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Conundrumist
2016-04-29, 07:47 PM
Recently, I have begun running a 5e campaign styled after The West Marches. This is my first foray into the world of running a campaign and my first real experience with Dungeons & Dragons (and tabletop roleplaying in general) outside internet curiosity.

In the six months or so of running this campaign, I, like many others, have come to notice the shortcomings of the 5e Ranger Class. Aside from the complaints concerning its potency compared to other classes, I also disliked it's dependence on magic. To satisfy myself and two of my players, I have set about to recreate the Ranger class in its entirety. I have drawn particular inspiration from the Unearthed Arcana articles concerning the Fighter: Scout, Ranger: Deep Stalker, and the no-spells Ranger, as well as, simonb350's Modified Ranger posted here (http://www.giantitp.com/forums/showthread.php?480825-Modified-Ranger-Base-Class-and-Archetypes) on these forums and found here (http://www.naturalcrit.com/homebrew/share/Vk6VWGvng) (I outright stole his Beast Master Archetype so I hope he will forgive the appropriation). I also looked at the Fighter class and the Battlemaster Archetype along with the Rogue Class along with gaining various other inspiration from around the internet. It has taken some weeks of research and revision to create what you are about to see.

The following includes the base class features followed by features for Hunter and Beast Master Ranger Archetypes. For the sake of brevity, I have not included my motivations for any of the class features, but I am happy to discuss those if anyone is interested.

My primary concerns at present are the mechanics of the build and ensuring this new Ranger is neither overpowered nor underpowered. It is important to note that it is not meant to be the end all be all ranger fix. I seek only a viable option for my campaign. As such their may be some omissions to certain aspects of the class. Of course if it works in other campaigns all the better. Your feedback is most welcome. I look forward to reading your perspectives.


Fighting Style
At first level, you adopt a particular style of fighting as your specialty. Choose one from the following options.

Archery: +2 bonus to attack rolls made with ranged weapons
Defense: +1 bonus to AC while wearing armor
Dueling: +2 bonus to damage when wielding a melee weapon in one hand and no other weapons.
Two-Weapon Fighting: Add your Ability modifier to off-hand weapon attack damage.
Close Quarters Shooter: +1 bonus to ranged attack rolls, ignore disadvantage on ranged attack rolls made against targets within 5ft of you.

Natural Explorer
You are particularly adept at traveling and surviving in the wilderness and adapting to the natural environment. On a long rest, you acclimatize to your surroundings. When adapted to the surrounding terrain, your proficiency bonus is doubled when you make an Intelligence or Wisdom check related to your surroundings if you are using a skill in which you are proficient.

While traveling for an hour or more in terrain to which you have adapted, you gain the following benefits:

Difficult terrain doesnít slow your groups travel
Even when you are engaged in another activity while traveling (such as foraging, navigating, or tracking), you remain alert to danger.
If you are traveling alone, you can move stealthily at a normal pace.
When you forage you find twice as much food as you normally would.
While tracking other creatures, you also learn their exact number, their sizes, and how long ago they passed through the area

At 6th level you adapt on a short rest and 10th level you automatically adapt when entering a new terrain type.

Hunterís Animus
By the time you reach 2nd level you have gained experience hunting and killing your enemies and use that to your advantage. You may mark a target as a bonus action. As long as the target is marked, you have advantage on Wisdom(Survival) checks to track it and deal an additional 1d6 damage when you hit with a weapon attack. If the target escapes, the mark lasts until you dismiss it or until the end of your next long rest. The damage increases as you gain levels in this class. It increases by 1d6 at 9th level (2d6) and again at 18th level (3d6).

Poultices
At 2nd level, you can create special herbal poultices that have healing power comparable to some potions. You can spend 1 hour gathering herbs and preparing herbal poultices using treated bandages to create a number of such poultices equal to your Wisdom modifier (minimum 1). You can carry a number of poultices at one time equal to your Wisdom modifier (minimum 1). The poultices you create cannot be applied by anyone but you. After 24 hours, any poultices that you have not used lose their potency.

If you spend 1 minute applying one of your poultices to a wounded humanoid creature, thereby expending its use, that creature regains 1d6 hit Die for every two ranger levels you have (rounded down) plus your wisdom modifier.

