise stated, and avoiding or defusing them requires a Dexterity save against your charge save DC.
Tripwire. This trap uses a thin wire of up to 30ft strung between two sturdy positions to trip enemies to the floor. If an enemy walks over the tripwire and fails on the Dexterity save, they will fall prone. On a successful save, their movement speed is reduced to 0 until they succeed on a Strength or Dexterity save (charge save DC) at the beginning of their turn to extricate themselves. A creature of Large or Huge size cannot fall prone to a tripwire. Tripwires have no effect on creatures of Colossal size or swimming creatures; flying or climbing creatures are only affected if the tripwire is perfectly placed.
Spike trap. This trap involves a line of up to 20ft of sharp spikes, usually covered over with leaves or some other camouflage. A creature who walks into a spike trap and fails the Dexterity save takes 1d6 plus your Intelligence modifier piercing damage and can only use half its movement speed on its next turn.
Poison pins. This trap involves a modified charge stuffed with poisoned pins and rusty nails. It is set off on contact, exploding in a 10ft radius sphere and dealing 1d4 plus your Intelligence modifier piercing damage and 1d4 poison damage, or half on a successful Dexterity save (as usual, the check is against your charge save DC).
Bear trap. This trap is a touch-sensitive pair of metal jaws that covers one 5ft square, and snaps closed around whatever is unfortunate enough to tread in it. A creature that steps on the trap takes 1d10 plus your Intelligence modifier piercing damage (or, if the target is armoured, bludgeoning damage) and is restrained until they pass a Strength check to break the trap open, or damage the trap sufficiently to break it.
Net snare. This trap involves a net spread flat across the ground in a 10ft square, which is triggered when a creature steps in it. The creature that triggers the trap is enveloped in the net and suspended above the ground, and is restrained until they succeed on a Strength check or until they deal sufficient damage to the net to destroy it. When a creature frees themselves from the net, they must succeed on a further Dexterity check or take 1d4 fall damage. This trap does not work on creatures of Huge size or above, and it can only be set up where there is something overhead from which the net can be suspended.

SIXTH SENSE
The best Trappers rig battlefields to their advantage before the enemy even knows they were there. Beginning at 7th level, you may use this feature once per long rest to move yourself to the top of the initiative order. Furthermore you are able to spot non-magical traps when walking at normal pace as if you were proceeding carefully.

FLASHBANG
Beginning at 11th level, when an enemy makes a melee weapon attack against you, you can use your reaction to toss a small firecracker to distract your attacker, who must make a Wisdom (Perception) check against your charge save DC.
If your attacker succeeds on its check, it is partially distracted and has disadvantage on any attack rolls made on its turn. However if your attacker fails the check, it is wholly distracted by the flash and bang, and you immediately enter stealth, you may choose to lay a placed charge at your location, and you can immediately move up to your full movement speed as a free action. You may use this feature once between short rests.

RAZE
Beginning at 11th level, you are adept at spotting structural weaknesses and placing your charges to exploit them. Your placed charges are now capable of felling small trees or breaking large chunks of rock free from walls or structures. Any creature in the area beneath any falling debris must succeed on a DC15 Dexterity saving throw, taking 22 (4d10) bludgeoning damage on a failed save, or half as much on a successful one. Once the debris has fallen, the floor of the area is filled with rubble and becomes difficult terrain. If destroying a section of the environment releases another hazard, for example a cascade of water or a flow of molten rock, then further damage may be added depending on the weight and severity of the hazard.

IMPROVED TRAPS
Beginning at 15th level, you are a master trapmaker. You may choose to learn two other traps from the list above, and each trap has the following additional effects:
Your Tripwire trap now knocks enemies prone on a failed save and restrains them on a successful save, and works against creatures of Huge size and below. Furthermore, when the tripwire snaps, it lashes round the creature's legs or body, dealing 1d8 plus your Intelligence modifier slashing damage.
Your Spike trap now has a maximum length of 30ft, and on a failed save, deals 1d12 plus your Intelligence modifier piercing damage. Affected enemies can only use half their movement speed on their next turn.
Your Poison pin trap now deals 1d8 plus your Intelligence modifier piercing damage and 1d8 poison damage in a 15ft sphere, and any creatures that take damage are poisoned.
Your Bear trap now deals 1d12 plus your Intelligence modifier piercing damage and 1d12 plus your Intelligence modifier bludgeoning damage, regardless of whether or not the enemy is armoured; if the affected body part of the target is not armoured and the creature affected is Large or smaller, the body part is severed according to the rules on page 272 of the Dungeon Master's Guide.
Your Net snare trap now works on creatures of Huge size or smaller, and can be set up to trap creatures at ground level. If an enemy frees themselves from a net at ground level, no further Dexterity check is required as no fall damage will be taken.


