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Kitten Champion
2015-11-13, 07:04 AM
I'm going to be running a relatively light game in a school setting - while the school's not specifically magical, it's in a high fantasy world relatively similar to Eberron - and I wanted some sport or athletic competition which the school and surrounding village could be engaged in on rest days that will bring some flavour to the world.

I could go with something relatively mundane, but I'm just curious what sort of ideas people have run across or thought up in their own games that have some uniqueness. Just nothing overtly lethal, at least to the sapient beings participating.

DuxAstrorum
2015-11-13, 07:09 AM
well, you could always do something like Warhammer's Bloodbowl. Fantasy crazy antic filled rugby/American Football.

Fri
2015-11-13, 07:14 AM
Here's a random idea. Fantastic football/soccer style sport, except done with large magical armor. So there's two part of the team, the athletes who despite using large magical armor must still be dextrous and strong, and the magicians/artificer/technicians who tinker and maintain the magical armors.

So both physical-type students and brainy-type students must cooperate to win. I guess this could originally started so the jock-type and nerd-type in schools would be friendly. And as a bonus, with the magical-armor bearing most of the brunt of damages, the games could be a lot more physical and dangerous.

Killer Angel
2015-11-13, 07:21 AM
Something ala fox hunting, or bear hunting, but the target is a mechanical construct, and it has some magical abilities to hide / defend / capture hunters, so the teams will need to use good tactics and a coordinated effort between the team's members.

TheCountAlucard
2015-11-14, 05:38 PM
That hip-ball sport they played in Mesoamerica could be adapted. Just don't sacrifice the losing team. :smalltongue:

Honest Tiefling
2015-11-14, 05:42 PM
Dinosaur riding. Its not lethal as you are not attacking each other. I could see a halfling trying to bring their dinosaur to the school and competing with it.

Lvl 2 Expert
2015-11-15, 06:08 PM
Freestyle hover-board (make up a more "fantasy" name for it) racing. Make tricks through the rings of fire to get to a total of at least x points (dependent of the level of the competition and the particular track) and finish first. Tracks in school grounds are often very compact, twisting through themselves. Most other tracks can be found in barren landscapes where they could spare the room.

Honest Tiefling
2015-11-15, 06:13 PM
Freestyle hover-board (make up a more "fantasy" name for it) racing. Make tricks through the rings of fire to get to a total of at least x points (dependent of the level of the competition and the particular track) and finish first. Tracks in school grounds are often very compact, twisting through themselves. Most other tracks can be found in barren landscapes where they could spare the room.

Skip the board. Use the floating disk spell. Then again, I just want to see a situation where a gangly, physically guy is making fun of a big ol' jock for not being able to compete in the school's most reknown sport and laughing as he and a very nerdy cheerleader(bonus points for glasses!) make fun of the fighter. The cheerleader obviously also being a wizard and using pyrotechnics/illusions/mind control/summoning to cheer on the team. The jock is then consoled by his sorcerer girlfriend, who is mocked for not being smart enough to make it onto the team and not having the proper spells.

Kitten Champion
2015-11-15, 07:55 PM
Ah, with hover-boards they can reenact the whole chase scene from Back to the Future II, I'm sure they'd like that.

Xuc Xac
2015-11-16, 02:55 AM
Tenser's Radical Halfpipe

Lvl 2 Expert
2015-11-16, 12:01 PM
Skip the board. Use the floating disk spell.


The disk also winks out if you move beyond range or try to take the disk more than 3 feet away from the surface beneath it. When the disk winks out, whatever it was supporting falls to the surface beneath it.

Veto. :smallbiggrin:

(It would be cool to have magically appearing transparent force boards though...)

A physical board or at least some kind of spell the course or referee casts rather than the racers would also allow anyone to join. As entertaining as the mental image you paint in the rest of your post is, it would be kind of fun to let the classes all get in on the sport in their own way. Maybe casters can use their casting stat for stunts and planned maneuvers, willing or "magicking" the board to do a backflip rather than doing it by strength? Or maybe instead they can use magic senses to up their reaction to other racers?

@Kitten Champion: What were you thinking off? Do you have a strong preference for either a team or an individual sport? Does there have to be a victory condition, or is it also cool if they say go ice climbing together a lot? Are there any important values or skills in this society you want the sport to embody, like teamwork, independence, honor or combat prowess?