Ranger Archetype
At 3rd level, you choose an archetype that you strive to emulate: Hunter or Beast Master. Your choice grants you feature at 3rd level and again at 7th, 11th, 15th, and 18th level.

Ambuscade
At 3rd level, you are a master at getting the drop on your enemies. On your first turn during combat you gain a +10 bonus to speed. If you use the attack action, you can make one additional attack. If you are acting before any other creature, your attack has advantage.

Ability Score Improvement
When you reach 4th level, and again at 8th, 12th, 16th, and 19th level, you can increase one ability score of your choice by 2 or two ability scores of your choice by 1 each. You cannot increase an ability beyond 20 using this feature.

Extra Attack
Beginning at 5th, you can attack twice instead of once when you take the Attack action on your turn.

Natural Antivenom
At 6th level, you develop an understanding of and resistance to poisons. You have advantage on saving throws against poison and you have resistance to poison damage. Additionally, you can use one of your poultices to cure one poison effect on the creature to which you are applying the poultice in addition to restoring hit points.

Landís Stride
Starting at 8th level, moving through non-magical difficult terrain costs you no extra movement. You can also pass through non-magical plants without being slowed by them and without taking damage from them if they have thorns, spines, or a similar hazard.

In addition, you have advantage on saving throws against the plants that are magically created or manipulated to impede movements, such as those created by the entangle spell.

You also canít be tracked by non-magical means unless you choose to leave a trail.

Evasion
At 9th level, you can dodge nimbly out of the way of danger. When you are subjected to an effect, such as the lightning bolt spell, that allows you to make a Dexterity saving throw to take only half damage, you instead take no damage if you succeed on the saving throw and only half damage if you fail the saving throw.

Hide in Plain Sight
Starting at 10th level, you have learned to blend into your surroundings. You can use the Hide action as a bonus action on your turn and may Hide while under direct observation as long as you are with 10ft of some form of cover including shadows.

Iron Mind
By 13th level, your time in the wilderness has strengthened your resolve and made your mind as strong a iron. You gain proficiency in Wisdom saving throws.

Hard Living
By 14th level, your prolonged exposure to the elements has made you a survivor. When you are reduced to 0 hit points and are not killed outright, you can choose to drop to 1 hit point instead. Once you use this ability, you canít use it again until you finish a long rest.

Feral Senses
At 17th level, you gain preternatural senses that help you fight creatures you canít see. When you attack a creature you canít see, your inability to not see doesnít impose disadvantage on your attack rolls against it.

You are also aware of the location of any invisible creature within 30 feet of you, provided that the creature isnít hidden from you and your arenít blinded or deafened.

Foe Slayer
At 20th level, you become an unparalleled hunter of your enemies. You may add your Wisdom modifier to your attack or damage rolls (your choice) in addition to other modifiers. You can choose to use this feature before or after the roll, but before the effects are known.

Ranger Archetype-Hunter
Emulating the Hunter Archetype means accepting your place as a bulwark between civilization and the terrors of the wilderness. As you walk the Hunterís Path, you learn to Focus your abilities to fight the threats you face.

Focus
At 3rd level, you have learned to focus your mind and body to exploit your enemyís weaknesses and accomplish amazing feats. You utilize focus dice to augment certain abilities called Exploits. A Ranger cannot combine multiple Exploits in one single attack. You pick 3 Exploits at 3rd level and learn one additional Exploit at 7th, 11th, 15th and 18th level.

Focus Dice: You have four focus dice which are d8s. A focus die is expended when you use it. You regain all expended focus dice when you complete a short or a long rest. You gain one additional focus die at 7th level and another at 15th level.

Some Exploits require the target to make a saving throw. The Exploit Save DC is 8 + your proficiency bonus + your Strength or Dexterity modifier (your choice)

Exploits:

Expertise: When you make a check that allows you to apply your proficiency in Athletics, Nature, Perception, Stealth, or Survival, you can expend one focus die and add it to the check. You may choose to use a focus die after you roll the check, but before learning if it was successful.
Precision: When you make a weapon attack against a creature, you can expend one focus die and add it to the attack roll. You can use this ability before or after making the attack roll, but before any of the effects of the attack are applied.
Quickness: When you roll for initiative you may expend one focus die and add it to your initiative roll. You can use this ability before or after making the initiative roll, but before the DM reveals the initiative order.
Stand Against the Tide: When a hostile creature misses you with a melee attack, you can expend one focus die and use your reaction to force the creature to repeat the attack against another creature (other than itself) of your choice. Add the focus die to the attack roll.
Distraction: When you hit a creature with a weapon attack, you can expend one focus die to distract the creature, giving your allies an opening. The next attack roll against the target by an attacker other than you adds the focus die to the attack roll if the attack is made before the start of your next turn.
Flurry: When you miss a creature with a weapon attack, you can expend one focus die to immediately make a second attack. Add the focus die to the attack roll.
Imposing Presence: When you hit a creature with a weapon attack, you can expend one focus die to attempt to frighten the target. Add the focus die to the damage and the target must make a Wisdom saving throw. On a failed save, it is frightened of you until the end of your next turn.
Dodge: When another creature hits you with a melee weapon attack, you can use your reaction and expend one focus die and add it to your Armor Class.
Knock Back: When you hit a creature with a weapon attack, you can expend one focus die to attempt to drive the target back. Add the focus die to the damage and if it is Large or smaller, it must make a Strength saving throw. On a failed save, you push the target 15 feet from you.
Retribution: When a creature misses you with a melee attack, you can use your reaction and expend one focus die to immediately make a melee weapon attack against the creature. Add the focus die to the attack roll.
Tough it Out: When you are required to make a Constitution saving throw you may expend a focus die and add it to the roll. You may do this before or after the saving throw, but before the result is known.
Colossus Slayer: Your tenacity can wear down the most potent foes. When you hit a creature with a weapon attack, you may expend a focus die and add it to the damage and the creature takes an extra 1d8 damage if itís below its hit die maximum.
Escape the Horde: When an Opportunity Attack is made against you, you can use your reaction to spend 1 Focus die to have all Opportunity Attacks made against you subtract the focus die until the end of your turn.
Horde Breaker: Once on each of your turns when you make a weapon attack, you can use your reaction to spend 1 Focus die to make another attack with the same weapon against a different creature that is within 5 feet of the original target and within range of your weapon. Add the focus die to the Attack roll.
Multiattack Defense: When a creature hits you with an Attack, you can spend 1 Focus die and add it to your AC against all subsequent attacks made by that creature for the rest of the turn.


Know your Prey
Starting at 7th level, if you spend at least 1 minute observing another creature outside combat, you can learn certain information about its capabilities compared to your own. The DM tells you if the creature is your equal, superior, or inferior in regard to two of the following characteristics of your choice:
Strength score
Dexterity score
Constitution score
Armor Class
Current hit points

Multiattack
At 11th level, you gain the following feature of your choice.

Volley: You can use your action to make a ranged attack against any number of creatures within 10 feet of a point you can see within your weaponís range. You must have ammunition for each target, as normal, and you make a separate roll for each target.

Whirlwind Attack: You can use your action and expend 1 focus die to move half your remaining speed and make a melee attack against a number of creatures equal to 1 + the focus die roll within 5 feet of you. You make a separate attack roll for each target.

Call Your Shot
At 15th level, you become familiar with the weak points of your enemies. You gain the following ability.

Strategic Strike: You can expend a Focus die to target a specific location on a foeís body with a weapon attack. If the Ranger has multiple attacks for their Attack action, they can make multiple Targeted shots for 1 Focus die each. Add the focus die to the Attack roll.
Arms Ė On a hit, the target takes normal damage and drops 1 held item of the Rangerís choice.
Head Ė On a hit, the target takes normal damage and has disadvantage on attacks for 1 round.
Legs Ė On a hit, the target takes normal damage and gets knocked prone.
Torso Ė On a hit, the target takes normal damage and is pushed up to 10 ft away from you.
Wings Ė On a hit, the target takes normal damage, and plummets 20 ft.

Vigilance
At 18th level, when you roll initiative and have no focus dice remaining, you regain 1 focus Die.