THUNDERCLAPPER
The Thunderclapper style is for adventurers who enjoy maximising the explosions they cause... but watching them from a safe distance. As you learn the arts of the Thunderclapper, you craft your own custom charge launcher which allows you to fire your charges great distances, blanketing wide areas with explosives and dealing high damage to large targets, all the while safely tucked in the rearguard.

CHARGE LAUNCHER

At 3rd level, the Thunderclapper designs their very own charge launcher, and becomes proficient in its use. It is up to you how you wish for your launcher to appear, so long as your DM agrees that it fits in-universe.

All charge launchers are intricate contraptions of metal pipework with thick barrels that thrust charges great distances in a soaring arc; using a launcher requires mathematical and algorithmic calculations to judge the trajectory, and therefore attack rolls when firing a charge from your launcher use your Intelligence modifier (if you throw charges as normal, they still retain the Thrown property).

Charge launchers can fire charges much further than a person can throw them; as such, your range when using your charge launcher is 150/600ft. Your charges also explode more fiercely when fired from your launcher due to the extra impact. The blast radius of your charges is increased by 5ft when you fire them from your launcher.
However, a charge launcher is heavy and requires a few seconds to put it down and aim it before firing; therefore your movement speed is reduced by 10ft as long as you are carrying your launcher.

SQUARE PEGS, ROUND HOLE
From 7th level, you are able to tweak your launcher's firing mechanism so that it can launch objects other than your charges. You can use your action to fire any object or creature up to a weight of 50lbs using your launcher, making an attack roll as normal (including the additional d8 direction roll on a miss).
The range of the projectile is 50ft for a 50lb weight, increasing by 1ft for every 1lb decrease in weight. If you are firing something breakable or alive, you must ensure that there is a soft or safe landing or the object or creature will take 4d10 bludgeoning damage on impact.
The projectile will deal direct-hit damage according to its hardness and weight. A soft projectile will deal 1d6 damage per 10lbs weight on impact. A hard projectile will deal 1d10 damage per 10lbs on impact.
Firing projectiles other than the charges for which the launcher was designed can cause damage to the barrels. As such, you may only use this feature a number of times between rests equal to your Intelligence modifier.

SCORCHED EARTH
Beginning at 11th level, you have developed a high degree of efficacy in your launcher. Whenever any target is hit by the splash damage from a charge fired using your launcher, you can use the direct-hit damage die instead. Additionally, targets of Huge size or larger take both direct hit and splash damage when hit by a charge fired from your launcher.

DOUBLE-BARRELLED
Beginning at 15th level, you add a second barrel to your charge launcher. When you use your action to Attack, you may fire two chargers from your launcher at once. This feature stacks with the Saboteur 20th level Ambidextrous feature.


VOLATILE MIX
Each saboteur uses a different mix of chemicals and herbs when putting together their charges, and there are many secret ingredients that can add unique effects to charge detonations. You cannot choose the same mix more than once. As the volatile ingredient must be added to the charge mix at the last moment, you can decide which mix of the ingredients you have learned to use when you are making your Attack roll. Any additional damage applies to both direct hit and splash damage rolls.

1. Berserk mix
You add a pinch of a rare herb that causes the victim to become enraged. All targets hit by your charges take an additional 1d6 psychic damage and must perform a Wisdom saving throw against your charge save DC. On a fail, they go berserk and must use their next action to attack the creature nearest them.

2. Boom mix
You add a dab of a rare liquid that magnifies sound. Your charge detonations ring out with a loud boom that is audible within 300ft of you. All targets hit by your charges take an additional 1d6 thunder damage and must perform a Constitution saving throw against your charge save DC. On a fail, they become deafened until the end of your next turn.

3. Burn mix
You add a tuft of a fire giant's eyebrow. Your charges explode in a shower of liquid flame, dealing 1d6 fire damage to all targets within the blast radius and igniting flammable objects inside the radius that are not being worn or carried. The blast momentarily sheds bright light in a 10ft radius and dim light for an additional 10ft. If an enemy is within the radius of the oil spread by a slick mix charge when the burn mix charge is used, they take an extra 1d4 damage and the oil is burned away.