Segev
2015-11-16, 12:11 PM
Most games involve attempting to get something like a ball into something like a goal. Assuming mystical/psychic abilities are as non-uniformly distributed in this setting as they are in, say, D&D, you wouldn't want to make the sport exclude "mundanes," but neither would you want to place too many artificial restrictions on what could be fun tactics. (Even if ordinary soccer were played, for example, somebody would have come up with the "what if we allowed this spell...?" variant.)

So maybe some sort of soccer or basketball game with several positions: "Grounders" can use their feet and move around like soccer players; "flyers" are buffed with a sort of flying spell, and follow basketball rules while not being allowed within 5 feet of the ground; and the "goalies" are some sort of magic user or psion, allowed to use any spells or powers they want as long as their effects don't extend past the goalie zone (analogous to where a soccer goalie is allowed to use his hands). They can telekinetically hurl the ball out of the zone, but can't use TK on it while it's out of the zone. Probably have soccer and basketball-like foul rules that include additional ones which amount to "if you do hp damage, it's a foul."

Ralanr
2015-11-16, 01:02 PM
Multidimensional hockey? By which I mean playing hockey (actually any sport with two goals) with hoverboards or anti-gravity like stuff.

Or a soccer game where you jump from platform to platform to kick the ball.

As long as it's not stuck on the ground! Let everything float!

raygun goth
2015-11-16, 01:32 PM
Here are some games and sports from my setting.

Agayateni

This is a sort of table-top game that's a variant on paper dolls where players sit around a flat surface. Everyone brings cutouts of people, objects, or places and puts them out, describing their “starting” positions. Everyone asserts mana over the table and attempts to wrestle control of the events by controlling their own cutouts. Players jockey for positions of narrative power, limited by the paper dolls they placed. This game used to be played by children pre-unification, and the only real rule is that no player can draw what they're bringing to the table, though there are a few variants that allow only doodled figures, most of which require the figures to be swapped around randomly. Like most Nuwep games, it has no clear winner or objective other than to have fun.



The Curse Game/Card Game
A small spirit is called into the center of a playing field. Players have cards, sometimes hand made and sometimes manufactured, that have portions of bargains, taboos, exchanges, and deals written on them, or addenda to taboos or pacts and take turns playing cards and infusing the spirit with mana assertions or withdrawing power from it. Turns can be skipped to exert more mana. Loser is the first one to break a taboo, and the spirit leaps from the playing field, leaving a minor curse on the loser for a few minutes. This game is very common among most every culture in the northern hemisphere.



Volleyball Variants
Most volleyball is actually quite familiar, except that the first person to touch the ball in a scoring round switches teams.


Pull-Up
Very similar to tug of war, except both teams start on the ground and the scoring method is pulling the other team to their feet.



Storming

This game is a combat game played on a large field.



Field size: Maximum length is 120m and maximum width is 90m. Minimum is 90mx45m. A fortress box is always 16mx40m.



Team Size: Official team size is 25 members. Fifteen members are on the field and ten are held in immediate reserve. They need them. A lot.
Field Team: A field team is 15 members: five skirmishers, one unit commander, four unit members, and any combination of up to five total archers and fortress defenders.


Skirmisher: An independent fighter. Skirmishers are safe from storms, but not from strikes. Skirmishers can enter enemy fortresses without storming the enemy unit first.

Unit Commander: The commander of a unit, who counts as two strikes if he is taken out. A Unit Commander possesses the power to call an attack on any target on the field and can attempt a Resource Hit.
Unit Soldier: Any fighter in a unit who is not the commander. Strikes count as single strikes.
Archer: A fighter in the fortress box with the ability to target up to half the field's range with nonlethal attacks.

Fortress Defense: A fighter who is not capable of long range attacks but is fielded in the fortress box.

Magician: As an archer, but mages can be fielded in skirmish positions. Magic can be used against the field and fighters in a nonlethal manner. One magician per field team.



Fortress: One team's end of the field. Fighters who start in the fortress box cannot leave the fortress unless relived by a skirmisher teammate. Unit Commanders can enter and leave the fortress, and can enter the fortress with their unit if they are attempting to defend against a resource hit only. Skirmishers can leave and enter the enemy fortress box at will and can enter their own fortress box to deliver resources.