The Beast Master
The Beast Master archetype embodies a friendship between the civilized races and the beasts of the world. United in focus, beast and ranger work as one to fight the monstrous foes that threaten civilization and the wilderness alike. Emulating the Beast Master archetype means committing yourself to this ideal, working in partnership with all animal as its companion and friend.
Rangerís Companion

At 3rd level, you gain a beast companion that accompanies you on your adventures and is trained to fight alongside you. Choose a beast that is no larger than Medium and that has a challenge rating (CR) of 1 or lower. It's hit die maximum equals its normal maximum or four times your ranger level, whichever is higher. The beast obeys your commands as best as it can. It takes its turn on your initiative, though it doesn't take an action unless you command it to. On your turn, you can verbally command the beast where to move (no action required by you). As a bonus action, you can verbally command your beast to use the Attack action. The beast companion also gains the following traits:


While traveling through terrain to which you are acclimated with only the beast, you can move stealthily at a normal pace.
The beast can make death saving throws.If the beast dies, you can obtain another one by spending 8 hours bonding with another beast that isn't hostile to you, either the same type of beast as before or a different one.
The beast gains a number of Hit Dice equal to the your Ranger level. Use the hit dice provided by the Monster's Stat block.
Your beast gains proficiency in one saving throw of your choice. The proficiency bonus add to the saving throw is dependent on the original beast's CR. If the CR is less than 4, you have a proficiency bonus of +2. If the CR is greater than 5, you have a proficiency bonus of +3. (MM pg. 8)
The beast saving throws, skills, and abilities DC should be re-calculated after improving your beast.
The beast can spend its Hit Dice during a short rest using the same rules as players to regain hit Die.
The beast can take reactions such as opportunity attacks independent of your commands.



Beast Companions: As you increase in level, you may either choose to increase your companion's potency, or designate a new beast as your primary companion. The CR limit of any potential Beasts increases to 2 at 5th level, CR 3 at 9th level, CR 4 at 13th level, and CR 5 at 17th level.
At every level where you would normally increase the CR of your Beast Companion, you may instead Improve your current one. Each instance of Improvement has the following effects:
+4 to a single Ability Score or +2 to Two separate ability scores. The Companion's maximum ability score is still 30.
+1 Natural Armor Bonus to AC.

At 5th level, your Companion may be a Large or smaller sized creature.
If you choose a beast below CR 1, you can use additional Improvements to make the beast companion comparable to CR 1 beast. This option is available to give the player more beast choices. For example:
If you choose a beast with a CR of 1/4, your beast gains 2 improvement instance at 3rd level.
If you choose a beast with a CR of 1/2, your beast gains 1 improvement instance at 3rd level.

Exceptional Training
At 7th level, you become proficient in training your beast companion. You can choose one of the following traits to give to your beast companion. At 11th, 15th and 18th you can pick another trait for your beast companion.
Beast of Unusual Size: You can increase the size of your beast by one category. This would increase the Hit and Damage Dice to the next size. This training can be taken multiple times, but your beast companion's size can't be bigger than large.
Ability Score Improvement: You can increase one ability score of your beast companion by 2 or you can increase two Ability Scores of your beast companion by 1. You canít increase an ability score of your beast companion above 30 using this feature. This training can be taken multiple times.


Advance Tactics: Your beast companion can perform dash, disengage, dodge, or help action.
Pack Tactics: You and your beast companion have advantage on an Attack roll against a creature if you and your beast companion are within 5 ft. of each other threatening the same creature.
Hunting Tactics: You gain advantage on an Attack roll with ranged weapons against a creature, if your beast companion is within 5 ft. of the target. Your beast companion also gains advantage on an Attack roll against a creature if you damaged the creature this turn.
Light Barding: You beast companion gains light barding proficiency (See Appendix)
Medium Barding: You beast companion gains medium barding proficiency (prerequisite Light Barding, See Appendix)
Saving Throw: Your beast gains proficiency in one saving throw of your choice. The proficiency bonus add to the saving throw is dependent on the original beast's CR.(MM pg. 8)
Skilled: Your beast gains proficiency in three skills of your choice. The proficiency bonus add to the skills is dependent on the original beast's CR.(MM pg. 8)
Evasion: Your beast companion gains Evasion (prerequisite 9th level)
Increased Movement: Increase your beast companion's movement by 10 ft
Magical Attacks: Your beast companion attacks are considered magical for the purpose of overcoming resistance. (prerequisite 10th level)



Bestial Fury
Starting at 11th level, your beast companion can make one additional attack when you command it to use the Attack action.

Natural Antivenom and Landís Stride
At 15th level, your beast companion gains the benefits of Natural Antivenom and Landís Stride

Blood Bond
At 15th level, you can sacrifice half of your current hit Die to allow your beast companion to heal for half of the amount sacrificed. Your beast companion can also sacrifice half of its current hit Die to heal you. This can be done even if you are unconscious. You can use this feature a number of times equal to your wisdom modifier per long rest.