4. Charm mix
You add a drop of Rakshasa essence. All targets hit by your charges take an additional 1d6 psychic damage and must perform a Wisdom saving throw against your charge save DC. On a fail, they are charmed until the end of your next turn.

5. Cloud mix
You add a touch of efreeti soot. The blast radius of your charge undergoes the effects of a Fog Cloud spell (ignoring the spell's radius of effect).

6. Corrosive mix
You add a swab of gray ooze extract. Your charges explode in a spray of corrosive acid, dealing 1d6 acid damage to all targets within the blast radius. If any creature hit by the charge is wearing non-magical metal armour, the next weapon attack against them has advantage.

7. Fear mix
You add a pinch of mummy bonemeal. All targets hit by your charges take an additional 1d6 psychic damage and must perform a Wisdom saving throw against your charge save DC. On a fail, they become frightened until the end of your next turn.

8. Flash mix
You add a drop of holy water. All targets hit by your charges take an additional 1d6 radiant damage and must perform a Constitution saving throw against your charge save DC. On a fail, they are blinded until the end of your next turn. The blast momentarily sheds bright light in a 30ft radius and dim light for an additional 30ft.

9. Frag mix
You carefully split the casing of your charge. All targets hit by your charges take an additional 1d6 piercing damage and must perform a Constitution saving throw against your charge save DC. On a fail, they take a further 1d4 damage as they pull the shrapnel out.

10. Freeze mix
You add a tuft of frost giant hair. All targets hit by your charges take an additional 1d6 cold damage and must perform a Dexterity saving throw against your charge save DC. On a fail, they fall prone. If an enemy is within the radius of the oil spread by a slick mix charge when the freeze mix charge is used, automatically fail the Dexterity saving throw.

11. Mental mix
You add a drop of beholder blood. All targets hit by your charges take an additional 1d6 psychic damage and must perform a Wisdom saving throw against your charge save DC. On a fail, roll a d100. The creature affected falls under the relevant effect from the "Short-term Madness" table on p.259 of the Dungeon Master's Guide until the end of your next turn.

12. Push mix
You add an amplifying reagent. All targets hit by your charges take an additional 1d6 force damage and must perform a Dexterity saving throw against your charge save DC. On a fail, they are pushed 10ft away from the epicentre of the charge detonation and fall prone.

13. Quiet mix
You add a mysterious magical essence. All targets hit by your charges take an additional 1d6 necrotic damage and must perform a Constitution saving throw against your charge save DC. On a fail, they are silenced until the end of your next turn.

14. Shock mix
You add a tuft from a storm giant's beard. All targets hit by your charges take an additional 1d6 lightning damage and must perform a Dexterity saving throw against your charge save DC. On a fail, they are paralyzed until the end of the current turn. If the creature hit is wearing metal armour, they automatically fail the saving throw.

15. Sicken mix
You add a vial of gorgon breath. All targets hit by your charges take an additional 1d6 poison damage and must perform a Constitution saving throw against your charge save DC. On a fail, they are poisoned until the end of your next turn.

16. Slick mix
You add a drop of slaad grease. All targets hit by your charges take an additional 1d6 bludgeoning damage and must perform a Dexterity saving throw against your charge save DC. On a fail, they fall prone. This mix creates a slick of oil on the floor in the charge's blast radius that can be ignited by a burn mix or can amplify the slipperiness of the ice left behind by a freeze mix.

17. Snare mix
You add a cutting from a vine blight. All targets hit by your charges take an additional 1d6 slashing damage and must perform a Dexterity saving throw against your charge save DC. On a fail, they are restrained until the end of your next turn.

18. Spread mix
You add a wisp from an air elemental. The blast radius of your charges is extended by 5 feet. This effect stacks with the Thunderclapper's Charge Launcher feature.

19. Weak mix
You add a numbing anaesthetic. All targets hit by your charges take an additional 1d6 necrotic damage and must perform a Constitution saving throw against your charge save DC. On a fail, they have advantage on attack and damage rolls until the end of your next turn.

20. Lucky dip mix
You add a fistful of whatever comes to hand first. Roll two d20s. Your charge takes the effects of the corresponding mixes according to the two numbers rolled. If either die roll results in a 20, the charge is a dud and deals no damage, additional or base.