Storm: A hit on an enemy unit or fortress. Four strikes make a storm if a unit is hit, and a fortress storm is when three strikes are scored against the opposing team's fortress by a skirmisher.
Strike: A hit on an enemy soldier. A strike takes that fighter out of the game unless his team performs a resource hit or that quarter ends. A strike is called when a fighter is unconscious or gives up. It doesn't matter who started it.
Kill: A fighter is killed when he racks up five strikes against him in a single game. He cannot be returned to the field again.
Resource Hit: Entry into the fortress box by a skirmisher who returns with resources to his home fortress box.

Resources: A fun-colored crate marked "resources." Half the fun is trying to get it back across the field without getting your ass beat. A resource hit allows you to bring a struck fighter back into the game.
Optical: A power or effect that looks like it's there, but isn't, or is otherwise non-harmful. Opticals most often occur when teams really get into their flow, and a field can get full of all manner of weather, cracked stone, macuahuitls sparking with flames or thunder, water up to knee height on the field, and so on.
Practical: A power or effect that is there and capable of inflicting harm. These are things magicians tend to do - actual lightning, wells of fire, flying across the field on levitated rocks, and so on.


Quarter: One quarter is 20 minutes. Four quarters in a game.

Scoring: Only storms are tallied. If storms are tied, then strikes are tallied. If strikes and storms are tied, one extra quarter is added.

TheThan
2015-11-16, 01:35 PM
Ah, with hover-boards they can reenact the whole chase scene from Back to the Future II, I'm sure they'd like that.

just remember; if you want to go over water; you've gotta have power.

Mark Hall
2015-11-16, 01:42 PM
The recent Mercedes Lackey Valdemar books have included a sport called "Kirball", which is something of a compromise between hockey and polo. At the Herald's Collegium, most of the riders are mounted on magical horse-like creatures and have their own magical powers (from mind-reading to minor teleportation and telekinesis) that they can use, while the foot troops work well with the group, guarding the goals. Out in the boonies, the sport is played on regular horses, and you have far fewer magically gifted players, so it's a more mundane sport.

That would be my design goal: Something that can be enhanced by magic, but doesn't need it to play, so you have bush-league teams where everyone's mundane, and some flashy pro teams where magic happens, literally.

For specifics? I'd make it a simple ball game, similar to rugby or soccer, with a guarded goal.

Honest Tiefling
2015-11-16, 02:16 PM
Multidimensional hockey?

When I first read this, I thought of the playing field itself being in multiple dimensions. Real players of Multidimensional hockey score goals in the Elemental Plane of Fire. Much to the possible confusion of nearby salamanders.

spineyrequiem
2015-11-16, 04:36 PM
If you've got decent magical healing, you have the option to make sports absurdly dangerous. Quidditch, for instance, could have had far less rules about fouling given that they seem to be able to fix anything up to and including missing bones in days, hours or even minutes. Of course, if people care about pain they might still have rules against it...

One I came up with (explicitly for a magical school, but still relying mostly on their physical abilities) doesn't have a name yet but does have the basic rules fleshed out. Scoring is done like Rugby or many variants of football in that you're aiming to carry a ball to the opposite end of the field and touch it down. Like rugby, you can only throw backwards but unlike most sensible sports you can't move under your own power if you're holding the ball. Instead, you have to be carried by one or more teammates (originally, it was developed to train people to fight in formation and defend important, vulnerable things), who try to take you over the goal line. Teams may be any number, so long as both have the same, but it's traditionally played with fifteen per side. Some tournaments instead measure teams by total weight of members and equipment rather than numbers, to deal with the occasional clever sod who teaches a load of ogres to play and becomes completely unstoppable without massively superior numbers. The initial players are allowed to set up anywhere within their own halves and the ovoid ball is levitated to thirty feet above the central marker. Play starts as soon as it hits the ground, and continues until half time or until one team scores a goal.

Arguably the most important rule is the concept of unlimited reserves. At any time, a player may leave the pitch (either under their own power or with assistance) to be replaced by one of the reserves. These reserves may only enter from their own goal line, meaning that as a formation runs down the pitch it will be faced with a steadily increasing number of defenders as the front line get subbed out and its own reserves are left far behind. Substitutions are usually free, but the referee may intervene if there's a massive difference between the players being substituted (such as a four-foot goblin being replaced with a ton of troll). Teams may dispute any such decision by a referee if they feel it's unfair, meaning that referees only rarely use this option. As it's rarely played professionally, the honor system can be broadly relied upon to stop teams blatantly abusing the rules.