Mind Sync
At 18th level, you and your beast minds are linked telepathically as long as you are within 100 feet. You can issue commands to your beast as a free action and you and your beast have advantage on saving throws against being charmed and frightened.

Rerem115
2016-04-29, 09:34 PM
I like what you've done with the class; I've been trying to do pretty much the same thing for a while now.:smallbiggrin: There's just a few things I'm leery about:

1. The changes you've made to Hunter's Mark. I get that you didn't want the ranger to be a spellcaster, and I understand that they need a damage boost from somewhere, but this has the potential to be absolutely bonkers. As written, you eliminated the "Concentration" aspect of the spell; you can now maintain the effect indefinitely, don't have to worry about taking hits, and you can mark as many creatures as you want. That alone is a ridiculously strong upgrade. With the scaling damage, you can now do as much or more damage than a rogue; the progression for Hunter's Mark now being one-half sneak attack dice, and there's no sneak attack restrictions! Finally, by treating it like a cantrip, you now have unlimited castings per day. To put this in perspective as to how strong this feature is now, imagine this: 5th level 18 Dex dual rapier-wielding ranger with dual wielding feat and fighting style gets hasted by 6th level sorcerer. Assuming you marked an enemy the previous turn, or it's the first round, you now have four attacks that deal 1d8+2d6+4 damage each, for a grand total of 4d8+8d6+16, which averages out at 68 damage per round, every round, for as long as the battle lasts, and you don't have to worry about losing concentration. At 5th level. Yes, this assumes that each attack hits, but if you're playing a Beastmaster, at 7th level or if you have a wolf that tripped them you have advantage, and if you're playing a Hunter, you can just buff your accuracy and reroll attacks, and do even more damage.

This ability needs to be nerfed, hard. Make it concentration. Make it limited use per day. Slash the scaling.

2. The "Called Shot" Hunter ability needs a save. Guaranteed status effects, including disadvantage and prone, with no save is way too strong.

3. The reason the PHB Beasmaster is unfun to play is because if it was fun to play, it would be broken as all hell. Action economy is a definite concern when playing a class that essentially lets you control two characters. What you've done to the class broke the action economy. By letting your companion attack on its own, you essentially have twice as many attacks. To show how strong this is, imagine you have a 7th, or even a 5th level Beasmaster with the same stats as the previous example. Turn one, you order your Brown Bear companion to stand next to the enemy and attack, and then you attack twice, with advantage at 7th level, and the two of you combined deal an average of 39 damage per round, and this only increases next turn, when you have a free bonus action. This is without any other damage boosting abilities or assistance from the party.

As much as I hate to say it, because I really like what you did to the archetype, the original rules regarding ordering your companion to attack should remain in force; free attacks are just too powerful, especially at the low levels your rewrite gets them. Maybe I'm just crazy, and there's no way to balance the Beastmaster without breaking it in half.


With those suggested changes, I feel that the class would be balanced. As is, it just deals way too much damage too early, and still manages to buff your party, debuff the enemy, and scale to do even more damage, while maintaining all of the regular ranger utility out of combat.

Conundrumist
2016-04-29, 10:42 PM
Thank you for those critiques, Rerem115. I appreciate your input.

1. This was my primary area of concern. While I respect math as the fundamental language of the universe, I don't particularly enjoy actually working it out. So I threw some things together I thought wouldn't be too, as you put it, bonkers. Even so Seeing it spelled out, I definitely see your point. To summarize, you suggest adding a concentration component, limiting it to a finite number of uses (a number of times equal to your Wisdom modifier, perhaps?), and removing the scaling entirely to remain at 1d6? Or by slash did you simply mean scale back by a certain degree? Are these finite uses per short rest or per long rest? If Long Rest, would the scaling be appropriate?

2. You know, I thought it had one. I must have deleted it without realizing at some point. Good catch. I will also take this time to credit simonb350 for this feature. I had considered implementing something like this, but he beat me to it.