MULTICLASSING
Prerequisites: DEX 13 and INT 13
Proficiencies Gained: Light armour, simple weapons, saboteur's supplies

Jormengand
2015-08-11, 10:15 AM
I don't have any immediate input (I still need to learn to play 5th...) but what I will say is that you'll probably get a better response if you post it directly in the thread.

Sammuthegreat
2015-08-11, 10:16 AM
Noted, thanks - will do. It's not far short of 6000 words so I figured the opposite might hold true. I'll post it in the OP now.

Bharaeth
2015-08-12, 04:36 AM
Okay, so this character class is amazing, and very silly, and very fun! I especially like the Sapper, but also the Thunderclapper firing halflings and/or puppies at their enemies is a nice touch, too.

Some thoughts: on volatiles - do volatile mixes cost anything? it seems that the ingredients come from exotic sources, so maybe they should. Not that the class tax is a good thing, but there are probably other classes that require expensive items to work - does a wizard have to pay for their spellbook? I can't remember right now. Also, I know that you had to spread the volatiles to make up 20 varieties, but one or two seem a little contrived; ones that stick out at me the most are the Mental Mix and the Charm Mix.

Mental Mix doing temporary insanity seems a little too... I don't know. Would a group regularly want to roll to see what trauma orc #13 develops? And with Charm Mix, what sort of in-world pseudo-science justification would there be for the victims to be charmed by the saboteur, seeing as they have no direct arcane link to their target?

My last comment is the Trapper subclass: I think basically it gets too much love. I reckon it has too many options, and also how long does it take to lay a trap? An action? More?

Specifically, with the tripwire option, it seems that pushing prone is actually a less powerful result than being restrained - my instinct would be too have a weaker condition hit the larger creatures that trigger it, not a stronger condition.

And then there is the flashbang. Unless I read it wrong, it seems like the attacker getting a success on their check means that its attack still misses, and a failure means even worse for them: I would have thought that if the attacker succeeds, their attack should work; also, entering stealth, doing a full move and laying a trap is like 3 actions all as a reaction - it is a bit too much. And can a spike pit, a trip wire or a net trap really be laid in a split second?

Sammuthegreat
2015-08-12, 07:04 AM
Okay, so this character class is amazing, and very silly, and very fun! I especially like the Sapper, but also the Thunderclapper firing halflings and/or puppies at their enemies is a nice touch, too.

Firstly, thank you very much! Very kind words. I'll deal with each of your points in turn - thank you for going through the class with a fine-tooth comb, this is exactly the sort of feedback I was after.


Some thoughts: on volatiles - do volatile mixes cost anything? it seems that the ingredients come from exotic sources, so maybe they should. Not that the class tax is a good thing, but there are probably other classes that require expensive items to work - does a wizard have to pay for their spellbook? I can't remember right now. Also, I know that you had to spread the volatiles to make up 20 varieties, but one or two seem a little contrived; ones that stick out at me the most are the Mental Mix and the Charm Mix.

Mental Mix doing temporary insanity seems a little too... I don't know. Would a group regularly want to roll to see what trauma orc #13 develops? And with Charm Mix, what sort of in-world pseudo-science justification would there be for the victims to be charmed by the saboteur, seeing as they have no direct arcane link to their target?

I'm fairly ambivalent about volatiles having a material cost. I agree that they probably should, particularly given the little fluff phrase at the beginning of each mix description. Those phrases were principally there for flavour rather than mechanical benefit, but given that spells often have material cost it only seems fair. Having said that, I had the sort of hand-wavey idea that maybe the extra pinches of this and that were in the saboteur's supplies, which can be replenished by picking up a bit of this and that on the road, but I can see how that doesn't fit with the flavour descriptions. I'm leaning towards not needing materials on principle, because otherwise the volatile mixes (which are an essential part of ensuring that charge damage scales with level) will be a bit inaccessible; if that means tweaking the mix descriptions then that's easily done.

As for the logical link for Mental and Charm mixes... I can completely see what you're saying. While I think the Mental mix is quite easily to explain in-universe (there must be all sorts of hallucinogens in the world of D&D that could make a person have a terror episode) I can see why consulting the DMG and rolling a d100 is a bit of a pain. Perhaps I could think about codifying a simple set of rules for Madness - maybe even just pick one from the DMG table.