Rules about attacking other players are about on a level with those of 13th Century melees, in that, while murder is still murder, you can do practically anything else. Weapons are not allowed on the pitch (referee's discretion on what counts as a weapon, but anything not held in the hands or obviously sharpened is usually fair game) but you can, if you so wish, knock someone over and keep jumping on them until they stop making funny noises. This is mostly because magical healing is good enough that anything short of death or physical amputation can usually be healed, often in time for the player to be filled with painkillers and told to get back on the pitch. Equipment is fairly unregulated (beyond the weapons rule), and may even include things like rangefinders, extra arms (magically grown or magitech) and, in a few cases, wheels (which are great until the pitch gets horribly churned up). About the only thing that almost everyone has is eye protection as they are particularly vulnerable, and almost everyone but a few brave ball carriers and casualty clearers will wear helmets in some form. Those engaging in so-called 'suicide blocking' where a player throws him or herself at the feet of a large formation in the hopes of fouling their stride and bringing the group down will typically wear enormous amounts of armour, in particular trying to protect the spine as that's quite hard to repair quickly, and makes it much harder to get off the pitch when necessary. Hand protection is also popular as these are very vulnerable, with design varying from simple padded gloves to heavy gauntlets with built-in knuckledusters.

Pitch size and game length are both variable, though it's typically played on a pitch 180 meters long and a third as wide in two forty-five minute halves. In the event of a tie after ninety minutes, the referee or other match officials may allow extra time (particularly in the final of a tournament), award a tie or declare a winner based on which team they felt played the best. As you can imagine, referees tend to be unpopular figures.

TheThan
2015-11-16, 05:42 PM
One I came up with (explicitly for a magical school, but still relying mostly on their physical abilities) doesn't have a name yet but does have the basic rules fleshed out. Scoring is done like Rugby or many variants of football in that you're aiming to carry a ball to the opposite end of the field and touch it down. Like rugby, you can only throw backwards but unlike most sensible sports you can't move under your own power if you're holding the ball. Instead, you have to be carried by one or more teammates (originally, it was developed to train people to fight in formation and defend important, vulnerable things), who try to take you over the goal line. Teams may be any number, so long as both have the same, but it's traditionally played with fifteen per side. Some tournaments instead measure teams by total weight of members and equipment rather than numbers, to deal with the occasional clever sod who teaches a load of ogres to play and becomes completely unstoppable without massively superior numbers. The initial players are allowed to set up anywhere within their own halves and the ovoid ball is levitated to thirty feet above the central marker. Play starts as soon as it hits the ground, and continues until half time or until one team scores a goal.


Ok this sounds like something thought up by college frat boys using a unhealthy amount of beer (for inspiration), old broken down furniture and absolutely no regard for the consequences.

snacksmoto
2015-11-16, 08:27 PM
Perhaps some inspiration can be taken from the 1989 movie Salute of the Jugger (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0094764) (also known as The Blood of Heroes). It has small team tactics using melee weapons.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jugger
movie clip of Juggers gearing up (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ZxURn4OFU4)

From what I remember of the movie, there are two teams of five. It has the basic concept of scoring more points than the other team in a specified game duration. Unlike many such games, only the "runner" can score the points and is the only one who is unarmed but is typically more agile. One player wields a long-reach chain weapon typically for area denial and runner protection. The other three usually wield staves. It seems as if the amount of armour and disarm/trip hooks on the staves is up to the player.

spineyrequiem
2015-11-16, 11:11 PM
Ok this sounds like something thought up by college frat boys using a unhealthy amount of beer (for inspiration), old broken down furniture and absolutely no regard for the consequences.

How could you possibly have guessed my research methods?

It actually makes a sort of sense in my world, most wizards are drugged-up lunatics and magical healing makes the consequences way more trivial than they should be.

Erth16
2015-11-16, 11:34 PM
A fictional sport that is often brought up in my games, although rather silly, is Salmon Whacking. It could best be described as a 10 on 10 brawl where the fighters wield salmon while dressed as salmon and fight each other for control over the two zones, upstream, an open hill or raised platform, and downstream a fortified trench. It happens in four rounds, the first round one team is placed upstream and must advance downstream, defended by the other team, the second they swap sides. Then after a break, they swap objectives, the first team is placed downstream and must occupy upstream to succeed. In the case of both teams succeeding the point for the half is awarded to whomever was faster, if they both fail, whomever lasted longer is awarded the point. In a tie across the two halves, a fifth round is fought that is fought till one side is incapacitated or surrenders.