3. I admit to doing the least amount of work on the Beast Master. I initially wasn't even going to have one. In my original draft, the ranger had no archetypes. Instead the whole class was based around the Hunter archetype and had a Call Nature's Allies feature at 13th level as shown in the Unearthed Arcana regarding a no-magic ranger. Even though I have a player that would love to have a beast companion, I simply didn't have any ideas on the subject. When I saw what simonb350 had done with his Beast Master, I admit to a large degree of plagiarism. Any praise you have of the archetype should be directed solely to him.

That said I have certainly seen many concerns about companion attacks in relation to the vanilla class and every revision of it I have seen. I believe it's safe to say this is the single biggest sticking point of the entire class. Perhaps you are correct and there is no way to balance it. I'm just hoping to settle on something that plays reasonably well and that my players will enjoy should they select the option. If we required a bonus action each time the beast attacks, as opposed to a bonus action once per target as stated in the current revision or a full action as described by the vanilla rules, would that bring the action economy into more of a balance?

Thanks again for taking a look at the revision and for offering your opinions. I look forward to more discussion with you and others regarding the Revised Ranger.

Rerem115
2016-04-29, 11:02 PM
If you're keen on keeping the increased damage to Hunter's Mark, I'd suggest having the damage go up by 1d6 at 9th and 18th level. I agree that the spell could use a damage buff, but it would need to scale slower. As for the rest of it, making it a concentration ability usable something like 1+Wisdom modifier (minimum 1) times per day, but transferable as a bonus action would balance it pretty well.

I really like what you did to the Beastmaster. It really needed some buffs. However, I think all the buffs you gave it stacked too much. Getting a CR 1 or higher beast, and having it be large solves a lot of the problems it had. In order to keep actions fair, maybe use your bonus action to command it each turn? This would help curb some of the crazier combos, but still keep the flavor of attacking with your companion. I'm just spitballing here; your fix would probably be as good as mine.

I'm tempted to submit this as an option to my DM :smallbiggrin:

Conundrumist
2016-04-30, 03:48 PM
I believe I would like to keep damage upgrade as I want to make the Ranger a bigger combat threat, but I agree it should be scaled back. I did a little research and discovered Hunter's Quarry from 4e, that offered an additional d6 per tier of play for a total of 3d6. Obviously this isn't entirely transferable, but does give us a good place to draw inspiration and does line up fairly well with your suggestion of a d6 increase at 9th and 18th level. I believe this is what I shall do.

I think bonus action to command the beast is probably the way to go. It seems to fit the "logic" of what should occur while not totally outclassing everything else. Might make the Two Weapon fighting style kind of worthless since you wouldn't be able to make an off hand attack and command the beast at the same time, but I'm probably not thinking it through entirely. I'm sure there are situations where it might come in handy.

Kerleth
2016-05-03, 12:23 AM
In regards to Hunter's Animus, why not keep the damage scaling, but limit it to once per turn? That way multiple attacks is still nice, since you only need to land one to get the full bonus, but it prevents the craziness outlined above.

Amnoriath
2016-05-03, 09:17 AM
In regards to Hunter's Animus, why not keep the damage scaling, but limit it to once per turn? That way multiple attacks is still nice, since you only need to land one to get the full bonus, but it prevents the craziness outlined above.

Because Sneak Attack can be overrided, this can't. Ultimately they are getting almost smite level damage with no cost and little conditions.

weaseldust
2016-05-03, 09:42 AM
Since Hunter's Mark is basically always on, why not just let the Beastmaster replace the damage from Hunter's Mark with the damage from the beast's attack once per turn? Then you can fluff it as the beast attacking without requiring extra actions. It's not a problem as long as you only allow quite low CR beasts until high levels. E.g. if your beast is a CR 1/4 panther, you're just replacing d6 Hunter's mark damage with d6+2 panther damage, which is fine.

Conundrumist
2016-05-03, 05:51 PM
Thank you to everyone who has contributed to the discussion thus far. Here is the revised Hunter's Animus


By the time you reach 2nd level you have gained experience hunting and killing your enemies and use that to your advantage. By concentrating on a target you can see, you may mark it as a bonus action. As long as the target is marked, you have advantage on Wisdom(Survival) checks to track it and deal an additional 1d6 damage when you hit with a weapon attack. If the target escapes, the mark lasts until you dismiss it or until the end of your next long rest. The damage increases as you gain levels in this class. It increases by 1d6 at 9th level (2d6) and again at 18th level (3d6). You may use this feature a number of times equal to your Wisdom modifier. Expended uses recharge after a Long Rest.