As for Charm, perhaps this could be something more along the lines of the victim being charmed by the nearest hostile creature to them, in a sort of Titania/Bottom-from-Midsummer-Night's-Dream fashion? That would get round the lack of a causative link between Saboteur and victim.



My last comment is the Trapper subclass: I think basically it gets too much love. I reckon it has too many options, and also how long does it take to lay a trap? An action? More?

This one's tricky... as you appear to have noticed, the Trapper was the anomalous subclass insofar as it needed lots and lots of individual features to make it fully work according to my original ideas. There's a lot of choice, but I think it's fair to say that while they have tons of options and utility, they have comfortably the least potential damage output of all 3 subclasses. That's kinda by design, they're supposed to be tricky but clever and tactical, so they need plenty of utility options for manoeuvring enemies to make sure they don't become a bit useless.

As for laying traps, yeah that's a whole action. I wasn't aware I hadn't spelt that out in the description, and I'll make sure to do so.



Specifically, with the tripwire option, it seems that pushing prone is actually a less powerful result than being restrained - my instinct would be too have a weaker condition hit the larger creatures that trigger it, not a stronger condition.

Is restrained stronger? My reading was that it was weaker, since you can still attack, cast spells etc from a restrained position. Is there a better condition that evokes the idea of a large creature getting tangled in a wire? Perhaps something as simple as lowering their movement to 0 for the rest of that round after they trip the wire?



And then there is the flashbang. Unless I read it wrong, it seems like the attacker getting a success on their check means that its attack still misses, and a failure means even worse for them: I would have thought that if the attacker succeeds, their attack should work; also, entering stealth, doing a full move and laying a trap is like 3 actions all as a reaction - it is a bit too much. And can a spike pit, a trip wire or a net trap really be laid in a split second?

This was a really difficult one to balance. Obviously on the one hand it's a twice-per-rest feature so it's a proper "last gasp" escape mechanism; I've thought about potentially removing the "lay a trap or placed charge" part from the feature. It is supposed to be powerful and it's quite flavourful as a sort of "missed me, hahaha" which fits the Trapper quite well, I feel.

Regarding the "on a success, the attack still hits" - I originally drafted the feature so that a success on the check would result in nothing happening, but that seems like far too big a downside for a twice-per-rest feature. How about on a fail, the attacker gets disadvantage on their attack roll? At least that way there's no circumstance in which you use your high-level feature to literally no effect.



Thanks again for your feedback, would love to hear some more thoughts!

Bharaeth
2015-08-12, 07:20 AM
I'm leaning towards not needing materials on principle, because otherwise the volatile mixes (which are an essential part of ensuring that charge damage scales with level) will be a bit inaccessible; if that means tweaking the mix descriptions then that's easily done.

Yeah, actually, that makes a lot of sense - it would be too pedantic otherwise. After all, only a minority of spells require priced ingredients. Or you could just require the PC to purchase a component bag and be done with it


Is restrained stronger? My reading was that it was weaker, since you can still attack, cast spells etc from a restrained position. Is there a better condition that evokes the idea of a large creature getting tangled in a wire? Perhaps something as simple as lowering their movement to 0 for the rest of that round after they trip the wire?

I was under the impression you could attack from prone? I don't have my book with me to be honest. I think maybe go for the grappled condition, or whatever it is called. I think that's the one. It's basically the younger brother of restrained, without all the disadvantage/advantage shenanigans.


This was a really difficult one to balance. Obviously on the one hand it's a twice-per-rest feature so it's a proper "last gasp" escape mechanism; I've thought about potentially removing the "lay a trap or placed charge" part from the feature. It is supposed to be powerful and it's quite flavourful as a sort of "missed me, hahaha" which fits the Trapper quite well, I feel.

Regarding the "on a success, the attack still hits" - I originally drafted the feature so that a success on the check would result in nothing happening, but that seems like far too big a downside for a twice-per-rest feature. How about on a fail, the attacker gets disadvantage on their attack roll? At least that way there's no circumstance in which you use your high-level feature to literally no effect.

Hmm. So I've not actually played a vast amount of 5e, but I kind of suspect that twice-per-rest is actually fairly frequent - doesn't that still include twice per short rest, too? If so, what about making it once per rest? And changing it to disadvantage on the attack if the attacker succeeds is cool - I can see why you wouldn't want the feature to be expended and still come up zilch.