Another "sport" in my games was Bloodball. It was less of a sport and more of a contained military or diplomatic action between two kingdoms, in a region where a war between any of the 6 powers would lead to the destruction of both belligerents, as well as the destruction of the land if the kings got involved. Bloodball was strange, and violent. Five champions would be chosen to represent their kingdom, and they would meet the other team on the field of battle. At the start of each round, the teams would designate a member of their team "The Ball." This must be made known to the other team. Then the presiding kings would sanction the match and declare it to have begun after agreeing upon the results of the outcome. The two teams would try and wrestle the other team's ball to the ground and kill him or her, before then taking the corpse and dragging it to the other side of the field and tossing it into a raised net to score. If a team's ball was slain, they designate a new one and continue playing with fewer people. Five rounds will be played, and at the end of the five rounds, the team who scored more points wins. Killing of players who are not the ball is prohibited, and results in an immediate loss.

Kitten Champion
2015-11-17, 01:27 AM
@Kitten Champion: What were you thinking off? Do you have a strong preference for either a team or an individual sport? Does there have to be a victory condition, or is it also cool if they say go ice climbing together a lot? Are there any important values or skills in this society you want the sport to embody, like teamwork, independence, honor or combat prowess?

Good questions.

A team sport would be preferable for this specific instance, but it's not like I'm restricted to just doing one. Just, one sport will be the sport that the village enjoys hands down, while others may be popular among a minority, or be confined to just the school as something only it could pull off. I have a lot of creative leeway to explain anything that looks interesting, and I don't intend to be serious about it to the point that it can't be just "ah, that's cool!"

I wanted something relatively similar to soccer, football, or baseball -- insofar as there are multiple participants, people can spectate (and plausibly bet on the outcome) comfortably, no one usually dies (it's a tragic accident rather than the focus of the sport), it has some physical activity involved, and you don't need to spend more than the entire village's GDP to have the resources required to play it. I want people to be discussing last week's game and what marvellous/pitiful play that player A pulled off, possible strategies for the local team B winning next week's game against team C from a ways away, loud and vociferous fans of professional team D and how professional team E are a spoiled bunch of cheaters... etc. The atmosphere of organized sports that bemuses and annoys the uninterested and becomes practically a weekly ritual for those invested in it. Hell, it could have a significant religious nature, why not? I'm still deciding the faiths of the world - along with proper nouns.

The world was decimated by a part-mystical part-biological blight that killed their crops and was subtly poisoning the air and water. In response the people (possessing not inconsiderable amounts of magic) came together to colonize the larger of the two moons after lots of futile attempts to stick it out on the planet.

The society of the moon colony became highly restrictive and hierarchical - there was little to no chance for you or your children to move up in the world and there were strict population controls in place - to the point of an informal but fairly durable caste system was being propped up. The economy was fairly tightly regulated, frills were few and far between outside of the black market. The heterogeneous cultures, religions, and various other conflicting practices that the original moon colonists possessed were - sometimes brutally - homogenized, though not completely erased. It wasn't a terrible place to live insofar as there was much strife or corruption, the system was elegantly maintained through a rather earnest if heartless utilitarian political system, but there were plenty of people who felt marginalized and helpless.

So, move forward a few centuries, after years of experimentation and development - they found a way to kill the blight and immunize their crops from further saturation, eventually ensuring the poisonous air could be reliably purified. Naturally, many jumped at the chance to re-settle the planet's soil. Freedom and advancement are now a viable option and at the low cost of the near absolute certainty - in their lives and future - only those living in the moon society could possess. People could worship as they want, speak their long-dead languages and observe the cultural practices they've been covertly maintaining.

Our story begins 80 years hence, the planet's population is now in the 10's of millions, though spread out considerably. This game takes place in one of the early agricultural colleges formed to teach young settlers the ways and hows to survive on the planet, set up in the middle of a rural district a couple of hours outside the planet's biggest city. More specifically, the players are learning to be monster hunters and exterminators. The population of the moon couldn't maintain livestock of much quality and many staple diet species went extinct centuries earlier from the blight, so acquiring meat of certain monsters or even better successfully capturing and domesticating them, has significant market value both planet-side and with the moon-interior (which is still extensively wealthier and more "civilized" than the surface). Monsters flourished and grew much more powerful during the blight years, and are a danger to any community without walls, wards, and some kind of firepower backing them - and most moon-born people were actively discouraged from learning fighting skills, hazardous magic, or making weapons - so skilled exterminators are generally welcome everywhere planet-side.