And, only from my narrow bounds of suspension of disbelief, what do you think about changing it from "lay a trap or placed charge" to simply "lay a placed charge"? That could quite conceivably be dropped and go off in a second or two.

Sammuthegreat
2015-08-12, 07:20 AM
P.s. the "shallow trench" reference in the Spike Trap description was a typo that slipped through the net post-edit - the trap is like police stinger traps, rather than a trench that needs digging. Obviously a 20ft trench couldn't be dug in one action.

The rest, though, I think are OK for one 6-second action, maybe stretching it a bit but I'm comfortable with it.

Sammuthegreat
2015-08-12, 07:28 AM
Yeah, actually, that makes a lot of sense - it would be too pedantic otherwise. After all, only a minority of spells require priced ingredients. Or you could just require the PC to purchase a component bag and be done with it

I'd be happy with that. It would leave it at the DM's discretion, to an extent, to require a Sab to refill their pouch after a reasonable length of time, which would be fine with me.


I was under the impression you could attack from prone? I don't have my book with me to be honest. I think maybe go for the grappled condition, or whatever it is called. I think that's the one. It's basically the younger brother of restrained, without all the disadvantage/advantage shenanigans.

I believe you have to get up before you can attack from prone, which from memory uses your action and half your movement. Grappled could work, although I think the mechanics are reliant on there being a grappler as well as a grapplee, as it were... I'm leaning towards the "movement reduced to 0" option now.


Hmm. So I've not actually played a vast amount of 5e, but I kind of suspect that twice-per-rest is actually fairly frequent - doesn't that still include twice per short rest, too? If so, what about making it once per rest? And changing it to disadvantage on the attack if the attacker succeeds is cool - I can see why you wouldn't want the feature to be expended and still come up zilch.

Once per long rest could work, with the disadvantage on success amendment. That feels a bit more balanced. There's plenty of once per long rest features in the book, and this one is certainly powerful enough to need limitations.


And, only from my narrow bounds of suspension of disbelief, what do you think about changing it from "lay a trap or placed charge" to simply "lay a placed charge"? That could quite conceivably be dropped and go off in a second or two.

Yeah, this makes perfect sense actually. I'm good with that.

Bharaeth
2015-08-12, 07:35 AM
I believe you have to get up before you can attack from prone, which from memory uses your action and half your movement. Grappled could work, although I think the mechanics are reliant on there being a grappler as well as a grapplee, as it were... I'm leaning towards the "movement reduced to 0" option now.

Yeah, cool, that's nice and simple. I think it was only in 4e that immobilised was a condition


Once per long rest could work, with the disadvantage on success amendment. That feels a bit more balanced. There's plenty of once per long rest features in the book, and this one is certainly powerful enough to need limitations.

Hah, I know this kinda goes against what I was just saying, but why not leave in once per short rest OR long rest. There's not enough abilities that recharge on a short rest, in my humble opinion. The justification perhaps being why only once per short rest/encounter is that your foes won't fall for it twice in the same 30 seconds, but maybe once per day (effectively) seems a little too arbitrary? I realise that in the interest of rules mechanics and balance and such, that arbitrary is often called for, but still

Sammuthegreat
2015-08-12, 07:39 AM
I'm happy to go with whatever looks natural and balanced to a second set of eyes - that's the benefit of getting neutral feedback since I may be a bit biased.One per short rest it is.

Thanks for your help - the lack of comments about the class in general tells me I did a reasonable job of balancing it in the first place, even if the Trapper was a bit wonky. I'm pretty confident it'll stand up in real play now.

Bharaeth
2015-08-12, 07:45 AM
Yeah, to my eyes that's the case. Perhaps there's others around with a better grasp of mechanics who might say otherwise, but...

Now I just got to find an excuse to start a new character and persuade my group to allow homebrew material! Dwarves and explosions always go well together

GhostCastle
2015-09-09, 02:12 AM
So, I looked over the class and I think overall it's pretty well balanced and interesting. I haven't read Trapper (as I read the comments regarding it's favor, and it didn't fit my character's concept).

Sapper:

Sounds good - some things require a bit of clarification, such as "In and Out" guaranteeing a hit. Does that mean no attack roll need be done within 10 feet? The Dash part is fine, but it's not clear on what exactly "guarantee" means.
In my experience when one makes an attack (even if they plan on moving after) the attack is resolved at that time. The way Ride the Wave reads is that you have the option to move out of the way or the option to stay - and (when using Ride the Wave) if you stay, you can do some additional stuff with the extra charge. Does that mean the that, normally, the Charge damage is resolved at the end of combat? (I don't know how necessary this clarification is, as my DM's tend not to be sticklers, but it may be important to have it specifically say that damage is resolved at the end of the turn or something, otherwise how do you explain getting out of the way without taking damage?
Tinnitis is fine, though other level 7 features are WAY stronger. Trapper you move to the TOP of initiative (you already get a passive +3 so the need to use this is less frequent making the times you WOULD use it extraordinary and thus, the INT-mod times per day isn't really a draw back... I mean it's going to be your primary stat, so what an average of 3 times per day for most characters? How often do you really re-roll Initiative per day? Square Pegs, Round Holes seems a bit less strong, but still it is an option when you want to save charges or you have to do environmental damage without wasting a charge. it has some utility, which is cool. Shopping a grappling hook with a long rope like Batman? Super cool. Tinnitis could use a buff... not entirely sure what. Maybe something with you can take damage now but not have it affect you until a turn later or something? We can brainstorm if you like.


I plan on playing my level 10 Gnomish pirate as a Thunderclapper, so I can provide more actual playtest feedback as we get going. From reading it, everything seems pretty good.

One thing that wasn't clear to me was also on Charges. Direct damage is dealt to the target that is hit with the charge. Makes sense. Splash damage hits things around that target by 5 ft (10 with spread or if you're a Launcher, and 15 if you're both of those things - (I think, anyway, it seems like you made most other possibly stackable things stack, but this isn't explicitly clear either, though I wouldn't see why they wouldn't stack).

My question, however, is two-fold. Firstly, it states that
The damage charges deal is dependent on the potency of the mixture in each charge, which is learned through trial and error as well as natural intellect. You add your Intelligence modifier to damage rolls when using charges, instead of your Dexterity modifier. Does this mean that you add the INT modifier to your Direct Damage die... to your Splash die... or both? (I'd think both, as it's all the same "thing" exploding, so it's not like you didn't get how to make stuff around it feel the ouch. Again, my assumption is it applies to both types of damage but it isn't explicit, and i feel like the room for interpretation is too wide and can greatly effect the intended damage output.

Secondly, volatile mixes. Does their damage affect both direct damage and splash, or just direct damage. It's not explicitly stated, so I would love if you could clarify your intent.

Thanks for all the hard work! I would be happy to share my play test results with you, should you be interested.

Sammuthegreat
2015-11-26, 01:58 PM
Wow - I'm sorry, I totally failed to realise I had such a detailed reply that I hadn't responded to. Sorry about that! I stopped checking the thread after the initial flurry of replies.

Glad to see you liked the class. I'll reply properly ASAP. Hopefully you're still around to read it!

Scaileanna
2015-11-28, 01:50 PM
So the trapper can affix bombs to surfaces do creatures count?
How many bombs can I affix/connect to one spot/fuse?
If I can affix multiple bombs do they count as one bomb adding their damage together for one attack or as separate still?
And lastly can I affix bombs to myself for that going out style approach ( would blind luck be able to save me front that?)

Sammuthegreat
2015-12-21, 06:30 AM
So, I looked over the class and I think overall it's pretty well balanced and interesting. I haven't read Trapper (as I read the comments regarding it's favor, and it didn't fit my character's concept).

Thanks! I'll take your points one by one.


Sapper:
Sounds good - some things require a bit of clarification, such as "In and Out" guaranteeing a hit. Does that mean no attack roll need be done within 10 feet? The Dash part is fine, but it's not clear on what exactly "guarantee" means.

Correct - no damage roll required. I'm aware that means no crits, but I think the tradeoff is fair.


In my experience when one makes an attack (even if they plan on moving after) the attack is resolved at that time. The way Ride the Wave reads is that you have the option to move out of the way or the option to stay - and (when using Ride the Wave) if you stay, you can do some additional stuff with the extra charge. Does that mean the that, normally, the Charge damage is resolved at the end of combat? (I don't know how necessary this clarification is, as my DM's tend not to be sticklers, but it may be important to have it specifically say that damage is resolved at the end of the turn or something, otherwise how do you explain getting out of the way without taking damage?