So, freedom and teamwork are both important though - the sport could be a lost invention of pre-blight civilization brought to life again in a revivalist moment, or something made that fits into the tight confines and restrictions of the moon during that long period that became exceedingly popular, it might be a modern invention that utilizes the newly open space and helps build stamina for the work, it could be an adaptation of a moon-based sport to fit the new setting.


Most of that is simply there to justify a campaign sort of based around the premise of Dungeon Meshi (http://myanimelist.net/manga/85781/Dungeon_Meshi), by the way. Though the school and need for a sport was more because I was watching Silver Spoon (http://myanimelist.net/anime/16918/Gin_no_Saji) at the time. Also, I watched Interstellar recently.

Lvl 2 Expert
2015-11-17, 12:39 PM
A game I made up and played in real life is touchdown football (because I want the whole football situation to become even more confusing and frustrating). It's a bit simple perhaps, but it is rather distinctive as far as soccer variants go, and it's kind of a rough game, the sort of thing a British boys school could have made up in the 1800's.

Basically it goes like this:
* There is one ball (ball shaped).
* There are two teams.
* Each team has a goal zone, I used one about 6-8 meters wide and 2 meters deep I think, it sits well within the boundaries of the playing field (you can run around it).
* Players can hit the ball with any body part they like including hands, but they cannot hold or clamp the ball in any way or carry the ball in any way. (Which includes running across the field while balancing the ball on your nose. Very impressive, not allowed.)
* The ball is allowed to go high. If a player chooses to try and kick a high ball, it can be penalized as dangerous play if there were other players near.
* Players score by touching the ball down with any body part in the opposing goal zone. In D&D terms: they have to get the ball and a player into the same square in the zone.
* Players are allowed to use their full body including arms to protect the ball. They can also protect it very actively by pushing opponents back in this manner and jumping into opponents and even "protect the ball" when it's not anywhere near. In general: contact is allowed. It's not allowed to really push someone by touching them and stretching your arms, to kick people, to punch or bite people. Attacking from behind is also strictly prohibited.
* I did not have a rule about slidings, turns out maybe I should have.
* I don't remember the exact rules I had made up for fouls and penalties. I think team A would get the ball for a light offense by team B, a really big foul would get the offending player kicked out of the game (there were no reserve players, maybe something to think about in a more organised sport) and in between you might have been able to earn a penalty run, getting a go one on one from the center spot.
* Games are relatively short. I used 2 times 10 minutes at least ones. Slightly longer games are probably better if the sport gets more organised, but this will always be a game that's supposed to be very energetic, stalling and saving energy should not be the most viable strategy. Scoring is relatively easy, a match ending in 0-0 should be very rare. If it isn't: bigger goal zones.
* In case of a tie that shouldn't be the preferable solution is extra time according to the golden goal principle, the next point ends the game.

FlumphPaladin
2015-11-17, 04:54 PM
A little-known (and thus freely adaptable) game you could use is the ancient Japanese game of gitchô (http://www.sengokudaimyo.com/miscellany/miscellany.html), which appears to be somewhat lacrosse-like.

darkscizor
2015-11-18, 12:15 AM
...

Basically it goes like this:
* There is one ball (ball-shaped)
...

Somebody get this genius a medal.

Storm_Of_Snow
2015-11-18, 08:23 AM
A very old White Dwarf (as in late-1980s, before 40k took the company over) had Runequest rules for Cricket.

Lvl 2 Expert
2015-11-18, 01:09 PM
Somebody get this genius a medal.

When talking football codes you never know how the ball will look. This one is a ball. You can even play it with your foot.

FlumphPaladin
2015-11-18, 02:24 PM
When talking football codes you never know how the ball will look. This one is a ball. You can even play it with your foot.

Just like that (American) commercial from about fifteen years ago with the two culture-shocked British stereotypes...

"They play football wi' their 'ands!"
"'n crisps is chips, 'n chips is fries!"

Pex
2015-11-19, 01:42 PM
Two teams of 7. They all fly in the air. Three try to get a ball into one of three hoops for points. A 4th guards the hoops. Two fling two other balls at all players to disrupt them. The seventh searches for a fourth ball that randomly moves about the place. Catching it is worth lots of points and ends the game.

:smallbiggrin:

JAL_1138
2015-11-19, 02:46 PM
Brockian Ultra-Cricket.