I think I get your point - the order would be:

1. Use 1st charge (In and Out - auto-hit)
2. Roll 1st charge damage
3. Roll DEX save (Ride the Wave)
3a. Roll splash damage for 1st charge if DEX save failed
4. Use 2nd charge (also an auto-hit as at this point you'll still be in In and Out range as you're dropping the 2nd charge as you're blasted clear, rather than at the same time as the 1st charge)
5. Roll 2nd charge damage
6. Move 20ft directly away from enemy


Tinnitis is fine, though other level 7 features are WAY stronger.

Interesting... I thought it was pretty strong myself but I'm open to suggestions for improvements!


Trapper you move to the TOP of initiative (you already get a passive +3 so the need to use this is less frequent making the times you WOULD use it extraordinary and thus, the INT-mod times per day isn't really a draw back... I mean it's going to be your primary stat, so what an average of 3 times per day for most characters? How often do you really re-roll Initiative per day?

This is a fair point. I've dropped it to one per long rest.


Square Pegs, Round Holes seems a bit less strong, but still it is an option when you want to save charges or you have to do environmental damage without wasting a charge. it has some utility, which is cool. Shopping a grappling hook with a long rope like Batman? Super cool. Tinnitis could use a buff... not entirely sure what. Maybe something with you can take damage now but not have it affect you until a turn later or something? We can brainstorm if you like.

Glad you like it, and like I said, always open to ideas - I'd be delighted to brainstorm!


I plan on playing my level 10 Gnomish pirate as a Thunderclapper, so I can provide more actual playtest feedback as we get going. From reading it, everything seems pretty good.

Awesome. You'll see from the intro blurb that gnomes were in my head when I thought up the Thunderclapper - I just love the idea of a tiny gnome lugging around a launcher bigger than them!


One thing that wasn't clear to me was also on Charges. Direct damage is dealt to the target that is hit with the charge. Makes sense. Splash damage hits things around that target by 5 ft (10 with spread or if you're a Launcher, and 15 if you're both of those things - (I think, anyway, it seems like you made most other possibly stackable things stack, but this isn't explicitly clear either, though I wouldn't see why they wouldn't stack).

Correct. They do stack - I thought I'd made that clear for some reason. I'll check through.


My question, however, is two-fold. Firstly, it states that Does this mean that you add the INT modifier to your Direct Damage die... to your Splash die... or both? (I'd think both, as it's all the same "thing" exploding, so it's not like you didn't get how to make stuff around it feel the ouch. Again, my assumption is it applies to both types of damage but it isn't explicit, and i feel like the room for interpretation is too wide and can greatly effect the intended damage output.

From the "Explosive Charges" feature: "You add your Intelligence modifier to damage rolls when using charges, instead of your Dexterity modifier."

Direct and splash damage rolls are both "damage rolls." Ergo, both use INT mod.


Secondly, volatile mixes. Does their damage affect both direct damage and splash, or just direct damage. It's not explicitly stated, so I would love if you could clarify your intent.

Both - I've added a little clarifier.


Thanks for all the hard work! I would be happy to share my play test results with you, should you be interested.

No, thank you! I really appreciate the feedback and would genuinely love to hear your test results.

Sammuthegreat
2015-12-21, 06:36 AM
Thanks for the questions - again, I'll deal with them one by one!


So the trapper can affix bombs to surfaces do creatures count?

They most certainly do. This one will be partially up to your DM to regulate though since some creatures are clearly not very sticky, and bear in mind that charges are extremely volatile, like old dynamite. Attaching one to a very hot, very cold or corrosive surface would definitely make it go boom, and if the creature is moving then it'd be very difficult to keep your hands steady enough to attach it without it going off in your face.


How many bombs can I affix/connect to one spot/fuse?

Theoretically it's one fuse per charge, but you can put as many charges as you have in the same spot if you like, and then when one goes off (via fuse) the rest will all be set off as well.


If I can affix multiple bombs do they count as one bomb adding their damage together for one attack or as separate still?

If you've managed to pre-prepare to the extent that you've placed several charges in one place, then they'll all go off together. Bear in mind, though, that it takes your full action to affix a single charge to a surface, so it's not the most practical thing to do mid-combat.


And lastly can I affix bombs to myself for that going out style approach ( would blind luck be able to save me front that?)

Great question! You absolutely can attach bombs to yourself - I would say that yes, Blind Luck will save you from the damage. Bear in mind though that you only have one use of Blind Luck per rest. If you attach more than one charge to yourself, you'll only be spared the damage from the first detonation.

Thanks for the questions!